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1.
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis ; 16: 1477-1496, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34103907

RESUMO

Purpose: Quantitative computed tomography (qCT) imaging-based cluster analysis identified clinically meaningful COPD former-smoker subgroups (clusters) based on cross-sectional data. We aimed to identify progression clusters for former smokers using longitudinal data. Patients and Methods: We selected 472 former smokers from SPIROMICS with a baseline visit and a one-year follow-up visit. A total of 150 qCT imaging-based variables, comprising 75 variables at baseline and their corresponding progression rates, were derived from the respective inspiration and expiration scans of the two visits. The COPD progression clusters identified were then associated with subject demography, clinical variables and biomarkers. Results: COPD severities at baseline increased with increasing cluster number. Cluster 1 patients were an obese subgroup with rapid progression of functional small airway disease percentage (fSAD%) and emphysema percentage (Emph%). Cluster 2 exhibited a decrease of fSAD% and Emph%, an increase of tissue fraction at total lung capacity and airway narrowing over one year. Cluster 3 showed rapid expansion of Emph% and an attenuation of fSAD%. Cluster 4 demonstrated severe emphysema and fSAD and significant structural alterations at baseline with rapid progression of fSAD% over one year. Subjects with different progression patterns in the same cross-sectional cluster were identified by longitudinal clustering. Conclusion: qCT imaging-based metrics at two visits for former smokers allow for the derivation of four statistically stable clusters associated with unique progression patterns and clinical characteristics. Use of baseline variables and their progression rates enables identification of longitudinal clusters, resulting in a refinement of cross-sectional clusters.

2.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(10): e020361, 2021 May 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33955229

RESUMO

Background Intensive systolic blood pressure treatment (<120 mm Hg) in SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) improved survival compared with standard treatment (<140 mm Hg) over a median follow-up of 3.3 years. We projected life expectancy after observed follow-up in SPRINT using SPRINT-eligible participants in the NHLBI-PCS (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Pooled Cohorts Study). Methods and Results We used propensity scores to weight SPRINT-eligible NHLBI-PCS participants to resemble SPRINT participants. In SPRINT participants, we estimated in-trial survival (<4 years) using a time-based flexible parametric survival model. In SPRINT-eligible NHLBI-PCS participants, we estimated posttrial survival (≥4 years) using an age-based flexible parametric survival model and applied the formula to SPRINT participants to predict posttrial survival. We projected overall life expectancy for each SPRINT participant and compared it to parametric regression (eg, Gompertz) projections based on SPRINT data alone. We included 8584 SPRINT and 10 593 SPRINT-eligible NHLBI-PCS participants. After propensity weighting, mean (SD) age was 67.9 (9.4) and 68.2 (8.8) years, and 35.5% and 37.6% were women in SPRINT and NHLBI-PCS, respectively. Using the NHLBI-PCS-based method, projected mean life expectancy from randomization was 21.0 (7.4) years with intensive and 19.1 (7.2) years with standard treatment. Using the Gompertz regression, life expectancy was 11.2 (2.3) years with intensive and 10.5 (2.2) years with standard treatment. Conclusions Combining SPRINT and NHLBI-PCS observed data likely offers a more realistic estimate of life expectancy than parametrically extrapolating SPRINT data alone. These results offer insight into the potential long-term effectiveness of intensive SBP goals.

