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1.
Circ Heart Fail ; 12(9): e006345, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31510776
2.
Eur Heart J ; 2019 08 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31435675

RESUMO

Ventricular pressure-volume (PV) analysis is the reference method for the study of cardiac mechanics. Advances in calibration algorithms and measuring techniques brought new perspectives for its application in different research and clinical settings. Simultaneous PV measurement in the heart chambers offers unique insights into mechanical cardiac efficiency. Beat to beat invasive PV monitoring can be instrumental in the understanding and management of heart failure, valvular heart disease, and mechanical cardiac support. This review focuses on intra cardiac left ventricular PV analysis principles, interpretation of signals, and potential clinical applications.

3.
J Card Fail ; 2019 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31442494

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Historically, invasive hemodynamic guidance was not superior compared to clinical assessment in patients admitted with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). This study assessed the accuracy of clinical assessment versus. invasive hemodynamics in patients with ADHF. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients admitted with ADHF. Prior to RHC, physicians categorically predicted right atrial pressure (RAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), cardiac index (CI) and hemodynamic profile (Wet/Dry, Warm/Cold) based on physical exam and clinical data evaluation. "Warm"= CI > 2.2 L/min/m2; "Wet" = PCWP >18 mmHg. 218 surveys (83 cardiology fellows, 55 attending cardiologists, 45 residents, 35 interns) evaluating 97 patients were collected. 46% were receiving inotropes prior to RHC. Positive and negative predictive values of clinical assessment compared to RHC for the "Cold and Wet" subgroup were 74.7% and 50.4%. Accuracy of categorical prediction was 43.6% for RAP, 34.4% for PCWP, 49.1% for CI, and did not differ by clinician (P >0.05 for all). Interprovider agreement was 44.4%. Therapeutic changes following RHC occurred in 71.1% overall (P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Clinical assessment of patients with advanced heart failure presenting with ADHF has low accuracy across all training levels, with exaggerated rates of misrecognition of the most high-risk patients.

4.
Circ Heart Fail ; 12(7): e005981, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31296094

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a lethal complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and is often associated with cardiogenic shock. The optimal form of percutaneous mechanical circulatory support (MCS) for AMI-VSD is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a previously validated cardiovascular model to simulate AMI-VSD with parameters adjusted to replicate average hemodynamics reported in the literature, including a pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow ratio of 3.0. We then predicted effects of different types of percutaneous MCS (including intra-aortic balloon pumping, Impella, TandemHeart, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) on pressures and flows throughout the cardiovascular system. The simulation replicated all major hemodynamic parameters reported in the literature with AMI-VSD. Inotropes and vasopressors worsened left-to-right shunting, whereas vasodilators decreased shunting at the expense of worsening hypotension. All MCS devices increased forward blood flow and arterial pressure but other effects varied among devices. Impella 5.0 provided the greatest degree of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure reductions and decreased left-to-right shunting. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation worsened pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and shunting, which could be improved by adding Impella or passive left ventricular vent. Pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow ratio could not be reduced below 2.0, and pulmonary flows remained high with all forms of MCS. CONCLUSIONS: Although no form of percutaneous MCS normalized hemodynamics in AMI-VSD, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and shunting were worsened by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and improved by Impella. Accordingly, based on hemodynamics alone, Impella provides the optimal form of support in AMI-VSD. However, other factors, including team experience, device availability, potential for tissue ingestion, and clinical characteristics, need to be considered when choosing a percutaneous MCS device for AMI-VSD.

5.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 93(7): 1205-1210, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31112633

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Acutely decompensated heart failure remains a major clinical problem. Volume overload promotes cardiac and renal dysfunction and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. We hypothesized that transient occlusion of the superior vena cava (SVC) will reduce cardiac filling pressures without reducing cardiac output or systemic blood pressure. The objective of this proof of concept study was to provide initial evidence of safety and feasibility of transient SVC occlusion in patients with acutely decompensated heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In eight patients with systolic heart failure, SVC occlusion was performed using a commercially available occlusion balloon. Five minutes of SVC occlusion reduced biventricular filling pressures without decreasing systemic blood pressure or total cardiac output. In three of the eight patients, a second 10-minutes occlusion had similar hemodynamic effects. SVC occlusion was well-tolerated without development of new symptoms, new neurologic deficits, or any adverse events including stroke, heart attack, or reported SVC injury or thrombosis at 7 days of follow up. CONCLUSION: We report the first clinical experience with transient SVC occlusion as a potentially new therapeutic approach to rapidly reduce cardiac filling pressures in heart failure. No prohibitive safety signal was identified and further testing to establish the clinical utility of transient SVC occlusion for acute decompensated heart failure is justified.

