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1.
Int J Cancer ; 2019 Sep 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31525256

RESUMO

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disorder for which the majority of the underlying germline predisposition factors remain still unidentified. Here, we combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and linkage analysis in families with multiple relatives affected by CRC to identify candidate genes harboring rare variants with potential high-penetrance effects. Forty-seven affected subjects from 18 extended CRC families underwent WES. Genome-wide linkage analysis was performed under linear and exponential models. Suggestive linkage peaks were identified on chromosomes 1q22-q24.2 (maxSNP= rs2134095; LODlinear=2.38, LODexp=2.196), 7q31.2-q34 (maxSNP=rs6953296; LODlinear=2.197, LODexp=2.149), and 10q21.2-q23.1 (maxSNP= rs1904589; LODlinear=1.445, LODexp=2.195). These linkage signals were replicated in 10 independent sets of random markers from each of these regions. To assess the contribution of rare variants predicted to be pathogenic, we performed a family-based segregation test with 89 rare variants predicted to be deleterious from 78 genes under the linkage intervals. This analysis showed significant segregation of rare variants with CRC in 18 genes (weighted P-value>0.0028). Protein network analysis and functional evaluation were used to suggest a plausible candidate gene for germline CRC predisposition. Etiologic rare variants implicated in cancer germline predisposition may be identified by combining traditional linkage with WES data. This approach can be used with already available NGS data from families with several sequenced members to further identify candidate genes involved germline predisposition to disease. This approach resulted in one candidate gene associated with increased risk of CRC but needs evidence from further studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

2.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 9814, 2019 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31285513

RESUMO

Attenuated adenomatous polyposis (AAP) is a heterogeneous syndrome in terms of clinical manifestations, heritability and etiology of the disease. Genetic heterogeneity and low penetrance alleles are probably the best explanation for this variability. Certainly, it is known that APC and MUTYH are high penetrance predisposition genes for adenomatous polyposis, but they only account for 5-10% of AAP. Other new predisposition genes, such as POLE, POLD1, NTHL1, AXIN2 or MSH3, have been recently described and have been associated with AAP, but their relative contribution is still not well defined. In order to evaluate the genetic predisposition to AAP in a hospital based population, germline DNAs from 158 AAP subjects were screened for genetic variants in the coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of seven associated genes through a next-generation sequencing (NGS) custom gene panel. Splicing, segregation studies, somatic mutational screening and RNA quantitative expression assays were conducted for selected variants. In four of the probands the adenoma susceptibility could be explained by actionable mutations in APC or MUTYH, and one other patient was a double carrier of two truncating variants in both POLE and NTHL1. Furthermore, 16 additional patients harbored uncertain significance variants in the remaining tested genes. This report gives information about the contribution of the newly described adenomatous polyposis predisposition genes in a Spanish attenuated polyposis cohort. Our results highly support the convenience of NGS multigene panels for attenuated polyposis genetic screening and reveals POLE frameshift variants as a plausible susceptibility mechanism for AAP.

3.
Br J Cancer ; 121(2): 180-192, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31213659

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Height and body mass index (BMI) are associated with higher ovarian cancer risk in the general population, but whether such associations exist among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is unknown. METHODS: We applied a Mendelian randomisation approach to examine height/BMI with ovarian cancer risk using the Consortium of Investigators for the Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) data set, comprising 14,676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, with 2923 ovarian cancer cases. We created a height genetic score (height-GS) using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score (BMI-GS) using 93 BMI-associated variants. Associations were assessed using weighted Cox models. RESULTS: Observed height was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.07 per 10-cm increase in height, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.94-1.23). Height-GS showed similar results (HR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.85-1.23). Higher BMI was significantly associated with increased risk in premenopausal women with HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.06-1.48) and HR = 1.59 (95% CI: 1.08-2.33) per 5-kg/m2 increase in observed and genetically determined BMI, respectively. No association was found for postmenopausal women. Interaction between menopausal status and BMI was significant (Pinteraction < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our observation of a positive association between BMI and ovarian cancer risk in premenopausal BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is consistent with findings in the general population.

