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4.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 35(11): 1057-1067, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32710289

RESUMO

Citrus intake has been suggested to increase the risk of skin cancer. Although this relation is highly plausible biologically, epidemiologic evidence is lacking. We aimed to examine the potential association between citrus intake and skin cancer risk. EPIC is an ongoing multi-center prospective cohort initiated in 1992 and involving ~ 520,000 participants who have been followed-up in 23 centers from 10 European countries. Dietary data were collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During a mean follow-up of 13.7 years, 8448 skin cancer cases were identified among 270,112 participants. We observed a positive linear dose-response relationship between total citrus intake and skin cancer risk (HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.18 in the highest vs. lowest quartile; Ptrend = 0.001), particularly with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (HR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.20, Ptrend = 0.007) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.04-1.47, Ptrend = 0.01). Citrus fruit intake was positively associated with skin cancer risk (HR = 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16, Ptrend = 0.01), particularly with melanoma (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.02-1.48; Ptrend = 0.01), although with no heterogeneity across skin cancer types (Phomogeneity = 0.21). Citrus juice was positively associated with skin cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.004), particularly with BCC (Ptrend = 0.008) and SCC (Ptrend = 0.004), but not with melanoma (Phomogeneity = 0.02). Our study suggests moderate positive linear dose-response relationships between citrus intake and skin cancer risk. Studies with available biomarker data and the ability to examine sun exposure behaviors are warranted to clarify these associations and examine the phototoxicity mechanisms of furocoumarin-rich foods.

5.
Environ Health ; 19(1): 54, 2020 05 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32434563

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are lipophilic substances with endocrine-disrupting properties. To date, only few investigations, mainly retrospective case-control studies, have explored the link between internal levels of BFRs and the risk of breast cancer, leading to conflicting results. We investigated the associations between plasma concentrations of two main groups of BFRs, PBDEs (pentabromodiphenyl ethers) and PBBs (polybrominated biphenyls), and the risk of breast cancer in a nested case-control study. METHODS: A total of 197 incident breast cancer cases and 197 controls with a blood sample collected in 1994-1999 were included. Plasma levels of PBDE congeners (BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE153, BDE-154) and of PBB-153 were measured by gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Conditional logistic regression models, adjusted for potential confounders, were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Women were aged 56 years on average at blood draw. All cases, except for one, were diagnosed after menopause, with an average age at diagnosis of 68 years. Overall, we found no evidence of an association between plasma levels of PBDEs and PBB-153 and postmenopausal breast cancer risk (log-concentrations of BFRs yielding non-statistically significant ORs of 0.87 to 1.07). The analysis showed a non-linear inverse association for BDE-100 and BDE-153 and postmenopausal breast cancer risk; nevertheless, these findings were statistically significant only when the exposure was modeled as ng/L plasma (third vs. first quintile: OR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.19-0.93 and OR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.18-0.98, respectively) and not when modeled as ng/gr of lipids (OR = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.27-1.25 and OR = 0.53, 95%CI = 0.25-1.17). These results were unchanged in stratified analyses by tumor hormone receptor expression or body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest no clear association between internal levels of PBDEs and PBB-153 and the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. However, these findings need to be carefully interpreted, taking into account limitations due to the limited number of women included in the study, the lack of information concerning genetic susceptibility of cases, and the unavailability of exposure assessment during critical windows of susceptibility for breast cancer. More studies are warranted to further investigate the relationships between PBDE and PBB exposure and breast cancer risk.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Disruptores Endócrinos/sangue , Poluentes Ambientais/sangue , Retardadores de Chama/metabolismo , Éteres Difenil Halogenados/sangue , Bifenil Polibromatos/sangue , Pós-Menopausa , Neoplasias da Mama/induzido quimicamente , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco
6.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(8): 1654-1664, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32467345

