Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 49
Filtrar
2.
J Cutan Pathol ; 2021 Feb 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33576022

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Novel solutions are needed for expediting margin assessment to guide BCC surgeries. Ex-vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) is starting to be used in freshly-excised surgical specimens to examine BCC margins in real-time. Training and educational process are needed for this novel technology to be implemented into clinic. OBJECTIVE: To test a training and reading process, and measure diagnostic accuracy of clinicians with varying expertise level in reading ex-vivo FCM images. METHODS: An international 3-center study was designed for training and reading to assess BCC surgical margins and residual subtypes. Each center included a lead dermatologic/Mohs surgeon (clinical developer of FCM), and 3 additional readers (dermatologist, dermatopathologist, dermatologic/Mohs surgeon), who use confocal in clinical practice. Testing was conducted on 30 samples. RESULTS: Overall, the readers achieved 90% average sensitivity, 78% average specificity in detecting residual BCC margins, showing high and consistent diagnostic reading accuracy. Those with expertise in dermatologic surgery and dermatopathology showed the strongest potential for learning to assess FCM images. LIMITATIONS: Small dataset, variability in mosaic quality between centers. CONCLUSION: Suggested process is feasible and effective. This process is proposed for wider implementation, to facilitate wider adoption of FCM to potentially expedite BCC margin assessment to guide surgery in real-time. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

3.
Dermatol Surg ; 2021 Feb 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625139

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) poses treatment challenges. Invasive and noninvasive treatment modalities exist with variable success reported. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is emerging as an adjuvant diagnostic tool. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the treatment of EMPD patients and the role of RCM. METHODS: Prospective study. Demographic and tumor characteristics were recorded. Handheld-RCM was performed and correlated with histology. Treatment, clearance, pathology, and follow-up were all recorded. RESULTS: Thirty-six EMPD lesions in 33 patients were included. Mean age was 71.7 years, and 23 were men. Mean number of surgical stages needed to clear margins was 1.9 (SD, 0.9; 1.0-3.0 stages), and mean margin needed to clear was 1.8 cm. Reflectance confocal microscopy correlated well with scouting punch biopsies (kappa, 0.93; p < .001). Disruption of the dermoepidermal junction was associated with invasive EMPD versus in situ (83.3% vs 25.9%) on histology (p = .01). LIMITATIONS: Relatively small sample size. CONCLUSION: Extramammary Paget disease is challenging, and lesion demarcation is of the utmost importance. Using a staged surgical excision approach, the mean margins needed were 1.8 cm, less than previously reported. Nonsurgical modalities, including radiation therapy, imiquimod, or photodynamic therapy can be considered if surgery is not pursued. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a valuable noninvasive imaging modality for the management of EMPD.

4.
J Biophotonics ; : e202000207, 2020 Dec 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33314673

RESUMO

We investigated the utility of the fluorescent dye Deep Red Anthraquinone 5 (DRAQ5) for digital staining of optically sectioned skin in comparison to acridine orange (AO). Eight fresh-frozen thawed Mohs discard tissue specimens were stained with AO and DRAQ5, and imaged using an ex vivo confocal microscope at three wavelengths (488 nm and 638 nm for fluorescence, 785 nm for reflectance). Images were overlaid (AO + Reflectance, DRAQ5 + Reflectance), digitally stained, and evaluated by three investigators for perceived image quality (PIQ) and histopathological feature identification. In addition to nuclear staining, AO seemed to stain dermal fibers in a subset of cases in digitally stained images, while DRAQ5 staining was more specific to nuclei. Blinded evaluation showed substantial agreement, favoring DRAQ5 for PIQ (82%, Cl 75%-90%, Gwet's AC 0.74) and for visualization of histopathological features in (81%, Cl 73%-89%, Gwet's AC 0.67), supporting its use in digital staining of multimodal confocal micrographs of skin.