6.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 94(1): 29-37, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31104355

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The outcome of cardiogenic shock complicating myocardial infarction has not appreciably changed in the last 30 years despite the development of various percutaneous mechanical circulatory support options. It is clear that there are varying degrees of cardiogenic shock but there is no robust classification scheme to categorize this disease state. METHODS: A multidisciplinary group of experts convened by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions was assembled to derive a proposed classification schema for cardiogenic shock. Representatives from cardiology (interventional, advanced heart failure, noninvasive), emergency medicine, critical care, and cardiac nursing all collaborated to develop the proposed schema. RESULTS: A system describing stages of cardiogenic shock from A to E was developed. Stage A is "at risk" for cardiogenic shock, stage B is "beginning" shock, stage C is "classic" cardiogenic shock, stage D is "deteriorating", and E is "extremis". The difference between stages B and C is the presence of hypoperfusion which is present in stages C and higher. Stage D implies that the initial set of interventions chosen have not restored stability and adequate perfusion despite at least 30 minutes of observation and stage E is the patient in extremis, highly unstable, often with cardiovascular collapse. CONCLUSION: This proposed classification system is simple, clinically applicable across the care spectrum from pre-hospital providers to intensive care staff but will require future validation studies to assess its utility and potential prognostic implications.

7.
J Card Fail ; 25(6): 457-467, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31035007

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Myocarditis may be associated with hemodynamic instability and portends a poor prognosis when associated with cardiogenic shock (CS). There are limited data available on the incidence of in-hospital mortality, CS, and utilization of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices in these patients. METHODS: We queried the 2005-2014 National Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged >18 years with myocarditis in the United States. RESULTS: The number of reported cases of myocarditis per 1 million gradually increased from 95 in 2005 to 144 in 2014 (Pfor trend <.01). The trend and incidence of endomyocardial biopsy remained the same despite the increase in clinical diagnosis. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 4.43% of total admissions without a change in overall trend over the study period. We also observed a significant increase in the incidence of CS from 6.94% in 2005 to 11.99% in 2014 (Pfor trend <.01). There was a parallel increase in the utilization of advanced MCS devices during the same time period such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (0.32% in 2005 to 2.1% in 2014; P< .01) and percutaneous ventricular assist devices such as Impella/tandem heart (0.176% in 2005 to 1.75% in 2014; P< .01). CONCLUSION: Although the incidence of myocarditis has increased in the last decade, the in-hospital mortality has remained the same despite increases in the incidence of CS, possibly reflecting the benefits of increased usage of advanced MCS devices. We noted that increasing age, presence of multiple comorbidities and CS were associated with an increase in in-patient mortality.

8.
ASAIO J ; 2019 Apr 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30985304

RESUMO

There are conflicting data regarding whether concomitant mitral valve surgery (MVS) at left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is beneficial. This study aimed to assess the hemodynamic effects of concomitant MVS. Of all 73 enrolled patients, 44 patients had undergone concomitant MVS and 29 patients had not. Before LVAD implantation, MVS group had higher pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (p = 0.04). After LVAD implantation, MVS group had higher mean pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output (CO). During the hemodynamic ramp study, MVS group had steeper CO slopes (0.18 [0.13 0.28] vs. 0.15 [0.08, 0.20] L/min/step; p = 0.04) at incremental LVAD speed and achieved a higher CO at the optimized set speed (5.5 [4.7, 6.9] vs. 4.9 [4.0, 5.7] L/min; p = 0.03). One-year freedom from death or heart failure readmission was statistically comparable between the two groups (61% vs. 80%, p = 0.20). Thus far, after LVAD implantation and concomitant MVS, patients had increased pulmonary hypertension, despite having higher CO and a better response of CO at incremental LVAD speed. The implication of hemodynamic features after concomitant MVS on clinical outcomes warrants further investigation.

