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1.
Hum Mutat ; 40(9): 1557-1578, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31131967

RESUMO

The multifactorial likelihood analysis method has demonstrated utility for quantitative assessment of variant pathogenicity for multiple cancer syndrome genes. Independent data types currently incorporated in the model for assessing BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants include clinically calibrated prior probability of pathogenicity based on variant location and bioinformatic prediction of variant effect, co-segregation, family cancer history profile, co-occurrence with a pathogenic variant in the same gene, breast tumor pathology, and case-control information. Research and clinical data for multifactorial likelihood analysis were collated for 1,395 BRCA1/2 predominantly intronic and missense variants, enabling classification based on posterior probability of pathogenicity for 734 variants: 447 variants were classified as (likely) benign, and 94 as (likely) pathogenic; and 248 classifications were new or considerably altered relative to ClinVar submissions. Classifications were compared with information not yet included in the likelihood model, and evidence strengths aligned to those recommended for ACMG/AMP classification codes. Altered mRNA splicing or function relative to known nonpathogenic variant controls were moderately to strongly predictive of variant pathogenicity. Variant absence in population datasets provided supporting evidence for variant pathogenicity. These findings have direct relevance for BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant evaluation, and justify the need for gene-specific calibration of evidence types used for variant classification.

2.
Breast ; 45: 29-35, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30822622

RESUMO

Multigene panel testing for breast and ovarian cancer predisposition diagnosis is a useful tool as it makes possible to sequence a considerable number of genes in a large number of individuals. More than 200 different multigene panels in which the two major BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer predisposing genes are included are proposed by public or commercial laboratories. We review the clinical validity and clinical utility of the 26 genes most oftenly included in these panels. Because clinical validity and utility are not established for all genes and due to the heterogeneity of tumour risk levels, there is a substantial difficulty in the routine use of multigene panels if management guidelines and recommendations for testing relatives are not previously defined for each gene. Besides, the classification of variant of unknown significance (VUS) is a particular limitation and challenge. Efforts to classify VUSs and also to identify factors that modify cancer risks are now needed to produce personalised risk estimates. The complexity of information, the capacity to come back to patients when VUS are re-classified as pathogenic, and the expected large increase in the number of individuals to be tested especially when the aim of multigene panel testing is not only prevention but also treatment are challenging both for physicians and patients. Quality of tests, interpretation of results, information and accompaniment of patients must be at the heart of the guidelines of multigene panel testing.

4.
Cancers (Basel) ; 10(11)2018 Nov 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30453575

RESUMO

BRCA1 and BRCA2 are major breast cancer susceptibility genes whose pathogenic variants are associated with a significant increase in the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Current genetic screening is generally limited to BRCA1/2 exons and intron/exon boundaries. Most identified pathogenic variants cause the partial or complete loss of function of the protein. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that variants in these regions only account for a small proportion of cancer risk. The role of variants in non-coding regions beyond splice donor and acceptor sites, including those that have no qualitative effect on the protein, has not been thoroughly investigated. The key transcriptional regulatory elements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 are housed in gene promoters, untranslated regions, introns, and long-range elements. Within these sequences, germline and somatic variants have been described, but the clinical significance of the majority is currently unknown and it remains a significant clinical challenge. This review summarizes the available data on the impact of variants on non-coding regions of BRCA1/2 genes and their role on breast and ovarian cancer predisposition.

6.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2018 10 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30312457

RESUMO

Background: BRCA1/2 mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast cancer, although other factors may modify this risk. Whether height or body mass index (BMI) modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remains unclear. Methods: We used Mendelian randomization approaches to evaluate the association of height and BMI on breast cancer risk, using data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 with 14 676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, including 11 451 cases of breast cancer. We created a height genetic score using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score using 93 BMI-associated variants. We examined both observed and genetically determined height and BMI with breast cancer risk using weighted Cox models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Observed height was positively associated with breast cancer risk (HR = 1.09 per 10 cm increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0 to 1.17; P = 1.17). Height genetic score was positively associated with breast cancer, although this was not statistically significant (per 10 cm increase in genetically predicted height, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93 to 1.17; P = .47). Observed BMI was inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.90 to 0.98; P = .007). BMI genetic score was also inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase in genetically predicted BMI, HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.98; P = .02). BMI was primarily associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Conclusion: Height is associated with overall breast cancer and BMI is associated with premenopausal breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Incorporating height and BMI, particularly genetic score, into risk assessment may improve cancer management.

