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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33941385

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore the lived experience of people with calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) disease and the impact of this condition on their daily lives. METHODS: Patients with CPPD and their caregivers were invited to take part in a one-to-one (patient only) or paired (patient and caregiver) semi-structured interview. Interviews covered patients' diagnosis and treatment experiences, and the impact of CPPD on their daily lives. Transcribed interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: 28 patient interviews, six of which included a caregiver, were conducted across five countries. Acute CPP crystal arthritis flares resulted in temporary but profound disability for most patients, disrupting their ability to go about day-to-day activities, and they sought immediate medical attention. CPPD+OA and chronic CPP crystal inflammatory arthritis presented patients with longer term limitations in daily lives. Patients and their caregivers described these disruptions and limitations, which included a reduced ability or inability to complete household and self-care tasks, exercise, socialise, work and drive. They also described how arthritis pain and resulting limitations adversely impacted upon patients' psychological wellbeing. Delays in referral to specialists and diagnostic uncertainty were described by many. Lack of appropriate treatment or access to treatments only upon worsening of symptoms impacted upon the length of time some patients spent in pain and with functional limitations. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to demonstrate the wide-ranging impact of CPPD, and highlights the need for improved diagnosis, physician training, as well as greater emphasis upon finding targeted therapies to specifically treat CPPD.

2.
Trials ; 22(1): 244, 2021 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33794975

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lifestyle intervention, i.e. diet and physical activity, forms the basis for care of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The current physical activity recommendation for T2D is aerobic training for 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous intensity, supplemented with resistance training 2-3 days/week, with no more than two consecutive days without physical activity. The rationale for the recommendations is based on studies showing a reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). This reduction is supposed to be caused by increased insulin sensitivity in muscle and adipose tissue, whereas knowledge about effects on abnormalities in the liver and pancreas are scarce, with the majority of evidence stemming from in vitro and animal studies. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the volume of exercise training as an adjunct to dietary therapy in order to improve the pancreatic ß-cell function in T2D patients less than 7 years from diagnosis. The objective of this protocol for the DOSE-EX trial is to describe the scientific rationale in detail and to provide explicit information about study procedures and planned analyses. METHODS/DESIGN: In a parallel-group, 4-arm assessor-blinded randomised clinical trial, 80 patients with T2D will be randomly allocated (1:1:1:1, stratified by sex) to 16 weeks in either of the following groups: (1) no intervention (CON), (2) dietary intervention (DCON), (3) dietary intervention and supervised moderate volume exercise (MED), or (4) dietary intervention and supervised high volume exercise (HED). Enrolment was initiated December 15th, 2018, and will continue until N = 80 or December 1st, 2021. Primary outcome is pancreatic beta-cell function assessed as change in late-phase disposition index (DI) from baseline to follow-up assessed by hyperglycaemic clamp. Secondary outcomes include measures of cardiometabolic risk factors and the effect on subsequent complications related to T2D. The study was approved by The Scientific Ethical Committee at the Capital Region of Denmark (H-18038298). TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Effects of Different Doses of Exercise on Pancreatic ß-cell Function in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes (DOSE-EX), NCT03769883, registered 10 December 2018 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03769883 ). Any modification to the protocol, study design, and changes in written participant information will be approved by The Scientific Ethical Committee at the Capital Region of Denmark before effectuation. DISCUSSION: The data from this study will add knowledge to which volume of exercise training in combination with a dietary intervention is needed to improve ß-cell function in T2D. Secondarily, our results will elucidate mechanisms of physical activity mitigating the development of micro- and macrovascular complications correlated with T2D.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33875246

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To develop an operational definition of contextual factors (CF) [1]. METHODS: Based on previously conducted interviews, we presented three CF types in a Delphi survey; Effect Modifying -, Outcome Influencing - and Measurement Affecting CFs. Subsequently, a virtual Special Interest Group (SIG) session was held for in depth discussion of Effect Modifying CFs. RESULTS: Of 161 Delphi participants, 129 (80%) completed both rounds. After two rounds, we reached consensus (≥70% agreeing) for all but two statements. The 45 SIG participants were broadly supportive. CONCLUSION: Through consensus we developed an operational definition of CFs, which was well received by OMERACT members.

