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1.
Lupus Sci Med ; 8(1)2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33563729

RESUMO

The Addressing Lupus Pillars for Health Advancement (ALPHA) Project is a global consensus effort to identify, prioritise and address top barriers in lupus impacting diagnosis, care, treatment and research. To conduct this process, the ALPHA Project convened a multistakeholder Global Advisory Committee (GAC) of lupus experts and collected input from global audiences, including patients. In phase I, the ALPHA Project used expert interviews and a global survey of lupus experts to identify and categorise barriers into three overarching pillars: drug development, clinical care and access to care. In phase II, reported here, the GAC developed recommended actionable solutions to address these previously identified barriers through an in-person stakeholder meeting, followed by a two-round scoring process. Recommendations were assessed for feasibility, impact and timeline for implementation (FIT), where potential FIT component values were between 1 and 3 and total scores were between 3 and 9. Higher scores represented higher achievability based on the composite of the three criteria. Simplifying and standardising outcomes measures, including steroid sparing as an outcome (drug development) and defining the lupus spectrum (clinical care) ranked as the highest two priority solutions during the GAC meeting and received high FIT scores (7.67 and 7.44, respectively). Leveraging social media (access to care) received the highest FIT score across all pillars (7.86). Cross-cutting themes of many solutions include leveraging digital technology and applying specific considerations for special populations, including paediatrics. Implementing the recommendations to address key barriers to drug development, clinical care and access to care is essential to improving the quality of life of adults and children with lupus. Multistakeholder collaboration and guidance across existing efforts globally is warranted.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33555325

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and metabolic syndrome (MetS) may both contribute to increased cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to examine the association of demographic factors, SLE phenotype, therapy and vitamin D levels with MetS and insulin resistance. METHODS: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) enrolled patients recently diagnosed with SLE (<15 months) from 33 centres across 11 countries from 2000. Clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected. Vitamin D level was defined according to tertiles based on distribution across this cohort, which were set at T1 (10-36 nmol/l), T2 (37-60 nmol/l) and T3 (61-174 nmol/l). MetS was defined according to the 2009 consensus statement from the International Diabetes Federation. Insulin resistance was determined using the HOMA-IR model. Linear and logistic regressions were used to assess the association of variables with vitamin D levels. RESULTS: Of the 1847 patients, 1163 (63%) had vitamin D measured and 398 (34.2%) subjects were in the lowest 25(OH)D tertile. MetS was present in 286 of 860 (33%) patients whose status could be determined. Patients with lower 25(OH)D were more likely to have MetS and higher HOMA-IR. The MetS components, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and decreased HDL were all significantly associated with lower 25(OH)D. Increased average glucocorticoid exposure was associated with higher insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS: MetS and insulin resistance are associated with lower vitamin D in patients with SLE. Further studies could determine whether vitamin D repletion confers better control of these cardiovascular risk factors and improve long-term outcomes in SLE.