3.
Circulation ; 143(20): e963-e978, 2021 May 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33853363

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In 2007, the American Heart Association published updated evidence-based guidelines on the recommended use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent viridans group streptococcal (VGS) infective endocarditis (IE) in cardiac patients undergoing invasive procedures. The 2007 guidelines significantly scaled back the underlying conditions for which antibiotic prophylaxis was recommended, leaving only 4 categories thought to confer the highest risk of adverse outcome. The purpose of this update is to examine interval evidence of the acceptance and impact of the 2007 recommendations on VGS IE and, if needed, to make revisions based on this evidence. METHODS AND RESULTS: A writing group was formed consisting of experts in prevention and treatment of infective endocarditis including members of the American Dental Association, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, in addition to the American Heart Association. MEDLINE database searches were done for English language articles on compliance with the recommendations in the 2007 guidelines and the frequency of and morbidity or mortality from VGS IE after publication of the 2007 guidelines. Overall, there was good general awareness of the 2007 guidelines but variable compliance with recommendations. There was no convincing evidence that VGS IE frequency, morbidity, or mortality has increased since 2007. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of a review of the available evidence, there are no recommended changes to the 2007 VGS IE prevention guidelines. We continue to recommend VGS IE prophylaxis only for categories of patients at highest risk for adverse outcome while emphasizing the critical role of good oral health and regular access to dental care for all. Randomized controlled studies to determine whether antibiotic prophylaxis is effective against VGS IE are needed to further refine recommendations.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33829714

RESUMO

Introduction: Age and vitamin D levels may affect symptom burden in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We used the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study (SPIROMICS) to determine independent associations between vitamin D levels and COPD symptoms in different age strata. Methods: Serum 25-hydroxy(OH)-vitamin D levels were modeled continuously and categorically (<20 ng/ml vs. ≥20 ng/ml). Stratifying by age group (middle-age: 40-64 years old and older: >65 years old), multivariable modeling was performed to identify relationships between 25-OH-vitamin D levels and COPD Assessment Test (CAT), modified Medical Research Council score (mMRC), St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total and subdomain scores, Veterans' Specific Activity Questionnaire, and six-minute walk test distance. Results: In the middle-aged group, each 5 ng/ml higher 25-OH-vitamin D level was independently associated with more favorable CAT score [-0.35 (-0.67 to -0.03), P=0.03], total SGRQ [-0.91 (-1.65 to -0.17); P=0.02], and the SGRQ subdomains [Symptoms:-1.07 (-1.96 to -0.18), P=0.02; Impact: -0.77 (-1.53 to -0.003), P=0.049; Activity: -1.07 (-1.96 to -0.18), P=0.02]. These associations persisted after addition of comorbidity score, reported vitamin D supplementation, outdoor time, or season of blood draw to models. No associations were observed between 25-OH-vitamin D levels and symptom scores in the older age group. Discussion: When controlled for clinically relevant covariates, higher 25-OH-vitamin D levels are associated with more favorable respiratory-specific symptoms and quality-of-life assessments in middle-age but not older COPD individuals. Study of the role of vitamin D supplementation in the symptom burden of younger COPD patients is needed.

5.
Genome Med ; 13(1): 66, 2021 04 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33883027

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The large airway epithelial barrier provides one of the first lines of defense against respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19. Substantial inter-individual variability in individual disease courses is hypothesized to be partially mediated by the differential regulation of the genes that interact with the SARS-CoV-2 virus or are involved in the subsequent host response. Here, we comprehensively investigated non-genetic and genetic factors influencing COVID-19-relevant bronchial epithelial gene expression. METHODS: We analyzed RNA-sequencing data from bronchial epithelial brushings obtained from uninfected individuals. We related ACE2 gene expression to host and environmental factors in the SPIROMICS cohort of smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and replicated these associations in two asthma cohorts, SARP and MAST. To identify airway biology beyond ACE2 binding that may contribute to increased susceptibility, we used gene set enrichment analyses to determine if gene expression changes indicative of a suppressed airway immune response observed early in SARS-CoV-2 infection are also observed in association with host factors. To identify host genetic variants affecting COVID-19 susceptibility in SPIROMICS, we performed expression quantitative trait (eQTL) mapping and investigated the phenotypic associations of the eQTL variants. RESULTS: We found that ACE2 expression was higher in relation to active smoking, obesity, and hypertension that are known risk factors of COVID-19 severity, while an association with interferon-related inflammation was driven by the truncated, non-binding ACE2 isoform. We discovered that expression patterns of a suppressed airway immune response to early SARS-CoV-2 infection, compared to other viruses, are similar to patterns associated with obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, which may thus contribute to a COVID-19-susceptible airway environment. eQTL mapping identified regulatory variants for genes implicated in COVID-19, some of which had pheWAS evidence for their potential role in respiratory infections. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide evidence that clinically relevant variation in the expression of COVID-19-related genes is associated with host factors, environmental exposures, and likely host genetic variation.


