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1.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 2428, 2020 Feb 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32051496

RESUMO

Although many patients with cluster headaches (CH) are disabled by their condition, few studies have examined this in detail. This cross-sectional, multicenter observational study prospectively collected demographic and clinical questionnaire data from 224 consecutive patients with CH. We assessed headache impact using the six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) and evaluated the factors associated with the impact of CH. Participants with a HIT-6 score ≥ 60 were classified into a severe impact group. The majority (190, 84.8%) of the participants were classified into the severe impact group. These patients were characterized by younger age, earlier onset of CH, longer duration of each headache attack, higher pain intensity, more cranial autonomic symptoms, a higher proportion of depression or anxiety, higher score of stress, and lower score of quality of life. The anxiety (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.08-1.31, p = 0.006), greater pain intensity (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10, p = 0.002), and age (OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.99-1.00, p = 0.008) were significant predictors for a severe impact of CH patients. According to the HIT-6 results, most of the CH patients were significantly affected by CH. As well as pain intensity, anxiety and age modulated CH's impact on their lives.

2.
PLoS One ; 15(1): e0227190, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917784

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder with significant psychiatric/physical comorbidities in the general population. The aim of this study is to investigate whether socioeconomic and demographic factors are associated with gender differences in insomnia and subtypes in Korean population. METHOD: The present study used data from the nationwide, cross-sectional study on sleep among all Koreans aged 19 to 69 years. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was used to classify insomnia symptoms and their subtypes (cutoff value: 9.5). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Goldberg Anxiety Scale (GAS) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were used to measure sleep quality, anxiety and depression. RESULTS: A total of 2695 participants completed the survey. The overall prevalence of insomnia symptoms was 10.7%, including difficulty in initiating sleep (DIS) (6.8%), difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS) (6.5%) and early morning awakening (EMA) (6.5%), and these symptoms were more prevalent in women than in men. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender, shorter sleep time and psychiatric complications were found to be independent predictors for insomnia symptoms and subtypes. After adjusting for covariates among these factors, female gender remained a significant risk factor for insomnia symptoms and their subtypes. As for men, low income was related to insomnia. CONCLUSION: Approximately one-tenth of the sample from the Korean general population had insomnia symptoms. The prevalence of insomnia symptom and the subtypes were more prevalent in women than men. Gender is an independent factor for insomnia symptoms.

3.
Cephalalgia ; : 333102420902175, 2020 Jan 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31955597
4.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 19608, 2019 Dec 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31863000

RESUMO

Anxiety, depression, and insomnia are highly prevalent among migraineurs and are associated with negative health consequences. Anxiety and depression, however, unlike insomnia, are usually underdiagnosed, due to less self-reporting of these two conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of anxiety and depression in migraineurs with self-reported insomnia, using a general population-based sample. We used data from a nationwide population-based survey on headache and sleep, the Korean Headache-Sleep Study. Of all 2,695 participants, 143 (5.3%), 268 (10.0%), 116 (4.3%), and 290 (10.8%) were classified as having migraine, anxiety, depression, and self-reported insomnia, respectively. The risk of anxiety (odds ratio [OR] = 7.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.0-16.7) and depression (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.3-8.5) was significantly increased in migraineurs with self-reported insomnia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for anxiety in migraineurs with self-reported insomnia were 46.5%, 89.0%, 64.5%, and 79.5%, respectively. For depression, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 41.7%, 82.4%, 32.3%, and 87.5%, respectively. Self-reported insomnia is likely to be comorbid with anxiety and depression in migraineurs and could thus be a useful predictor of anxiety and depression in migraine.

5.
Cephalalgia ; : 333102419883372, 2019 Oct 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31623453

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the temporal changes of circadian rhythmicity in relation to the disease course in patients with cluster headache. METHODS: In this multicenter study, patients with cluster headache were recruited between September 2016 and July 2018. We evaluated the patients for circadian rhythmicity and time of cluster headache attacks in the current bout and any experience of bout-to-bout change in circadian rhythmicity. We analyzed the patterns of circadian rhythmicity in relation to the disease progression (the number of total lifetime bouts, grouped into deciles). RESULTS: Of the 175 patients in their active, within-bout period, 86 (49.1%) had circadian rhythmicity in the current bout. The prevalence of circadian rhythmicity in the active period was overall similar regardless of disease progression. Sixty-three (46.3%) out of 136 patients with ≥2 bouts reported bout-to-bout changes in circadian rhythmicity. The most frequent time of cluster headache attacks was distributed evenly throughout the day earlier in the disease course and dichotomized into hypnic and midday as the number of lifetime bouts increased (p = 0.037 for the homogeneity of variance). When grouped into nighttime and daytime, nighttime attacks were predominant early in the disease course, while daytime attacks increased with disease progression (up to 7th deciles of total lifetime bouts, p = 0.001) and decreased in patients with the most advanced disease course (p = 0.013 for the non-linear association). CONCLUSIONS: Circadian rhythmicity is not a fixed factor, and changes according to the disease course. Our findings will be valuable in providing a new insight into the stability of functional involvement of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the pathophysiology of cluster headache.

