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1.
J Hosp Med ; 14: E1-E6, 2019 Jun 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31251162

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To (1) measure hospitalist care for sepsis and heart failure patients using online simulated patients, (2) improve quality and reduce cost through customized feedback, and (3) compare patient-level outcomes between project participants and nonparticipants. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, quasi-controlled cohort study of hospitalists in eight hospitals matched with comparator hospitalists in six nonparticipating hospitals across the AdventHealth system. We provided measurement and feedback to participants using Clinical Performance and Value (CPV) vignettes to measure and track quality improvement. We then compared length of stay (LOS) and cost results between the two groups. RESULTS: 107 providers participated in the study. Over two years, participants improved CPV scores by nearly 8% (P < .001), with improvements in utilization of the three-hour sepsis bundle (46.0% vs 57.7%, P = .034) and ordering essential medical treatment elements for heart failure (58.2% vs 72.1%, P = .038). In study year one, average LOS observed/expected (O/E) rates dropped by 8% for participants, compared to 2.5% in the comparator group, equating to an additional 570 hospital days saved among project participants. In study year two, cost O/E rates improved from 1.16 to 0.98 for participants versus 1.14 to 1.01 in the comparator group. Based on these improvements, we calculated total cost savings of $6.2 million among study participants, with $3.8 million linked to system-wide improvements and an additional $2.4million in savings attributable to this project. CONCLUSIONS: CPV case simulation-based measurement and feedback helped drive improvements in evidence-based care that translated into lower costs and LOS, above-and-beyond other improvements at AdventHealth.

3.
Int J Emerg Med ; 11(1): 47, 2018 Nov 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31179933

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to highlight career paths of senior women leaders in academic emergency medicine (EM) to encourage younger women to pursue leadership. METHODS: This was a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with female EM leaders. We interviewed 22 recognized female leaders selected using criterion-based sampling and a standardized script of open-ended questions derived from the Intelligent Career Model. Questions were related to job purpose, skills, and networking. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and three trained reviewers analyzed transcripts following grounded theory principles and using Dedoose®. Researchers used an iterative process over several meetings to produce the final set of codes and themes. RESULTS: Our iterative process identified four themes: women leaders made an intentional decision to pursue opportunities to influence emergency medicine, women sought out natural mentors and sponsors to facilitate career development, women leaders intentionally planned their out of work life to support their leadership role, and an important focus for their work was to help others achieve excellence. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides insights from senior female leaders in EM; supporting the value of women pursuing leadership. There is a widely acknowledged need to diversify leadership and support gender-specific needs to develop women leaders in medicine. Becoming a woman leader in EM means making intentional decisions and taking risks. Leaders found benefits in natural mentors and sponsors. Those relationships have power to change the trajectory of emerging women leaders by identifying and reinforcing potential. Work/life balance remains an area which requires intentional planning. Woman leaders encourage succession planning and corroborate the need for increasing the percentage of women leaders to benefit the organizational culture. Leadership in academic medicine is changing with reorientation of a largely autocratic, vertically oriented hierarchy into a more democratic, consensus-driven, and horizontally organized management structure which should complement the strengths women bring to the leadership table.