7.
Hum Mutat ; 39(12): 2025-2039, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30204945

RESUMO

The widespread use of next generation sequencing for clinical testing is detecting an escalating number of variants in noncoding regions of the genome. The clinical significance of the majority of these variants is currently unknown, which presents a significant clinical challenge. We have screened over 6,000 early-onset and/or familial breast cancer (BC) cases collected by the ENIGMA consortium for sequence variants in the 5' noncoding regions of BC susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, and identified 141 rare variants with global minor allele frequency < 0.01, 76 of which have not been reported previously. Bioinformatic analysis identified a set of 21 variants most likely to impact transcriptional regulation, and luciferase reporter assays detected altered promoter activity for four of these variants. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that three of these altered the binding of proteins to the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 promoter regions, including NFYA binding to BRCA1:c.-287C>T and PAX5 binding to BRCA2:c.-296C>T. Clinical classification of variants affecting promoter activity, using existing prediction models, found no evidence to suggest that these variants confer a high risk of disease. Further studies are required to determine if such variation may be associated with a moderate or low risk of BC.

8.
Mol Cancer Res ; 2018 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30257991

RESUMO

BRCA1 mutations have been identified that increase the risk of developing hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Genetic screening is now offered to patients with a family history of cancer, to adapt their treatment and the management of their relatives. However, a large number of BRCA1 variants of uncertain significance (VUS) are detected. To better understand the significance of these variants, a high-throughput structural and functional analysis was performed on a large set of BRCA1 VUS. Information on both cellular localization and homology-directed DNA repair (HR) capacity was obtained for 78 BRCT missense variants in the UMD-BRCA1 database and measurement of the structural stability and phosphopeptide-binding capacities was performed for 42 mutated BRCT domains. This extensive and systematic analysis revealed that most characterized causal variants affect BRCT-domain solubility in bacteria and all impair BRCA1 HR activity in cells. Furthermore, binding to a set of 5 different phosphopeptides was tested: all causal variants showed phosphopeptide-binding defects and no neutral variant showed such defects. A classification is presented on the basis of mutated BRCT domain solubility, phosphopeptide-binding properties, and VUS HR capacity. These data suggest that HR-defective variants, which present, in addition, BRCT domains either insoluble in bacteria or defective for phosphopeptide binding, lead to an increased cancer risk. Furthermore, the data suggest that variants with a WT HR activity and whose BRCT domains bind with a WT affinity to the 5 phosphopeptides are neutral. The case of variants with WT HR activity and defective phosphopeptide binding should be further characterized, as this last functional defect might be sufficient per se to lead to tumorigenesis.Implications: The analysis of the current study on BRCA1 structural and functional defects on cancer risk and classification presented may improve clinical interpretation and therapeutic selection. Mol Cancer Res; 1-16. ©2018 AACR.

9.
Oncotarget ; 9(25): 17334-17348, 2018 Apr 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29707112

RESUMO

Germline pathogenic variants in the BRCA2 gene are associated with a cumulative high risk of breast/ovarian cancer. Several BRCA2 variants result in complete loss of the exon-3 at the transcript level. The pathogenicity of these variants and the functional impact of loss of exon 3 have yet to be established. As a collaboration of the COVAR clinical trial group (France), and the ENIGMA consortium for investigating breast cancer gene variants, this study evaluated 8 BRCA2 variants resulting in complete deletion of exon 3. Clinical information for 39 families was gathered from Portugal, France, Denmark and Sweden. Multifactorial likelihood analyses were conducted using information from 293 patients, for 7 out of the 8 variants (including 6 intronic). For all variants combined the likelihood ratio in favor of causality was 4.39*1025. These results provide convincing evidence for the pathogenicity of all examined variants that lead to a total exon 3 skipping, and suggest that other variants that result in complete loss of exon 3 at the molecular level could be associated with a high risk of cancer comparable to that associated with classical pathogenic variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. In addition, our functional study shows, for the first time, that deletion of exon 3 impairs the ability of cells to survive upon Mitomycin-C treatment, supporting lack of function for the altered BRCA2 protein in these cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that any variant leading to expression of only BRCA2 delta-exon 3 will be associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

10.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 46(15): 7913-7923, 2018 Sep 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29750258

RESUMO

Variant interpretation is the key issue in molecular diagnosis. Spliceogenic variants exemplify this issue as each nucleotide variant can be deleterious via disruption or creation of splice site consensus sequences. Consequently, reliable in silico prediction of variant spliceogenicity would be a major improvement. Thanks to an international effort, a set of 395 variants studied at the mRNA level and occurring in 5' and 3' consensus regions (defined as the 11 and 14 bases surrounding the exon/intron junction, respectively) was collected for 11 different genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, CFTR and RHD, and used to train and validate a new prediction protocol named Splicing Prediction in Consensus Elements (SPiCE). SPiCE combines in silico predictions from SpliceSiteFinder-like and MaxEntScan and uses logistic regression to define optimal decision thresholds. It revealed an unprecedented sensitivity and specificity of 99.5 and 95.2%, respectively, and the impact on splicing was correctly predicted for 98.8% of variants. We therefore propose SPiCE as the new tool for predicting variant spliceogenicity. It could be easily implemented in any diagnostic laboratory as a routine decision making tool to help geneticists to face the deluge of variants in the next-generation sequencing era. SPiCE is accessible at (https://sourceforge.net/projects/spicev2-1/).