3.
Lupus Sci Med ; 8(1)2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33568389

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the appropriateness of expanded serological activity eligibility criteria for belimumab use in the UK systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) population (and possibly other countries), which includes patients with either anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) positivity or hypocomplementaemia rather than both criteria. METHODS: This post-hoc analysis used data from three randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III belimumab trials: BLISS-52 (BEL110752; NCT00424476), BLISS-76 (BEL110751; NCT00410384) and BLISS-SC (BEL112341; NCT01484496). Patients with SLE were stratified by high disease activity (HDA): HDA1, Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-SLE Disease Activity Index (SELENA-SLEDAI) score ≥10, low complement and positive anti-dsDNA; and HDA2, SELENA-SLEDAI ≥10 and either low complement or positive anti-dsDNA. RESULTS: This analysis included 660 HDA1 patients (n=396 on intravenous treatment; n=264 on subcutaneous treatment) and 969 HDA2 patients (n=532 on intravenous treatment; n=437 on subcutaneous treatment). Significant improvements were observed at week 52 with belimumab versus placebo, irrespective of subgroups or drug formulations, in SLE Responder Index (SRI) 4 response (OR (95% CI): HDA1 intravenous 2.7 (1.8 to 4.1); HDA2 intravenous 2.3 (1.61 to 3.26); HDA1 subcutaneous 2.2 (1.22 to 3.85); HDA2 subcutaneous 1.8 (1.17 to 2.74)); proportion of patients achieving ≥4-point reduction in SELENA-SLEDAI score (OR (95% CI): HDA1 intravenous 2.6 (1.7 to 3.9); HDA2 intravenous 2.1 (1.49 to 3.03); HDA1 subcutaneous 2.3 (1.30 to 4.14); HDA2 subcutaneous 1.9 (1.21 to 2.84)); patients with no worsening in Physician Global Assessment (OR (95% CI): HDA1 intravenous 2.0 (1.3 to 3.1); HDA2 intravenous 1.7 (1.17 to 2.45); HDA1 subcutaneous 2.3 (1.18 to 4.40); HDA2 subcutaneous 1.8 (1.11 to 2.92)); and risk of severe flares (HR (95% CI): HDA1 intravenous 0.6 (0.37 to 0.81); HDA2 intravenous 0.6 (0.43 to 0.86); HDA1 subcutaneous 0.52 (0.30 to 0.92); HDA2 subcutaneous 0.59 (0.37 to 0.94)). CONCLUSION: Broadening the HDA population to include either low complement or positive anti-dsDNA, rather than both, would enable more UK patients to receive SLE treatment and experience improved clinical outcomes.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33291150

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To assess the baseline care provided to patients with SLE attending UK Rheumatology units, audited against standards derived from the recently published BSR guideline for the management of adults with SLE, the NICE technology appraisal for belimumab, and NHS England's clinical commissioning policy for rituximab. METHODS: SLE cases attending outpatient clinics during any 4-week period between February and June 2018 were retrospectively audited to assess care at the preceding visit. The effect of clinical environment (general vs dedicated CTD/vasculitis clinic and specialized vs non-specialized centre) were tested. Bonferroni's correction was applied to the significance level. RESULTS: Fifty-one units participated. We audited 1021 episodes of care in 1003 patients (median age 48 years, 74% diagnosed >5 years ago). Despite this disease duration, 286 (28.5%) patients had active disease. Overall in 497 (49%) clinic visits, it was recorded that the patient was receiving prednisolone, including in 28.5% of visits where disease was assessed as inactive. Low documented compliance (<60% clinic visits) was identified for audit standards relating to formal disease-activity assessment, reduction of drug-related toxicity and protection against comorbidities and damage. Compared with general clinics, dedicated clinics had higher compliance with standards for appropriate urine protein quantification (85.1% vs 78.1%, P ≤ 0.001). Specialized centres had higher compliance with BILAG Biologics Register recruitment (89.4% vs 44.4%, P ≤ 0.001) and blood pressure recording (95.3% vs 84.1%). CONCLUSIONS: This audit highlights significant unmet need for better disease control and reduction in corticosteroid toxicity and is an opportunity to improve compliance with national guidelines. Higher performance with nephritis screening in dedicated clinics supports wider adoption of this service-delivery model.

5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33313921

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: ∼30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) develop lupus nephritis (LN). Presence and/or severity of LN are currently assessed by renal biopsy, but biomarkers in serum or urine samples may provide an avenue for non-invasive routine testing. We aimed to validate a urinary protein panel for its ability to predict active renal involvement in SLE. METHODS: 197 SLE patients and 48 healthy controls were recruited, and urine samples collected. 75 of the SLE patients had active LN and 104 had no or inactive renal disease. Concentrations of lipocalin-like prostaglandin D synthase (LPGDS), transferrin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP-1), ceruloplasmin, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were quantified by MILLIPLEX® Assays using the MAGPIX Luminex platform. Binary logistic regression was conducted to examine whether proteins levels associate with active renal involvement and/or response to rituximab treatment. RESULTS: Urine levels of transferrin (p< 0.005), AGP-1 (p< 0.0001), MCP-1 (p< 0.001) and sVCAM-1 (p< 0.005) were significantly higher in SLE patients when compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, levels of transferrin, AGP-1, ceruloplasmin, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1 (all p< 0.0001) were higher in SLE patients with active LN when compared with patients without active LN. A combination of five urine proteins, namely LPGDS, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1 was a good predictor of active LN (AUC 0.898). A combined model of LPGDS, transferrin, AGP-1, ceruloplasmin, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1 predicted response to rituximab treatment at 12 months (AUC 0.818). CONCLUSIONS: Findings support the use of a urinary protein panel to identify active LN and potentially predict response to treatment with rituximab in adult SLE patients. Prospective studies are required to confirm findings.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33325488