9.
Circ Heart Fail ; 12(4): e006067, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30946600

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hemodynamic ramp (HR) tests can guide the optimization of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) speed and direct medical therapy. We investigated the effects of HR-guided LVAD management. METHODS AND RESULTS: This prospective, multicenter, randomized, pilot study compared outcomes in LVAD patients using an HR-guided (HR group) versus a standard transthoracic echocardiography-guided (control group) management strategy. Patients were enrolled and randomized 1 to 3 months post-HVAD implantation and followed for 6 months. Twenty-two patients (57±10 years, 73% male) were randomized to the HR group and 19 patients (51±13 years, 63% male) to the control group. HR group patients had double the number of LVAD speed changes (1.68 versus 0.84 changes/patient, P=0.09 with an incidence rate ratio 2.0, 95% CI, 0.9-4.7) with twice the magnitude of rotations per minute changes (130 versus 60 rotations per minute/patient, P=0.004) during the study. The HR group also had 2-fold greater heart failure medication changes (4.32 versus 2.53 changes/patient, P=0.072, incidence rate ratio 1.7 with 95% CI, 0.8-3.5) predominantly because of changes in diuretic dose (40 versus 0 mg/patient, P<0.001). The HR group had numerically but not statistically higher event-free survival (62% versus 46%, P=0.087; hazard ratio, 0.46 with 95% CI, 0.2-1.2), with numerically but not statistically lower events per patient-year ( P=0.084). There were no significant differences in the 6-minute walk or Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire tests at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized pilot study of LVAD patient management we demonstrated the feasibility of standardized HR testing at multiple institutions and that a strategy guided by hemodynamics was associated with more LVAD speed and medication adjustments and a nonsignificant reduction in adverse events. A pivotal study to demonstrate the clinical benefit of HR testing is warranted. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT03021239.

10.
Eur Heart J ; 40(26): 2155-2163, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30957868

RESUMO

Randomized clinical trials initially used heart failure (HF) patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to select study populations with high risk to enhance statistical power. However, this use of LVEF in clinical trials has led to oversimplification of the scientific view of a complex syndrome. Descriptive terms such as 'HFrEF' (HF with reduced LVEF), 'HFpEF' (HF with preserved LVEF), and more recently 'HFmrEF' (HF with mid-range LVEF), assigned on arbitrary LVEF cut-off points, have gradually arisen as separate diseases, implying distinct pathophysiologies. In this article, based on pathophysiological reasoning, we challenge the paradigm of classifying HF according to LVEF. Instead, we propose that HF is a heterogeneous syndrome in which disease progression is associated with a dynamic evolution of functional and structural changes leading to unique disease trajectories creating a spectrum of phenotypes with overlapping and distinct characteristics. Moreover, we argue that by recognizing the spectral nature of the disease a novel stratification will arise from new technologies and scientific insights that will shape the design of future trials based on deeper understanding beyond the LVEF construct alone.

11.
ASAIO J ; 2019 Feb 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30913103

RESUMO

Volume status assessment in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) patients remains challenging. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices are common in LVAD patients, and the impedance across the CRT leads may be associated with hemodynamics and serve as a tool for noninvasive estimation of volume status. Ninety-one sets of measurements including cardiac filling pressures and lead impedances were prospectively obtained during ramp tests from 11 LVAD patients (65.5 ± 9.7 years old; nine male) with CRT devices. Right atrial (RA), right ventricular (RV), and left ventricular (LV) lead impedances were all significantly associated with central venous pressure (CVP) (p < 0.05). We derived the following equation: estimated CVP = 47.90-(0.086 × RA lead impedance) + (0.013 × RV lead impedance)-(0.020 × LV lead impedance). The estimated CVP had a significant correlation (r = 0.795) and good agreement with the measured CVP (mean difference -0.14 ± 1.77 mmHg). Applying the above equation on the validation cohort of twenty-one patients also maintained a strong association with measured CVP (r = 0.705). In conclusion, we have derived a novel equation to estimate CVP using lead impedance measurements. This finding may allow noninvasive monitoring of volume status in LVAD patients.

12.
JACC Heart Fail ; 7(4): 321-332, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30852235

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to discern which central (e.g., heart rate, stroke volume [SV], filling pressure) and peripheral factors (e.g., oxygen use by skeletal muscle, body mass index [BMI]) during exercise were most strongly associated with the presence of heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) as compared with healthy control subjects exercising at the same workload. BACKGROUND: The underlying mechanisms limiting exercise capacity in patients with HFpEF are not fully understood. METHODS: In patients with HFpEF (n = 108), the hemodynamic response at peak exercise was measured using right-sided heart catheterization and was compared with that in healthy control subjects (n = 42) at matched workloads to reveal hemodynamic differences that were not attributable to the workload performed. The patients studied were prospectively included in the REDUCE-LAP HF (Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure) trials and HemReX (Effect of Age on the Hemodynamic Response During Rest and Exercise in Healthy Humans) study. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were used to analyze variables associated with HFpEF versus control subjects. RESULTS: Compared with healthy control subjects, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and SV were the only independent hemodynamic variables that were associated with HFpEF, a finding explaining 66% (p < 0.0001) of the difference between the groups. When relevant baseline characteristics were added to the base model, only BMI emerged as an additional independent variable, in total explaining of 90% of the differences between groups (p < 0.0001): PCWP (47%), BMI (31%), and SV (12%). CONCLUSIONS: The study identified 3 key variables (PCWP, BMI, and SV) that independently correlate with the presence of patients with HFpEF compared with healthy control subjects exercising at the same workload. Therapies that decrease left-sided heart filling pressures could improve exercise capacity and possibly prognosis.

