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1.
Lancet ; 391(10134): 2019-2027, 2018 05 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29864018

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Stroke disproportionately affects people in low-income and middle-income countries. Although improvements in stroke care and outcomes have been reported in high-income countries, little is known about practice and outcomes in low and middle-income countries. We aimed to compare patterns of care available and their association with patient outcomes across countries at different economic levels. METHODS: We studied the patterns and effect of practice variations (ie, treatments used and access to services) among participants in the INTERSTROKE study, an international observational study that enrolled 13 447 stroke patients from 142 clinical sites in 32 countries between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015. We supplemented patient data with a questionnaire about health-care and stroke service facilities at all participating hospitals. Using univariate and multivariate regression analyses to account for patient casemix and service clustering, we estimated the association between services available, treatments given, and patient outcomes (death or dependency) at 1 month. FINDINGS: We obtained full information for 12 342 (92%) of 13 447 INTERSTROKE patients, from 108 hospitals in 28 countries; 2576 from 38 hospitals in ten high-income countries and 9766 from 70 hospitals in 18 low and middle-income countries. Patients in low-income and middle-income countries more often had severe strokes, intracerebral haemorrhage, poorer access to services, and used fewer investigations and treatments (p<0·0001) than those in high-income countries, although only differences in patient characteristics explained the poorer clinical outcomes in low and middle-income countries. However across all countries, irrespective of economic level, access to a stroke unit was associated with improved use of investigations and treatments, access to other rehabilitation services, and improved survival without severe dependency (odds ratio [OR] 1·29; 95% CI 1·14-1·44; all p<0·0001), which was independent of patient casemix characteristics and other measures of care. Use of acute antiplatelet treatment was associated with improved survival (1·39; 1·12-1·72) irrespective of other patient and service characteristics. INTERPRETATION: Evidence-based treatments, diagnostics, and stroke units were less commonly available or used in low and middle-income countries. Access to stroke units and appropriate use of antiplatelet treatment were associated with improved recovery. Improved care and facilities in low-income and middle-income countries are essential to improve outcomes. FUNDING: Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland.


Assuntos
Padrões de Prática Médica , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/terapia , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Países Desenvolvidos , Países em Desenvolvimento , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados da Assistência ao Paciente , Pobreza , Inquéritos e Questionários , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento
2.
Lancet ; 388(10046): 761-75, 2016 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27431356

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke in different regions of the world, and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes of stroke. METHODS: We completed a standardised international case-control study in 32 countries in Asia, America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East, and Africa. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days of symptom onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls were hospital-based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke, and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks (PARs) were calculated, with 99% confidence intervals. FINDINGS: Between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015, 26 919 participants were recruited from 32 countries (13 447 cases [10 388 with ischaemic stroke and 3059 intracerebral haemorrhage] and 13 472 controls). Previous history of hypertension or blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or higher (OR 2·98, 99% CI 2·72-3·28; PAR 47·9%, 99% CI 45·1-50·6), regular physical activity (0·60, 0·52-0·70; 35·8%, 27·7-44·7), apolipoprotein (Apo)B/ApoA1 ratio (1·84, 1·65-2·06 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26·8%, 22·2-31·9 for top two tertiles vs lowest tertile), diet (0·60, 0·53-0·67 for highest vs lowest tertile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index [mAHEI]; 23·2%, 18·2-28·9 for lowest two tertiles vs highest tertile of mAHEI), waist-to-hip ratio (1·44, 1·27-1·64 for highest vs lowest tertile; 18·6%, 13·3-25·3 for top two tertiles vs lowest), psychosocial factors (2·20, 1·78-2·72; 17·4%, 13·1-22·6), current smoking (1·67, 1·49-1·87; 12·4%, 10·2-14·9), cardiac causes (3·17, 2·68-3·75; 9·1%, 8·0-10·2), alcohol consumption (2·09, 1·64-2·67 for high or heavy episodic intake vs never or former drinker; 5·8%, 3·4-9·7 for current alcohol drinker vs never or former drinker), and diabetes mellitus (1·16, 1·05-1·30; 3·9%, 1·9-7·6) were associated with all stroke. Collectively, these risk factors accounted for 90·7% of the PAR for all stroke worldwide (91·5% for ischaemic stroke, 87·1% for intracerebral haemorrhage), and were consistent across regions (ranging from 82·7% in Africa to 97·4% in southeast Asia), sex (90·6% in men and in women), and age groups (92·2% in patients aged ≤55 years, 90·0% in patients aged >55 years). We observed regional variations in the importance of individual risk factors, which were related to variations in the magnitude of ORs (rather than direction, which we observed for diet) and differences in prevalence of risk factors among regions. Hypertension was more associated with intracerebral haemorrhage than with ischaemic stroke, whereas current smoking, diabetes, apolipoproteins, and cardiac causes were more associated with ischaemic stroke (p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: Ten potentially modifiable risk factors are collectively associated with about 90% of the PAR of stroke in each major region of the world, among ethnic groups, in men and women, and in all ages. However, we found important regional variations in the relative importance of most individual risk factors for stroke, which could contribute to worldwide variations in frequency and case-mix of stroke. Our findings support developing both global and region-specific programmes to prevent stroke. FUNDING: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Canadian Stroke Network, Health Research Board Ireland, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation, The Health & Medical Care Committee of the Regional Executive Board, Region Västra Götaland (Sweden), AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada), Pfizer (Canada), MSD, Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland, and The Stroke Association, with support from The UK Stroke Research Network.