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: SLE is characterized by relapses and remissions. We aimed to describe the frequency, type and time to flare in a cohort of SLE patients. METHODS: SLE patients with one or more 'A' or 'B' BILAG-2004 systems meeting flare criteria ('new' or 'worse' items) and requiring an increase in immunosuppression were recruited from nine UK centres and assessed at baseline and monthly for 9 months. Subsequent flares were defined as: severe (any 'A' irrespective of number of 'B' flares), moderate (two or more 'B' without any 'A' flares) and mild (one 'B'). RESULTS: Of the 100 patients, 94% were female, 61% White Caucasians, mean age (s.d.) was 40.7 years (12.7) and mean disease duration (s.d.) was 9.3 years (8.1). A total of 195 flares re-occurred in 76 patients over 781 monthly assessments (flare rate of 0.25/patient-month). There were 37 severe flares, 32 moderate flares and 126 mild flares. By 1 month, 22% had a mild/moderate/severe flare and 22% had a severe flare by 7 months. The median time to any 'A' or 'B' flare was 4 months. Severe/moderate flares tended to be in the system(s) affected at baseline, whereas mild flares could affect any system. CONCLUSION: . In a population with active SLE we observed an ongoing rate of flares from early in the follow-up period with moderate-severe flares being due to an inability to fully control the disease. This real-world population study demonstrates the limitations of current treatments and provides a useful reference population from which to inform future clinical trial design.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33152181

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) frailty index (FI) predicts mortality and damage accrual in SLE, but its association with hospitalizations has not been described. We estimated the association of baseline SLICC-FI values with future hospitalizations in the SLICC inception cohort. METHODS: Baseline SLICC-FI scores were calculated. The number and duration of inpatient hospitalizations during follow-up were recorded. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the association between baseline SLICC-FI values and the rate of hospitalizations per patient-year of follow-up. Linear regression was used to estimate the association of baseline SLICC-FI scores with the proportion of follow-up time spent in hospital. Multivariable models were adjusted for relevant baseline characteristics. RESULTS: The 1549 SLE patients eligible for this analysis were mostly female (88.7%) with mean (SD) age 35.7 (13.3) years and median (IQR) disease duration 1.2 (0.9-1.5) years at baseline. Mean (SD) baseline SLICC-FI was 0.17 (0.08). During mean (SD) follow-up of 7.2 (3.7) years, 614 patients (39.6%) experienced 1570 hospitalizations. Higher baseline SLICC-FI values (per 0.05 increment) were associated with more frequent hospitalizations during follow-up (Incidence Rate Ratio 1.21; 95%CI 1.13-1.30), adjusting for baseline age, sex, corticosteroid use, immunosuppressive use, ethnicity/location, SLE disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K), SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI), and disease duration. Among patients with ≥1 hospitalization, higher baseline SLICC-FI values predicted a greater proportion of follow-up time spent hospitalized (Relative Rate 1.09; 95%CI 1.02-1.16). CONCLUSION: The SLICC-FI predicts future hospitalizations among incident SLE patients, further supporting the SLICC-FI as a valid health measure in SLE.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32813314