13.
ESC Heart Fail ; 6(3): 457-463, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30861640

RESUMO

AIMS: Understanding the pathophysiological background on haemodynamic changes in acute myocardial infarction and during its interventional treatment is important to adequately use mechanical circulatory support. METHODS AND RESULTS: We describe haemodynamic simulations based on a real case scenario of infarct-related ischaemia with beginning haemodynamic compromise illustrating the advantage of active haemodynamic support. The patient case used for computer simulation is that of an acute coronary syndrome, slightly hypotonic. The right coronary artery is chronically occluded, and both left main and a saphenous vein graft to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) show subtotal stenosis. In this scenario used for computer modelling of haemodynamics, we illustrate how unprotected percutaneous coronary intervention would limit coronary blood flow and constantly reduce myocardial contractility until cardiac arrest occurs. The simulation demonstrates how an intra-aortic balloon pump would delay but not prevent that compromise and how an Impella microaxial pump will actively support cardiac output and stabilize haemodynamics even when prolonged balloon inflations are performed, which will temporarily stop coronary perfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The simulation illustrates how temporary circulatory support with an Impella microaxial pump can stabilize haemodynamics and allow for a safe procedure in an unstable patient. Using computer simulation of haemodynamics to understand changes in haemodynamics when performing interventions in unstable patients might help to properly select a suitable support device if needed.

14.
Eur Heart J ; 40(26): 2164-2169, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30891599

RESUMO

AIMS: Haemodynamic load induces cardiac remodelling via mechano-transduction pathways, which can further trigger inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that particularly in an inflammatory disorder such as myocarditis, a therapeutic strategy is required which, in addition to providing adequate circulatory support, unloads the left ventricle, decreases cardiac wall stress, and mitigates inflammatory responses. METHODS AND RESULTS: Axial flow pumps such as the Impella systems comply with these requirements. Here, we report a potential mode-of-action of prolonged Impella support (PROPELLA concept) in fulminant myocarditis, including a decrease in cardiac immune cell presence, and integrin α1, α5, α6, α10 and ß6 expression during unloading. CONCLUSION: PROPELLA may provide benefits beyond its primary function of mechanical circulatory support in the form of additional disease-altering effects, which may contribute to enhanced myocardial recovery/remission in patients with chronic fulminant myocarditis.

16.
Circ Heart Fail ; 12(2): e005094, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30704291

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy improves the hemodynamics of advanced heart failure patients. However, it is unknown whether hemodynamic optimization improves clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hemodynamic optimization reduces hospital readmission rate in LVAD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: LVAD patients undergoing an invasive hemodynamic ramp test were prospectively enrolled and followed for 1 year. LVAD speed was optimized using a ramp test, targeting the following goals: central venous pressure <12 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure <18 mm Hg, and cardiac index >2.2 L/(min·m2). The frequency and cause of hospital readmissions were compared between patients who achieved (optimized group) or did not achieve (nonoptimized group) these goals. Eighty-eight outpatients (median 61 years old, 53 male) underwent ramp testing 236 days after LVAD implantation, and 54 (61%) had optimized hemodynamics after LVAD speed adjustment. One-year survival after the ramp study was comparable in both groups (89% versus 88%). The total hospital readmission rate was lower in the optimized group compared with the nonoptimized group (1.15 versus 2.86 events/y, P<0.001). This result was predominantly because of a reduction in the heart failure readmission rate in the optimized group (0.08 versus 0.71 events/y, P=0.016). CONCLUSIONS: LVAD patients, in whom hemodynamics were optimized, had a significantly lower rate of hospital readmissions, primarily because of fewer heart failure admissions. These findings highlight the importance of achieving hemodynamic optimization in LVAD patients.