4.
J Clin Epidemiol ; 2021 Apr 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33857619

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To provide practical principles and examples to help GRADE users make optimal choices regarding their ratings of certainty of evidence using a minimally or partially contextualized approach. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Based on the GRADE clarification of certainty of evidence in 2017, a project group within the GRADE Working Group conducted iterative discussions and presentations at GRADE Working Group meetings to refine this construct and produce practical guidance. RESULTS: Systematic review and health technology assessment authors need to clarify what it is in which they are rating their certainty of evidence (i.e. the target of their certainty rating). The decision depends on the degree of contextualization (partially or minimally contextualized), thresholds (null, small, moderate or large effect threshold), and where the point estimate lies in relation to the chosen threshold(s). When the 95% confidence interval crosses multiple possible thresholds (i.e. including both large benefit and large harm), it is not worthwhile for authors to determine the target of certainty rating. CONCLUSION: GRADE provides practical principles to help systematic review and health technology assessment authors specify the target of their certainty of evidence rating.

5.
J Rheumatol ; 2021 Apr 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33858982

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Due to no existing data, we aimed to derive evidence to support test-retest reliability for the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and Medical Outcome Survey Short-Form-36 item physical functioning domain (SF-36 PF) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: We identified datasets that collected relevant data for test-retest reliability for HAQ-DI and SF-36 PF; and evaluated them using OMERACT Filter 2.1 methodology. We calculated intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) as a measure of test-retest reliability. We then conducted a quality assessment and evaluated the adequacy of test-retest reliability performance. RESULTS: Two datasets were identified for HAQ-DI and one for SF-36 PF in PsA. The quality of the datasets was good. The ICCs for HAQ-DI were excellent in both datasets: 0.94 (95% CI: 0.88 to 0.97) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.89 to 0.97). The ICC of SF-36 PF was good (0.89, 95% CI: 0.76 to 0.95). The performance of test-retest reliability for both instruments was judged to be adequate. CONCLUSION: The new data derived support good and reasonable test-retest reliability for HAQ-DI and SF-36 PF in PsA.

6.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2021 Apr 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33926922

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Although causality remains to be established, targeting dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota by faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been proposed as a novel treatment for inflammatory diseases. In this exploratory, proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of FMT in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, superiority trial, we randomly allocated (1:1) adults with active peripheral PsA (≥3 swollen joints) despite ongoing treatment with methotrexate to one gastroscopic-guided FMT or sham transplantation into the duodenum. Safety was monitored throughout the trial. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of participants experiencing treatment failure (ie, needing treatment intensification) through 26 weeks. Key secondary endpoints were change in Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and American College of Rheumatology (ACR20) response at week 26. RESULTS: Of 97 screened, 31 (32%) underwent randomisation (15 allocated to FMT) and 30 (97%) completed the 26-week clinical evaluation. No serious adverse events were observed. Treatment failure occurred more frequently in the FMT group than in the sham group (9 (60%) vs 3 (19%); risk ratio, 3.20; 95% CI 1.06 to 9.62; p=0.018). Improvement in HAQ-DI differed between groups (0.07 vs 0.30) by 0.23 points (95% CI 0.02 to 0.44; p=0.031) in favour of sham. There was no difference in the proportion of ACR20 responders between groups (7 of 15 (47%) vs 8 of 16 (50%)). CONCLUSIONS: In this first preliminary, interventional randomised controlled trial of FMT in immune-mediated arthritis, we did not observe any serious adverse events. Overall, FMT appeared to be inferior to sham in treating active peripheral PsA. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03058900.