4.
Acad Emerg Med ; 23(11): 1203-1209, 2016 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27286760

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women in medicine continue to experience disparities in earnings, promotion, and leadership roles. There are few guidelines in place defining organization-level factors that promote a supportive workplace environment beneficial to women in emergency medicine (EM). We assembled a working group with the goal of developing specific and feasible recommendations to support women's professional development in both community and academic EM settings. METHODS: We formed a working group from the leadership of two EM women's organizations, the Academy of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) and the American Association of Women Emergency Physicians (AAWEP). Through a literature search and discussion, working group members identified four domains where organizational policies and practices supportive of women were needed: 1) global approaches to supporting the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in EM; 2) recruitment, hiring, and compensation of women emergency physicians; 3) supporting development and advancement of women in EM; and 4) physician health and wellness (in the context of pregnancy, childbirth, and maternity leave). Within each of these domains, the working group created an initial set of specific recommendations. The working group then recruited a stakeholder group of EM physician leaders across the country, selecting for diversity in practice setting, geographic location, age, race, and gender. Stakeholders were asked to score and provide feedback on each of the recommendations. Specific recommendations were retained by the working group if they achieved high rates of approval from the stakeholder group for importance and perceived feasibility. Those with >80% agreement on importance and >50% agreement on feasibility were retained. Finally, recommendations were posted in an open online forum (blog) and invited public commentary. RESULTS: An initial set of 29 potential recommendations was created by the working group. After stakeholder voting and feedback, 16 final recommendations were retained. Recommendations were refined through qualitative comments from stakeholders and blog respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Using a consensus building process that included male and female stakeholders from both academic and community EM settings, we developed recommendations for organizations to implement to create a workplace environment supportive of women in EM that were perceived as acceptable and feasible. This process may serve as a model for other medical specialties to establish clear, discrete organization-level practices aimed at supporting women physicians.


Assuntos
Mobilidade Ocupacional , Consenso , Medicina de Emergência/organização & administração , Guias como Assunto , Seleção de Pessoal/métodos , Médicas , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
5.
West J Emerg Med ; 17(1): 1-7, 2016 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26823922

RESUMO

On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.


Assuntos
Planejamento em Desastres/organização & administração , Serviços Médicos de Emergência/organização & administração , Socorristas , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/organização & administração , Incidentes com Feridos em Massa , Terrorismo , Transporte de Pacientes/organização & administração , Triagem/organização & administração , California/epidemiologia , Comunicação , Aglomeração , Humanos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Fatores de Tempo , Índices de Gravidade do Trauma
6.
Int J Emerg Med ; 4: 44, 2011 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21781295

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to identify publications in the medical literature that support the efficacy or value of Emergency Medicine (EM) as a medical specialty and of clinical care delivered by trained emergency physicians. In this study we use the term "value" to refer both to the "efficacy of clinical care" in terms of achieving desired patient outcomes, as well as "efficiency" in terms of effective and/or cost-effective utilization of healthcare resources in delivering emergency care. A comprehensive listing of publications describing the efficacy or value of EM has not been previously published. It is anticipated that the accumulated reference list generated by this study will serve to help promote awareness of the value of EM as a medical specialty, and acceptance and development of the specialty of EM in countries where EM is new or not yet fully established. METHODS: The January 1995 to October 2010 issues of selected journals, including the EM journals with the highest article impact factors, were reviewed to identify articles of studies or commentaries that evaluated efficacy, effectiveness, and/or value related to EM as a specialty or to clinical care delivered by EM practitioners. Articles were included if they found a positive or beneficial effect of EM or of EM physician-provided medical care. Additional articles that had been published prior to 1995 or in other non-EM journals already known to the authors were also included. RESULTS: A total of 282 articles were identified, and each was categorized into one of the following topics: efficacy of EM for critical care and procedures (31 articles), efficacy of EM for efficiency or cost of care (30 articles), efficacy of EM for public health or preventive medicine (34 articles), efficacy of EM for radiology (11 articles), efficacy of EM for trauma or airway management (27 articles), efficacy of EM for using ultrasound (56 articles), efficacy of EM faculty (34 articles), efficacy of EM residencies (24 articles), and overviews and editorials of EM efficacy and value (35 articles). CONCLUSION: There is extensive medical literature that supports the efficacy and value for both EM as a medical specialty and for emergency patient care delivered by trained EM physicians.