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Urothelial carcinoma is the predominant (95%) bladder cancer subtype in industrialized nations. Animal and epidemiologic human studies suggest that hormonal factors may influence urothelial carcinoma risk. METHODS: We used an analytic cohort of 333,919 women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort. Associations between hormonal factors and incident urothelial carcinoma (overall and by tumor grade, tumor aggressiveness, and non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma) risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: During a mean of 15 years of follow-up, 529 women developed urothelial carcinoma. In a model including number of full-term pregnancies (FTP), menopausal status, and menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), number of FTP was inversely associated with urothelial carcinoma risk (HR≥5vs1 = 0.48; 0.25-0.90; P trend in parous women = 0.010) and MHT use (compared with nonuse) was positively associated with urothelial carcinoma risk (HR = 1.27; 1.03-1.57), but no dose response by years of MHT use was observed. No modification of HRs by smoking status was observed. Finally, sensitivity analyses in never smokers showed similar HR patterns for the number of FTP, while no association between MHT use and urothelial carcinoma risk was observed. Association between MHT use and urothelial carcinoma risk remained significant only in current smokers. No heterogeneity of the risk estimations in the final model was observed by tumor aggressiveness or by tumor grade. A positive association between MTH use and non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma risk was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support that increasing the number of FTP may reduce urothelial carcinoma risk. IMPACT: More detailed studies on parity are needed to understand the possible effects of perinatal hormone changes in urothelial cells.

7.
Eur J Cancer Prev ; 29(2): 182-185, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31764213

RESUMO

Cutaneous melanoma has been suspected to be influenced by female sex hormones. A review of the literature in 2018 indicated that fertility drug (FD) use was associated with increased melanoma risk among parous women only. However, most studies so far were based on a retrospective design and the current evidence is unclear. We sought to prospectively investigate the associations between FD use and melanoma risk in women. E3N is a prospective cohort of 98 995 French women aged 40-65 years at inclusion in 1990. Information on use of FDs, including duration and time of administration, was assessed through self-administered questionnaires. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age and melanoma risk factors. Over 1990-2008, about 611 melanoma cases were ascertained among 86 653 women. Compared with never use, ever use of FDs was not associated with melanoma risk overall [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.75-1.74], or among parous women (HR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.67-1.73). Among ever users of FDs, duration of use and age at first use were not associated with melanoma risk. Associations were similar after adjustment for UV exposure, although FD users were more likely to report tanning bed use than never-users (odds ratio = 1.50; CI = 1.01-2.22) in a subsample with recreational UV exposure data. Our data do not support an association between FD use and melanoma risk, but underlie the importance of taking into consideration potential confounding from sun exposure in future research.

8.
Int J Cancer ; 146(12): 3267-3280, 2020 Jun 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31506954

RESUMO

Evidence suggests an influence of sex hormones on cutaneous melanoma risk, but epidemiologic findings are conflicting. We examined the associations between use of oral contraceptives (OCs) and menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and melanoma risk in women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1992 in 10 European countries. Information on exogenous hormone use at baseline was derived from country-specific self-administered questionnaires. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Over 1992-2015, 1,696 melanoma cases were identified among 334,483 women, whereof 770 cases among 134,758 postmenopausal women. There was a positive, borderline-significant association between OC use and melanoma risk (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.00-1.26), with no detected heterogeneity across countries (phomogeneity = 0.42). This risk increased linearly with duration of use (ptrend = 0.01). Among postmenopausal women, ever use of MHT was associated with a nonsignificant increase in melanoma risk overall (HR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.97-1.43), which was heterogeneous across countries (phomogeneity = 0.05). Our findings do not support a strong and direct association between exogenous hormone use and melanoma risk. In order to better understand these relations, further research should be performed using prospectively collected data including detailed information on types of hormone, and on sun exposure, which may act as an important confounder or effect modifier on these relations.