6.
Headache ; 59(10): 1722-1730, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31535372

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most of the clinical characteristics of cluster headache (CH) have been established through the observation of men with CH. Epidemiological data of CH in women are scarce especially in the Asian population. Here, we sought to assess the prevalence and clinical characteristics of women with CH in comparison to men in a prospective CH registry. METHODS: Data used in this study were obtained from the Korean Cluster Headache Registry, a prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter headache registry that collected data from consecutive patients diagnosed with CH. Demographics and clinical characteristics were compared between the sexes. RESULTS: In total, 250 patients were enrolled in this study; 41 (16.4%) were women (male to female ratio 5.1:1). Mean age of onset did not differ between women and men (30.7 ± 15.5 vs 29.0 ± 11.1 years). The clinical features of CH in women and men were similar, with no differences in pain severity, duration, and attack frequency. Among autonomic features, facial and forehead sweating was significantly rare in women (4.9%) compared to men with CH (33.0%). Headache-related disability assessed by Headache Impact Test-6 did not differ between the sexes; however, depression scale assessed by Patients Health Questionnaire-9 (11.0 ± 8.5 vs 7.0 ± 5.8, P = .009) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale 4, 7.5 ± 3.4 vs 6.4 ± 3.0, P = .045) were significantly higher in women with CH. CONCLUSIONS: Although decreasing male preponderance was suggested in recent Western CH studies, CH in women is still far less prevalent than in men in the Korean population. Clinical and demographic characteristics were similar between the sexes. However, psychiatric comorbidities might be highly associated in women with CH.

7.
Chronobiol Int ; 36(11): 1528-1536, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31456434

RESUMO

Migraine attacks have a time preference of headache attack (TPHA). Chronotype is the propensity for an individual to sleep at a particular time during a 24-h period. However, limited evidence exists regarding the association between TPHA and chronotype in individuals with migraine or tension-type headache (TTH). The aim of the present study is to investigate TPHA and chronotype in individuals with migraine and TTH, which are two of the most common primary headaches. One hundred sixty-nine first-visit migraine and TTH participants were consecutively enrolled. Information on sleep onset time and wake up time on workdays and free days, and TPHA were investigated with a face-to-face interview using a questionnaire booklet. Chronotype was assessed, using the midpoint of sleep on free days, corrected for sleep extension on free days (MSFsc), by subtracting one-half of the average weekly sleep duration. Headache frequency per month, headache intensity, impact of headache, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, insomnia severity, and mood status were also assessed. Time preference of headache attack was reported for 45.5% and 44.8% of participants with migraine and TTH, respectively. Migraineurs with TPHA had an earlier MSFsc than did migraineurs without TPHA (1:18 a.m. ± 282 min vs. 4:18 a.m. ± 186 min; p = .022). Among migraineurs with TPHA, a later MSFsc was associated with a later preferential time of attack (ß = 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.6-2.1, p = .004). A later MSFsc was significantly correlated with a higher headache frequency per month among migraineurs with TPHA (ß = 1.9, 95% CI = 0.3-3.4, p = .023), but was not significantly correlated among migraineurs without TPHA (ß = 1.4, 95% CI -1.7-4.4, p = .332). Among TTH participants with TPHA, MSFsc was not significantly associated with a preferential time of attack (ß = -0.2, 95% CI = -1.0 to 0.6, p = .611). Headache frequency was not associated with MSFsc among TTH participants with TPHA (ß = 0.2, 95% CI = -1.2 to 1.6, p = .792) or among TTH participants without TPHA (ß = 0.4, 95% CI = -0.5 to 1.3, p = .354). In conclusion, approximately one-half of participants with migraine and TTH reported having TPHA. Migraineurs with TPHA had an earlier chronotype than did migraineurs without TPHA. A later chronotype was associated with increased headache frequency and a later time of attack among migraineurs with TPHA. Among participants with TTH, TPHA and headache frequency were not significantly associated with chronotype.