Assuntos
Brônquios , Mucosa Respiratória , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Asma/genética , Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Doenças Cardiovasculares/imunologia , Expressão Gênica , Variação Genética , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/genética , Obesidade/imunologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/genética
6.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 126, 2021 Apr 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33902556

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of mechanism-driven, clinically relevant biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial dysfunction, a proposed disease mechanism in COPD, is associated with the release of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but plasma cell-free mtDNA has not been previously examined prospectively for associations with clinical COPD measures. METHODS: P-mtDNA, defined as copy number of mitochondrially-encoded NADH dehydrogenase-1 (MT-ND1) gene, was measured by real-time quantitative PCR in 700 plasma samples from participants enrolled in the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study (SPIROMICS) cohort. Associations between p-mtDNA and clinical disease parameters were examined, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, and for informative loss to follow-up. RESULTS: P-mtDNA levels were higher in participants with mild or moderate COPD, compared to smokers without airflow obstruction, and to participants with severe COPD. Baseline increased p-mtDNA levels were associated with better CAT scores in female smokers without airflow obstruction and female participants with mild or moderate COPD on 1-year follow-up, but worse 6MWD in females with severe COPD. Higher p-mtDNA levels were associated with better 6MWD in male participants with severe COPD. These associations were no longer significant after adjusting for informative loss to follow-up. CONCLUSION: In this study, p-mtDNA levels associated with baseline COPD status but not future changes in clinical COPD measures after accounting for informative loss to follow-up. To better characterize mitochondrial dysfunction as a potential COPD endotype, these results should be confirmed and validated in future studies. TRIAL REGISTRATION:  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01969344 (SPIROMICS).

7.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 127, 2021 Apr 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33906653

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) is a proposed emphysema and airflow obstruction biomarker; however, previous publications have shown inconsistent associations and only one study has investigate the association between sRAGE and emphysema. No cohorts have examined the association between sRAGE and progressive decline of lung function. There have also been no evaluation of assay compatibility, receiver operating characteristics, and little examination of the effect of genetic variability in non-white population. This manuscript addresses these deficiencies and introduces novel data from Pittsburgh COPD SCCOR and as well as novel work on airflow obstruction. A meta-analysis is used to quantify sRAGE associations with clinical phenotypes. METHODS: sRAGE was measured in four independent longitudinal cohorts on different analytic assays: COPDGene (n = 1443); SPIROMICS (n = 1623); ECLIPSE (n = 2349); Pittsburgh COPD SCCOR (n = 399). We constructed adjusted linear mixed models to determine associations of sRAGE with baseline and follow up forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) and emphysema by quantitative high-resolution CT lung density at the 15th percentile (adjusted for total lung capacity). RESULTS: Lower plasma or serum sRAGE values were associated with a COPD diagnosis (P < 0.001), reduced FEV1 (P < 0.001), and emphysema severity (P < 0.001). In an inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis, one SD lower log10-transformed sRAGE was associated with 105 ± 22 mL lower FEV1 and 4.14 ± 0.55 g/L lower adjusted lung density. After adjusting for covariates, lower sRAGE at baseline was associated with greater FEV1 decline and emphysema progression only in the ECLIPSE cohort. Non-Hispanic white subjects carrying the rs2070600 minor allele (A) and non-Hispanic African Americans carrying the rs2071288 minor allele (A) had lower sRAGE measurements compare to those with the major allele, but their emphysema-sRAGE regression slopes were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Lower blood sRAGE is associated with more severe airflow obstruction and emphysema, but associations with progression are inconsistent in the cohorts analyzed. In these cohorts, genotype influenced sRAGE measurements and strengthened variance modelling. Thus, genotype should be included in sRAGE evaluations.