9.
Int J Cancer ; 146(3): 759-768, 2020 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30968961

RESUMO

Alcohol consumption is associated with higher risk of breast cancer (BC); however, the biological mechanisms underlying this association are not fully elucidated, particularly the extent to which this relationship is mediated by sex hormone levels. Circulating concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, their free fractions and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), were examined in 430 incident BC cases and 645 matched controls among alcohol-consuming postmenopausal women nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Mediation analysis was applied to assess whether individual hormone levels mediated the relationship between alcohol intake and BC risk. An alcohol-related hormonal signature, obtained by partial least square (PLS) regression, was evaluated as a potential mediator. Total (TE), natural direct and natural indirect effects (NIE) were estimated. Alcohol intake was positively associated with overall BC risk and specifically with estrogen receptor-positive tumors with respectively TE = 1.17(95%CI: 1.01,1.35) and 1.36(1.08,1.70) for a 1-standard deviation (1-SD) increase of intake. There was no evidence of mediation by sex steroids or SHBG separately except for a weak indirect effect through free estradiol where NIE = 1.03(1.00,1.06). However, an alcohol-related hormonal signature negatively associated with SHBG and positively with estradiol and testosterone was associated with BC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25 [1.07,1.47]) for a 1-SD higher PLS score, and had a statistically significant NIE accounting for a mediated proportion of 24%. There was limited evidence of mediation of the alcohol-BC association by individual sex hormones. However, a hormonal signature, reflecting lower levels of SHBG and higher levels of sex steroids, mediated a substantial proportion of the association.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/sangue , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Pós-Menopausa/sangue , Idoso , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estradiol/sangue , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Globulina de Ligação a Hormônio Sexual/análise , Testosterona/sangue
10.
Int J Cancer ; 146(4): 929-942, 2020 02 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31050823

RESUMO

Obesity has been associated with upper gastrointestinal cancers; however, there are limited prospective data on associations by subtype/subsite. Obesity can impact hormonal factors, which have been hypothesized to play a role in these cancers. We investigated anthropometric and reproductive factors in relation to esophageal and gastric cancer by subtype and subsite for 476,160 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox models. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 220 esophageal adenocarcinomas (EA), 195 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, 243 gastric cardia (GC) and 373 gastric noncardia (GNC) cancers were diagnosed. Body mass index (BMI) was associated with EA in men (BMI ≥30 vs. 18.5-25 kg/m2 : HR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.25-3.03) and women (HR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.15-6.19); however, adjustment for waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) attenuated these associations. After mutual adjustment for BMI and HC, respectively, WHR and waist circumference (WC) were associated with EA in men (HR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.99-6.06 for WHR >0.96 vs. <0.91; HR = 2.67, 95% CI: 1.52-4.72 for WC >98 vs. <90 cm) and women (HR = 4.40, 95% CI: 1.35-14.33 for WHR >0.82 vs. <0.76; HR = 5.67, 95% CI: 1.76-18.26 for WC >84 vs. <74 cm). WHR was also positively associated with GC in women, and WC was positively associated with GC in men. Inverse associations were observed between parity and EA (HR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.14-0.99; >2 vs. 0) and age at first pregnancy and GNC (HR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.32-0.91; >26 vs. <22 years); whereas bilateral ovariectomy was positively associated with GNC (HR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.04-3.36). These findings support a role for hormonal pathways in upper gastrointestinal cancers.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Esofágicas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Antropometria , Distribuição da Gordura Corporal , Estudos de Coortes , Neoplasias Esofágicas/classificação , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , História Reprodutiva , Fatores de Risco , Neoplasias Gástricas/classificação
11.
Am J Epidemiol ; 189(4): 314-329, 2020 04 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31665225

RESUMO

We investigated the influence of premenopausal use of progestogens on melanoma using data from E3N (Etude Epidémiologique Auprès de Femmes de l'Education Nationale), a prospective cohort of 98,995 French women, aged 40-65 years at inclusion. We used Cox models to adjust for age and melanoma risk factors. Over 1992-2008, 540 melanoma cases were ascertained among 79,558 women. We found a modest association between self-reported progestogen use and melanoma risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02, 1.47), which was reduced after adjustment for melanoma risk factors (HR = 1.15, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.39). There was no heterogeneity across types of progestogens (P = 0.22), and use of multiple progestogens was positively associated with melanoma risk (HR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.70). Among users, we found no relationship with duration of progestogen use, age at start and last use, and time since first and last use. Although our results did not show evidence of a confounding effect of sun exposure, progestogen users had lower levels of residential sun exposure and were more likely to report sunscreen use, suggesting specific sun exposure profiles in users. Our findings do not support a strong influence of progestogens on melanoma risk. Further research is needed to confirm these results.