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess cancer risk factors in incident SLE. METHODS: Clinical variables and cancer outcomes were assessed annually among incident SLE patients. Multivariate hazard regression models (over-all risk, and most common cancers) included demographics and time-dependent medications (corticosteroids, antimalarial drugs, immunosuppressants), smoking, and adjusted mean SLE Disease Activity Index-2K. RESULTS: Among 1668 patients (average 9 years follow-up), 65 cancers occurred: 15 breast, 10 non-melanoma skin, seven lung, six hematological, six prostate, five melanoma, three cervical, three renal, two each gastric, head and neck, and thyroid, and one each rectal, sarcoma, thymoma, and uterine cancers. Half of cancers (including all lung cancers) occurred in past/current smokers, versus one-third of patients without cancer. Multivariate analyses indicated over-all cancer risk was related primarily to male sex and older age at SLE diagnosis. In addition, smoking was associated with lung cancer. For breast cancer risk, age was positively and anti-malarial drugs were negatively associated. Anti-malarial drugs and higher disease activity were also negatively associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) risk, whereas age and cyclophosphamide were positively associated. Disease activity was associated positively with hematologic and negatively with NMSC risk. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking is a key modifiable risk factor, especially for lung cancer, in SLE. Immunosuppressive medications were not clearly associated with higher risk except for cyclophosphamide and NMSC. Antimalarials were negatively associated with breast cancer and NMSC risk. SLE activity was associated positively with hematologic cancer and negatively with NMSC. Since the absolute number of cancers was small, additional follow-up will help consolidate these findings.

10.
Lupus Sci Med ; 7(1)2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32723809

RESUMO

This study aimed to understand and appraise the approaches taken to handle the complexities of a multisystem disease in published decision-analytic model-based economic evaluations of treatments for SLE. A systematic review was conducted to identify all published model-based economic evaluations of treatments for SLE. Treatments that were considered for inclusion comprised antimalarial agents, immunosuppressive therapies, and biologics including rituximab and belimumab. Medline and Embase were searched electronically from inception until September 2018. Titles and abstracts were screened against the inclusion criteria by two reviewers; agreement between reviewers was calculated according to Cohen's κ. Predefined data extraction tables were used to extract the key features, structural assumptions and data sources of input parameters from each economic evaluation. The completeness of reporting for the methods of each economic evaluation was appraised according to the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement. Six decision-analytic model-based economic evaluations were identified. The studies included azathioprine (n=4), mycophenolate mofetil (n=3), cyclophosphamide (n=2) and belimumab (n=1) as relevant comparator treatments; no economic evaluation estimated the relative cost-effectiveness of rituximab. Six items of the CHEERS statement were reported incompletely across the sample: target population, choice of comparators, measurement and valuation of preference-based outcomes, estimation of resource use and costs, choice of model, and the characterisation of heterogeneity. Complexity in the diagnosis, management and progression of disease can make decision-analytic model-based economic evaluations of treatments for SLE a challenge to undertake. The findings from this study can be used to improve the relevance of model-based economic evaluations in SLE and as an agenda for research to inform future health technology assessment and decision-making.

11.
RMD Open ; 6(2)2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32723832

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Approximately 30% of patients with the systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disorder systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) develop lupus nephritis (LN) that affects treatment and prognosis. Easily accessible biomarkers do not exist to reliably predict renal disease. The Maximizing SLE Therapeutic Potential by Application of Novel and Systemic Approaches and the Engineering Consortium aims to identify indicators of treatment responses in SLE. This study tested the applicability of calcium-binding S100 proteins in serum and urine as biomarkers for disease activity and response to treatment with rituximab (RTX) in LN. METHODS: S100A8/A9 and S100A12 proteins were quantified in the serum and urine of 243 patients with SLE from the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Biologics Register (BILAG-BR) study and 48 controls matched for age using Meso Scale Discovery's technology to determine whether they perform as biomarkers for active LN and/or may be used to predict response to treatment with RTX. Renal disease activity and response to treatment was based on BILAG-BR scores and changes in response to treatment. RESULTS: Serum S100A12 (p<0.001), and serum and urine S100A8/A9 (p<0.001) levels are elevated in patients with SLE. While serum and urine S100 levels do not correlate with global disease activity (SLE Disease Activity Index), levels in urine and urine/serum ratios are elevated in patients with active LN. S100 proteins perform better as biomarkers for active LN involvement in patients with SLE who tested positive for anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies. Binary logistic regression and area under the curve analyses suggest the combination of serum S100A8/A9 and S100A12 can predict response to RTX treatment in LN after 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study show promise for clinical application of S100 proteins to predict active renal disease in SLE and response to treatment with RTX.

