Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 30
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Environ Monit Assess ; 192(2): 134, 2020 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31970501

RESUMO

Healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs) contribute to maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Deficient environmental health (EH) conditions and infection prevention and control (IPC) practices in healthcare facilities (HCFs) contribute to the spread of HAIs, but microbial sampling of sources of contamination is rarely conducted nor reported in low-resource settings. The purpose of this study was to assess EH conditions and IPC practices in Malawian HCFs and evaluate how EH deficiencies contribute to pathogen exposures and HAIs, and to provide recommendations to inform improvements in EH conditions using a mixed-methods approach. Thirty-one maternity wards in government-run HCFs were surveyed in the three regions of Malawi. Questionnaires were administered in parallel with structured observations of EH conditions and IPC practices and microbial testing of water sources and facility surfaces. Results indicated significant associations between IPC practices and microbial contamination. Facilities where separate wards were not available for mothers and newborns with infections and where linens were not used for patients during healthcare services were more likely to have delivery tables with surface contamination (relative risk = 2.23; 1.49, 3.34). E. coli was detected in water samples from seven (23%) HCFs. Our results suggest that Malawian maternity wards could reduce microbial contamination, and potentially reduce the occurrence of HAIs, by improving EH conditions and IPC practices. HCF staff can use the simple, low-cost EH monitoring methods used in this study to incorporate microbial monitoring of EH conditions and IPC practices in HCFs in low-resource settings.

2.
Sci Total Environ ; 714: 136553, 2020 Jan 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31982735

RESUMO

There are 70.8 million forcibly displaced people worldwide, including internally displaced persons, refugees, and asylum seekers. Since mortality rates are highest in the first six months of displacement, the provision of adequate services and infrastructure by relief organizations is critical in this "emergency phase." Environmental health provisions such as adequate water supply, excreta management, solid waste management, and vector control measures are among those essential services. We conducted a systematic scoping review of environmental health in the emergency phase of displacement (the six months following first displacement). A total of 122 publications, comprising 104 peer-reviewed and 18 grey literature publications, met the inclusion criteria. We extracted data relating to environmental health conditions and services, associated outcomes, and information concerning obstacles and recommendations for improving these conditions and services. Despite the fact that most displaced people live outside of camps, publications largely report findings for camps (n = 73, 60%). Water supply (n = 57, 47%) and excreta management (n = 47, 39%) dominate the literature. Energy access (n = 7, 6%), exposure to harsh weather from inadequate shelter (n = 5, 4%), food hygiene and safety (n = 4, 3%), indoor air quality (n = 3, 3%), menstrual hygiene management (n = 2, 2%), dental hygiene (n = 2, 2%), and ambient air quality (n = 1, 1%) are relatively understudied. The most common health outcome attributed to inadequate environmental conditions in the included publications is diarrhea (n = 43, 35%). We found that organizations and governments often embrace their own standards, however we call for policymakers to adopt standards no less rigorous than Sphere for the emergency phase of displacement. Although other reviews examine water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions in emergencies, this is the first systematic review of environmental health more broadly in the first six months of displacement.

3.
Sci Total Environ ; 712: 135241, 2020 Apr 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31843312

RESUMO

Sustainable Development Goal 6.1 seeks to "by 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water", which is challenging particularly in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Pacific Island Countries (PIC). We report drinking water sources and services in the Solomon Islands and examine geographical inequalities. Based on two quantitative baseline datasets of n = 1,598 rural and n = 1,068 urban households, we analyzed different drinking water variables (source type, collection time, amount, use, perceived quality, storage, treatment) and a composite index, drinking water service level. We stratified data by urban and rural areas and by province, mapped, and contextualized them. There are substantive rural-urban drinking water inequalities in the Solomon Islands. Overall, urban households are more likely to: use improved drinking water sources, need less time to collect water, collect more water, store their water more safely, treat water prior to consumption, perceive their water quality as better and have an at least basic drinking water service than rural households. There are also provincial and center-periphery inequalities in drinking water access, with more centrally located provinces using piped water supplies and more distant and remote provinces using rainwater and surface water as their primary source. There are also inter-national inequalities. Out of all PICs, the Solomon Islands have among the lowest access to basic drinking water services: 92% of urban and 55% of rural households. Of all SIDS, PICs are least serviced. This study shows that drinking water inequality is a critical issue, and highlights that all identified dimensions of inequality - rural-urban, provincial, center-periphery and inter-national - need to be explicitly recognized and addressed and included in pro-equity monitoring, policy and programming efforts by the Solomon Islands Government and stakeholders to reduce inequalities as per the Agenda 2030.