8.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 139, 2021 Apr 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33906617

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Millions of Americans are living in food deserts in the United States, however the role of the local food environment on COPD has not been studied. The aim of this study is to determine the association between food deserts and COPD-related outcomes. METHOD: In this cross-sectional analysis we linked data collected from SPIROMICS (SubPopulations and InteRmediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study) between 2010 and 2015 and food desert data, defined as an underserved area that lacks access to affordable healthy foods, from the Food Access Research Atlas. COPD outcomes include percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), COPD Assessment Test (CAT), 6-min walk distance test (6MWD), exacerbations, and air trapping. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the association between living in food deserts and respiratory outcomes, adjusting for age, gender, race, education, income, marital status, BMI, smoking status, pack years, and urban status RESULTS: Among 2713 participants, 22% lived in food deserts. Participants living in food deserts were less likely to be white and more likely to have a lower income than those who did not live in food deserts. In the adjusted model controlling for demographics and individual income, living in food deserts was associated lower FEV1% (ß = - 2.51, P = 0.046), higher air trapping (ß = 2.47, P = 0.008), worse SGRQ (ß = 3.48, P = 0.001) and CAT (ß = 1.20, P = 0.003) scores, and 56% greater odds of severe exacerbations (P = 0.004). Results were consistent when looking at food access alone, regardless of whether participants lived in low income areas. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest an independent association between food desert and food access alone with COPD outcomes. Health program planning may benefit from addressing disparities in access to food.

9.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0245478, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33730034

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to explore the association between perceived social support and COPD outcomes and to determine whether the associations are mediated by depressive symptoms. METHODS: Subjects with COPD who were enrolled as part of SPIROMICS were included in this analysis. Questionnaires relating to quality of life, symptom burden, and functional status were administered at annual clinic visits for over a 3 year period. In both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, we examined the association of social support as measured by the FACIT-F with COPD outcomes. Cross sectional analyses used multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for covariates. For longitudinal analyses, generalized linear mixed models with random intercepts were used. Models were adjusted with and without depressive symptoms and mediation analyses performed. RESULTS: Of the 1831 subjects with COPD, 1779 completed the FACIT- F questionnaire. In adjusted cross-sectional analysis without depressive symptoms, higher perceived social support was associated with better quality of life, well-being, 6 minute walk distance, and less dyspnea. When also adjusting for depressive symptoms, all associations between social support and COPD outcomes were attenuated and no longer statistically significant. Mediation analysis suggested that depressive symptoms explained the majority (> = 85%) of the association between social support and measured COPD outcomes. Results of the longitudinal analysis were consistent with the cross-sectional analyses. There was no association between social support and odds of exacerbations. CONCLUSION: Higher social support was associated with better COPD outcomes across several measures of morbidity including quality of life, respiratory symptoms, and functional status. In addition, these associations were largely attenuated when accounting for depressive symptoms suggesting that the beneficial association of social support with COPD outcomes may be largely mediated by the association between social support and depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: SPIROMICS was approved by Institutional Review Boards at each center and all participants provided written informed consent (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01969344).

10.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 152(5): 344-353.e10, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33745682