12.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(10): 1734-1740, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32515554

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In previous studies, atherosclerotic vascular events (AVEs) were shown to occur in ~10% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We undertook this study to investigate the annual occurrence and potential risk factors for AVEs in a multinational, multiethnic inception cohort of patients with SLE. METHODS: A large 33-center cohort of SLE patients was followed up yearly between 1999 and 2017. AVEs were attributed to atherosclerosis based on SLE being inactive at the time of the AVE as well as typical atherosclerotic changes observed on imaging or pathology reports and/or evidence of atherosclerosis elsewhere. Analyses included descriptive statistics, rate of AVEs per 1,000 patient-years, and univariable and multivariable relative risk regression models. RESULTS: Of the 1,848 patients enrolled in the cohort, 1,710 had ≥1 follow-up visit after enrollment, for a total of 13,666 patient-years. Of these 1,710 patients, 3.6% had ≥1 AVEs attributed to atherosclerosis, for an event rate of 4.6 per 1,000 patient-years. In multivariable analyses, lower AVE rates were associated with antimalarial treatment (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.32-0.91]), while higher AVE rates were associated with any prior vascular event (HR 4.00 [95% CI 1.55-10.30]) and a body mass index of >40 kg/m2 (HR 2.74 [95% CI 1.04-7.18]). A prior AVE increased the risk of subsequent AVEs (HR 5.42 [95% CI 3.17-9.27], P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of AVEs and the rate of AVE accrual demonstrated in the present study is much lower than that seen in previously published data. This may be related to better control of both the disease activity and classic risk factors.

13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32596718

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: MTX remains the cornerstone for therapy for RA, yet research shows that non-adherence is significant and correlates with response to therapy. This study aimed to halve self-reported non-adherence to MTX at the Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology. METHODS: An anonymous self-report adherence questionnaire was developed and data collected for 3 months prior to the introduction of interventions, and then regularly for the subsequent 2.5 years. A series of interventions were implemented, including motivational interviewing training, consistent information about MTX and development of a summary bookmark. Information on clinic times was collected for consultations with and without motivational interviewing. Surveys were conducted to ascertain consistency of messages about MTX. A biochemical assay was used to test MTX serum levels in patients at two time points: before and 2.8 years following introduction of the changes. Remission rates at 6 and 12 months post-MTX initiation were retrieved from patient notes and cost savings estimated by comparing actual numbers of new biologic starters compared with expected numbers based on the numbers of consultants employed at the two time points. RESULTS: Between June and August 2016, self-reported non-adherence to MTX was 24.7%. Following introduction of the interventions, self-reported non-adherence rates reduced to an average of 7.4% between April 2018 and August 2019. Clinic times were not significantly increased when motivational interviewing was employed. Consistency of messages by staff across three key areas (benefits of MTX, alcohol guidance and importance of adherence) improved from 64% in September 2016 to 94% in January 2018. Biochemical non-adherence reduced from 56% (September 2016) to 17% (June 2019), whilst remission rates 6 months post-initiation of MTX improved from 13% in 2014/15 to 37% in 2017/18, resulting is estimated cost savings of £30 000 per year. CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to MTX can be improved using simple measures including focussing on the adherence and the benefits of treatment, and providing consistent information across departments.

14.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 270: 387-391, 2020 Jun 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32570412

RESUMO

Integrating data from different sources into homogeneous dataset increases the opportunities to study human health. However, disparate data collections are often heterogeneous, which complicates their integration. In this paper, we focus on the issue of content heterogeneity in data integration. Traditional approaches for resolving content heterogeneity map all source datasets to a common data model that includes only shared data items, and thus omit all items that vary between datasets. Based on an example of three datasets in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, we describe and experimentally evaluate a probabilistic data integration approach which propagates the uncertainty resulting from content heterogeneity into statistical inference, avoiding the need to map to a common data model.