7.
Acta Orthop ; : 1-8, 2021 Apr 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33929284

RESUMO

Background and purpose - Meniscal repair may reduce long-term risk of knee osteoarthritis compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM), whereas patient-reported outcomes may be poorer at short term than for APM. We compared patient-reported outcomes in young adults undergoing meniscal repair or APM up to ∼5 years after surgery.Patients and methods - We included 150 patients aged 18-40 years from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS) undergoing meniscal repair or APM. Between-group differences in change in a composite of 4 of 5 Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales (pain, symptoms, sport and recreation, and quality of life-KOOS4) from baseline, 12, and 52 weeks, and a median of 5 years (range 4-6 years) were analyzed using adjusted mixed linear models, with 52 weeks being the primary endpoint.Results - 32 patients had meniscal repair (mean age 26 [SD 6]), and 118 patients underwent APM (mean age 32 [SD 7]). The repair and APM groups improved in KOOS4 from before to 52 weeks after surgery (least square means 7 and 19, respectively; adjusted mean difference -12, [95% CI -19 to -4] in favor of APM). Both groups improved further from 52 weeks to 5 years after surgery with the difference in KOOS4 scores between the groups remaining similar.Interpretation - Patients having meniscal repair experienced less improvements in patient-reported outcomes from baseline to 52 weeks and 5 years post-surgery. The findings highlight the need for randomized trials comparing these interventions in terms of patient-reported outcomes and knee OA development.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33892937

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To gain consensus on the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) core domain set for rheumatology trials of shared decision making (SDM) interventions. METHODS: The process followed the OMERACT Filter 2.1 methodology, and used consensus-building methods, with patients involved since the inception. After developing the draft core domain set in previous research, we conducted five steps: (i) improving the draft core domain set; (ii) developing and disseminating white-board videos to promote its understanding; (iii) conducting an electronic survey to gather feedback on the draft core domain set; (iv) finalizing the core domain set and developing summaries, a plenary session video and discussion boards to promote its understanding; and (v) conducting virtual workshops with voting to endorse the core domain set. RESULTS: A total of 167 participants from 28 countries answered the survey (62% were patients/caregivers). Most participants rated domains as relevant (81%-95%) and clear (82%-93%). A total of 149 participants (n = 48 patients/caregivers, 101 clinicians/researchers) participated in virtual workshops and voted on the proposed core domain set which received endorsement by 95%. Endorsed domains are: 1- Knowledge of options, their potential benefits and harms; 2- Chosen option aligned with each patient's values and preferences; 3- Confidence in the chosen option; 4- Satisfaction with the decision-making process; 5- Adherence to the chosen option and 6- Potential negative consequences of the SDM intervention. CONCLUSION: We achieved consensus among an international group of stakeholders on the OMERACT core domain set for rheumatology trials of SDM interventions. Future research will develop the Core Outcome Measurement Set. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Prior to this study, there had been no consensus on the OMERACT core domain set for SDM interventions. The current study shows that the OMERACT core domain set achieved a high level of endorsement by key stakeholders, including patients/caregivers, clinicians and researchers.

9.
BMJ Open ; 11(4): e041871, 2021 Apr 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33910945

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQol), increased risk of somatic and psychiatric comorbidities and reduced socioeconomic status. Individuals with one IMID have an increased risk for developing other IMIDs. The unmet needs in the care of patients with IMIDs may result from a lack of patient-centricity in the usual monodisciplinary siloed approach to these diseases. The advantages of novel interdisciplinary clinics towards the traditional therapeutic approach have not been investigated. The overall aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary combined clinic intervention compared with usual care in a population of patients with the IMIDs: psoriasis, hidradenitis suppurativa, psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Our hypothesis is that an interdisciplinary combined clinic intervention will be more effective than usual care in improving clinical and patient-reported outcomes, and that a more effective screening and management of other IMIDs and comorbidities can be performed. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a randomised, usual care controlled, parallel-group pragmatic clinical trial. 300 consecutively enrolled participants with co-occurrence of at least two IMIDs are randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to either treatment in the interdisciplinary combined clinic or usual care. The study will consist of a 6-month active intervention period and a 6-month follow-up period where no intervention or incentives will be provided by the trial. The primary outcome is the change from baseline to 24 weeks on the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Summary. Additional patient-reported outcome measures and clinical measures are assessed as secondary outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval of this study protocol was established by the institutional review board of the study site. The findings from this trial will be disseminated via conference presentations and publications in peer-reviewed journals, and by engagement with patient organisations. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04200690.

10.
J Rheumatol ; 2021 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33649070

RESUMO

The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA)-Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Working Group provided updates at the 2020 GRAPPA annual meeting on its work toward developing a core outcome set for PsA. Working groups were set up for the 4 prioritized domains: enthesitis, fatigue, structural damage, and physical function. Two instruments for measurement of physical function were provisionally endorsed: (1) the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index and (2) the physical functioning domain in the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form survey.