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A relationship between fluoride and osteosarcoma has been hypothesized but not validated. To the authors' knowledge, there are no published studies examining topical fluoride or dietary fluoride supplements and osteosarcoma risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between ever or never use of topical and dietary fluoride supplements and osteosarcoma. METHODS: The authors performed a secondary data analysis on data from 2 separate but linked studies. Patients for Phase 1 and Phase 2 were selected from US hospitals using a hospital-based matched case-control study design. Case patients were those who had received diagnoses of osteosarcoma, and control patients were those who had received diagnoses of other bone tumors or nonneoplastic conditions. In Phase 1, case patients (N = 209) and control patients (N = 440) were those seeking treatment at orthopedic departments from 1989 through 1993. In Phase 2, incident case patients (N = 108) and control patients (N = 296) were identified and treated by physicians from 1994 through 2000. This analysis included all patients who met eligibility criteria and on whom the authors had complete data on exposure, outcome, and covariates. The authors used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of topical fluoride use and supplemental fluoride use with osteosarcoma. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios were 0.94 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.46) and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.46 to 1.33) for topical fluoride and supplemental fluoride, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Neither topical nor dietary fluoride supplements are associated with an increased risk of developing osteosarcoma. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Supplemental and topical fluorides used in the dental office and in over-the-counter products are not related to an increased risk of developing osteosarcoma.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Ósseas , Cárie Dentária , Osteossarcoma , Neoplasias Ósseas/epidemiologia , Cariostáticos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Fluoretos/efeitos adversos , Fluoretos Tópicos/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Osteossarcoma/induzido quimicamente , Osteossarcoma/epidemiologia
11.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 4916, 2021 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33649381

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease and the traditional variables extracted from computed tomography (CT) images may not be sufficient to describe all the topological features of lung tissues in COPD patients. We employed an unsupervised three-dimensional (3D) convolutional autoencoder (CAE)-feature constructor (FC) deep learning network to learn from CT data and derive tissue pattern-clusters jointly. We then applied exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to discover the unobserved latent traits (factors) among pattern-clusters. CT images at total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV) of 541 former smokers and 59 healthy non-smokers from the cohort of the SubPopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in the COPD Study (SPIROMICS) were analyzed. TLC and RV images were registered to calculate the Jacobian (determinant) values for all the voxels in TLC images. 3D Regions of interest (ROIs) with two data channels of CT intensity and Jacobian value were randomly extracted from training images and were fed to the 3D CAE-FC model. 80 pattern-clusters and 7 factors were identified. Factor scores computed for individual subjects were able to predict spirometry-measured pulmonary functions. Two factors which correlated with various emphysema subtypes, parametric response mapping (PRM) metrics, airway variants, and airway tree to lung volume ratio were discriminants of patients across all severity stages. Our findings suggest the potential of developing factor-based surrogate markers for new COPD phenotypes.

12.
NPJ Biofilms Microbiomes ; 7(1): 14, 2021 02 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33547327

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is heterogeneous in development, progression, and phenotypes. Little is known about the lung microbiome, sampled by bronchoscopy, in milder COPD and its relationships to clinical features that reflect disease heterogeneity (lung function, symptom burden, and functional impairment). Using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected from 181 never-smokers and ever-smokers with or without COPD (GOLD 0-2) enrolled in the SubPopulations and InteRmediate Outcome Measures In COPD Study (SPIROMICS), we find that lung bacterial composition associates with several clinical features, in particular bronchodilator responsiveness, peak expiratory flow rate, and forced expiratory flow rate between 25 and 75% of FVC (FEF25-75). Measures of symptom burden (COPD Assessment Test) and functional impairment (six-minute walk distance) also associate with disparate lung microbiota composition. Drivers of these relationships include members of the Streptococcus, Prevotella, Veillonella, Staphylococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. Thus, lung microbiota differences may contribute to airway dysfunction and airway disease in milder COPD.