6.
J Cutan Pathol ; 2020 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32989842

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Accurate basal cell carcinoma (BCC) subtyping is requisite for appropriate management, but non-representative sampling occurs in 18% to 25% of biopsies. By enabling non-invasive diagnosis and more comprehensive sampling, integrated reflectance confocal microscopy-optical coherence tomography (RCM-OCT) may improve the accuracy of BCC subtyping and subsequent management. We evaluated RCM-OCT images and histopathology slides for the presence of two key features, angulation and small nests and cords, and calculated (a) sensitivity and specificity of these features, combined and individually, for identifying an infiltrative BCC subtype and (b) agreement across modalities. METHODS: Thirty-three RCM-OCT-imaged, histopathologically-proven BCCs (17 superficial and/or nodular; 16 containing an infiltrative component) were evaluated. RESULTS: The presence of angulation or small nests and cords was sufficient to identify infiltrative BCC on RCM-OCT with 100% sensitivity and 82% specificity, similar to histopathology (100% sensitivity, 88% specificity, kappa = 0.82). When both features were present, the sensitivity for identifying infiltrative BCC was 100% using either modality and specificity was 88% on RCM-OCT vs 94% on histopathology, indicating near-perfect agreement between non-invasive and invasive diagnostic modalities (kappa = 0.94). CONCLUSIONS: RCM-OCT can non-invasively identify key histopathologic features of infiltrative BCC offering a possible alternative to traditional invasive biopsy.

7.
J Cancer ; 11(20): 6019-6024, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32922542

RESUMO

The increasing rate of incidence and prevalence of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) worldwide, combined with the morbidity associated with conventional surgical treatment has led to the development and use of alternative minimally invasive non-surgical treatments. Biopsy and pathology are used to guide BCC diagnosis and assess margins and subtypes, which then guide the decision and choice of surgical or non-surgical treatment. However, alternatively, a noninvasive optical approach based on combined reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging may be used. Optical imaging may be used to guide diagnosis and margin assessment at the bedside, and potentially facilitate non-surgical management, along with long-term monitoring of treatment response. Noninvasive imaging may also complement minimally invasive treatments and help further reduce morbidity. In this paper, we highlight the current state of an integrated RCM/OCT imaging approach for diagnosis and triage of BCCs, as well as for assessing margins, which therefore may be ultimately used for guiding therapy.

8.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 2020 Aug 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32844312

RESUMO

Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) are two noninvasive, optical imaging tools used to facilitate clinical diagnosis. A biopsy technique that produces exact correlation with optical imaging features is not previously reported. To evaluate the applications of a novel feature-focused 'precision biopsy' technique that correlates clinical-dermoscopy-RCM findings with histopathology. This was a prospective case-series performed during August 2017 and June 2019 at a tertiary care cancer. We included consecutive patients requiring a precise dermoscopy-RCM-histopathologic correlation. We performed prebiopsy dermoscopy and both wide probe and handheld RCM of suspicious lesions. Features of interest were isolated with the aid of paper rings and a 2 mm punch biopsy was performed in the dermoscopy- or RCM-highlighted area. Tissue was processed either en face or with vertical sections. One-to-one correlation with histopathology was obtained. Twenty-three patients with 24 lesions were included in the study. The mean age was 64.6 years (range 22-91 years); there were 16 (69.6%) males, 14 (58.3%) lesions biopsied were on head and neck region. We achieved tissue-conservation diagnosis in 100% (24/24), 13 (54.2%) were clinically equivocal lesions, six (25%) were selected for 'feature correlation' of structures on dermoscopy or RCM, and five (20.8%) for 'correlation of new/unknown' RCM features seen on follow-up. The precision biopsy technique described herein is a novel method that facilitates direct histopathological correlation of dermoscopy and RCM features. With the aids of optical imaging devices, accurate diagnosis may be achieved by minimally invasive tissue extraction.

9.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 2020 Aug 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32827607

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy (RT) is a treatment option for selected skin cancers. The histologic effects of RT on normal skin or skin cancers are not well-characterized. Dermoscopy, high frequency ultrasonography (HFUS), and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) are non-invasive imaging modalities that may help characterize RT response. OBJECTIVES: To describe changes in the tumor and surrounding skin of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients treated with RT. METHODS: The study was conducted between 2014-2018. Patients with biopsy-proven BCCs were treated with 42 Gy in 6 fractions using a commercially available brachytherapy device. Dermoscopy, HFUS, RCM were performed before treatment, 6 weeks, 3 months and 12 months after RT. RESULTS: 137 imaging assessments (RCM + dermoscopy + HFUS) were performed in 12 patients. Presence of BCC-specific features were present in 81.8%, 91% and 17% of patients imaged with dermoscopy, RCM and HFUS at baseline, prior to treatment. After treatment, resolution of these features was noted in 33.4%, 91.7%, and 100% of patients imaged with the respective modalities. No recurrences were seen after 31.7 months mean follow-up. LIMITATIONS: Small sample size and no histopathological correlation. CONCLUSION: Dermoscopy and HFUS were not as reliable as RCM at characterizing BCCs RT response.