Assuntos
Isquemia Encefálica/epidemiologia , Hemorragia Cerebral/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/complicações , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/prevenção & controle , Adulto , África/epidemiologia , Idoso , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Apolipoproteína A-I/sangue , Apolipoproteínas B/sangue , Ásia/epidemiologia , Fibrilação Atrial/complicações , Fibrilação Atrial/epidemiologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Biomarcadores/sangue , Isquemia Encefálica/sangue , Isquemia Encefálica/complicações , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Hemorragia Cerebral/sangue , Hemorragia Cerebral/complicações , China/epidemiologia , Complicações do Diabetes/epidemiologia , Complicações do Diabetes/prevenção & controle , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Comportamento Alimentar , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Hipertensão/sangue , Cooperação Internacional , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Oriente Médio/epidemiologia , Atividade Motora , Obesidade Abdominal/complicações , Obesidade Abdominal/epidemiologia , Razão de Chances , Fatores de Risco , Autorrelato , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Fumar/epidemiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/sangue , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/etiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/patologia , Relação Cintura-Quadril
3.
Lancet ; 388(1046): 761-775, 2016. tab
Artigo em Inglês | Sec. Est. Saúde SP, SESSP-IDPCPROD, Sec. Est. Saúde SP | ID: ses-34758

RESUMO

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifi able risk factors for stroke in diff erent regions of the world,and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes of stroke. Methods We completed a standardised international case-control study in 32 countries in Asia, America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East, and Africa. Cases were patients with acute fi rst stroke (within 5 days of symptom onset and72 h of hospital admission). Controls were hospital-based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke,and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks(PARs) were calculated, with 99% confi dence intervals...(AU)


Assuntos
Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Controle , Risco
4.
Lancet ; 376(9735): 112-23, 2010 Jul 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20561675