8.
Front Neurol ; 10: 849, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31456736

RESUMO

Introduction: One of the most common sleep disorders, insomnia is a significant public health concern. Several psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression, have shown strong relationships with insomnia. However, the clinical impact of the combination of these two conditions on insomnia severity and sleep quality remains unknown. We investigated the relationship between sleep disturbance and psychiatric comorbidities in subjects with high risk for insomnia. Methods: We analyzed data from a nation-wide cross-sectional survey of Korean adults aged 19 ~ 69 years conducted from November 2011 to January 2012. The survey was performed via face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. We used the insomnia severity index (ISI) to evaluate insomnia and defined respondents with ISI scores of ≥10 were considered to be at high risk for insomnia. To diagnose anxiety and depression, we used the Goldberg anxiety scale (GAS) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), respectively. Results: Of the 2,762 respondents, 290 (10.5%) were classified as subjects with high risk for insomnia; anxiety [odds ratio (OR), 9.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.3-13.1] and depression (OR, 19.7; 95% CI, 13.1-29.6) were more common in this population than in participants without insomnia. Of the participants with insomnia, 152 (52.4%) had neither anxiety nor depression, 63 (21.7%) only had anxiety, 21 (7.2%) only had depression, and 54 (18.6%) had both anxiety and depression. The group with both anxiety and depression was associated with worse scores on sleep-related scales than the other groups [high ISI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale]. The relationship between outcome measures (ISI and PSQI) and psychiatric problems was significant only when anxiety and depression were present. The PSQI has a significant mediation effect on the relationship between psychiatric comorbidities and insomnia severity. Conclusion: Among the respondents with insomnia, psychiatric comorbidities may have a negative impact on daytime alertness, general sleep quality, and insomnia severity, especially when the two conditions are present at the same time. Clinicians should, therefore, consider psychiatric comorbidities when treating insomnia.

9.
PLoS One ; 14(8): e0221155, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31449536

RESUMO

The criterion for the remission period of chronic cluster headache (CCH) was recently revised from < 1 month to < 3 months in the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3). However, information on the clinical features of CCH based on the ICHD-3 criteria is currently limited. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical features of CCH based on ICHD-3 using data from the Korean Cluster Headache Registry (KCHR). The KCHR is a multicentre prospective registry of patients with cluster headache (CH) from 15 hospitals. Among the 250 participants with CH, 12 and 176 participants were classified as having CCH and episodic cluster headache (ECH), respectively. Among 12 participants with CCH, 6 (50%) had remission periods of < 1 month, and the remaining 6 (50%) had a remission period of 1-3 months. Six participants had CCH from the time of onset of CH, and in the other 6 participants, CCH evolved from ECH. CCH subjects had later age of onset of CH, developed the condition after a longer interval after CH onset, and had more migraine and less nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea than ECH subjects. Clinical features of CCH with remission periods < 1 month were not significantly different from those of CCH with remission periods of 1-3 months, except for the total number of bouts. More current smoking and less diurnal rhythmicity were observed in participants with CCH evolved from ECH compared to those with ECH. In conclusion, the number of subjects with CCH doubled when the revised ICHD-3 criteria were used. Most of clinical characteristics of CCH did not differ when the previous and current version of ICHD was applied and compared. Some clinical features of CCH were different from those of ECH, and smoking may have a role in CH chronification.

10.
J Clin Neurol ; 15(3): 334-338, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31286705

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cluster headache (CH) can present with migrainous symptoms such as nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia. In addition, an overlap between CH and migraine has been reported. This study aimed to determine the differences in the characteristics of CH according to the presence of comorbid migraine. METHODS: This study was performed using data from a prospective multicenter registry study of CH involving 16 headache clinics. CH and migraine were diagnosed by headache specialists at each hospital based on third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3). We interviewed patients with comorbid migraine to obtain detailed information about migraine. The characteristics and psychological comorbidities of CH were compared between patients with and without comorbid migraine. RESULTS: Thirty (15.6%) of 192 patients with CH had comorbid migraine, comprising 18 with migraine without aura, 1 with migraine with aura, 3 with chronic migraine, and 8 with probable migraine. Compared to patients with CH without migraine, patients with CH with comorbid migraine had a shorter duration of CH after the first episode [5.4±7.4 vs. 9.0±8.2 years (mean±standard deviation), p=0.008], a lower frequency of episodic CH (50.0% vs. 73.5%, p=0.010), and a higher frequency of chronic CH (13.3% vs. 3.7%, p=0.033). Psychiatric comorbidities did not differ between patients with and without comorbid migraine. The headaches experienced by patients could be distinguished based on their trigeminal autonomic symptoms, pulsating character, severity, and pain location. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct characteristics of CH remained unchanged in patients with comorbid migraine with the exception of an increased frequency of chronic CH. The most appropriate management of CH requires clinicians to check the history of preceding migraine, particularly in cases of chronic CH.