10.
JAMA Dermatol ; 156(8): 882-890, 2020 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32459294

RESUMO

Importance: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. Dermoscopic imaging has improved diagnostic accuracy; however, diagnosis of nonpigmented BCC remains limited to arborizing vessels, ulceration, and shiny white structures. Objective: To assess multiple aggregated yellow-white (MAY) globules as a diagnostic feature for BCC. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective, single-center, case-control study, nonpigmented skin tumors, determined clinically, were identified from a database of lesions consecutively biopsied during a 7-year period (January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2015). A subset of tumors was prospectively diagnosed, and reflectance confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and histopathologic correlation were performed. Data analysis was conducted from July 1 to September 31, 2019. Exposures: Investigators evaluated for the presence or absence of known dermoscopic criteria. MAY globules were defined as aggregated, white-yellow structures visualized in polarized and nonpolarized light. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was the diagnostic accuracy of MAY globules for the diagnosis of BCC. Secondary objectives included the association with BCC location and subtype. Interrater agreement was estimated. Results: A total of 656 nonpigmented lesions from 643 patients (mean [SD] age, 63.1 [14.9] years; 381 [58.1%] male) were included. In all, 194 lesions (29.6%) were located on the head and neck. A total of 291 (44.4%) were BCCs. MAY globules were seen in 61 of 291 BCC cases (21.0%) and in 3 of 365 other diagnoses (0.8%) (P < .001). The odds ratio for diagnosis of BCC was 32.0 (96% CI, 9.9-103.2). The presence of MAY globules was associated with a diagnosis of histologic high-risk BCC (odds ratio, 6.5; 95% CI, 3.1-14.3). The structure was never seen in cases of superficial BCCs. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings suggest that MAY globules may have utility as a new BCC dermoscopic criterion with a high specificity. MAY globules were negatively associated with superficial BCC and positively associated with deeper-seated, histologic, higher-grade tumor subtypes.

11.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 2020 Feb 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32020324

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Recently, a combined reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM)-optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been tested for the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Evaluating the role of RCM-OCT in management of complex BCCs has not been studied. The objective of the study was to investigate the utility of a new combined RCM-OCT device in the evaluation and management of complex BCCs in a descriptive study. METHODS: Prospective study of consecutive cases (July 2018-June 2019) of biopsy-proven 'complex' BCC defined as BCC in the head-and-neck area with multiple high-risk criteria such as large size in the mask area, multiple recurrences, and high-risk subtype. All cases were evaluated with a combined RCM-OCT device that provided simultaneous image viewing on a screen. Lesions were evaluated bedside with RCM-OCT according to previously described criteria. RESULTS: Ten patients with complex head-and-neck BCCs had mean age of 73.1 ± 13.0 years. Six (60%) patients were males. Mean BCC clinical size was 1.9 ± 1.2 cm (range 0.6-4.0 cm). RCM detected residual BCC in 8 out of 10 cases (80%) and OCT detected residual BCC in all 10 cases (100%). Six BCCs (60%) had a depth estimate of > 1000 µm under OCT. In five cases, (50%) RCM-OCT imaging results led to a change/modification in BCC management. CONCLUSION: The use of a combined RCM-OCT device may help in the evaluation of complex head-and-neck BCCs by guiding treatment selection and defining the extent of surgery.

15.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 82(4): 962-968, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31634517

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Initial biopsy of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) may fail to show aggressive histologic subtypes. Additionality, the clinical evaluation of BCC before surgery can miss subclinical extension. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are emerging tools that can help in the presurgical evaluation of BCCs. OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of a combined RCM-OCT imaging modality for presurgical evaluation of biopsy-proven BCCs for residual tumor, margin status, and depth. METHODS: Thirty-eight BCCs in 35 patients referred to a tertiary cancer center for Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) were imaged with combined RCM-OCT. Images were correlated to MMS frozen sections. RESULTS: Thirty-eight BCCs were analyzed. The mean age of patients was 67.34 years (range, 36-84 years), and 20 patients were female (57.14%). Twenty four BCCs were located on the head (63.16%) , and the mean size was 8.58 mm (range, 3-30 mm). RCM-OCT showed an overall agreement of 91.1% with MMS frozen sections. A sensitivity of 82.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 69%-92%), specificity of 93.8% (95% CI, 88%-97%), and receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.94) was found. OCT depth was highly correlated with MMS depth (r2 = 0.9). LIMITATIONS: Small sample size and difficulty evaluating certain challenging anatomic sites. CONCLUSIONS: Combined RCM-OCT may emerge as a useful tool for presurgical evaluation of BCCs.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Basocelular/diagnóstico , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios/métodos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico , Pele/diagnóstico por imagem , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Biópsia , Carcinoma Basocelular/patologia , Carcinoma Basocelular/cirurgia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Margens de Excisão , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cirurgia de Mohs , Imagem Multimodal/métodos , Neoplasia Residual , Estudos Prospectivos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Pele/patologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/patologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/cirurgia , Tomografia de Coerência Óptica
16.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(4): 1057-1063, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31202873