13.
Chest ; 2021 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33539837

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mild expiratory flow limitation may not be recognized using traditional spirometric criteria based on the ratio of FEV1 to FVC. RESEARCH QUESTION: Does slow vital capacity (SVC) instead of FVC increase the sensitivity of spirometry to identify patients with early or mild obstructive lung disease? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We included 854 current and former smokers from the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study cohort with a postbronchodilator FEV1 to FVC ratio of ≥ 0.7 and FEV1 % predicted of ≥ 80% at enrollment. We compared baseline characteristics, chest CT scan features, exacerbations, and progression to COPD (postbronchodilator FEV1 to FVC ratio, < 0.7) during the follow-up period between 734 participants with postbronchodilator FEV1 to SVC ratio of ≥ 0.7 and 120 with postbronchodilator FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 at the enrollment. We performed multivariate linear and logistic regression models and negative binomial and interval-censored proportion hazards regression models adjusted for demographics and smoking exposure to examine the association of FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 with those characteristics and outcomes. RESULTS: Participants with FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 were older and had lower FEV1 and more emphysema than those with FEV1 to SVC ratio of ≥ 0.7. In adjusted analysis, individuals with postbronchodilator FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 showed a greater percentage of emphysema by 0.45% (95% CI, 0.09%-0.82%), percentage of gas trapping by 2.52% (95% CI, 0.59%-4.44%), and percentage of functional small airways disease based on parametric response mapping by 2.78% (95% CI, 0.72%-4.83%) at baseline than those with FEV1 to SVC ratio of ≥ 0.7. During a median follow-up time of 1,500 days, an FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 was not associated with total exacerbations (incident rate ratio [IRR], 1.61; 95% CI, 0.97-2.64), but was associated with severe exacerbations (IRR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.04-4.89). An FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 was associated with progression to COPD during a 3-year follow-up even after adjustment for demographics and smoking exposure (hazard ratio, 3.93; 95% CI, 2.71-5.72). We found similar results when we examined the association of prebronchodilator FEV1 to SVC ratio of < 0.7 or FEV1 to SVC ratio of less than the lower limit of normal with chest CT scan features and progression to COPD. INTERPRETATION: Low FEV1 to SVC ratio in current and former smokers with normal spirometry results can identify individuals with CT scan features of COPD who are at risk for severe exacerbations and is associated with progression to COPD in the future. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01969344T4; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

14.
Alzheimers Dement ; 2021 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33527720

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Clinic-based study samples, including the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), offer rich data, but findings may not generalize to community-based settings. We compared associations in ADNI to those in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study to assess generalizability across the two settings. METHODS: We estimated cohort-specific associations among risk factors, cognitive test scores, and neuroimaging outcomes to identify and quantify the extent of significant and substantively meaningful differences in associations between cohorts. We explored whether using more homogenous samples improved comparability in effect estimates. RESULTS: The proportion of associations that differed significantly between cohorts ranged from 27% to 34% across sample subsets. Many differences were substantively meaningful (e.g., odds ratios [OR] for apolipoprotein E ε4 on amyloid positivity in ARIC: OR = 2.8, in ADNI: OR = 8.6). DISCUSSION: A higher proportion of associations differed significantly and substantively than would be expected by chance. Findings in clinical samples should be confirmed in more representative samples.

15.
J Hypertens ; 39(5): 987-993, 2021 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33587404

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the longitudinal relationships between blood pressure measured over 24 years and arterial stiffness in late life measured as pulse wave velocity (PWV). METHODS: Carotid--femoral (cf) and femoral--ankle (fa) PWV were measured in 4166 adults at the visit 5 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort examination (2011-2013). Participants were categorized into tertiles of PWV measurements. Blood pressure measurements were made at baseline (1987-1989), three subsequent triennial examinations, and visit 5. RESULTS: Partial correlation coefficients between visit 5 cfPWV and SBP ranged from 0.13 for visit 1 SBP to 0.32 for visit 5 SBP. For visit 5 faPWV, correlations were ∼0 for visits 1 to 4 SBP, but was 0.20 for visit 5 SBP. Over 24 years of follow-up, those with higher average SBP were more likely to fall in the middle and upper tertiles of visit 5 cfPWV. Average pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure over 24 years had similar but weaker associations with cfPWV tertiles. DBP had no clear association with cfPWV. Blood pressure measurements were positively associated with faPWV tertiles only cross-sectionally at visit 5. CONCLUSION: Adult life-course measures of SBP, more so than mean arterial and pulse pressure, were associated with later life central arterial stiffness. By contrast, only contemporaneous measures of blood pressure were associated with peripheral arterial stiffness. Although arterial stiffness was only measured at later life, these results are consistent with the notion that elevated blood pressure over time is involved in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffening.