7.
Shock ; 35(4): 360-6, 2011 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21068697

RESUMO

Patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest generally have poor outcomes. Guidelines for treatment can be complicated and difficult to implement. This study examined the feasibility of implementing a care bundle including therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and early hemodynamic optimization for comatose patients with return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The study included patients over a 2-year period in the ED and intensive care unit of an academic tertiary-care medical center. The first year (prebundle) provided a historical control, followed by a prospective observational period of bundle implementation during the second year. The bundle elements included (a) TH initiated; (b) central venous pressure/central venous oxygen saturation monitoring in 2 h; (c) target temperature in 4 h; (d) central venous pressure greater than 12 mmHg in 6 h; (e) MAP greater than 65 mmHg in 6 h; (f) central venous oxygen saturation greater than 70% in 6 h; (g) TH maintained for 24 h; and (h) decreasing lactate in 24 h. Fifty-five patients were enrolled, 26 patients in the prebundle phase and 29 patients in the bundle phase. Seventy-seven percent of bundle elements were completed during the bundle phase. In-hospital mortality in bundle compared with prebundle patients was 55.2% vs. 69.2% (P = 0.29). In the bundle patients, those patients who received all elements of the care bundle had mortality 33.3% compared with 60.9% in those receiving some of the bundle elements (P = 0.22). Bundle patients tended to achieve good neurologic outcome compared with prebundle patients, Cerebral Performance Category 1 or 2 in 31 vs. 12% patients, respectively (P = 0.08). Our study demonstrated that a post-cardiac arrest care bundle that incorporates TH and early hemodynamic optimization can be implemented in the ED and intensive care unit collaboratively and can achieve similar clinical benefits compared with those observed in previous clinical trials.


Assuntos
Coma/fisiopatologia , Coma/terapia , Parada Cardíaca/fisiopatologia , Hipotermia Induzida/métodos , Idoso , Feminino , Hemodinâmica , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos
8.
Resuscitation ; 80(6): 674-9, 2009 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19395143

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Widespread application of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and the severe sepsis resuscitation bundle is limited by clinician knowledge, skills and experience. This study evaluated use of simulation-based teaching during medical training to increase future clinician knowledge in the above therapies for severe sepsis and septic shock. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was performed with medical students at all levels of training. A 5-h course including didactic lectures, skill workshops, and a simulated case scenario of septic shock were administered to the participants. A checklist including 21 tasks was completed during the patient simulation. An 18-question pre-test, post-test and 2-week post-test were given. The participants completed a survey at the end of the course. RESULTS: Sixty-three students were enrolled. There was statistical difference between the pre-test and each of the post-test scores: 57.5+/-13.0, 85.6+/-8.8, and 80.9+/-10.9%, respectively. 20.6% of participants thought the pre-test was too difficult, whereas all participants thought the post-test was either appropriate or too easy. The task performance during the simulated septic shock patient was 94.1+/-6.0%. The participants noted improvements in their confidence levels at managing severe sepsis and septic shock, and agreed that the course should be a requirement during medical school training. CONCLUSIONS: Medical simulation is an effective method of educating EGDT and the severe sepsis resuscitation bundle to medical students with limited experience in patient care. The results suggest that our course may be of further benefit at increasing clinical experience with this intensive protocol for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Sepse/terapia , Protocolos Clínicos , Estudos de Coortes , Currículo , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Simulação de Paciente , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Estudos Prospectivos , Choque Séptico/terapia , Software , Estudantes de Medicina
9.
Acad Emerg Med ; 15(8): 762-7, 2008 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18783488

RESUMO

The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) convened a taskforce to study issues pertaining to women in academic emergency medicine (EM). The charge to the Taskforce was to "Create a document for the SAEM Board of Directors that defines and describes the unique recruitment, retention, and advancement needs for women in academic emergency medicine." To this end, the Taskforce and authors reviewed the literature to highlight key data points in understanding this issue and made recommendations for individuals at four levels of leadership and accountability: leadership of national EM organizations, medical school deans, department chairs, and individual women faculty members. The broad range of individuals targeted for recommendations reflects the interdependent and shared responsibility required to address changes in the culture of academic EM. The following method was used to determine the recommendations: 1) Taskforce members discussed career barriers and potential solutions that could improve the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in academic EM; 2) the authors reviewed recommendations in the literature by national consensus groups and experts in the field to validate the recommendations of Taskforce members and the authors; and 3) final recommendations were sent to all Taskforce members to obtain and incorporate additional comments and ensure a consensus. This article contains those recommendations and cites the relevant literature addressing this topic.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/organização & administração , Medicina de Emergência , Médicas/provisão & distribução , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Medicina de Emergência/educação , Medicina de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Cultura Organizacional , Seleção de Pessoal , Médicas/economia , Sociedades Médicas , Estados Unidos , Recursos Humanos
10.
Ann Emerg Med ; 51(6): 723-728.e8, 2008 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18342991