11.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 19(7): 44, 2019 May 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31144052

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Tension-type headache (TTH) is a common neurological condition that is related to sleep dysfunction. This review discusses recent evidence for the association between TTH and sleep disturbances. RECENT FINDINGS: There is an increasing evidence for the association of TTH with sleep disturbances including insomnia, poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, insufficient sleep, and shift working. Most studies have reported that sleep disturbances are more prevalent among subjects with TTH than among subjects without headaches. Clinical presentations of TTH are more exacerbated in TTH subjects with sleep disturbances than in those without sleep disturbances. Further, the close association of TTH with sleep disturbances is more robust in subjects with chronic TTH than in those with episodic TTH. Growing evidence highlights the association of TTH with psychiatric comorbidity, which is closely associated with sleep disturbances. Recent advances in our understanding of the association between sleep and TTH will help in improved diagnosis and treatment of TTH and sleep disturbances.

12.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 6548, 2019 Apr 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31024044

RESUMO

Cutaneous allodynia (CA) is an abnormal pain in response to non-painful stimuli. In the present study, we sought to investigate the presence of CA, its associated factors, and its clinical implications in patients with cluster headache (CH). In this cross-sectional study, we analysed data from a prospective multicentre registry enrolling consecutive patients with CH. We identified CA during and between headache attacks using the 12-item Allodynia Symptom Checklist (ASC) administered during the CH bout period. Comorbid depression and anxiety were ascertained using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scales. Headache impact was evaluated using the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6). Of 119 eligible patients, 48 and two (40.3% and 1.7%) had CA during and between headache attacks, respectively. In univariable analyses, total CH duration, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were associated with CA during headache attack. They remained significantly associated with CA during headache attack in multivariable analyses. Patients with CA during headache attack had higher headache impact (P = 0.002). A "50% responder" analysis showed no difference in outcome of acute and preventive treatment between patients with and without CA during headache attack. Patients with CH commonly experienced CA during headache attack, but not between headache attacks. CA during headache attack was associated with disease duration, depression, and anxiety.

13.
J Korean Med Sci ; 34(16): e130, 2019 Apr 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31020817

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and hypertension remains controversial. We investigated the relationship between RLS and hypertension in a nationwide sample of the Korean adult population. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study including 2,740 adults aged 19 years or more. Subjects who met the four essential International RLS Study Group criteria and reported symptoms occurring at least once a week were defined as the RLS group. The presence of hypertension was defined as a self-reported history of physician-diagnosed hypertension. We conducted multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the independent association between RLS symptoms and self-reported hypertension after adjusting for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Among the 2,740 subjects, 68 (2.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9%-3.1%) were found to have RLS with a symptom frequency of at least once a week. The prevalence of self-reported hypertension was 30.9% (95% CI, 20.5%-42.0%) in the RLS group, which was significantly higher than that in controls (12.4%; 95% CI, 11.2%-13.6%; P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the adjusted odds ratio for self-reported hypertension in the RLS group was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.12-3.93) compared to controls. In addition to RLS symptoms, old age, being overweight, low education level, diabetes mellitus, and short sleep duration were significantly associated with self-reported hypertension. CONCLUSION: RLS symptoms occurring at least once a week is independently associated with a higher prevalence of self-reported hypertension in the adult Korean population. Further research will confirm the clinical implication of the present results and the causal relationship between RLS and hypertension.