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows accurate, noninvasive, in vivo diagnosis for skin cancer. However, its impact on physicians' diagnostic confidence and management is unknown. OBJECTIVES: We sought to assess the physicians' diagnostic confidence and management before and after RCM of equivocal skin lesions. METHODS: Prospective, 2-center, observational study. During clinical practice, 7 dermatologists recorded their diagnostic confidence level (measured in a scale from 0 to 10), diagnosis, and management before and after RCM of clinically/dermoscopically equivocal lesions that raised concern for skin cancer. We also evaluated the diagnostic accuracy before and after RCM. RESULTS: We included 272 consecutive lesions from 226 individuals (mean age, 53.5 years). Diagnostic confidence increased from 6.2 to 8.1 after RCM (P < .001) when RCM confirmed or changed the diagnosis. Lesion management changed in 33.5% cases after RCM (to observation in 51 cases and to biopsy/excision in 31 cases). After RCM, the number needed to excise was 1.2. Sensitivity for malignancy before and after RCM was 78.2% and 85.1%, respectively. Specificity before and after RCM was 78.8% and 80%, respectively. LIMITATIONS: Small sample size, real-life environment, and different levels of expertise among RCM users. CONCLUSION: Physicians' diagnostic confidence and accuracy increased after RCM when evaluating equivocal tumors, frequently resulting in management changes while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy.

17.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 2019 Dec 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31812621

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lentigo maligna/lentigo maligna melanoma (LM/LMM) can present with subclinical extension that may be difficult to define preoperatively and lead to incomplete excision and potential recurrence. Preliminarily studies have used reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) to assess LM/LMM margins. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation of LM/LMM subclinical extension defined by RCM compared to the gold standard histopathology. METHODS: Prospective study of LM/LMM patients referred for dermatologic surgery. RCM was performed at the clinically-defined initial surgical margin followed by margin-controlled staged excision with paraffin-embedded tissue and histopathology was correlated with RCM results. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients were included. Mean age was 66.8 years (SD 11.1; 38 - 89 years); 69.4% were males. 70/72 (97.2%) lesions were located on the head neck with mean largest clinical diameter of 1.3cm (0.3 - 5 cm). Diagnostic accuracy for detection of residual melanoma in the tumor debulk (after biopsy) had a sensitivity of 96.7% and a specificity of 66.7% when compared to the histopathology. RCM margin assessment revealed an overall agreement with final histopathology of 85.9% (kappa 0.71; p<0.001). LIMITATIONS: No RCM imaging beyond initial planned margins was performed. CONCLUSION: RCM showed moderate to excellent overall agreement between RCM imaging of LM/LMM and histopathology of staged excision margins.