11.
Semin Arthritis Rheum ; 51(2): 367-386, 2021 Feb 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33601193

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Structural damage is as an important outcome in the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set and its assessment is recommended at least once in the development of a new drug. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review (SR) to identify studies addressing the measurement properties of radiographic outcome instruments for structural damage in PsA and appraise the evidence through the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.1 Framework Instrument Selection Algorithm (OFISA). METHODS: A SR was conducted using search strategies in EMBASE and MEDLINE to identify full-text English studies which aimed to develop or assess the measurement properties of radiographic outcome instruments in PsA. Determination of eligibility and data extraction was performed independently by two reviewers with input from a third to achieve consensus. Two reviewers assessed the methodology and results of eligible studies and synthesized the evidence using OMERACT methodology. RESULTS: Twelve articles evaluating radiographic instruments were included. The articles assessed nine peripheral (hands, wrists and/or feet) and six axial (spinal and/or sacroiliac joints) radiographic instruments. The peripheral radiographic instruments with some evidence for reliability, cross-sectional construct validity and longitudinal construct validity were the Ratingen and modified Sharp van der Heijde scores. No instruments had evidence for clinical trial discrimination or thresholds of meaning. There was limited evidence for the measurement properties of all identified axial instruments. CONCLUSION: There are significant knowledge gaps in the responsiveness of peripheral radiographic instruments. Axial radiographic instruments require further validation, and the need to generate novel instruments and utilise other imaging modalities should be considered.

12.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 113(2): 314-323, 2021 02 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33471039

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Weight loss is critical for preventing and managing obesity-related diseases. There is a notable lack of valid and reliable means to manage patients with overweight/obesity and knee osteoarthritis (KOA). OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy and safety of liraglutide in a 30 mg/d dosing in patients with overweight/obesity and KOA. METHODS: The trial was designed as a randomized controlled trial including patients between the age of 18 and 74 y with KOA and a BMI ≥27 (measured in kg/m2).Patients underwent a pre-random assignment diet intervention (week -8 to 0). At week 0, patients having lost >5% of their body weight were randomly assigned to liraglutide 3 mg/d or placebo for 52 wk. The coprimary outcomes were changes in body weight and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain subscale from week 0 to 52. RESULTS: In total, 168 patients enrolled and 156 were randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or placebo. Patients experienced a significant reduction in body weight and KOOS pain during the pre-random assignment dietary intervention period (week -8 to 0). From week 0 to 52 there was a significant difference in body weight between the liraglutide and placebo group (mean changes: -2.8 and +1.2 kg, respectively; group difference, 3.9 kg; 95% CI: -6.9, -1.0; P = 0.008). There was, however, no group difference in KOOS pain (mean changes: 0.4 and -0.6 points, respectively; group difference, 0.9 points; 95% CI: -3.9, 5.7; P = 0.71). Treatment-emergent adverse events related to the gastrointestinal system were experienced by 50.2% and 39.2% of patients in the liraglutide and placebo groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with KOA and overweight/obesity liraglutide added after an 8-wk pre-random assignment diet induced a significant weight loss at >52 wk but did not reduce knee pain compared to placebo. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02905864.


Assuntos
Dieta Redutora , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Liraglutida/uso terapêutico , Osteoartrite do Joelho/terapia , Dor/tratamento farmacológico , Perda de Peso/efeitos dos fármacos , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
13.
Trials ; 22(1): 18, 2021 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407791

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal condition causing pain, physical disability, and reduced quality of life. Exercise and patient education are non-pharmacological interventions for knee OA unanimously recommended as first-line treatments based on extensive research evidence. However, none of the numerous randomised controlled trials of exercise and education for knee OA has used adequate sham/placebo comparison groups because the 'active' ingredients are unknown. Designing and executing an adequate and 'blindable placebo' version of an exercise and education intervention is impossible. Therefore, using an open-label study design, this trial compares the efficacy of a widely used 'state-of-art' exercise and education intervention (Good Life with osteoarthritis in Denmark; GLAD) with presumably inert intra-articular saline injections on improvement in knee pain in patients with knee OA. METHODS: In this open-label randomised trial, we will include 200 patients with radiographically verified OA of the knee and randomly allocate them to one of two interventions: (i) 8 weeks of exercise and education (GLAD) or (ii) Intra-articular injections of 5 ml isotonic saline every second week for a total of 4 injections. Outcomes are taken at baseline, after 8 weeks of treatment (week 9; primary endpoint) and after an additional 4 weeks of follow-up (week 12). The primary outcome is change from baseline in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS) pain subscale score. Secondary outcomes include the Physical function in Activities of Daily Living, Symptoms, and Knee-related Quality of Life subscales of the KOOS, the patients' global assessment of disease impact, physical performance tests, and presence of knee joint swelling. DISCUSSION: This current trial compares a presumably active treatment (GLAD) with a presumably inert treatment (IA saline injections). Both study interventions have well-established and anticipated similar effects on knee OA symptoms, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The interpretation of the results of this trial will likely be difficult and controversial but will contribute to a better understanding of the bias introduced in the effect estimation of classically unblindable exercise and education interventions for knee OA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03843931 . Prospectively registered on 18 February 2019.

14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33483129

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Underreporting of harms in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) may lead to incomplete or erroneous assessments of the perceived benefit-to-harm profile of an intervention. To compare benefit with harm in clinical practice and future clinical studies, adverse event (AE) profiles including severity need to be understood. Even though patients report harm symptoms earlier and more frequently than clinicians, rheumatology RCTs currently do not provide a reporting framework from the patient's perspective regarding harms. Our objective for this meta-research project was to identify AEs in order to determine harm clusters and whether these could be self-reported by patients. Our other objective was to examine reported severity grading of the reported harms. METHODS: We considered primary publications of RCTs eligible if they were published between 2008 and 2018 evaluating pharmacological interventions in patients with a rheumatic or musculoskeletal condition and if they were included in Cochrane reviews. We extracted data on harms such as reported AE terms together with severity (if described), and categorized AE- and severity-terms into overall groups. We deemed all AEs with felt components appropriate for patient self-reporting. RESULTS: The literature search identified 187 possible Cochrane reviews, of which 94 were eligible for evaluation, comprising 1,297 articles on individual RCTs. Of these RCTs, 93 pharmacological trials met our inclusion criteria (including 31,023 patients; representing 20,844 accumulated patient years), which reported a total of 21,498 AEs, corresponding to 693 unique reported terms for AEs. We further sub-categorized these terms into 280 harm clusters (i.e., themes). AEs appropriate for patient self-reporting accounted for 58% of the AEs reported. Among the reported AEs, we identified medical terms for all of the 117 harm clusters appropriate for patient reporting and lay language terms for 86%. We intended to include severity grades of the reported AEs, but there was no evidence for systematic reporting of clinician- or patient-reported severity in the primary articles of the 93 trials. However, we identified 33 terms suggesting severity, but severity grading was discernible in only 9%, precluding a breakdown by severity in this systematic review. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the need for a standardized framework for patients' reporting of harms in rheumatology trials. Reporting of AEs with severity should be included in future reporting of harms, both from the patients' and investigators' perspectives. REGISTRATION: PROSPERO: CRD42018108393.

15.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2021 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33483318

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To produce European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the reporting of ultrasound studies in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). METHODS: Based on the literature reviews and expert opinion (through Delphi surveys), a taskforce of 23 members (12 experts in ultrasound in RMDs, 9 in methodology and biostatistics together with a patient research partner and a health professional in rheumatology) developed a checklist of items to be reported in every RMD study using ultrasound. This checklist was further refined by involving a panel of 79 external experts (musculoskeletal imaging experts, methodologists, journal editors), who evaluated its comprehensibility, feasibility and comprehensiveness. Agreement on each proposed item was assessed with an 11-point Likert scale, grading from 0 (total disagreement) to 10 (full agreement). RESULTS: Two face-to-face meetings, as well as two Delphi rounds of voting, resulted in a final checklist of 23 items, including a glossary of terminology. Twenty-one of these were considered 'mandatory' items to be reported in every study (such as blinding, development of scoring systems, definition of target pathologies) and 2 'optional' to be reported only if applicable, such as possible confounding factors (ie, ambient conditions) or experience of the sonographers. CONCLUSION: An EULAR taskforce developed a checklist to ensure transparent and comprehensive reporting of aspects concerning research and procedures that need to be presented in studies using ultrasound in RMDs. This checklist, if widely adopted by authors and editors, will greatly improve the interpretability of study development and results, including the assessment of validity, generalisability and applicability.

16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33441418

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The effects of lifestyle interventions in persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and subjective well-being are ambiguous, and no studies have explored the effect of exercise interventions that meet or exceed current recommended exercise levels. We investigated whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention is superior in improving HRQoL compared with standard care in T2D persons. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed secondary analyses of a previously conducted randomized controlled trial (April 2015 to August 2016). Persons with non-insulin-dependent T2D (duration ≤10 years) were randomized to 1-year supervised exercise and individualized dietary counseling (ie, 'U-TURN'), or standard care. The primary HRQoL outcome was change in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical component score (PCS) from baseline to 12 months of follow-up, and a key secondary outcome was changes in the SF-36 mental component score (MCS). RESULTS: We included 98 participants (U-TURN group=64, standard care group=34) with a mean age of 54.6 years (SD 8.9). Between-group analyses at 12-month follow-up showed SF-36 PCS change of 0.8 (95% CI -0.7 to 2.3) in the U-TURN group and deterioration of 2.4 (95% CI -4.6 to -0.1) in the standard care group (difference of 3.2, 95% CI 0.5 to 5.9, p=0.02) while no changes were detected in SF-36 MCS. At 12 months, 19 participants (30%) in the U-TURN group and 6 participants (18%) in the standard care group achieved clinically significant improvement in SF-36 PCS score (adjusted risk ratio 2.6, 95% CI 1.0 to 4.5 corresponding to number needed to treat of 4, 95% CI 1.6 to infinite). CONCLUSION: In persons with T2D diagnosed for less than 10 years, intensive lifestyle intervention improved the physical component of HRQoL, but not the mental component of HRQoL after 1 year, compared with standard care. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02417012.

17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33461759

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Although calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) disease is common, there are no validated outcome measures for clinical research in this condition. The aim of this study was to generate a list of outcome domains as reported by patients, their caregivers, healthcare professionals (HCPs) and stakeholders to inform the development of an Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Core Domain Set for CPPD. METHODS: Patients with CPPD and their caregivers, HCPs and stakeholders took part in semi-structured qualitative interviews to explore potential outcome domains for CPPD clinical research relevant to their lived experience and knowledge of CPPD. Interviews were conducted in six countries across three continents. Data was analysed using manifest content analysis to identify outcome domains, which were tabulated and mapped to the core areas as defined by the OMERACT Filter 2.1. RESULTS: Thirty-six interviews were conducted in total. Participants comprised of 28 patients (six of which included a caregiver), seven HCPs and one stakeholder. The commonly identified (sub-) domains (d) across the 1) abnormalities/manifestations core area were joint pain (d = 35), joint swelling (d = 27), joint stiffness (d = 25), CPPD flares (d = 25); 2) life-impact core area were overall function (d=35), and specifically the ability to complete daily tasks (d = 25); and 3) societal/resource use core area were use of analgesic medicines (d = 26). Patients more commonly reported joint swelling, stiffness and range of movement, and use of analgesics while HCPs more commonly reported domains relating to presence of CPP crystals, radiologic calcification, joint damage, time to diagnosis and suitability of treatment. CONCLUSION: Among a number of potential outcome domains identified, articular manifestations, function and analgesic use were most frequently mentioned by participants. These findings will be used to develop an OMERACT Core Domain Set for CPPD.

18.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(3): 543-549, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33386898

RESUMO

To compare changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other lipids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) randomised to a 1-year treat-to-target strategy with either adalimumab plus methotrexate or placebo plus methotrexate. Prespecified secondary analyses from the OPERA trial, where 180 early and treatment-naïve RA patients received methotrexate 20 mg once weekly in combination with either placebo or subcutaneous adalimumab 40 mg every other week. Serum lipid levels were measured at baseline and after 1 year. Changes in lipid levels were analysed using mixed linear models based on the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. Overall, 174 patients were included in the ITT population (adalimumab plus methotrexate n = 86; placebo plus methotrexate n = 88). Differences between changes in lipid levels were low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 0.18 mmol/l [95% CI - 0.05 to 0.42], total cholesterol 0.27 mmol/l [- 0.002 to 0.54], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 0.05 mmol/l [- 0.06 to 0.15], triglycerides 0.11 mmol/l [- 0.08 to 0.29], very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 0.03 mmol/l [- 0.05 to 0.12], and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 0.22 mmol/l [- 0.02 to 0.46]. In early RA patients treated to tight control of inflammation over a period of 1 year with either adalimumab plus methotrexate or placebo plus methotrexate, changes in lipid levels were similar. Trial registration number: NCT00660647.