Assuntos
Hipertensão/diagnóstico , Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas/diagnóstico , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Estudos Transversais , Complicações do Diabetes/patologia , Escolaridade , Feminino , Humanos , Hipertensão/complicações , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Razão de Chances , Sobrepeso/patologia , Prevalência , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas/complicações , Autorrelato , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/patologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
14.
Cephalalgia ; 39(7): 900-907, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30857402

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: *These authors are shared first authors. The recently published third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3) revised the criteria for accompanying symptoms of cluster headache (CH) and the remission period of chronic cluster headache (CCH). This study aimed at testing the validity of the ICHD-3 criteria for CH by using data from the Korean Cluster Headache Registry. METHODS: Consecutive patients with CH and probable cluster headache (PCH) were prospectively recruited from 15 hospitals. We analysed the validity of the revised ICHD-3 criteria for CH against the beta version of the third edition of the ICHD (ICHD-3ß). RESULTS: In total, 193 patients were enrolled: 140 (72.5%), 5 (2.6%) and 22 (11.4%) had episodic cluster headache (ECH), CCH, and PCH, respectively. The remaining 26 (13.5%) had CH with undetermined remission periods. One patient with ECH and one with PCH had only forehead and facial flushing and were diagnosed with PCH and non-cluster headache, respectively, according to the ICHD-3. Four participants with ECH according to the ICHD-3ß had remission periods of > 1 month and between 1 and 3 months and were newly diagnosed with CCH according to the ICHD-3. CONCLUSION: The change from ICHD-3ß to ICHD-3 resulted in few differences in the diagnoses of CH and PCH.

15.
Neuroepidemiology ; 52(3-4): 193-204, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30763945

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder, although it has a low prevalence in Asian populations. However, the reported RLS prevalence in -Korean adults is mostly 4.5-12.1%, which is higher than that reported in other Asian populations. This study aimed to diagnose RLS and exclude mimicking conditions in 2 independent samples of Korean adults, and to compare its prevalence to that from previous studies performed in Asian countries. METHODS: Study populations included a (1) nationwide stratified random sample (n = 2,824; age 19-79 years) and (2) community-based cohort (n = 2,685; age 47-79 years). We applied the Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire to diagnose RLS and differentiate it from RLS mimics. Sleep-related symptoms, mood, and medical conditions were compared between the RLS and non-RLS groups. Prior studies of the RLS prevalence in Asia were systematically reviewed and compared to our findings. RESULTS: The adjusted RLS prevalence was 0.4 and 1.3% in populations 1 and 2, respectively. In both populations, subjects with RLS had more depression. The prevalence of RLS mimics was 5.1 and 2.6%, in populations 1 and 2, respectively. The RLS prevalence in Asia was higher when RLS was defined by the presence of essential clinical features and lower when a differential diagnosis was additionally implemented. CONCLUSIONS: The RLS prevalence in Korean adults considering RLS mimics is comparable to that in adults from other Asian countries (< 2%). The reported RLS prevalence varies depending on the diagnostic method employed.


Assuntos
Vigilância da População , Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas/diagnóstico , Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Vigilância da População/métodos , Prevalência , Estudos Prospectivos , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
Sleep Breath ; 23(3): 979-985, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30805834

RESUMO

PURPOSE: We investigated the prevalence of sleep problems, such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), insomnia, and daytime sleepiness in commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers compared with that in the general population. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study comparing sleep habits and sleep problems in 110 truck drivers with 1001 matched controls from the general population. The assessment was based on self-administered questionnaires that included the Berlin questionnaire, the insomnia severity index, and the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine whether CMV drivers were independently associated with these sleep problems compared with controls. RESULTS: The prevalence of a high risk of OSA and insomnia was 35.5% and 15.2%, respectively, in CMV drivers, which was significantly higher than in controls with a prevalence of 12.2% and 4.1%, respectively (P < 0.001 for both). Although CMV drivers showed higher ESS scores than controls, the prevalence of daytime sleepiness did not differ between the two groups (19.1% vs. 16.8%, P = 0.54). After adjusting for covariates, CMV drivers had 3.68 times higher odds (95% CI 2.29-5.84) of OSA and 2.97 times higher odds (95% CI, 1.46-6.06) of insomnia compared with controls. However, the degree of daytime sleepiness was not independently associated with CMV drivers. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSA and insomnia in CMV drivers was higher than that in the general population. Daytime sleepiness was associated with increased BMI, depression, OSA, and short sleep duration, regardless of CMV driving as an occupational factor.