16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33180550

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The relative roles of mucus plugs and emphysema in mechanisms of airflow limitation and hypoxemia in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are uncertain. METHODS: We analyzed computed tomography (CT) lung images and lung function in participants in the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study. Radiologists scored mucus plugs on CT lung images and imaging software automatically quantified percent emphysema. Unadjusted and adjusted relationships between mucus plug score, percent emphysema, and lung function were determined using regression. RESULTS: Among 400 smokers, 229 (57%) had mucus plugs and 207 (52%) had emphysema and subgroups could be identified with mucus dominant and emphysema dominant disease. Only 33% of smokers with high mucus plug scores had mucus symptoms. Mucus plug score and percent emphysema were independently associated with lower values for forced expiratory volume in one second and peripheral oxygen saturation (p values < 0.001). The relationships between mucus plug score and lung function outcomes were strongest in smokers with limited emphysema (p values <0.001). Compared to smokers with low mucus plug scores, those with high scores had worse COPD Assessment Test scores (17.4 ± 7.7 vs. 14.4 ± 13.3), more frequent annual exacerbations (0.75 ± 1.1 vs. 0.43 ± 0.85), and shorter 6-minute walk distance (329 ± 115 vs. 392 ± 117 meters)(p values < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Symptomatically silent mucus plugs are highly prevalent in smokers and independently associate with lung function outcomes. These data provide rationale for targeting mucus-high/emphysema-low COPD patients in clinical trials of muco-active treatments.

17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33007162

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Black adults have worse health outcomes compared to white adults in certain chronic diseases, including Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). It is unclear if, and to what degree, disadvantage by individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) may contribute to racial disparities in COPD outcomes. METHODS: Individual and neighborhood-scale sociodemographic characteristics were determined in 2649 current or former adult smokers, with and without COPD, at recruitment into the SPIROMICS study. We assessed whether racial differences in symptom, functional and imaging outcomes (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ], COPD Assessment Test [CAT] score; modified Medical Research Council [mMRC] dyspnea scale; six-minute walk test distance [6MWD], CT scan metrics) and severe exacerbation risk were explained by individual or neighborhood SES. Using generalized linear mixed models regression, we compared respiratory outcomes by race, adjusting for confounders and individual-level and neighborhood-level descriptors of SES, both separately and sequentially. RESULTS: After adjusting for COPD risk factors, black participants had significantly worse respiratory symptoms and quality of life (mMRC, CAT and SGRQ), higher risk of severe exacerbations and higher percent emphysema, thicker airways (Pi10), and more air trapping on CT metrics compared to whites. Additionally, the association between black race and respiratory outcomes was attenuated but remained statistically significant after adjusting for individual-level SES, which explained up to 12% to 35% of racial disparities. Further adjustment showed that neighborhood-level SES explained another 26% to 54% of the racial disparities in respiratory outcomes. Even after accounting for both individual and neighborhood SES factors, black individuals continued to have increased severe exacerbation risk and persistently worse CT outcomes (emphysema, air trapping and airway wall thickness). CONCLUSIONS: Disadvantages by individual and neighborhood-level SES each partly explain disparities in respiratory outcomes between black individuals and whites. Strategies to narrow the gap in SES disadvantages may help to reduce race-related health disparities in COPD; however, further work is needed to identify additional risk factors contributing to persistent disparities.

18.
Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis ; 7(4): 370-381, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33108110