4.
Hum Mutat ; 40(9): 1557-1578, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31131967

RESUMO

The multifactorial likelihood analysis method has demonstrated utility for quantitative assessment of variant pathogenicity for multiple cancer syndrome genes. Independent data types currently incorporated in the model for assessing BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants include clinically calibrated prior probability of pathogenicity based on variant location and bioinformatic prediction of variant effect, co-segregation, family cancer history profile, co-occurrence with a pathogenic variant in the same gene, breast tumor pathology, and case-control information. Research and clinical data for multifactorial likelihood analysis were collated for 1,395 BRCA1/2 predominantly intronic and missense variants, enabling classification based on posterior probability of pathogenicity for 734 variants: 447 variants were classified as (likely) benign, and 94 as (likely) pathogenic; and 248 classifications were new or considerably altered relative to ClinVar submissions. Classifications were compared with information not yet included in the likelihood model, and evidence strengths aligned to those recommended for ACMG/AMP classification codes. Altered mRNA splicing or function relative to known nonpathogenic variant controls were moderately to strongly predictive of variant pathogenicity. Variant absence in population datasets provided supporting evidence for variant pathogenicity. These findings have direct relevance for BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant evaluation, and justify the need for gene-specific calibration of evidence types used for variant classification.

5.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 1741, 2019 04 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30988301

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 170 breast cancer susceptibility loci. Here we hypothesize that some risk-associated variants might act in non-breast tissues, specifically adipose tissue and immune cells from blood and spleen. Using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) reported in these tissues, we identify 26 previously unreported, likely target genes of overall breast cancer risk variants, and 17 for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, several with a known immune function. We determine the directional effect of gene expression on disease risk measured based on single and multiple eQTL. In addition, using a gene-based test of association that considers eQTL from multiple tissues, we identify seven (and four) regions with variants associated with overall (and ER-negative) breast cancer risk, which were not reported in previous GWAS. Further investigation of the function of the implicated genes in breast and immune cells may provide insights into the etiology of breast cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Feminino , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Locos de Características Quantitativas
6.
Hum Mutat ; 40(5): 566-577, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30817846

RESUMO

There is still around 50% of the familial breast cancer (BC) cases with an undefined genetic cause, here we have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to identify new BC susceptibility genes. This approach has led to the identification of RECQL5, a member of RECQL-helicases family, as a new BC susceptibility candidate, which deserves further study. We have used a combination of whole exome sequencing in a family negative for mutations in BRCA1/2 throughout (BRCAX), in which we found a probably deleterious variant in RECQL5, and targeted NGS of the complete coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of the candidate gene in 699 BC Spanish BRCAX families and 665 controls. Functional characterization and in silico inference of pathogenicity were performed to evaluate the deleterious effect of detected variants. We found at least seven deleterious or likely deleterious variants among the cases and only one in controls. These results prompt us to propose RECQL5 as a gene that would be worth to analyze in larger studies to explore its possible implication in BC susceptibility.