4.
Health Policy Plan ; 2019 Nov 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31722372

RESUMO

Many healthcare facilities (HCFs) in low-income countries experience unreliable connectivity to energy sources, which adversely impacts the quality of health service delivery and provision of adequate environmental health services. This assessment explores the status and consequences of energy access through interviews and surveys with administrators and healthcare workers from 44 HCFs (central hospitals, district hospitals, health centres and health posts) in Malawi. Most HCFs are connected to the electrical grid but experience weekly power interruptions averaging 10 h; less than one-third of facilities have a functional back-up source. Inadequate energy availability is associated with irregular water supply and poor medical equipment sterilization; it adversely affects provider safety and contributes to poor lighting and working conditions. Some challenges, such as poor availability and maintenance of back-up energy sources, disproportionately affect smaller HCFs. Policymakers, health system actors and third-party organizations seeking to improve energy access and quality of care in Malawi and similar settings should address these challenges in a way that prioritizes the specific needs of different facility types.

5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31652610

RESUMO

Translational research applies scientific techniques to achieve practical outcomes, connecting pure research and pure practice. Many translational research types have arisen since the mid-1900s, reflecting the need to better integrate scientific advancement with policy and practice. Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) development efforts have aimed to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve service delivery; thus, associated research has a strong orientation toward applied studies that use diverse methods to support decision-making. Drawing from knowledge that emerged to support other professional fields, such as manufacturing and clinical healthcare, we characterize different types of translational research and clarify nomenclature and principles. We describe study approaches relevant to translational research questions, and offer overarching recommendations, specific examples, and resources for further study as practical advice to professionals who seek to apply translational methods to WaSH problems. To enhance collective outcomes, professionals should mindfully align projects within the translational spectrum. We further recommend overarching good practices such as documenting intervention adaptations, overtly considering contextual factors, and better distinguishing efficacy from effectiveness research by replicating studies in different contexts. By consciously improving the compatibility and linkages between WaSH science and practice, this guide can accelerate urgently needed progress toward global development goals.

6.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 222(5): 790-803, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31078437

RESUMO

Adequate environmental health conditions in penal institutions are necessary to protect and promote the health of prisoners and prison workers. We conducted a scoping systematic review to: describe the environmental health conditions in penal institutions and the associated exposures and health outcomes; identify effective approaches to prevent environmental health concerns; and identify evidence gaps on environmental health in penal institution populations. PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCOhost, Scopus, and ProQuest were searched. Peer-reviewed studies that reported original data and on environmental health conditions and/or exposures in penal institutions were included. Seventy-three studies met these criteria. The most common risk factor identified was contaminated food and/or beverages prepared or handled in the institution's kitchen. Overcrowding, inadequate ventilation, and a lack of, or sharing of, soap and other hygiene products increased the risk of adverse health outcomes. Common responses included isolating infectious patients, educating prisoners and prison staff on improved sanitation and hygiene practices, improving ventilation, and disinfecting contaminated surfaces and/or water sources. Inadequate environmental health conditions in penal institutions are common, and adversely impact the health of prisoners and prison staff, yet are preventable. Few studies have been conducted in low- and middle-income countries, biasing our results. The development and implementation of national guidelines for essential environmental health in prisons, monitoring of conditions, and greater accountability of facility managers are needed to secure the health, rights, and well-being of prisoners.