RESUMO

Ratrionale: The antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin, also known in humans as LL-37, is a defensin secreted by immune and airway epithelial cells. Deficiencies in this peptide may contribute to adverse pulmonary outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: Using clinical and biological samples from the SubPopulations and InteRmediate Outcome Measures In COPD Study (SPIROMICS), we assessed the associations of plasma cathelicidin levels with cross-sectional and longitudinal COPD outcomes. Methods: A total of 1609 SPIROMICS participants with COPD and available plasma samples were analyzed. Cathelicidin was modeled dichotomously (lowest quartile [< 50 ng/ml] versus highest 75% [≥ 50 ng/ml]) and continuously per 10 ng/ml. Fixed-effect multilevel regression analyses were used to assess associations between cathelicidin and cross-sectional as well as longitudinal lung function. The associations between cathelicidin and participant-reported retrospective and prospective COPD exacerbations were assessed via logistic regression. Measurements and Main Results: Cathelicidin < 50 ng/ml (N=383) was associated with female sex, black race, and lower body mass index (BMI).At baseline,cathelicidin < 50 ng/ml was independently associated with 3.55% lower % predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)(95% confidence interval [CI] -6.22% to -0.88% predicted; p=0.01), while every 10 ng/ml lower cathelicidin was independently associated with 0.65% lower % predicted FEV1 (95% CI -1.01% to -0.28% predicted; p< 0.001). No independent associations with longitudinal lung function decline or participant-reported COPD exacerbations were observed. Conclusions: Reduced cathelicidin is associated with lower lung function at baseline. Plasma cathelicidin may potentially identify COPD patients at increased risk for more severe lung disease.

19.
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis ; 15: 1887-1898, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32821092

RESUMO

Rationale: Some COPD patients develop extreme breathlessness, decreased exercise capacity and poor health status yet respiratory disability is poorly characterized as a distinct phenotype. Objective: To define respiratory disability in COPD based on available functional measures and to determine associations with risk for exacerbations and death. Methods: We analyzed baseline data from a multi-center observational study (SPIROMICS). This analysis includes 2332 participants (472 with severe COPD, 991 with mild/moderate COPD, 726 smokers without airflow obstruction and 143 non-smoking controls). Measurements: We defined respiratory disability by ≥4 of 7 criteria: mMRC dyspnea scale ≥3; Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire <5; 6-minute walking distance <250 m; St George's Respiratory Questionnaire activity domain >60; COPD Assessment Test >20; fatigue (FACIT-F Trial Outcome Index) <50; SF-12 <20. Results: Using these criteria, respiratory disability was identified in 315 (13.5%) participants (52.1% female). Frequencies were severe COPD 34.5%; mild-moderate COPD 11.2%; smokers without obstruction 5.2% and never-smokers 2.1%. Compared with others, participants with disability had more emphysema (13.2 vs. 6.6%) and air-trapping (37.0 vs. 21.6%) on HRCT (P<0.0001). Using principal components analysis to derive a disability score, two factors explained 71% of variance, and a cut point -1.0 reliably identified disability. This disability score independently predicted future exacerbations (ß=0.34; CI 0.12, 0.64; P=0.003) and death (HR 2.97; CI 1.54, 5.75; P=0.001). Thus, participants with disability by this criterion had almost three times greater mortality compared to those without disability. Conclusion: Our novel SPIROMICS respiratory disability score in COPD was associated with worse airflow obstruction as well as airway wall thickening, lung parenchymal destruction and certain inflammatory biomarkers. The disability score also proved to be an independent predictor of future exacerbations and death. These findings validate disability as an important phenotype in the spectrum of COPD.

20.
Genet Epidemiol ; 44(7): 646-664, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32691502

RESUMO

There is a tremendous current interest in measuring multiple types of omics features (e.g., DNA sequences, RNA expressions, methylation profiles, metabolic profiles, protein expressions) on a large number of subjects. Although genotypes are typically available for all study subjects, other data types may be measured only on a subset of subjects due to cost or other constraints. In addition, quantitative omics measurements, such as metabolite levels and protein expressions, are subject to detection limits in that the measurements below (or above) certain thresholds are not detectable. In this article, we propose a rigorous and powerful approach to handle missing values and detection limits in integrative analysis of multiomics data. We relate quantitative omics variables to genetic variants and other variables through linear regression models and relate phenotypes to quantitative omics variables and other variables through generalized linear models. We derive the joint-likelihood for the two sets of models by allowing arbitrary patterns of missing values and detection limits for quantitative omics variables. We carry out maximum-likelihood estimation through computationally fast and stable algorithms. The resulting estimators are approximately unbiased and statistically efficient. An application to a major study on chronic obstructive lung disease yielded new biological insights.

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