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The contribution of various risk factors to the burden of stroke worldwide is unknown, particularly in countries of low and middle income. We aimed to establish the association of known and emerging risk factors with stroke and its primary subtypes, assess the contribution of these risk factors to the burden of stroke, and explore the differences between risk factors for stroke and myocardial infarction. METHODS: We undertook a standardised case-control study in 22 countries worldwide between March 1, 2007, and April 23, 2010. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days of symptoms onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls had no history of stroke, and were matched with cases for age and sex. All participants completed a structured questionnaire and a physical examination, and most provided blood and urine samples. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and population-attributable risks (PARs) for the association of all stroke, ischaemic stroke, and intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke with selected risk factors. FINDINGS: In the first 3000 cases (n=2337, 78%, with ischaemic stroke; n=663, 22%, with intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke) and 3000 controls, significant risk factors for all stroke were: history of hypertension (OR 2.64, 99% CI 2.26-3.08; PAR 34.6%, 99% CI 30.4-39.1); current smoking (2.09, 1.75-2.51; 18.9%, 15.3-23.1); waist-to-hip ratio (1.65, 1.36-1.99 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26.5%, 18.8-36.0); diet risk score (1.35, 1.11-1.64 for highest vs lowest tertile; 18.8%, 11.2-29.7); regular physical activity (0.69, 0.53-0.90; 28.5%, 14.5-48.5); diabetes mellitus (1.36, 1.10-1.68; 5.0%, 2.6-9.5); alcohol intake (1.51, 1.18-1.92 for more than 30 drinks per month or binge drinking; 3.8%, 0.9-14.4); psychosocial stress (1.30, 1.06-1.60; 4.6%, 2.1-9.6) and depression (1.35, 1.10-1.66; 5.2%, 2.7-9.8); cardiac causes (2.38, 1.77-3.20; 6.7%, 4.8-9.1); and ratio of apolipoproteins B to A1 (1.89, 1.49-2.40 for highest vs lowest tertile; 24.9%, 15.7-37.1). Collectively, these risk factors accounted for 88.1% (99% CI 82.3-92.2) of the PAR for all stroke. When an alternate definition of hypertension was used (history of hypertension or blood pressure >160/90 mm Hg), the combined PAR was 90.3% (85.3-93.7) for all stroke. These risk factors were all significant for ischaemic stroke, whereas hypertension, smoking, waist-to-hip ratio, diet, and alcohol intake were significant risk factors for intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that ten risk factors are associated with 90% of the risk of stroke. Targeted interventions that reduce blood pressure and smoking, and promote physical activity and a healthy diet, could substantially reduce the burden of stroke. FUNDING: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Canadian Stroke Network, Pfizer Cardiovascular Award, Merck, AstraZeneca, and Boehringer Ingelheim.


Assuntos
Isquemia Encefálica/complicações , Hemorragia Cerebral/complicações , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/etiologia , Fibrilação Atrial/complicações , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Países Desenvolvidos , Países em Desenvolvimento , Feminino , Humanos , Hipertensão/complicações , Estilo de Vida , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/epidemiologia , Infarto do Miocárdio/etiologia , Fatores de Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Relação Cintura-Quadril
5.
Can J Cardiol ; 23(5): 357-61, 2007 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17440640

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) of the lower extremities are among the highest risk vascular patients for fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and have been traditionally undertreated from a medical perspective. Recent evidence suggests that the incidence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke can be substantially reduced among PAD patients if they are treated with antiplatelet therapy, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and in some instances, beta-blockers. OBJECTIVES: To characterize practice patterns of drug therapy (antiplatelet, statin, ACEI and beta-blocker) among PAD patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital and to determine the 'care gap', defined as the proportion of patients who did not receive therapy among those who were eligible for it. DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with PAD (International Classification of Diseases code 440.2) admitted to the Hamilton General Hospital (Hamilton, Ontario) from January 2001 to January 2002 were considered for inclusion into the present study. Information was collected during hospitalization and by chart review. RESULTS: Data from 217 patients were used. The mean (+/- SD) age of participants was 68.6+/-11.9 years, and 41% were women. The primary reason for admission to hospital was peripheral artery bypass surgery (67%). Of these patients, 79% were current smokers or had a prior history of tobacco use, 60% had at least two cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, cholesterol, diabetes or smoking) and 45% had undergone prior peripheral artery bypass surgery, amputation or carotid endarterectomy. Three-quarters of the patients had established coronary or cerebrovascular disease, or at least two cardiovascular risk factors. At the time of discharge, of those patients eligible for medical therapies, 16% did not receive antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents, 69% did not receive statins, 48% did not receive ACEIs and 49% did not receive beta-blockers. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PAD represent a high-risk group in which more than 75% have established coronary or cerebrovascular disease, or multiple cardiovascular risk factors. Although the use of antiplatelet agents is common, the use of statins, ACEIs and beta-blockers may be improved.


Assuntos
Doenças Vasculares Periféricas/tratamento farmacológico , Padrões de Prática Médica , Antagonistas Adrenérgicos beta/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Inibidores da Enzima Conversora de Angiotensina/uso terapêutico , Canadá , Contraindicações , Feminino , Hospitalização , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inibidores da Agregação de Plaquetas/uso terapêutico , Fatores de Risco
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