7.
Sci Total Environ ; 670: 717-731, 2019 Jun 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30909048

RESUMO

Achieving sufficient, safe, continuously-available drinking water services in rural areas is a challenge, in high- and especially low-and middle-income countries. External support programs (ESPs) - which may include administrative, financial, and technical assistance - have been hypothesized to contribute to sustainable rural water services. While there are many descriptions of ESPs, a standard terminology and typology of ESP activities does not exist and the effect of ESP activities on system sustainability remains inadequately characterized. We conducted a systematic review of ESPs for rural drinking water systems to identify ESP terminology and describe ESP activities. Findings from 218 publications from low-, middle-, and high-income countries were analyzed. ESP terms were used inconsistently between regions and income classifications. There were few studies describing ESP activities related to mechanized piped water systems. Few studies quantitatively assess the effect of ESPs. Those that did found positive associations with functionality, household satisfaction, household participation, and financial stability. This review is the first comprehensive evaluation of the ESP literature and we derive a definition of external support programs and typology of ESP activities from the descriptions of ESPs. A common understanding of ESPs facilitates discussion and knowledge transfer between stakeholders. Consistent terminology creates a foundation for adapting ESPs to water services in community institutions and for mechanized piped water systems.

8.
Sci Total Environ ; 658: 1161-1174, 2019 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30677980

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adequate hygiene behaviors and environmental health conditions are fundamental to children's health, development, and well-being. They are especially important in institutional care settings for orphaned and abandoned children, a particularly vulnerable population whose basic needs are often not met. OBJECTIVES: We systematically reviewed the evidence about hygiene behaviors and environmental health conditions in institutional care settings for children and associated health outcomes; interventions to improve these behaviors, conditions, and outcomes; and obstacles to improvement. METHODS: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and EBSCOhost were searched for studies in the peer-reviewed and grey literature. Studies were included if they reported primary data on one or more environmental health condition or hygiene behavior in an institutional care setting for orphaned and abandoned children. RESULTS: Forty-five publications reporting on over 500 institutions in 29 countries were included. The most documented concern was poor personal hygiene behaviors followed by inadequate water and sanitation infrastructure and overcrowding. Protozoan, helminthic, viral infections, and diarrheal illness among institutionalized children were the most commonly documented associated health outcomes. DISCUSSION: More studies documented the status of hygiene and environmental health in children's institutions than interventions to improve behaviors and conditions. Insufficient finances and expertise or involvement of caregivers are reported barriers to implementing improvements in children's institutions. The development of guidelines for essential environmental health standards in orphanages, monitoring of facility conditions, accountability for facility deficiencies, and implementation research to identify improvement opportunities would contribute to and promote the health and development of orphaned and abandoned children worldwide.


Assuntos
Criança Abandonada/estatística & dados numéricos , Crianças Órfãs/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Ambiental/normas , Higiene/normas , Orfanatos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Populações Vulneráveis
9.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 222(3): 335-346, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30583994

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There are well-established relationships between health and homelessness, and shelters can facilitate the transmission of diseases and contribute to their prevention. Adequate environmental health conditions and hygiene behaviors in homeless shelters are fundamental to the health of their clients, a marginalized population. We report the status of environmental health conditions and hygiene behaviors in homeless shelters and associated health outcomes; interventions to improve these conditions, behaviors, and outcomes; and obstacles to improvement. METHODS: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and EBSCOhost were searched for peer-reviewed studies, and additional sources for grey literature. Studies were included if they reported primary data on one or more environmental health condition or hygiene behavior in homeless shelters. RESULTS: Twenty-eight studies were included in the review. Insufficient ventilation systems, unhygienic bedding, and overcrowding were the most documented environmental health and hygiene deficiencies in homeless shelters, and tuberculosis infections and skin diseases were the most documented associated health outcomes among clients. Studies frequently recommended or described implementation of behavioral and administrative controls, ventilation system improvements, and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation fixtures. DISCUSSION: Most studies addressed airborne transmission of tuberculosis and were conducted in high-income countries, revealing an imbalance in the literature. Insufficient resources and the transience of clients are barriers to improving hygiene behaviors and environmental conditions in homeless shelters. Further investment and research into ensuring adequate hygiene and environmental health in this setting can protect and promote the health and well-being of people experiencing homelessness.


Assuntos
Saúde Ambiental , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Pessoas em Situação de Rua , Higiene , Humanos
10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30261590

RESUMO

We examine factors associated with the use of basic water supply and sanitation services as part of an integrated community-based nutrition programme which included a drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) intervention and emphasise findings related to health risk perceptions. Data were collected from 2658 households in four regions in Ethiopia with a cross-sectional survey in WaSH intervention areas, as well as in control areas, where the intervention was not implemented. The data were analysed using bivariate and multivariable regression analysis. Awareness of health risk factors related to inadequate WaSH was high in the programme area. The use of basic water and sanitation services was associated with several health risk perceptions: Perceiving water quality as good increased the odds of using basic water services as opposed to believing the water quality was poor (OR 3.94; CI 3.06⁻5.08; p ≤ 0.001). Believing that drinking unsafe water was the main cause for diarrhoea increased the odds of using basic water services (OR 1.48; CI 1.20⁻1.81; p ≤ 0.001). In the WaSH intervention group, the use of basic sanitation was more likely than in the control group. The use of basic sanitation was associated with households who had previously received sanitation training, as opposed to such who had not (OR 1.55; CI 1.22⁻1.97; p ≤ 0.001). Perceiving dirty space as the main cause of diarrhoea (OR 1.81; CI 1.50⁻2.19; p ≤ 0.001), and privacy when using a latrine (OR 2.00; CI 1.67⁻2.40; p ≤ 0.001), were associated with higher odds of using basic sanitation. Households that indicated a disadvantage of owning a latrine was maintenance costs were less likely to use basic sanitation (OR 0.49; CI 0.38⁻0.63; p ≤ 0.001). Risk perceptions were important determinants of use of basic services. The findings point to risk perceptions motivating the application of positive WaSH-related and health-protective ours. This suggests that well-designed health risk communication strategies may be effective for engaging households in healthy WaSH behaviour.


Assuntos
Água Potável , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Prática de Saúde Pública , Saneamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Abastecimento de Água/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Diarreia/prevenção & controle , Etiópia , Características da Família , Feminino , Comportamentos de Risco à Saúde , Humanos , Higiene , Masculino , Propriedade , Percepção , Fatores de Risco , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Fatores de Tempo , Toaletes/estatística & dados numéricos , Água , Qualidade da Água
11.
Sci Total Environ ; 619-620: 1126-1132, 2018 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29734591

RESUMO

In rural sub-Saharan Africa, one in three handpumps are non-functional at any time. While there is some evidence describing factors associated with non-functional water systems, there is little evidence describing the categories of water system breakdowns that commonly occur. Insufficient water availability from broken down systems can force people to use unimproved water sources, which undermines the health benefits of an improved water source. We categorized common water system breakdowns using quantitative and qualitative monitoring data from Liberia, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda (each N>3600 water systems) and examined how breakdown category varies by water system type and management characteristics. Specific broken parts were mentioned more frequently than all other reasons for breakdown; hardware parts frequently found at fault for breakdown were aprons (Liberia), pipes (Tanzania and Uganda), taps/spouts (Tanzania and Uganda), and lift mechanisms (Nigeria). Statistically significant differences in breakdown category were identified based on system type, age, management type, and fee collection type. Categorization can help to identify common reasons for water system breakdown. The analysis of these data can be used to develop improved monitoring instruments to inform actors of different breakdown types and provide reasons for system non-functionality. Improved monitoring instruments would enable actors to target appropriate resources to address specific breakdowns likely to arise based on system type and management characteristics in order to inform improved implementation of and post-construction support for water systems in sub-Saharan Africa.

12.
Sci Total Environ ; 628-629: 715-721, 2018 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29454211

RESUMO

The sustainability of rural, community-managed water systems in sub-Saharan Africa depends in part on the ability of local water committees to repair breakdowns and carry out the operation and maintenance (O&M) of the system. Much of sub-Saharan Africa has two distinct seasons that affect the availability of water sources and how people use water. Little is known about how seasonality affects water system management. This qualitative study is based on 320 interviews and focus group discussions and examines the effects of season on community water use and management in Ghana, Kenya and Zambia. Participants revealed that seasonality affects water availability, water system breakdowns, resource mobilization, committee activity, and external support availability. In the rainy season, participants typically reported spending less time and money on water collection because rainwater harvesting and seasonal streams, ponds, wells and reservoirs are available. In the dry season, people used improved groundwater sources more often and spent more money and time collecting water. Although seasonal changes in household water demand and use have been examined previously, our data suggest that seasonality also influences community management through differential water system use, system breakdowns and management characteristics. We found that water committees generally have less money, time and access to external support during the rainy season, making them less able to carry out O&M. Our results suggest that community engagement should take place over a long period of time so that seasonal patterns in management can be understood and incorporated into water committee training. External support actors should make a more targeted effort to understand the cultural and economic patterns in a community in order to train committees with appropriate management strategies.


Assuntos
Conservação dos Recursos Hídricos/estatística & dados numéricos , Abastecimento de Água/estatística & dados numéricos , Gana , Humanos , Quênia , População Rural , Estações do Ano , Água , Abastecimento de Água/métodos , Zâmbia
13.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 221(3): 409-422, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29352706

RESUMO

Safe environmental conditions and the availability of standard precaution items are important to prevent and treat infection in health care facilities (HCFs) and to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets for health and water, sanitation, and hygiene. Baseline coverage estimates for HCFs have yet to be formed for the SDGs; and there is little evidence describing inequalities in coverage. To address this, we produced the first coverage estimates of environmental conditions and standard precaution items in HCFs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); and explored factors associated with low coverage. Data from monitoring reports and peer-reviewed literature were systematically compiled; and information on conditions, service levels, and inequalities tabulated. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with low coverage. Data for 21 indicators of environmental conditions and standard precaution items were compiled from 78 LMICs which were representative of 129,557 HCFs. 50% of HCFs lack piped water, 33% lack improved sanitation, 39% lack handwashing soap, 39% lack adequate infectious waste disposal, 73% lack sterilization equipment, and 59% lack reliable energy services. Using nationally representative data from six countries, 2% of HCFs provide all four of water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management services. Statistically significant inequalities in coverage exist between HCFs by: urban-rural setting, managing authority, facility type, and sub-national administrative unit. We identified important, previously undocumented inequalities and environmental health challenges faced by HCFs in LMICs. The information and analyses provide evidence for those engaged in improving HCF conditions to develop evidence-based policies and efficient programs, enhance service delivery systems, and make better use of available resources.


Assuntos
Países em Desenvolvimento , Equidade em Saúde , Recursos em Saúde , Higiene , Controle de Infecções , Saneamento , Abastecimento de Água , Desinfecção , Água Potável , Desinfecção das Mãos , Instalações de Saúde , Humanos , Renda , Políticas , População Rural , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Gerenciamento de Resíduos
14.
Environ Sci Technol ; 51(19): 11336-11345, 2017 Oct 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28854334

RESUMO

Sufficient, safe, and continuously available water services are important for human development and health yet many water systems in low- and middle-income countries are nonfunctional. Monitoring data were analyzed using regression and Bayesian networks (BNs) to explore factors influencing the functionality of 82 503 water systems in Nigeria and Tanzania. Functionality varied by system type. In Tanzania, Nira handpumps were more functional than Afridev and India Mark II handpumps. Higher functionality was associated with fee collection in Nigeria. In Tanzania, functionality was higher if fees were collected monthly rather than in response to system breakdown. Systems in Nigeria were more likely to be functional if they were used for both human and livestock consumption. In Tanzania, systems managed by private operators were more functional than community-managed systems. The BNs found strong dependencies between functionality and system type and administrative unit (e.g., district). The BNs predicted functionality increased from 68% to 89% in Nigeria and from 53% to 68% in Tanzania when best observed conditions were in place. Improvements to water system monitoring and analysis of monitoring data with different modeling techniques may be useful for identifying water service improvement opportunities and informing evidence-based decision-making for better management, policy, programming, and practice.


Assuntos
Teorema de Bayes , Abastecimento de Água , Humanos , Índia , Nigéria , Tanzânia , Água
15.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 220(8): 1199-1206, 2017 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28827123

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Water is an important, overlooked, and controllable source of nosocomial infection. Hospitalized neonates and their mothers are particularly vulnerable to nosocomial waterborne infections. Our objectives through this systematic review were to: investigate water sources, reservoirs, and transmission routes that lead to nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and their mothers; establish patient risk factors; compile measures for controlling outbreaks and recommended strategies for prevention; and identify information gaps to improve guidelines for reporting future outbreaks. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and clinicaltrials.gov. Peer-reviewed studies reporting contaminated water as a route of transmission to neonates and/or their mothers were included. RESULTS: Twenty-five studies were included. The most common contaminated water sources in healthcare facilities associated with infection transmission were tap water, sinks, and faucets. Low birthweights, preterm or premature birth, and underlying disease increased neonatal risk of infection. Effective control measures commonly included replacing or cleaning faucets and increased or alternative methods for hand disinfection, and recommendations for prevention of future infections highlighted the need for additional surveillance. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The implementation of control measures and recommended prevention strategies by healthcare workers and managing authorities of healthcare facilities and improved reporting of future outbreaks may contribute to a reduction in the incidence of nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and their mothers.


Assuntos
Infecção Hospitalar/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas pela Água/epidemiologia , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Mães
16.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 220(3): 531-538, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28292643

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sufficient, safe, continuously available drinking water is important for human health and development, yet one in three handpumps in sub-Saharan Africa are non-functional at any given time. Community management, coupled with access to external technical expertise and spare parts, is a widely promoted model for rural water supply management. However, there is limited evidence describing how community management can address common hardware and management failures of rural water systems in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: We identified hardware and management rehabilitation pathways using qualitative data from 267 interviews and 57 focus group discussions in Ghana, Kenya, and Zambia. Study participants were water committee members, community members, and local leaders in 18 communities (six in each study country) with water systems managed by a water committee and supported by World Vision (WV), an international non-governmental organization (NGO). Government, WV or private sector employees engaged in supporting the water systems were also interviewed. Inductive analysis was used to allow for pathways to emerge from the data, based on the perspectives and experiences of study participants. RESULTS: Four hardware rehabilitation pathways were identified, based on the types of support used in rehabilitation. Types of support were differentiated as community or external. External support includes financial and/or technical support from government or WV employees. Community actor understanding of who to contact when a hardware breakdown occurs and easy access to technical experts were consistent reasons for rapid rehabilitation for all hardware rehabilitation pathways. Three management rehabilitation pathways were identified. All require the involvement of community leaders and were best carried out when the action was participatory. CONCLUSIONS: The rehabilitation pathways show how available resources can be leveraged to restore hardware breakdowns and management failures for rural water systems in sub-Saharan Africa. Governments, NGOs, and private sector actors can better build capacity of community actors by focusing on their role in rehabilitating hardware and management and to ensure that they are able to quickly contact external support actors when needed for rehabilitation. Using qualitative and participatory methods allows for insight into rapid rehabilitation of hardware and management.


Assuntos
Falha de Equipamento , Purificação da Água/instrumentação , Participação da Comunidade , Gana , Humanos , Quênia , Governo Local , Organizações , Zâmbia
17.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 220(3): 539-550, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28238610

RESUMO

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in schools are important for child health, development, and educational performance; yet coverage in Indonesian schools remains low. To address this deficiency, UNICEF and partners conducted a WASH intervention in 450 schools across three provinces in Indonesia. A survey evaluating the sustainability of infrastructure and behavioral interventions in comparison to control districts was conducted one year after completion of the intervention. The survey data were also compared with national government data to assess the suitability of government data to report progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Logistic regression was used to explore associations between WASH conditions and behaviors. Intervention schools were more likely to have handwashing stations with soap and water. In multivariable analyses, schools with a toilet operation and maintenance fund were more likely to have functional toilets. Students who learn hygiene skills from their teachers were less likely to defecate openly, more likely to share hygiene knowledge with their parents, and more likely to wash their hands. Survey data were comparable with government data, suggesting that Indonesian government monitoring may be a reliable source of data to measure progress on the SDGs. This research generates important policy and practice findings for scaling up and sustaining WASH in schools and may help improve WASH in schools programs in other low-resource contexts.