7.
J Med Genet ; 56(7): 453-460, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30890586

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: PALB2 monoallelic loss-of-function germ-line variants confer a breast cancer risk comparable to the average BRCA2 pathogenic variant. Recommendations for risk reduction strategies in carriers are similar. Elaborating robust criteria to identify loss-of-function variants in PALB2-without incurring overprediction-is thus of paramount clinical relevance. Towards this aim, we have performed a comprehensive characterisation of alternative splicing in PALB2, analysing its relevance for the classification of truncating and splice site variants according to the 2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics-Association for Molecular Pathology guidelines. METHODS: Alternative splicing was characterised in RNAs extracted from blood, breast and fimbriae/ovary-related human specimens (n=112). RNAseq, RT-PCR/CE and CloneSeq experiments were performed by five contributing laboratories. Centralised revision/curation was performed to assure high-quality annotations. Additional splicing analyses were performed in PALB2 c.212-1G>A, c.1684+1G>A, c.2748+2T>G, c.3113+5G>A, c.3350+1G>A, c.3350+4A>C and c.3350+5G>A carriers. The impact of the findings on PVS1 status was evaluated for truncating and splice site variant. RESULTS: We identified 88 naturally occurring alternative splicing events (81 newly described), including 4 in-frame events predicted relevant to evaluate PVS1 status of splice site variants. We did not identify tissue-specific alternate gene transcripts in breast or ovarian-related samples, supporting the clinical relevance of blood-based splicing studies. CONCLUSIONS: PVS1 is not necessarily warranted for splice site variants targeting four PALB2 acceptor sites (exons 2, 5, 7 and 10). As a result, rare variants at these splice sites cannot be assumed pathogenic/likely pathogenic without further evidences. Our study puts a warning in up to five PALB2 genetic variants that are currently reported as pathogenic/likely pathogenic in ClinVar.

8.
Mol Aspects Med ; 69: 10-26, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30862463

RESUMO

The present article summarizes recent developments in the characterization of genetic predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC). The main themes covered include new hereditary CRC and polyposis syndromes, non-CRC hereditary cancer genes found mutated in CRC patients, strategies used to identify novel causal genes, and review of candidate genes that have been proposed to predispose to CRC and/or colonic polyposis. We provide an overview of newly described genes and syndromes associated with predisposition to CRC and polyposis, including: polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis, NTHL1-associated polyposis, mismatch repair gene biallelic inactivation-related adenomatous polyposis (including MSH3- and MLH3-associated polyposes), GREM1-associated mixed polyposis, RNF43-associated serrated polyposis, and RPS20 mutations as a rare cause of hereditary nonpolyposis CRC. The implementation of next generation sequencing approaches for genetic testing has exposed the presence of pathogenic germline variants in genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes not traditionally linked to CRC, which may have an impact on genetic testing, counseling and surveillance. The identification of new hereditary CRC and polyposis genes has not deemed an easy endeavor, even though known CRC-related genes explain a small proportion of the estimated familial risk. Whole-genome sequencing may offer a technology for increasing this proportion, particularly if applied on pedigree data allowing linkage type of analysis. The final section critically surveys the large number of candidate genes that have been recently proposed for CRC predisposition.

9.
Br J Cancer ; 120(6): 647-657, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30787463

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We examined the associations between germline variants and breast cancer mortality using a large meta-analysis of women of European ancestry. METHODS: Meta-analyses included summary estimates based on Cox models of twelve datasets using ~10.4 million variants for 96,661 women with breast cancer and 7697 events (breast cancer-specific deaths). Oestrogen receptor (ER)-specific analyses were based on 64,171 ER-positive (4116) and 16,172 ER-negative (2125) patients. We evaluated the probability of a signal to be a true positive using the Bayesian false discovery probability (BFDP). RESULTS: We did not find any variant associated with breast cancer-specific mortality at P < 5 × 10-8. For ER-positive disease, the most significantly associated variant was chr7:rs4717568 (BFDP = 7%, P = 1.28 × 10-7, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84-0.92); the closest gene is AUTS2. For ER-negative disease, the most significant variant was chr7:rs67918676 (BFDP = 11%, P = 1.38 × 10-7, HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16-1.39); located within a long intergenic non-coding RNA gene (AC004009.3), close to the HOXA gene cluster. CONCLUSIONS: We uncovered germline variants on chromosome 7 at BFDP < 15% close to genes for which there is biological evidence related to breast cancer outcome. However, the paucity of variants associated with mortality at genome-wide significance underpins the challenge in providing genetic-based individualised prognostic information for breast cancer patients.

10.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2018 10 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30312457

RESUMO

Background: BRCA1/2 mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast cancer, although other factors may modify this risk. Whether height or body mass index (BMI) modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remains unclear. Methods: We used Mendelian randomization approaches to evaluate the association of height and BMI on breast cancer risk, using data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 with 14 676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, including 11 451 cases of breast cancer. We created a height genetic score using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score using 93 BMI-associated variants. We examined both observed and genetically determined height and BMI with breast cancer risk using weighted Cox models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Observed height was positively associated with breast cancer risk (HR = 1.09 per 10 cm increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0 to 1.17; P = 1.17). Height genetic score was positively associated with breast cancer, although this was not statistically significant (per 10 cm increase in genetically predicted height, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93 to 1.17; P = .47). Observed BMI was inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.90 to 0.98; P = .007). BMI genetic score was also inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase in genetically predicted BMI, HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.98; P = .02). BMI was primarily associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Conclusion: Height is associated with overall breast cancer and BMI is associated with premenopausal breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Incorporating height and BMI, particularly genetic score, into risk assessment may improve cancer management.

11.
PLoS One ; 13(9): e0203885, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30256826

RESUMO

Half of the high-risk colorectal cancer families that fulfill the clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome lack germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes and remain unexplained. Genetic testing for hereditary cancers is rapidly evolving due to the introduction of multigene panels, which may identify more mutations than the old screening methods. The aim of this study is the use of a Next Generation Sequencing panel in order to find the genes involved in the cancer predisposition of these families. For this study, 98 patients from these unexplained families were tested with a multigene panel targeting 94 genes involved in cancer predisposition. The mutations found were validated by Sanger sequencing and the segregation was studied when possible. We identified 19 likely pathogenic variants in 18 patients. Out of these, 8 were found in MMR genes (5 in MLH1, 1 in MSH6 and 2 in PMS2). In addition, 11 mutations were detected in other genes, including high penetrance genes (APC, SMAD4 and TP53) and moderate penetrance genes (BRIP1, CHEK2, MUTYH, HNF1A and XPC). Mutations c.1194G>A in SMAD4, c.714_720dup in PMS2, c.2050T>G in MLH1 and c.1635_1636del in MSH6 were novel. In conclusion, the detection of new pathogenic mutations in high and moderate penetrance genes could contribute to the explanation of the heritability of colorectal cancer, changing the individual clinical management. Multigene panel testing is a more effective method to identify germline variants in cancer patients compared to single-gene approaches and should be therefore included in clinical laboratories.

12.
Mol Cancer ; 17(1): 114, 2018 Aug 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30075793

RESUMO

Exosome production from cancer-associated fibroblasts seems to be an important driver of tumor progression. We report the first in-depth biotype characterization of ncRNAs, analyzed by Next Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatics, expressed in established primary human normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) from cancer and normal mucosa tissues from 9 colorectal cancer patients, and/or packaged in their derived exosomes. Differential representation and enrichment analyses based on these ncRNAs revealed a significant number of differences between the ncRNA content of exosomes and the expression patterns of the normal and cancer-associated fibroblast cells. ncRNA regulatory elements are specifically packaged in CAF-derived exosomes, supporting a specific cross-talk between CAFs and colon cancer cells and/or other stromal cells, mediated by exosomes. These sncRNAs are potential biomarkers present in cancer-associated fibroblast-derived exosomes, which should thereby contribute to developing new non-invasive diagnostic, prognostic and predictive methods for clinical applications in management of cancer patients.