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Attrition rates in emergency medicine have been reported as high as 25% in 10 years. The number of women entering emergency medicine has been increasing, as has the number of female medical school graduates. No studies have identified factors that increase female emergency physician career satisfaction. We assess career satisfaction in women emergency physicians in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and identify factors associated with career satisfaction. METHODS: The survey questionnaire was developed by querying 3 groups: (1) ACEP women in the American Association of Women Emergency Physicians, the (2) Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Mentoring Women Interest Group, and (3) nonaffiliated female emergency physicians. Their responses were categorized into 6 main areas: schedule, relationships with colleagues, administrative support and mentoring, patient/work-related issues, career advancement opportunities, and financial. The study cohort for the survey included all female members of ACEP with a known e-mail address. All contact with survey recipients was exclusively through the e-mail that contained a uniform resource locator link to the survey itself. RESULTS: Two thousand five hundred two ACEP female members were sent the uniform resource locator link. The Web survey was accessed a total of 1,851 times, with a total of 1,380 surveys completed, an overall response rate of 56%. Most women were satisfied with their career as an emergency physician, 492 (35.5%) very satisfied, 610 (44.0%) satisfied, 154 (11.1%) neutral, 99 (7.1%) not satisfied, and 31 (2.3%) very unsatisfied. Significant factors for career satisfaction included amount of recognition at work, career advancement, schedule flexibility, and the fairness of financial compensation. Workplace factors associated with high satisfaction included academic practice setting and sex-equal opportunity for advancement and sex-equal financial compensation. CONCLUSION: Most of the ACEP female physicians surveyed were satisfied with their career choice of emergency medicine. Opportunities for career advancement, fairness in financial compensation, and schedule flexibility were key factors in career satisfaction among female emergency physicians.


Assuntos
Medicina de Emergência , Satisfação no Emprego , Médicas/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Salários e Benefícios , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
11.
Acad Emerg Med ; 13(8): 904-6, 2006 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16723723

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Despite the influx of female physicians in academic medicine departments, there are a small number of women in faculty and departmental leadership positions in emergency medicine (EM). The objective of this study was to determine if the gender of the chairperson of an academic EM department is associated with the gender of the residency program director (RPD) and gender proportion of its faculty. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 133 academic EM departments using the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine online residency catalog, program Web site, or e-mail. Main outcome measures were proportion of female EM faculty and gender of the RPD. RESULTS: Data were available for 133 academic departments. Women chaired 7.5% (n = 10) of departments and comprised 22.3% of all faculty and 15.0% (n = 20) of RPD positions. EM departments that were chaired by women had a significantly higher percentage of female faculty compared with those led by men (31% vs. 22%; p = 0.01). Similarly, departments that were chaired by women had a significantly higher proportion of female RPDs compared with those chaired by men (50% vs. 12%; p < 0.01). Compared with departments chaired by men, the RPD was 5.0 times (95% confidence interval = 1.9 to 27.8; p < 0.01) more likely to be a woman if the chairperson was also a woman. CONCLUSIONS: An academic EM department was more likely to have a higher proportion of female faculty and a female RPD when the department chairperson was female.


Assuntos
Medicina de Emergência/educação , Medicina de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Faculdades de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Liderança , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Distribuição por Sexo , Estados Unidos
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