Assuntos
Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico , Humanos
15.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 20(1): 164, 2020 Jun 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32580708

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individual clinical trials and cohort studies are a useful source of data, often under-utilised once a study has ended. Pooling data from multiple sources could increase sample sizes and allow for further investigation of treatment effects; even if the original trial did not meet its primary goals. Through the MASTERPLANS (MAximizing Sle ThERapeutic PotentiaL by Application of Novel and Stratified approaches) national consortium, focused on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), we have gained valuable real-world experiences in aligning, harmonising and combining data from multiple studies and trials, specifically where standards for data capture, representation and documentation, were not used or were unavailable. This was not without challenges arising both from the inherent complexity of the disease and from differences in the way data were captured and represented across different studies. MAIN BODY: Data were, unavoidably, aligned by hand, matching up equivalent or similar patient variables across the different studies. Heterogeneity-related issues were tackled and data were cleaned, organised and combined, resulting in a single large dataset ready for analysis. Overcoming these hurdles, often seen in large-scale data harmonization and integration endeavours of legacy datasets, was made possible within a realistic timescale and limited resource by focusing on specific research questions driven by the aims of MASTERPLANS. Here we describe our experiences tackling the complexities in the integration of large, diverse datasets, and the lessons learned. CONCLUSIONS: Harmonising data across studies can be complex, and time and resource consuming. The work carried out here highlights the importance of using standards for data capture, recording, and representation, to facilitate both the integration of large datasets and comparison between studies. Where standards are not implemented at the source harmonisation is still possible by taking a flexible approach, with systematic preparation, and a focus on specific research questions.

16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32433832

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) 2012 SLE classification criteria and the revised American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1997 criteria are list-based, counting each SLE manifestation equally. We derived a classification rule based on giving variable weights to the SLICC criteria, and compared its performance to the revised ACR 1997, unweighted SLICC 2012 and the newly reported European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/ACR 2019 criteria. METHODS: The physician-rated patient scenarios used to develop the SLICC 2012 classification criteria were re-employed to devise a new weighted classification rule using multiple linear regression. The performance of the rule was evaluated on an independent set of expert-diagnosed patient scenarios and compared to the performance of the previously reported classification rules. RESULTS: Weighted SLICC criteria and the EULAR/ACR 2019 criteria had less sensitivity but better specificity compared to the list-based revised ACR 1997 and SLICC 2012 classification criteria. There were no statistically significant differences between any pair of rules with respect to overall agreement with the physician diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The two new weighted classification rules did not perform better than the existing list-based rules in terms of overall agreement on a dataset originally generated to assess the SLICC criteria. Given the added complexity of summing weights, researchers may prefer the unweighted SLICC criteria. However, the performance of a classification rule will always depend on the populations from which the cases and non-cases are derived, and whether the goal is to prioritize sensitivity or specificity.

18.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 79(3): 356-362, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31915121

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Using a reversible multistate model, we prospectively examined neuropsychiatric (NP) events for attribution, outcome and association with health-related quality of life (HRQoL), in an international, inception cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. METHODS: Annual assessments for 19 NP events attributed to SLE and non-SLE causes, physician determination of outcome and patient HRQoL (short-form (SF)-36 scores) were measured. Time-to-event analysis and multistate modelling examined the onset, recurrence and transition between NP states. RESULTS: NP events occurred in 955/1827 (52.3%) patients and 592/1910 (31.0%) unique events were attributed to SLE. In the first 2 years of follow-up the relative risk (95% CI) for SLE NP events was 6.16 (4.96, 7.66) and non-SLE events was 4.66 (4.01, 5.43) compared with thereafter. Patients without SLE NP events at initial assessment had a 74% probability of being event free at 10 years. For non-SLE NP events the estimate was 48%. The majority of NP events resolved over 10 years but mortality was higher in patients with NP events attributed to SLE (16%) versus patients with no NPSLE events (6%) while the rate was comparable in patients with non-SLE NP events (7%) compared with patients with no non-SLE events (6%). Patients with NP events had lower SF-36 summary scores compared with those without NP events and resolved NP states (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: NP events occur most frequently around the diagnosis of SLE. Although the majority of events resolve they are associated with reduced HRQoL and excess mortality. Multistate modelling is well suited for the assessment of NP events in SLE.