14.
Cancer Res ; 78(18): 5419-5430, 2018 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30054336

RESUMO

Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 35 loci associated with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. The majority of GWAS-identified disease susceptibility variants are located in noncoding regions, and causal genes underlying these associations remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a transcriptome-wide association study to search for novel genetic loci and plausible causal genes at known GWAS loci. We used RNA sequencing data (68 normal ovarian tissue samples from 68 individuals and 6,124 cross-tissue samples from 369 individuals) and high-density genotyping data from European descendants of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx V6) project to build ovarian and cross-tissue models of genetically regulated expression using elastic net methods. We evaluated 17,121 genes for their cis-predicted gene expression in relation to EOC risk using summary statistics data from GWAS of 97,898 women, including 29,396 EOC cases. With a Bonferroni-corrected significance level of P < 2.2 × 10-6, we identified 35 genes, including FZD4 at 11q14.2 (Z = 5.08, P = 3.83 × 10-7, the cross-tissue model; 1 Mb away from any GWAS-identified EOC risk variant), a potential novel locus for EOC risk. All other 34 significantly associated genes were located within 1 Mb of known GWAS-identified loci, including 23 genes at 6 loci not previously linked to EOC risk. Upon conditioning on nearby known EOC GWAS-identified variants, the associations for 31 genes disappeared and three genes remained (P < 1.47 × 10-3). These data identify one novel locus (FZD4) and 34 genes at 13 known EOC risk loci associated with EOC risk, providing new insights into EOC carcinogenesis.Significance: Transcriptomic analysis of a large cohort confirms earlier GWAS loci and reveals FZD4 as a novel locus associated with EOC risk. Cancer Res; 78(18); 5419-30. ©2018 AACR.

15.
Nat Genet ; 50(7): 968-978, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29915430

RESUMO

The breast cancer risk variants identified in genome-wide association studies explain only a small fraction of the familial relative risk, and the genes responsible for these associations remain largely unknown. To identify novel risk loci and likely causal genes, we performed a transcriptome-wide association study evaluating associations of genetically predicted gene expression with breast cancer risk in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry. We used data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project to establish genetic models to predict gene expression in breast tissue and evaluated model performance using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Of the 8,597 genes evaluated, significant associations were identified for 48 at a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P < 5.82 × 10-6, including 14 genes at loci not yet reported for breast cancer. We silenced 13 genes and showed an effect for 11 on cell proliferation and/or colony-forming efficiency. Our study provides new insights into breast cancer genetics and biology.

17.
Gastroenterology ; 154(1): 181-194.e20, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28912018

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although there is a genetic predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC), few of the genes that affect risk have been identified. We performed whole-exome sequence analysis of individuals in a high-risk family without mutations in genes previously associated with CRC risk to identify variants associated with inherited CRC. METHODS: We collected blood samples from 3 relatives with CRC in Spain (65, 62, and 40 years old at diagnosis) and performed whole-exome sequence analyses. Rare missense, truncating or splice-site variants shared by the 3 relatives were selected. We used targeted pooled DNA amplification followed by next generation sequencing to screen for mutations in candidate genes in 547 additional hereditary and/or early-onset CRC cases (502 additional families). We carried out protein-dependent yeast growth assays and transfection studies in the HT29 human CRC cell line to test the effects of the identified variants. RESULTS: A total of 42 unique or rare (population minor allele frequency below 1%) nonsynonymous genetic variants in 38 genes were shared by all 3 relatives. We selected the BRF1 gene, which encodes an RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor subunit for further analysis, based on the predicted effect of the identified variant and previous association of BRF1 with cancer. Previously unreported or rare germline variants in BRF1 were identified in 11 of 503 CRC families, a significantly greater proportion than in the control population (34 of 4300). Seven of the identified variants (1 detected in 2 families) affected BRF1 mRNA splicing, protein stability, or expression and/or function. CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of families with a history of CRC, we associated germline mutations in BRF1 with predisposition to CRC. We associated deleterious BRF1 variants with 1.4% of familial CRC cases, in individuals without mutations in high-penetrance genes previously associated with CRC. Our findings add additional evidence to the link between defects in genes that regulate ribosome synthesis and risk of CRC.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa/genética , Fatores Associados à Proteína de Ligação a TATA/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias Colorretais/mortalidade , Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Linhagem , Espanha
18.
PLoS One ; 12(11): e0187312, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29095867

RESUMO

The involvement of GALNT12 in colorectal carcinogenesis has been demonstrated but it is not clear to what extent it is implicated in familial CRC susceptibility. Partially inactivating variant, NM_024642.4:c.907G>A, p.(D303N), has been previously detected in familial CRC and proposed as the causative risk allele. Since phenotypes of the described carrier families showed not only CRC but also a polyp history, we hypothesized that GALNT12 could be involved in adenoma predisposition and consequently, in hereditary polyposis CRC syndromes. For that purpose, we have screened the GALNT12 gene in germline DNA from 183 unrelated attenuated polyposis patients. c.907G>A, p.(D303N) was detected in 4 cases (MAF = 1.1%) and no other candidate variants were found. After segregation studies, LOH analyses, glycosylation pattern tests and case-control studies, our results did not support the role of c.907G>A, p.(D303N) as a high-penetrance risk allele for polyposis CRC.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Gardner/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , N-Acetilgalactosaminiltransferases/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Perda de Heterozigosidade , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Linhagem
19.
Hum Mol Genet ; 26(22): 4481-4493, 2017 11 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28973356

RESUMO

Familiar colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) comprises families that fulfill the Amsterdam criteria for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, but that lack the mismatch repair deficiency that defines the Lynch syndrome. Thus, the genetic cause that increases the predisposition to colorectal and other related cancers in families with FCCTX remains to be elucidated. Using whole-exome sequencing, we have identified a truncating mutation in the SETD6 gene (c.791_792insA, p.Met264IlefsTer3) in all the affected members of a FCCTX family. SETD6 is a mono-methyltransferase previously shown to modulate the NF-κB and Wnt signaling pathways, among other. In the present study, we characterized the truncated version of SETD6, providing evidence that this SETD6 mutation may play a role in the cancer inheritance in this family. Here we demonstrate that the truncated SETD6 lacks its enzymatic activity as a methyltransferase, while maintaining other properties such as its expression, localization and substrate-binding ability. In addition, we show that the mutant allele is expressed and that the resulting protein competes with the wild type for their substrates, pointing to a dominant negative nature. These findings suggest that the identified mutation impairs the normal function of SETD6, which may result in the deregulation of the different pathways in which it is involved, contributing to the increased susceptibility to cancer in this FCCTX family.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Metiltransferases de Proteína/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Sequência de Bases , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/enzimologia , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/metabolismo , Feminino , Mutação da Fase de Leitura , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , NF-kappa B/genética , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Linhagem , Metiltransferases de Proteína/metabolismo , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma
20.
Br J Cancer ; 117(7): 1048-1062, 2017 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28829762

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite a high prevalence of deleterious missense variants, most studies of RAD51C ovarian cancer susceptibility gene only provide in silico pathogenicity predictions of missense changes. We identified a novel deleterious RAD51C missense variant (p.Arg312Trp) in a high-risk family, and propose a criteria to prioritise RAD51C missense changes qualifying for functional analysis. METHODS: To evaluate pathogenicity of p.Arg312Trp variant we used sequence homology, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and segregation analysis, and a comprehensive functional characterisation. To define a functional-analysis prioritisation criteria, we used outputs for the known functionally confirmed deleterious and benign RAD51C missense changes from nine pathogenicity prediction algorithms. RESULTS: The p.Arg312Trp variant failed to correct mitomycin and olaparib hypersensitivity and to complement abnormal RAD51C foci formation according to functional assays, which altogether with LOH and segregation data demonstrated deleteriousness. Prioritisation criteria were based on the number of predictors providing a deleterious output, with a minimum of 5 to qualify for testing and a PredictProtein score greater than 33 to assign high-priority indication. CONCLUSIONS: Our study points to a non-negligible number of RAD51C missense variants likely to impair protein function, provides a guideline to prioritise and encourage their selection for functional analysis and anticipates that reference laboratories should have available resources to conduct such assays.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Carcinoma/genética , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Neoplasias Gástricas/diagnóstico por imagem , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Algoritmos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Ciclo Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Ciclo Celular/genética , Sobrevivência Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Sobrevivência Celular/genética , Células Cultivadas , Instabilidade Cromossômica , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Exoma , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Histonas/metabolismo , Humanos , Perda de Heterozigosidade , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mitomicina/farmacologia , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Linhagem , Medição de Risco/métodos , Homologia de Sequência
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