17.
J Cardiovasc Transl Res ; 12(2): 95-106, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30671717

RESUMO

Heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and myocardial infarction is its leading cause. Myocardial infarction destroys viable myocardium, and this dead tissue is replaced by a non-contractile scar that results in impaired cardiac function and a significantly increased likelihood of the patient developing heart failure. Limiting infarct scar size has been the target of pre-clinical and clinical investigations for decades. However, beyond reperfusion, few therapies have translated into the clinic that limit its formation. New approaches are needed. This review will focus on new clinical and pre-clinical data demonstrating that acute ventricular unloading prior to reperfusion by means of percutaneous left ventricular support devices reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury and limits infarct scar size. Emphasis will be given to summarizing our current mechanistic understanding of this new therapeutic approach to treating myocardial infarction.

18.
Eur J Heart Fail ; 21(9): 1103-1113, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30652394

RESUMO

AIMS: Cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) improves symptoms and exercise tolerance and reduces heart failure (HF) hospitalizations over 6-month follow-up in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III or IV symptoms, QRS < 130 ms and 25% ≤ left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 45% (FIX-HF-5C study). The current prospective registry study (CCM-REG) aimed to assess the longer-term impact of CCM on hospitalizations and mortality in real-world experience in this same population. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 140 patients with 25% ≤ LVEF ≤ 45% receiving CCM therapy (CCM-REG25-45 ) for clinical indications were included. Cardiovascular and HF hospitalizations, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) and NYHA class were assessed over 2 years. Mortality was tracked through 3 years and compared with predictions by the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM). A separate analysis was performed on patients with 35% ≤ LVEF ≤ 45% (CCM-REG35-45 ) and 25% ≤ LVEF < 35% (CCM-REG25-34 ). Hospitalizations decreased by 75% (from 1.2/patient-year the year before, to 0.35/patient-year during the 2 years following CCM, P < 0.0001) in CCM-REG25-45 and by a similar amount in CCM-REG35-45 (P < 0.0001) and CCM-REG25-34 . MLHFQ and NYHA class improved in all three cohorts, with progressive improvements over time (P < 0.002). Three-year survival in CCM-REG25-45 (82.8%) and CCM-REG24-34 (79.4%) were similar to those predicted by SHFM (76.7%, P = 0.16; 78.0%, P = 0.81, respectively) and was better than predicted in CCM-REG35-45 (88.0% vs. 74.7%, P = 0.046). CONCLUSION: In real-world experience, CCM produces results similar to those of previous studies in subjects with 25% ≤ LVEF ≤ 45% and QRS < 130 ms; cardiovascular and HF hospitalizations are reduced and MLHFQ and NYHA class are improved. Overall mortality was comparable to that predicted by the SHFM but was lower than predicted in patients with 35% ≤ LVEF ≤ 45%.

20.
J Card Fail ; 25(2): 105-113, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30582967

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Early right ventricular (RV) failure after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation increases morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous right ventricular assist device (pRVAD) support is an alternative to more invasive surgical RVAD (sRVAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: We retrospectively reviewed patients receiving isolated pRVAD or sRVAD after durable LVAD at our center in the years 2007-2018. Hemodynamic parameters before and after implantation and survival outcomes were compared among groups. Nineteen patients received pRVAD and 21 sRVAD. Hemodynamic parameters improved immediately with the use of pRVAD; central venous pressure decreased (from 15.9 ± 2.4 to 12.3 ± 3.2 mm Hg; P<.001) and cardiac index increased (from 2.4 ± 0.5 to 3.5 ± 0.8 L·min-1·m-2; P<.001). These were sustained after device removal and were similar to those with the use of sRVAD. Patients with pRVAD required fewer blood transfusions and mechanically ventilated days than those with sRVAD. Among survivors, intensive care unit and hospital days were fewer with the use of pRVAD: 21 (16-27) versus 34 (27-46) ICU days (P = .01); 43.5 (30-66) versus 91 (62-111) hospital days (P = .03). There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality with the use of pRVAD compared with sRVAD (21.1% vs 42.9%; P = .14), but there was a trend toward a higher rate of discharge free from hemodialysis (73.7% vs 47.6%; P = .09). CONCLUSIONS: Novel pRVAD systems for RV failure provide hemodynamic benefits similar to sRVAD, are associated with less morbidity, and should be considered as an alternative to sRVAD.


Assuntos
Oxigenação por Membrana Extracorpórea/métodos , Insuficiência Cardíaca/cirurgia , Ventrículos do Coração/cirurgia , Coração Auxiliar , Hemodinâmica/fisiologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Insuficiência Cardíaca/fisiopatologia , Ventrículos do Coração/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reoperação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
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