Assuntos
Melanoma/epidemiologia , Progestinas/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Melanoma/induzido quimicamente , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pré-Menopausa , Progestinas/administração & dosagem , Estudos Prospectivos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/induzido quimicamente
12.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 110(4): 993-1002, 2019 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31380561

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been reported to be associated with lower cancer risk. However, while previous studies explored major single components of the MD, only 1 previous study has investigated adherence to the MD in relation to melanoma risk. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the relations between adherence to the MD and the risk of skin cancer, including melanomas, basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). DESIGN: Etude Epidémiologique auprès de femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l'Education Nationale (E3N) is a prospective cohort of 98,995 French women aged 40-65 y in 1990. Dietary data were collected via a validated food questionnaire in 1993. Adherence to the MD was assessed using a 9-unit dietary score that incorporates intakes of fruit, vegetables, legumes, cereal products, olive oil, fish, dairy products, meat products, and alcohol. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute HRs and 95% CIs adjusted for age and main known skin cancer risk factors. RESULTS: From 1993 to 2008, a total of 2003 skin cancer cases were ascertained among 67,332 women, including 404 melanomas, 1367 BCCs, and 232 SCCs. Score of adherence to the MD was associated with lower risk of skin cancer (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.93 for high compared with low score, Ptrend = 0.001). MD score was also inversely and linearly associated with risks of melanoma (HR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.02) and BCC (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.90; Ptrend = 0.0006) but not SCC (HR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.55; Ptrend = 0.68), although with no heterogeneity across skin cancer types (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that adherence to the MD is associated with a lower skin cancer risk in women, particularly melanoma and BCC. If confirmed in future research, these findings may have important implications in skin cancer prevention.


Assuntos
Dieta Mediterrânea , Neoplasias Cutâneas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
13.
Int J Cancer ; 144(5): 957-966, 2019 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30191956

RESUMO

Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and is thought to play a role in tumour development. Previous prospective studies have shown that higher circulating concentrations of IGF-I are associated with a higher risk of cancers at specific sites, including breast and prostate. No prospective study has examined the association between circulating IGF-I concentrations and melanoma risk. A nested case-control study of 1,221 melanoma cases and 1,221 controls was performed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, a prospective cohort of 520,000 participants recruited from 10 European countries. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for incident melanoma in relation to circulating IGF-I concentrations, measured by immunoassay. Analyses were conditioned on the matching factors and further adjusted for age at blood collection, education, height, BMI, smoking status, alcohol intake, marital status, physical activity and in women only, use of menopausal hormone therapy. There was no significant association between circulating IGF-I concentration and melanoma risk (OR for highest vs lowest fifth = 0.93 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71 to 1.22]). There was no significant heterogeneity in the association between IGF-I concentrations and melanoma risk when subdivided by gender, age at blood collection, BMI, height, age at diagnosis, time between blood collection and diagnosis, or by anatomical site or histological subtype of the tumour (Pheterogeneity≥0.078). We found no evidence for an association between circulating concentrations of IGF-I measured in adulthood and the risk of melanoma.


Assuntos
Fator de Crescimento Insulin-Like I/metabolismo , Melanoma/etiologia , Melanoma/metabolismo , Estado Nutricional/fisiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Razão de Chances , Estudos Prospectivos , Neoplasias da Próstata/etiologia , Fatores de Risco
14.
Am J Epidemiol ; 188(2): 274-281, 2019 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30481275

RESUMO

The role of hormonal factors in the etiology of lymphoid neoplasms remains unclear. Previous studies have yielded conflicting results, have lacked sufficient statistical power to assess many lymphoma subtypes, or have lacked detailed information on relevant exposures. Within the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, we analyzed comprehensive data on reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use collected at baseline (1992-2000) among 343,458 women, including data on 1,427 incident cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and its major subtypes identified after a mean follow-up period of 14 years (through 2015). We estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals using multivariable proportional hazards modeling. Overall, we observed no statistically significant associations between parity, age at first birth, breastfeeding, oral contraceptive use, or ever use of postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of B-cell NHL or its subtypes. Women who had undergone surgical menopause had a 51% higher risk of B-cell NHL (based on 67 cases) than women with natural menopause (hazard ratio = 1.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.94). Given that this result may have been due to chance, our results provide little support for the hypothesis that sex hormones play a role in lymphomagenesis.


Assuntos
Terapia de Reposição de Estrogênios/estatística & dados numéricos , Linfoma de Células B/epidemiologia , História Reprodutiva , Aleitamento Materno , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Saúde da Mulher
15.
Am J Health Behav ; 42(1): 85-98, 2018 01 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29320342

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: In this study, we attempt to describe the profile of sunbed users among cancer-free French women. METHODS: E3N is a prospective cohort including 98,995 French women aged 40- 65 years in 1990. In 2008, a specific UV questionnaire was sent to all reported skin cancer cases and 3 controls per case, matched on age, county of birth, and education. We used logistic regression models adjusted for pigmentary traits. RESULTS: Compared with non-users, ever-users of sunbeds were younger (ptrend < .0001), had higher levels of education (ptrend = .0004) and income (ptrend = .002), and were more likely to be divorced/separated (OR = 1.58). They were more likely to be smokers (OR = 1.59) or former smokers (OR = 1.64), had higher alcohol intakes (ptrend = .001), and lower physical activity levels (OR = 0.54), although they had a lower BMI (ptrend = .004) and a thinner body shape (ptrend = .006). Sunbed users were also more likely to report many freckles (ptrend = .01) and sunburns in adulthood (ptrend = .008), to use sunscreen (SPF<8: OR = 2.15), and to renew sunscreen application (sometimes: OR = 1.49). CONCLUSIONS: Sunbed use is associated with intentional sun exposure and several unhealthy behaviors. Our findings call for further re- search towards the development of targeted prevention campaigns to reduce sunbed use.


Assuntos
Estilo de Vida , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Fumar , Banho de Sol , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , França , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
16.
Cancer Causes Control ; 28(10): 1011-1019, 2017 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28799019

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Endometriosis has been associated with an increased risk of skin melanoma. However, associations with other skin cancer types and how they compare with melanoma are unclear. Our objective was to prospectively investigate the relationships between endometriosis and risk of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. METHODS: E3N is a prospective cohort of 98,995 French women aged 40-65 years in 1990. Data on surgically confirmed endometriosis and skin cancer diagnoses were collected every 2-3 years through self-report, with skin cancer cases confirmed through pathology reports. Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression models. RESULTS: Between 1990 and 2008, 535 melanoma, 247 squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC), and 1,712 basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) cases were ascertained. Endometriosis was associated with an increased overall risk of skin cancer (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.05-1.55). When considering skin cancer type, endometriosis was associated with melanoma risk (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.15-2.35), but not with SCC (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.62-2.36) or BCC (HR 1.16, 95% CI 0.91-1.48) (non-melanoma skin cancers combined: HR 1.17, 95% CI 0.93-1.46), although no heterogeneity was detected across skin cancer types (Phomogeneity = 0.13). CONCLUSION: These data support an association between a personal history of endometriosis and the risk of skin cancer and suggest that the association is strongest for melanoma.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Basocelular/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Endometriose/epidemiologia , Melanoma/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Risco
17.
Int J Cancer ; 140(10): 2246-2255, 2017 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28218395

RESUMO

In vitro and animal studies suggest that bioactive constituents of coffee and tea may have anticarcinogenic effects against cutaneous melanoma; however, epidemiological evidence is limited to date. We examined the relationships between coffee (total, caffeinated or decaffeinated) and tea consumption and risk of melanoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a multicentre prospective study that enrolled over 500,000 participants aged 25-70 years from ten European countries in 1992-2000. Information on coffee and tea drinking was collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between coffee and tea consumption and melanoma risk. Overall, 2,712 melanoma cases were identified during a median follow-up of 14.9 years among 476,160 study participants. Consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men (HR for highest quartile of consumption vs. non-consumers 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69) but not among women (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.62-1.47). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of decaffeinated coffee or tea and the risk of melanoma among both men and women. The consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men in this large cohort study. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the possible role of caffeine and other coffee compounds in reducing the risk of melanoma.


Assuntos
Anticarcinógenos , Café , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/prevenção & controle , Chá , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos , Sistema de Registros , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
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