18.
Cancer Med ; 8(12): 5673-5686, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31369215

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Targeted therapies are based on specific gene alterations. Various specimen types have been used to determine gene alterations, however, no systemic comparisons have yet been made. Herein, we assessed alterations in selected cancer-associated genes across varying sample sites in lung cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Targeted deep sequencing for 48 tumor-related genes was applied to 153 samples from 55 lung cancer patients obtained from six sources: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues, pleural effusion supernatant (PES) and pleural effusion cell sediments (PEC), white blood cells (WBCs), oral epithelial cells (OECs), and plasma. RESULTS: Mutations were detected in 96% (53/55) of the patients and in 83% (40/48) of the selected genes. Each sample type exhibited a characteristic mutational pattern. As anticipated, TP53 was the most affected sequence (54.5% patients), however this was followed by NOTCH1 (36%, across all sample types). EGFR was altered in patient samples at a frequency of 32.7% and KRAS 10.9%. This high EGFR/ low KRAS frequency is in accordance with other TCGA cohorts of Asian origin but differs from the Caucasian population where KRAS is the more dominant mutation. Additionally, 66% (31/47) of PEC samples had copy number variants (CNVs) in at least one gene. Unlike the concurrent loss and gain in most genes, herein NOTCH1 loss was identified in 21% patients, with no gain observed. Based on the relative prevalence of mutations and CNVs, we divided lung cancer patients into SNV-dominated, CNV-dominated, and codominated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm previous reports that EGFR mutations are more prevalent than KRAS in Chinese lung cancer patients. NOTCH1 gene alterations are more common than previously reported and reveals a role of NOTCH1 modifications in tumor metastasis. Furthermore, genetic material from malignant pleural effusion cell sediments may be a noninvasive manner to identify CNV and participate in treatment decisions.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/genética , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Receptor Notch1/genética , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA , Humanos , Mutação , Taxa de Mutação , Metástase Neoplásica , Análise de Sequência de DNA
19.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 81(4): 984-988, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31202871

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) treatment modalities can be stratified by tumor subtype and recurrence risk. The main limitation of nonsurgical treatment modalities is the lack of histopathologic confirmation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging device that provides quasihistologic images. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of RCM-guided carbon dioxide (CO2) laser ablation of low-risk BCCs. METHODS: Prospective study with biopsy specimen-proven low-risk BCCs imaged with RCM. RCM was performed on these sites before and after ablation. If residual tumor was found, a new series of laser passes were performed. The patients were then monitored for recurrence clinically and with RCM. RESULTS: Twenty-two tumor sites in 9 patients (5 men, 4 women) were imaged and treated. Median age was 59 ± 12.9 years (range, 30-74 years). Mean tumor size was 7.7 mm (range, 5-10 mm). Residual tumor was identified in 5 of 22 cases (22.7%) under RCM on immediate first-pass postablation sites, prompting additional laser passes. Median follow-up was 28.5 months (range, 22-32 months) with no recurrences found. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of RCM to laser ablation workflow can detect subclinical persistent tumor after initial ablation and may serve as an aid to increase the efficacy of laser ablation.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Basocelular/cirurgia , Terapia a Laser/métodos , Lasers de Gás/uso terapêutico , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Cutâneas/cirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Biópsia , Carcinoma Basocelular/diagnóstico por imagem , Carcinoma Basocelular/patologia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Terapia a Laser/instrumentação , Masculino , Microscopia Confocal , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/prevenção & controle , Neoplasia Residual , Estudos Prospectivos , Medição de Risco , Pele/diagnóstico por imagem , Pele/patologia , Pele/efeitos da radiação , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Cutâneas/patologia , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 81(2): 417-426, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31227277

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Biopsy specimens from patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) can present to surgery with no clinically residual tumor, complicating treatment decisions. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) for the assessment of residual BCC following biopsy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with biopsy-proven BCC and no clinical evidence of residual tumor who had been referred for Mohs micrographic surgery were included. Biopsy sites were imaged with a handheld RCM device. On the basis of RCM evaluation, cases were labeled RCM positive or RCM negative. Mohs micrographic surgery was performed in all cases; margins and 15-µm serial vertical sectioning were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 61 patients were included (mean age, 61.7 years [standard deviation, 12.2 years]; range, 37-87 years); 60.7% were women. The mean lesion size was 5.1 mm (range, 3-12 mm); 73.8% of patients were positive on RCM, and 68.9% had residual BCC on histopathologic examination. The rates of RCM sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 92.8%, 68.4%, 86.6%, and 81.2%, respectively. Three cases of BCC (high-risk, infiltrative, and basosquamous) were missed with use of RCM. When high-risk subtypes were excluded (n = 5), sensitivity and negative predictive value were both 100%. LIMITATIONS: RCM can miss deep-seated residual tumor. CONCLUSION: RCM is a valuable tool for the evaluation of residual BCC following biopsy, with the potential to reduce unnecessary surgical procedures.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Basocelular/diagnóstico por imagem , Carcinoma Basocelular/patologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Cutâneas/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Biópsia , Carcinoma Basocelular/cirurgia , Dermoscopia , Reações Falso-Negativas , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Microscopia Confocal/métodos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cirurgia de Mohs , Neoplasia Residual , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Estudos Prospectivos , Pele/patologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/cirurgia , Carga Tumoral
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA