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1.
Otol Neurotol ; 41(6): e759-e762, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32271262

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To report and discuss the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) for tumor control following surgical resection of endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. SETTING: Multi-institutional academic referral centers. PATIENTS: Patients undergoing surgical resection for ELST followed by SRS or FRT. INTERVENTION(S): Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Local tumor control. RESULTS: Two of the five patients experienced tumor recurrence after gross total microsurgical at 78 and 11 months, respectively. The former patient received salvage 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and while the latter patient underwent three courses of salvage SRS for recurrence, two of which were in-field and was disease-free at last follow up. Two additional patients underwent subtotal tumor resection (STR) followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and are currently without disease. One patient underwent STR followed by proton-beam therapy (PBT) and was free of disease at most recent follow-up. CONCLUSION: SRS/FRT remains a useful adjuvant for treatment of residual or recurrent ELSTs, where the risk of revision microsurgical resection is high.

2.
Otol Neurotol ; 41(2): e262-e267, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31789797

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Accurate volume assessment is essential for the management of vestibular schwannoma after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). A cuboidal approximation for volume is the standard surveillance method; however, this may overestimate tumor volume. We sought to evaluate several volumetric models and their suitability for post-SRS surveillance. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: We evaluated 54 patients with vestibular schwannoma before and after SRS. INTERVENTION(S): Gold-standard volumes were obtained by a radiation oncologist using contouring software. Volume was also calculated by cuboidal, ellipsoidal, and spherical formulae using tumor diameters obtained by a neuroradiologist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Percent error (PE) and absolute percent error (APE) were calculated. Paired t test evaluated bias, and the Bland-Altman method evaluated reproducibility. Linear regression evaluated predictors of model error. RESULTS: All models overestimated volume compared with the gold standard. The cuboidal model was not reproducible before SRS (p < 0.001), and no model was reproducible after SRS (cuboidal p < 0.001; ellipsoidal p = 0.02; spherical p = 0.02). Significant bias was present before SRS for the cuboidal model (p < 0.001), and post-SRS for all models [cuboidal (p < 0.001), ellipsoidal (p < 0.02), and spherical (p = 0.005)]. Model error was negatively associated with pretreatment volume for the cuboidal (PE p = 0.03; APE p = 0.03), ellipsoidal (PE p = 0.03; APE p = 0.04), and spherical (PE p = 0.02; APE p = 0.03) methods and lost linearity post-SRS. CONCLUSIONS: The standard cuboidal practice for following vestibular schwannoma tumor volume after SRS overestimates size. Ellipsoidal and spherical estimations have improved performance but also overestimate volume and lack reliability post-SRS. The development of other volumetric models or application of contouring software should be investigated.

3.
Otol Neurotol ; 41(1): 133-140, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31789966

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To analyze local control (LC) and toxicity rates between stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in relation to reported surgical rates in the treatment of paragangliomas (PG) in the upfront, adjuvant, and salvage settings, and to explore factors affecting tumor size reduction, toxicity rates, and symptom control. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Thirty patients treated with either linear accelerator-based SRS or IMRT in the definitive, planned adjuvant, or unplanned salvage postsurgery settings. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Local control, toxicities, symptom control, tumor size reduction, and factors affecting each. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 4.16 years. LC rates were 100%. Acute grade >3 toxicity rate was 6.7%, 86.7% of tumors had a reduction in volume, and 76.7% of patients had improvement in at least one tumor-induced symptom by last follow-up. Larger tumor size at presentation and longer time to last follow-up were significantly associated with greater tumor size reduction on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: SRS and IMRT are safe and effective treatment for PG with high efficacy and low morbidity rates in the upfront, planned adjuvant, and unplanned salvage settings.

5.
Pituitary ; 22(6): 607-613, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31552580

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for refractory Cushing's disease may offer a condensed treatment schedule for patients with large tumors abutting the optic chiasm unsuitable for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). To-date only four patients have been treated by HSRT in the published literature. We investigated the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of HSRT compared to SRS. METHODS: After approval, we retrospectively evaluated patients treated at our institution for refractory Cushing's disease with SRS or HSRT. Study outcomes included biochemical control, time to biochemical control, local control, and late complications. Binary logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression evaluated predictors of outcomes. RESULTS: Patients treated with SRS (n = 9) and HSRT (n = 9) were enrolled with median follow-up of 3.4 years. Clinicopathologic details were balanced between the cohorts. Local control was 100% in both cohorts. Time to biochemical control was 6.6. and 9.5 months in the SRS and HSRT cohorts, respectively (p = 0.6258). Two patients in each cohort required salvage bilateral adrenalectomy. Late complications including secondary malignancy, radionecrosis, cranial nerve neuropathy, and optic pathway injury were minimal for either cohort. CONCLUSIONS: HSRT is an appropriate treatment approach for refractory Cushing's disease, particularly for patients with large tumors abutting the optic apparatus. Prospective studies are needed to validate these findings and identify factors suggesting optimal fractionation approaches.


Assuntos
Hipersecreção Hipofisária de ACTH/cirurgia , Hipersecreção Hipofisária de ACTH/terapia , Radiocirurgia/métodos , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Fracionamento da Dose de Radiação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
6.
Neurosurgery ; 85(6): E1078-E1083, 2019 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31215628

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannomas (VS) has been theorized to allow for tumor control with higher rates of hearing preservation in selected patients with useful hearing. However, there is a paucity of literature with formal audiologic measures of hearing preservation to support the standard use of fractionated SRS in VS. We hypothesized that fractionation would diminish the amount of hearing damage. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between audiologic performance and SRS fractionation scheme. METHODS: We performed an IRB-approved retrospective review of patients treated with 1, 3, or 5 fraction SRS for VS at our institution from 1998 to 2016. Pre- and post-SRS audiograms with speech awareness threshold (SAT) in treated and contralateral ears were obtained. Contralateral ear measurements were used for hearing normalization to account for presbycusis. RESULTS: Fifty-six patients with median audiologic follow-up 2.0 yr (mean 2.66 yr, min-max 0.50-9.45 yr) were included. Patients treated with single fractionation had a significantly worsened SAT (dB) compared to patients treated with 5 fractions (P = .008) and compared to all multifraction patients (P = .009) at 12 to 24 mo follow-up. CONCLUSION: This retrospective analysis supports the use of fractionated SRS to preserve hearing in patients with VS. SAT can be used as an objective metric of hearing response to radiosurgery.


Assuntos
Audiometria/tendências , Fracionamento da Dose de Radiação , Audição/efeitos da radiação , Neuroma Acústico/radioterapia , Radiocirurgia/tendências , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Seguimentos , Audição/fisiologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neuroma Acústico/diagnóstico , Neuroma Acústico/fisiopatologia , Radiocirurgia/efeitos adversos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
J Glob Oncol ; 4: 1-9, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30241193

RESUMO

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing in incidence in the United States and in many countries worldwide primarily as a result of increasing rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV-positive OPSCC represents a distinct disease entity from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma caused by traditional risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol, with different epidemiology, patterns of failure, and expected outcomes. Because patients with HPV-positive OPSCC have a younger median age and superior prognosis compared with their HPV-negative counterparts, they live longer with the morbidity of treatment, which can be severe. Therefore, efforts are under way to de-escalate therapy in favorable-risk patients while maintaining treatment efficacy. Additional work is being undertaken to discover new therapies that may benefit both HPV-positive and HPV-negative patient subsets. Herein, we will review the available data for the evolving treatment paradigms in OPSCC as well as discuss ongoing clinical trials.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/terapia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/terapia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/diagnóstico , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/etiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/mortalidade , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Terapia Combinada/efeitos adversos , Terapia Combinada/métodos , Gerenciamento Clínico , Humanos , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/etiologia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/mortalidade , Resultado do Tratamento
8.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 16(5): 479-490, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29752322

RESUMO

The NCCN Guidelines for Head and Neck (H&N) Cancers provide treatment recommendations for cancers of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, ethmoid and maxillary sinuses, and salivary glands. Recommendations are also provided for occult primary of the H&N, and separate algorithms have been developed by the panel for very advanced H&N cancers. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel's discussion and most recent recommendations regarding evaluation and treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.


Assuntos
Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Guias como Assunto , História do Século XXI , Humanos
9.
J Appl Clin Med Phys ; 19(2): 191-197, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29411506

RESUMO

Radiation dermatitis during radiotherapy is correlated with skin dose and is a common clinical problem for head and neck and thoracic cancer patients. Therefore, accurate prediction of skin dose during treatment planning is clinically important. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of skin dose calculated by a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). We evaluated the accuracy of skin dose calculations by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) implemented in Varian Eclipse (V.11) system. Skin dose is calculated as mean dose to a contoured structure of 0.5 cm thickness from the surface. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are utilized for the evaluation. The 6, 10 and 15 MV photon beams investigated are from a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. The accuracy of the MC dose calculations was validated by phantom measurements with optically stimulated luminescence detectors. The calculation accuracy of patient skin doses is studied by using CT based radiotherapy treatment plans including 3D conformal, static gantry IMRT, and VMAT treatment techniques. Results show the Varian Eclipse system underestimates skin doses by up to 14% of prescription dose for the patients studied when external body contour starts at the patient's skin. The external body contour is used in a treatment planning system to calculate dose distributions. The calculation accuracy of skin dose with Eclipse can be considerably improved to within 4% of target dose by extending the external body contour by 1 to 2 cm from the patient's skin. Dose delivered to deeper target volumes or organs at risk are not affected. Although Eclipse treatment planning system has its limitations in predicting patient skin dose, this study shows the calculation accuracy can be considerably improved to an acceptable level by extending the external body contour without affecting the dose calculation accuracy to the treatment target and internal organs at risk. This is achieved by moving the calculation entry point away from the skin.


Assuntos
Algoritmos , Neoplasias/radioterapia , Imagens de Fantasmas , Lesões por Radiação/prevenção & controle , Planejamento da Radioterapia Assistida por Computador/métodos , Pele/efeitos da radiação , Simulação por Computador , Humanos , Método de Monte Carlo , Órgãos em Risco/efeitos da radiação , Aceleradores de Partículas , Fótons , Monitoramento de Radiação , Dosagem Radioterapêutica , Absorção Cutânea/efeitos da radiação
10.
Front Oncol ; 7: 279, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29218301

RESUMO

Purpose: The optimal treatment strategy following local recurrence after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remains unclear. While upfront SRS has been extensively studied, few reports focus on outcomes after retreatment. Here, we report the results following a second course of SRS for local recurrence of brain metastases previously treated with SRS. Methods: Using institutional database, patients who received salvage SRS (SRS2) following in-field failure of initial SRS (SRS1) for brain metastases were identified. Radionecrosis and local failure were defined radiographically by MRI following SRS2. The primary endpoint was defined as the time from SRS2 to the date of all-cause death or last follow-up [overall survival (OS)]. The secondary endpoints included local failure-free survival (LFFS) and radionecrosis-free survival, defined as the time from SRS2 to the date of local failure or radionecrosis, or last follow-up, respectively. Results: Twenty-eight patients with 32 brain metastases were evaluated between years 2004 and 2015. The median interval between SRS1 and SRS2 was 9.7 months. Median OS was 22.0 months. Median LFFS time after SRS2 was 13.6 months. The overall local control rate following SRS2 was 84.4%. The 1- and 2-year local control rates are 88.3% (95% CI, 76.7-100%) and 80.3% (95% CI, 63.5-100%), respectively. The overall rate of radionecrosis following SRS2 was 18.8%. On univariate analysis, higher prescribed isodose line (p = 0.033) and higher gross tumor volume (p = 0.015) at SRS1 were associated with radionecrosis. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward lower risk of radionecrosis with interval surgical resection, fractionated SRS, lower total EQD2 (<50 Gy), and lack of concurrent systemic therapy at SRS2. Conclusion: In select patients, repeat LINAC-based SRS following recurrence remains a reasonable option leading to long-term survival and local control. Radionecrosis approaches 20% for high risk individuals and parallels historic values.

11.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 15(6): 761-770, 2017 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28596256

RESUMO

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Head and Neck Cancers provide treatment recommendations for cancers of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, ethmoid and maxillary sinuses, and salivary glands. Recommendations are also provided for occult primary of the head and neck (H&N), and separate algorithms have been developed by the panel for very advanced H&N cancers. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel's discussion and most recent recommendations regarding the increase in human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer and the availability of immunotherapy agents for treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic H&N cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/diagnóstico , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/terapia , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/etiologia , Humanos
12.
Cureus ; 9(5): e1279, 2017 May 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28656127

RESUMO

Introduction Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used as an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) following surgical resection of brain metastases. We analyzed the outcomes of postoperative frameless fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (fSRS) cases for surgically resected brain metastases at our institution. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of 85 patients who underwent fSRS to 87 resection beds from 2006 - 2014 with a median follow-up of 6.4 months. Clinically relevant outcomes were assessed with analysis to determine predictors of these outcomes. Results The median target volume was 9.8 cm-3 (1.1 - 43.1 cm-3). The most frequently used fractionation scheme was 3,000 cGy in five fractions. The rates of local control (LC), distant brain failure (DBF), and overall survival (OS) at one-year were 87%, 52%, and 52%, respectively. Five patients (5.9%) experienced Grade >2 toxicity related to fSRS, including seizures (two), symptomatic radionecrosis (two), and potential treatment-related death (one). A multivariable analysis revealed that tumor volume (p < 0.001) and number of fractions (p < 0.001) were associated with LC, while recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class (p < .0001), tumor volume (p = .0181), and the number of fractions (p = .0181) were associated with OS. Conclusions Postoperative fSRS for surgically resected brain metastases is well-tolerated and achieves durable LC. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dose and fractionation for fSRS as well as to compare outcomes with WBRT.

13.
J Neurooncol ; 133(2): 435-442, 2017 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28488066

RESUMO

We hypothesized that sorafenib (BAY 43-9006), an oral multi-kinase inhibitor, used in combination with SRS will improve overall intracranial control. This Phase I study assesses the safety, tolerability, and maximal tolerated dose of sorafenib administered with SRS to treat 1-4 brain metastases. This was an open label phase I dose escalation study with an expansion cohort. Eligible adults had 1-4 brain metastases from solid malignancies. Sorafenib was begun 5-7 days prior to SRS and continued for 14 days thereafter. Dose escalation of sorafenib was conducted via a "3 + 3" dose escalation design. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were determined 1 month after SRS and defined as ≥grade 3 neurologic toxicities. Twenty-three patients were enrolled. There were no DLTs at dose level 1 (400 mg per day) or dose level 2 (400 mg twice per day). An expansion cohort of 17 patients was treated at dose level 2. There were six grade 3 toxicities: hypertension (n = 2), rash (n = 1), lymphopenia (n = 1), hypokalemia (n = 1), fatigue (n = 1) and hand-foot syndrome (n = 1). All of these were attributable to sorafenib and not to the combination with SRS. The median time to CNS progression was 10 months, 1 year CNS progression-free survival was 46%, the median overall survival was 11.6 months and the 1 year overall survival was 46%. The use of sorafenib concurrent with SRS for the treatment of 1-4 brain metastases is safe and well tolerated at 400 mg twice a day. Our recommended phase II dose of concurrent sorafenib with SRS would be 400 mg twice daily.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias Encefálicas , Niacinamida/análogos & derivados , Compostos de Fenilureia/uso terapêutico , Radiocirurgia/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias Encefálicas/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Encefálicas/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Encefálicas/secundário , Neoplasias Encefálicas/cirurgia , Estudos de Coortes , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Niacinamida/uso terapêutico , Sorafenibe
15.
Radiat Oncol ; 12(1): 13, 2017 Jan 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28086954

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Planning and delivery of IMRT for locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) can be performed using sequential boost or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Whether these techniques differ in treatment-related outcomes including survival and acute and late toxicities remain largely unexplored. METHODS: We performed a single institutional retrospective matched cohort analysis on patients with LAHNC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy to 69.3 Gy in 33 fractions. Treatment was delivered via sequential boost (n = 68) or SIB (n = 141). Contours, plan evaluation, and toxicity assessment were performed by a single experienced physician. Toxicities were graded weekly during treatment and at 3-month follow up intervals. Recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were estimated via Kaplan-Meier statistical method. RESULTS: At 4 years, the estimated overall survival was 69.3% in the sequential boost cohort and 76.8% in the SIB cohort (p = 0.13). Disease-free survival was 63 and 69% respectively (p = 0.27). There were no significant differences in local, regional or distant recurrence-free survival. There were no significant differences in weight loss (p = 0.291), gastrostomy tube placement (p = 0.494), or duration of gastrostomy tube dependence (p = 0.465). Rates of acute grade 3 or 4 dysphagia (82% vs 55%) and dermatitis (78% vs 58%) were significantly higher in the SIB group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.012 respectively). Moreover, a greater percentage of the SIB cohort did not receive the prescribed dose due to acute toxicity (7% versus 0, p = 0.028). CONCLUSIONS: There were no differences in disease related outcomes between the two treatment delivery approaches. A higher rate of grade 3 and 4 radiation dermatitis and dysphagia were observed in the SIB group, however this did not translate into differences in late toxicity. Additional investigation is necessary to further evaluate the acute toxicity differences.


Assuntos
Quimiorradioterapia/métodos , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/radioterapia , Radioterapia de Intensidade Modulada/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/mortalidade , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dosagem Radioterapêutica , Planejamento da Radioterapia Assistida por Computador , Radioterapia de Intensidade Modulada/efeitos adversos , Estudos Retrospectivos
16.
J Clin Oncol ; 35(5): 490-497, 2017 Feb 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28029303

RESUMO

Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is treatment-responsive. Definitive chemoradiation results in high cure rates but causes long-term toxicity and may represent overtreatment of some patients. This phase II trial evaluated whether complete clinical response (cCR) to induction chemotherapy (IC) could select patients with HPV-associated OPSCC for reduced radiation dose as a means of sparing late sequelae. Methods Patients with HPV16 and/or p16-positive, stage III-IV OPSCC received three cycles of IC with cisplatin, paclitaxel, and cetuximab. Patients with primary-site cCR to IC received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) 54 Gy with weekly cetuximab; those with less than cCR to IC at the primary site or nodes received 69.3 Gy and cetuximab to those regions. The primary end point was 2-year progression-free survival. Results Of the 90 patients enrolled, 80 were evaluable. Their median age was 57 years (range, 35 to 73 years), with the majority having stage T1-3N0-N2b OPSCC and a history of ≤ 10 pack-years of cigarette smoking. Three cycles of IC were delivered to 77 of the 80 patients. Fifty-six patients (70%) achieved a primary-site cCR to IC and 51 patients continued to cetuximab with IMRT 54 Gy. After median follow-up of 35.4 months, 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 80% and 94%, respectively, for patients with primary-site cCR treated with 54 Gy of radiation (n = 51); 96% and 96%, respectively, for patients with < T4, < N2c, and ≤ 10 pack-year smoking history who were treated with ≤ 54 Gy of radiation (n = 27). At 12 months, significantly fewer patients treated with a radiation dose ≤ 54 Gy had difficulty swallowing solids (40% v 89%; P = .011) or had impaired nutrition (10% v 44%; P = .025). Conclusion For IC responders, reduced-dose IMRT with concurrent cetuximab is worthy of further study in favorable-risk patients with HPV-associated OPSCC. Radiation dose reduction resulted in significantly improved swallowing and nutritional status.


Assuntos
Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapêutico , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/terapia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/terapia , Dosagem Radioterapêutica , Adulto , Idoso , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/complicações , Cetuximab/administração & dosagem , Quimiorradioterapia/efeitos adversos , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Esquema de Medicação , Exantema/etiologia , Feminino , Papillomavirus Humano 16/fisiologia , Humanos , Quimioterapia de Indução/métodos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neutropenia/etiologia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/complicações , Infecções por Papillomavirus/complicações , Infecções por Papillomavirus/virologia , Indução de Remissão
17.
Cancer ; 122(22): 3464-3471, 2016 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27419843

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prospective quality metrics for neck dissection have not been established for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between lymph node counts from neck dissection, local-regional recurrence, and overall survival. METHODS: The number of lymph nodes counted from neck dissection in patients treated in 2 NRG Oncology trials (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] 9501 and RTOG 0234) was evaluated for its prognostic impact on overall survival with a multivariate Cox model adjusted for demographic, tumor, and lymph node data and stratified by the postoperative treatment group. RESULTS: Five hundred seventy-two patients were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8 years. Ninety-eight percent of the patients were pathologically N+. The median numbers of lymph nodes recorded on the left and right sides were 24 and 25, respectively. The identification of fewer than 18 nodes was associated with worse overall survival in comparison with 18 or more nodes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.74; P = .007). The difference appeared to be driven by local-regional failure (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02-2.08; P = .04) but not by distant metastases (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.77-1.53; P = .65). When the analysis was limited to NRG Oncology RTOG 0234 patients, adding the p16 status to the model did not affect the HR for dissected nodes, and the effect of nodes did not differ with the p16 status. CONCLUSIONS: The removal and identification of 18 or more lymph nodes was associated with improved overall survival and lower rates of local-regional failure, and this should be further evaluated as a measure of quality in neck dissections for mucosal squamous cell carcinoma. Cancer 2016;122:3464-71. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

18.
J Palliat Med ; 19(9): 949-56, 2016 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27227341

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Tumor/treatment-related internal lymphedema (IL) and/or external lymphedema (EL) are associated with functional deficits and increased symptom burden in head and neck cancer patients (HNCP). Previously, we noted association between EL/IL and patient-reported dysphagia using the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey (VHNSS) version 1.0. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between IL/EL and subjective and objective measures of swallowing function. METHODS: Eighty-one HNCP completed: (1) VHNSS version 2.0, including 13 swallowing/nutrition-related questions grouped into three clusters: swallow solids (ss), swallow liquids (sl), and nutrition(nt); (2) physical assessment of EL using Foldi scale; (3) endoscopic assessment of IL using Patterson scale (n = 56); and (4) modified barium swallow study rated by dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) and in conjunction with a swallow evaluation by National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS). Examinations were performed at varied time points to assess lymphedema spectrum, from baseline (n = 15, 18.1%) to 18 months post-therapy (n = 20, 24.1%). RESULTS: VHNSS swallow/nutrition items scores correlated with NOMS/DOSS ratings (p < 0.001). Highest correlation was with NOMS: ss (-0.73); sl (-0.61); nt (-0.56). VHNSS swallow/nutrition scores correlated with maximum grade of swelling for any single structure on Patterson scale: ss (0.43; p = 0.001); sl (0.38; p = 0.004); nt (0.41; p = 0.002). IL of aryepiglottic/pharyngoepiglottic folds, epiglottis, and pyriform sinus were most strongly correlated with VHNSS and NOMS ratings. NOMS/DOSS ratings correlated with EL (> = -0.34; p < 0.01). No meaningful correlations exist between VHNSS swallow/nutrition items and EL (< ± 0.15, p > 0.20). CONCLUSIONS: IL correlated with subjective and objective measures of swallow dysfunction. Longitudinal analysis of trajectory and impact of IL/EL on dysphagia is ongoing.


Assuntos
Linfedema , Transtornos de Deglutição , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Humanos , Laringe , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 37(3): 255-8, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27178519

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate radiographic tumor control and treatment-related toxicity in glomus jugulare tumors treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. SETTING: Tertiary academic referral center. PATIENTS: Glomus jugulare tumors treated with SRS between 1998 and 2014 were identified. The data analysis only included patients with at least 18months of post-treatment follow up (FU). INTERVENTION: Patients were treated with either single fraction or fractionated SRS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Patient demographics and tumor characteristics were assessed. Radiographic control was determined by comparing pre and post treatment MRI, and was categorized as no change, regression, or progression. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were treated with SRS, and 14 met inclusion criteria. Median age at treatment was 55years (range 35-79), and 71.4% of patients were female. 5 patients (35.7%) received single fraction SRS (dose range 15-18Gy), and 9 (64.3%) fractionated therapy (dose 3-7Gy×3-15 fractions). Median tumor volume was 3.78cm(3) (range 1.15-30.6). Median FU was 28.8months (range 18.6-56.1), with a mean of 31.7months. At their last recorded MRI, 7 patients (50%) had tumor stability, 6 (42.9%) had improvement, and 1 (7.1%) had progression. Disease improvement and progression rates in the single fraction group were 40% and 0%, and in the multiple-fraction group, 44.4% and 11.1%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in disease improvement (p=0.88) or progression (p=0.48) rates between groups (unpaired t-test). CONCLUSIONS: At a median follow up of 28months, both single fraction and fractionated SRS appear to have comparable radiographic tumor control outcomes and toxicity profiles.


Assuntos
Tumor do Glomo Jugular/diagnóstico por imagem , Tumor do Glomo Jugular/terapia , Radiocirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Fracionamento da Dose de Radiação , Feminino , Tumor do Glomo Jugular/patologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Radiografia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 13(7): 847-55; quiz 856, 2015 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26150579

RESUMO

These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the 2015 NCCN Guidelines for Head and Neck (H&N) Cancers. These Insights describe the different types of particle therapy that may be used to treat H&N cancers, in contrast to traditional radiation therapy (RT) with photons (x-ray). Research is ongoing regarding the different types of particle therapy, including protons and carbon ions, with the goals of reducing the long-term side effects from RT and improving the therapeutic index. For the 2015 update, the NCCN H&N Cancers Panel agreed to delete recommendations for neutron therapy for salivary gland cancers, because of its limited availability, which has decreased over the past 2 decades; the small number of patients in the United States who currently receive this treatment; and concerns that the toxicity of neutron therapy may offset potential disease control advantages.


Assuntos
Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/radioterapia , Carbono/uso terapêutico , Guias como Assunto , Radioterapia com Íons Pesados/métodos , Humanos , Terapia por Captura de Nêutron/métodos , Terapia com Prótons/métodos
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