Assuntos
Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/psicologia , Vasculite Associada ao Lúpus do Sistema Nervoso Central/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/mortalidade , Vasculite Associada ao Lúpus do Sistema Nervoso Central/mortalidade , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Estatísticos , Análise Multinível , Estudos Prospectivos , Qualidade de Vida
19.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(1): 67-77, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31390162

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency, clinical characteristics, associations, and outcomes of different types of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease in a multiethnic/multiracial, prospective inception cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. METHODS: Patients were evaluated annually for 19 neuropsychiatric (NP) events including 7 types of PNS disease. SLE disease activity, organ damage, autoantibodies, and patient and physician assessment of outcome were measured. Time to event and linear regressions were used as appropriate. RESULTS: Of 1,827 SLE patients, 88.8% were female, and 48.8% were white. The mean ± SD age was 35.1 ± 13.3 years, disease duration at enrollment was 5.6 ± 4.2 months, and follow-up was 7.6 ± 4.6 years. There were 161 PNS events in 139 (7.6%) of 1,827 patients. The predominant events were peripheral neuropathy (66 of 161 [41.0%]), mononeuropathy (44 of 161 [27.3%]), and cranial neuropathy (39 of 161 [24.2%]), and the majority were attributed to SLE. Multivariate Cox regressions suggested longer time to resolution in patients with a history of neuropathy, older age at SLE diagnosis, higher SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 scores, and for peripheral neuropathy versus other neuropathies. Neuropathy was associated with significantly lower Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical and mental component summary scores versus no NP events. According to physician assessment, the majority of neuropathies resolved or improved over time, which was associated with improvements in SF-36 summary scores for peripheral neuropathy and mononeuropathy. CONCLUSION: PNS disease is an important component of total NPSLE and has a significant negative impact on health-related quality of life. The outcome is favorable for most patients, but our findings indicate that several factors are associated with longer time to resolution.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Nervos Cranianos/fisiopatologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/fisiopatologia , Vasculite Associada ao Lúpus do Sistema Nervoso Central/fisiopatologia , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/fisiopatologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Estudos de Coortes , Doenças dos Nervos Cranianos/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mononeuropatias/etiologia , Mononeuropatias/fisiopatologia , Análise Multivariada , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/etiologia , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
20.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(4): 658-666, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31631584

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) frailty index (FI) has been shown to predict mortality, but its association with other important outcomes is unknown. We examined the association of baseline SLICC FI values with damage accrual in the SLICC inception cohort. METHODS: The baseline visit was defined as the first visit at which both organ damage (SLICC/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI]) and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36) were assessed. Baseline SLICC FI scores were calculated. Damage accrual was measured by the increase in SDI between the baseline assessment and the last study visit. Multivariable negative binomial regression was used to estimate the association between baseline SLICC FI values and the rate of increase in the SDI during follow-up, adjusting for relevant demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: The 1,549 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients eligible for this analysis were mostly female (88.7%) with a mean ± SD age of 35.7 ± 13.3 years and a median disease duration of 1.2 years (interquartile range 0.9-1.5 years) at baseline. The mean ± SD baseline SLICC FI was 0.17 ± 0.08. Over a mean ± SD follow-up of 7.2 ± 3.7 years, 653 patients (42.2%) had an increase in SDI. Higher baseline SLICC FI values (per 0.05 increase) were associated with higher rates of increase in the SDI during follow-up (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.19 [95% confidence interval 1.13-1.25]), after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity/region, education, baseline SLE Disease Activity Index 2000, baseline SDI, and baseline use of glucocorticoids, antimalarials, and immunosuppressive agents. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the SLICC FI predicts damage accrual in incident SLE, which further supports the SLICC FI as a valid health measure in SLE.


Assuntos
Fragilidade/diagnóstico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Qualidade de Vida , Adulto , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
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