11.
Oncotarget ; 9(7): 7464-7475, 2018 Jan 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29484124

RESUMO

In mammals, FOXO transcriptional factors form a family of four members (FOXO1, 3, 4, and 6) involved in the modulation proliferation, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. The role of the FOXO family in breast cancer remains poorly elucidated. According to the cellular context and the stage of the disease, FOXOs can have opposite effects on carcinogenesis. To study the role of FOXOs in breast carcinogenesis in more detail, we examined their expression in normal tissues, breast cell lines, and a large series of breast tumours of human origin. We found a very low physiological level of FOXO6 expression in normal adult tissues and high levels of expression in foetal brain. FOXO gene expressions fluctuate specifically in breast cancer cells compared to normal cells, suggesting that these genes may have different roles in breast carcinogenesis. For the first time, we have shown that, among the various FOXO genes, only FOXO6 was frequently highly overexpressed in breast cell lines and tumours. We also found that inhibition of the endogenous expression of FOXO6 by a specific siRNA inhibited the growth of the human breast cell lines MDA-MB-468 and HCC-38. FACS and Western blot analysis showed that inhibition of endogenous expression of FOXO6 induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, but not apoptosis. These results tend to demonstrate that the overexpression of the human FOXO6 gene that we highlighted in the breast tumors stimulates breast carcinogenesis by activating breast cancer cell proliferation.

12.
J Med Genet ; 55(1): 15-20, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28490613

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We previously showed that the BRCA1 variant c.5096G>A p.Arg1699Gln (R1699Q) was associated with an intermediate risk of breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC). This study aimed to assess these cancer risks for R1699Q carriers in a larger cohort, including follow-up of previously studied families, to further define cancer risks and to propose adjusted clinical management of female BRCA1*R1699Q carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 129 BRCA1*R1699Q families ascertained internationally by ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) consortium members. A modified segregation analysis was used to calculate BC and OC risks. Relative risks were calculated under both monogenic model and major gene plus polygenic model assumptions. RESULTS: In this cohort the cumulative risk of BC and OC by age 70 years was 20% and 6%, respectively. The relative risk for developing cancer was higher when using a model that included the effects of both the R1699Q variant and a residual polygenic component compared with monogenic model (for BC 3.67 vs 2.83, and for OC 6.41 vs 5.83). CONCLUSION: Our results confirm that BRCA1*R1699Q confers an intermediate risk for BC and OC. Breast surveillance for female carriers based on mammogram annually from age 40 is advised. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy should be considered based on family history.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Mutação/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Segregação de Cromossomos , Feminino , Humanos , Fatores de Risco
13.
Hum Mutat ; 37(12): 1318-1328, 2016 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27633797

RESUMO

As next-generation sequencing increases access to human genetic variation, the challenge of determining clinical significance of variants becomes ever more acute. Germline variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes can confer substantial lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Assessment of variant pathogenicity is a vital part of clinical genetic testing for these genes. A database of clinical observations of BRCA variants is a critical resource in that process. This article describes BRCA Share™, a database created by a unique international alliance of academic centers and commercial testing laboratories. By integrating the content of the Universal Mutation Database generated by the French Unicancer Genetic Group with the testing results of two large commercial laboratories, Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp), BRCA Share™ has assembled one of the largest publicly accessible collections of BRCA variants currently available. Although access is available to academic researchers without charge, commercial participants in the project are required to pay a support fee and contribute their data. The fees fund the ongoing curation effort, as well as planned experiments to functionally characterize variants of uncertain significance. BRCA Share™ databases can therefore be considered as models of successful data sharing between private companies and the academic world.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Bases de Dados Factuais , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Curadoria de Dados , Bases de Dados Factuais/economia , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Mutação
14.
Hum Mol Genet ; 25(11): 2256-2268, 2016 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27008870