18.
Headache ; 59(2): 215-223, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30623976

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to investigate sex differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of migraine and probable migraine in a general population-based sample. BACKGROUND: While there is research on sex differences in clinical characteristics and their impact on migraine headache, only few studies have investigated sex differences in probable migraine in population-based settings. Moreover, compared with Western countries, the prevalence of probable migraine in Asia is relatively high. This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate sex differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of migraine and probable migraine in a general population-based sample. METHODS: We used the data of the Korean Headache-Sleep Study, which is a nationwide survey on headache and sleep. RESULTS: We interviewed 7430 people, and 3114 of them agreed to participate in our study (rejection rate, 58.1%). Among these people, 419 withdrew their participation during the interview. Ultimately, 2695 people completed our survey (cooperation rate, 36.3%). The prevalence of overall migraine and probable migraine was 350/1350 (25.9%) for women and 172/1345 (12.8%) for men (P < .001, respectively). The prevalence of migraine (107/1350 [7.9%] vs 36/1345 [2.7%], P < .001) and probable migraine (243/1350 [18.0%] vs 136/1345 [10.1%], P < .001) was significantly higher among women than among men. Headache frequency per month (median [interquartile range]) (1.0 [0.3-3.0] vs 0.8 [0.3-2.0], P = .037), the visual analog scale score for headache intensity (5.0 [4.0-7.0] vs 5.0 [3.0-6.0], P = .019), and the impact of headache {Headache Impact Test-6 score (47.0 [42.0-54.0] vs 44.0 [42.0-51.8], P = .013)} were significantly higher among women with probable migraine than men. Headache frequency per month (2.0 [0.4-4.0] vs 1.0 [0.3-2.0], P = .073), headache intensity (6.0 [5.0-8.0] vs 6.0 [4.2-7.0], P = .281), and the impact of headache (55.0 [48.0-61.0] vs 49.0 [46.3-60.8], P = .225) were not significantly different between women and men with migraine. Other comorbidities or associated symptoms, such as anxiety and depression, were not significantly different between women and men with migraine and probable migraine, except for nausea in probable migraine. CONCLUSION: Women experience more severe symptoms and a higher impact of headache than men among participants with probable migraine. Our findings suggest that women with PM need a more intensive evaluation and treatment than men with PM.

19.
Pain Med ; 20(6): 1193-1201, 2019 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30566656

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain disorder typically associated with headache disorders, particularly chronic daily headache. However, fibromyalgia is typically underdiagnosed and undertreated. The Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool questionnaire is a brief, self-administered questionnaire composed of six "yes/no" questions for detecting fibromyalgia. The Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool questionnaire has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity among patients with chronic diffuse pain conditions. This study assessed the validity and reliability of the aforementioned questionnaire for detecting fibromyalgia among patients with chronic daily headache. METHODS: Consecutive first-visit headache patients with primary chronic daily headache (≥15 days/month for three or more months) at the outpatient clinics of four university hospitals were enrolled in this study from April 2015 to October 2015, and the validity and reliability of the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool questionnaire for determining fibromyalgia were evaluated. Fibromyalgia was diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria of 2010. RESULTS: A total of 171 patients with primary chronic daily headache were recruited, and 100 (58.4%) were determined to have fibromyalgia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that a cutoff score of 5 (corresponding to the number of positive items) provided the highest rate of correct identification of patients (77.2%), with a sensitivity of 70.0% and specificity of 87.3%. The positive and negative predictive values were 88.6% and 67.4%, respectively. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.684. CONCLUSIONS: The Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool is a valid and reliable instrument for identifying fibromyalgia among patients with chronic daily headache.

20.
Front Neurol ; 9: 908, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30416482

RESUMO

Background: Epidemiological data of probable cluster headaches (CH) are scarce in the relevant literature. Here, we sought to assess the prevalence and clinical characteristics of probable CH in comparison with definite CH. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from the Korean Cluster Headache Registry (KCHR), a prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter headache registry that collected data from consecutive patients diagnosed with CH. Results: In total, 159 patients were enrolled in this study; 20 (12.6%) were diagnosed with probable CH. The most common unfulfilled criterion in patients with probable CH was the duration of attack, which was found in 40% of patients with probable CH. Among clinical characteristics, the number of autonomic symptoms tended to be lower in probable CH than in definite CH (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.4 ± 1.5, p = 0.051) and conjunctival injection and lacrimation showed an increased odds ratio (OR) [OR = 3.03; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-8.33] in definite CH. The groups did not differ with regard to baseline demographic characteristics, disability, impact on life, or treatment response. Conclusions: Probable CH is relatively common among CH disorders, with a clinical impact similar to that of definite CH.

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