19.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 78(3): 250-260, 2021 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33355633

RESUMO

Importance: Behavioral therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) programs targeting a single class of problems have not been widely implemented. The population of youths with common mental health problems is markedly undertreated. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of a new transdiagnostic CBT program (Mind My Mind [MMM]) compared with management as usual (MAU) in youths with emotional and behavioral problems below the threshold for referral to mental health care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This pragmatic, multisite, randomized clinical trial of MMM vs MAU was conducted from September 7, 2017, to August 28, 2019, including 8 weeks of postintervention follow-up, in 4 municipalities in Denmark. Consecutive help-seeking youths were randomized (1:1) to the MMM or the MAU group. Main inclusion criteria were age 6 to 16 years and anxiety, depressive symptoms, and/or behavioral disturbances as a primary problem. Data were analyzed from August 12 to October 25, 2019. Interventions: The MMM intervention consisted of 9 to 13 weekly, individually adapted sessions of manualized CBT delivered by local psychologists. The MAU group received 2 care coordination visits to enhance usual care. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was change in mental health problems reported by parents at week 18, using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) Impact scale (range, 0-10 points, with higher scores indicating greater severity of distress and impairment). Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the intention-to-treat population at week 18. Maintenance effects were assessed at week 26. Results: A total of 396 youths (mean [SD] age, 10.3 [2.4] years; 206 [52.0%] boys) were randomized to MMM (n = 197) or MAU (n = 199), with primary outcome data available in 177 (89.8%) and 167 (83.9%), respectively, at 18 weeks. The SDQ Impact score decreased by 2.34 points with MMM and 1.23 with MAU, from initial scores of 4.12 and 4.21, respectively (between-group difference, 1.10 [95% CI, 0.75-1.45]; P < .001; Cohen d = 0.60). Number of responders (≥1-point reduction in SDQ Impact score) was greater with MMM than with MAU (144 of 197 [73.1%] vs 93 of 199 [46.7%]; number needed to treat, 4 [95% CI, 3-6]). Secondary outcomes indicated statistically significant benefits in parent-reported changes of anxiety, depressive symptoms, daily functioning, school attendance, and the principal problem. All benefits were maintained at week 26 except for school attendance. Conclusions and Relevance: In this randomized clinical trial, the scalable transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral intervention MMM outperformed MAU in a community setting on multiple, clinically relevant domains in youth with emotional and behavioral problems. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03535805.

20.
BMJ Open ; 10(11): e038970, 2020 Nov 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33191256

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Obesity increases the risk of comorbidities and diabetes-related complications and, consequently, efforts to prevent and reduce excess weight in people with type 1 diabetes are essential. The aim of this systematic review and network meta-analysis is to assess the effect of adjunctive glucose-lowering drugs on body weight and other important health outcomes in people with type 1 diabetes. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This systematic review and network meta-analysis will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the use of adjunctive glucose-lowering drugs for treatment of people with type 1 diabetes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform will be searched from inception to present. Key eligibility criteria include: RCT study design; adult participants with type 1 diabetes; treatment with a glucose-lowering drug for ≥24 weeks; and comparison of the intervention to placebo, usual care or another glucose-lowering drug. The primary outcome is change in body weight. Other major outcomes include change in HbA1c and total daily insulin dose and risk of hypoglycaemia and other adverse events. Dual study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be performed. Results from the meta-analysis will be presented as weighted mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes. Sources of heterogeneity will be explored by subgroup and sensitivity analysis. A network meta-analysis for the primary outcome will be performed using an arm-based random-effects model based on the Bayesian framework while assessing for transitivity across studies and consistency between direct and indirect estimates. The overall quality of the evidence will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach for each outcome. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical assessment is required. The results of this review will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication and conference presentation. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020158676.

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