RESUMO

A recent analysis using family history weighting and co-observation classification modeling indicated that BRCA1 c.594-2A > C (IVS9-2A > C), previously described to cause exon 10 skipping (a truncating alteration), displays characteristics inconsistent with those of a high risk pathogenic BRCA1 variant. We used large-scale genetic and clinical resources from the ENIGMA, CIMBA and BCAC consortia to assess pathogenicity of c.594-2A > C. The combined odds for causality considering case-control, segregation and breast tumor pathology information was 3.23 × 10-8 Our data indicate that c.594-2A > C is always in cis with c.641A > G. The spliceogenic effect of c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] was characterized using RNA analysis of human samples and splicing minigenes. As expected, c.[594-2A > C; 641A > G] caused exon 10 skipping, albeit not due to c.594-2A > C impairing the acceptor site but rather by c.641A > G modifying exon 10 splicing regulatory element(s). Multiple blood-based RNA assays indicated that the variant allele did not produce detectable levels of full-length transcripts, with a per allele BRCA1 expression profile composed of ≈70-80% truncating transcripts, and ≈20-30% of in-frame Δ9,10 transcripts predicted to encode a BRCA1 protein with tumor suppression function.We confirm that BRCA1c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] should not be considered a high-risk pathogenic variant. Importantly, results from our detailed mRNA analysis suggest that BRCA-associated cancer risk is likely not markedly increased for individuals who carry a truncating variant in BRCA1 exons 9 or 10, or any other BRCA1 allele that permits 20-30% of tumor suppressor function. More generally, our findings highlight the importance of assessing naturally occurring alternative splicing for clinical evaluation of variants in disease-causing genes.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Mutação/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Proteínas Supressoras de Tumor/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Processamento Alternativo/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Éxons/genética , Feminino , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia , Sítios de Splice de RNA/genética , Processamento de RNA/genética
15.
J Med Genet ; 52(4): 224-30, 2015 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25643705

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inactivating germline mutations in the tumour suppressor gene BRCA1 are associated with a significantly increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. A large number (>1500) of unique BRCA1 variants have been identified in the population and can be classified as pathogenic, non-pathogenic or as variants of unknown significance (VUS). Many VUS are rare missense variants leading to single amino acid changes. Their impact on protein function cannot be directly inferred from sequence information, precluding assessment of their pathogenicity. Thus, functional assays are critical to assess the impact of these VUS on protein activity. BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein and different assays have been used to assess the impact of variants on different biochemical activities and biological processes. METHODS AND RESULTS: To facilitate VUS analysis, we have developed a visualisation resource that compiles and displays functional data on all documented BRCA1 missense variants. BRCA1 Circos is a web-based visualisation tool based on the freely available Circos software package. The BRCA1 Circos web tool (http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/bic/circos/) aggregates data from all published BRCA1 missense variants for functional studies, harmonises their results and presents various functionalities to search and interpret individual-level functional information for each BRCA1 missense variant. CONCLUSIONS: This research visualisation tool will serve as a quick one-stop publically available reference for all the BRCA1 missense variants that have been functionally assessed. It will facilitate meta-analysis of functional data and improve assessment of pathogenicity of VUS.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Gráficos por Computador , Internet , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Software , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Sistemas de Gerenciamento de Base de Dados , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Humanos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética
16.
Hum Mutat ; 35(2): 151-64, 2014 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24323938

RESUMO

Missense variants in the BRCA2 gene are routinely detected during clinical screening for pathogenic mutations in patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer. These subtle changes frequently remain of unknown clinical significance because of the lack of genetic information that may help establish a direct correlation with cancer predisposition. Therefore, alternative ways of predicting the pathogenicity of these variants are urgently needed. Since BRCA2 is a protein involved in important cellular mechanisms such as DNA repair, replication, and cell cycle control, functional assays have been developed that exploit these cellular activities to explore the impact of the variants on protein function. In this review, we summarize assays developed and currently utilized for studying missense variants in BRCA2. We specifically depict details of each assay, including variants of uncertain significance analyzed, and describe a validation set of (genetically) proven pathogenic and neutral missense variants to serve as a golden standard for the validation of each assay. Guidelines are proposed to enable implementation of laboratory-based methods to assess the impact of the variant on cancer risk.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Genes BRCA2 , Técnicas Genéticas , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Animais , Proteína BRCA2/fisiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Ciclo Celular , Reparo do DNA , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Humanos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/diagnóstico , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
17.
Hum Mutat ; 33(11): 1526-37, 2012 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22753008

RESUMO

Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 confer an estimated lifetime risk of 56-80% for breast cancer and 15-60% for ovarian cancer. Since the mid 1990s when BRCA1 was identified, genetic testing has revealed over 1,500 unique germline variants. However, for a significant number of these variants, the effect on protein function is unknown making it difficult to infer the consequences on risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Thus, many individuals undergoing genetic testing for BRCA1 mutations receive test results reporting a variant of uncertain clinical significance (VUS), leading to issues in risk assessment, counseling, and preventive care. Here, we describe functional assays for BRCA1 to directly or indirectly assess the impact of a variant on protein conformation or function and how these results can be used to complement genetic data to classify a VUS as to its clinical significance. Importantly, these methods may provide a framework for genome-wide pathogenicity assignment.


Assuntos
Genes BRCA1 , Variação Genética , Proteína BRCA1/química , Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA1/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Oligopeptídeos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Domínios e Motivos de Interação entre Proteínas , Tolerância a Radiação/genética , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Transcrição , Ativação Transcricional , Ubiquitina-Proteína Ligases/metabolismo
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