Assuntos
Higiene , Saneamento , Instituições Acadêmicas , Abastecimento de Água , Comportamento , Criança , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Governo Federal , Feminino , Órgãos Governamentais , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Indonésia , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 220(3): 611-620, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28017547

RESUMO

Healthcare-acquired infections are an increasing problem for health care providers and policy makers. Water is an overlooked source of infectious microorganisms in health care facilities. Waterborne nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous, and particularly problematic in health care facility water systems, and cause a variety of diseases. The purpose of this review is to assess health care associated NTM infections from health care facility water systems. We documented susceptible populations, modes of transmission, and the median attack rate (e.g. patients infected per patients exposed). We aimed to identify transmission risk factors and inform evidence-based policies for infection control and prevention. We searched Embase, PubMed, Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov without date restrictions. English language articles with original data on NTM waterborne infections in health care settings were included. Randomized controlled trials, descriptive studies (case reports, case series), case-control studies, cohort studies, cross-sectional surveys, and quasi-experimental studies on nosocomial waterborne infections were included. Three investigators independently screened titles and abstracts for relevant articles, and one screened full-text articles. Data were extracted by one investigator, and a second confirmed accuracy for 10% of results. We included 22 observational studies. Immunocompromised, post-surgical, and hemodialysis patients were commonly affected populations. A range of exposure routes such as uncovered central venous catheters (CVCs), wound exposure, and contamination during surgical procedures was reported. The median attack rate was 12.1% (interquartile range, 11-27.2). Waterborne NTM infection affects susceptible patients through common, preventable exposure routes. Effective prevention strategies will require both medical and environmental health expertise, and inter-professional cooperation will optimize these efforts.


Assuntos
Infecção Hospitalar/epidemiologia , Infecções por Mycobacterium/epidemiologia , Micobactérias não Tuberculosas , Doenças Transmitidas pela Água/epidemiologia , Monitoramento Ambiental , Instalações de Saúde , Humanos , Microbiologia da Água , Abastecimento de Água
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27563916

RESUMO

Information and communications technologies (ICTs) such as mobile survey tools (MSTs) can facilitate field-level data collection to drive improvements in national and international development programs. MSTs allow users to gather and transmit field data in real time, standardize data storage and management, automate routine analyses, and visualize data. Dozens of diverse MST options are available, and users may struggle to select suitable options. We developed a systematic MST Evaluation Framework (EF), based on International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) software quality modeling standards, to objectively assess MSTs and assist program implementers in identifying suitable MST options. The EF is applicable to MSTs for a broad variety of applications. We also conducted an MST user survey to elucidate needs and priorities of current MST users. Finally, the EF was used to assess seven MSTs currently used for water and sanitation monitoring, as a validation exercise. The results suggest that the EF is a promising method for evaluating MSTs.


Assuntos
Coleta de Dados/instrumentação , Coleta de Dados/métodos , Monitoramento Ambiental/instrumentação , Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos , Saneamento , Poluentes da Água/análise , Humanos , População Rural , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26999180

RESUMO

Monitoring water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) is important to track progress, improve accountability, and demonstrate impacts of efforts to improve conditions and services, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Indicator selection methods enable robust monitoring of WaSH projects and conditions. However, selection methods are not always used and there are no commonly-used methods for selecting WaSH indicators. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic review of indicator selection methods used in WaSH-related fields. We present a summary of indicator selection methods for environment, international development, and water. We identified six methodological stages for selecting indicators for WaSH: define the purpose and scope; select a conceptual framework; search for candidate indicators; determine selection criteria; score indicators against criteria; and select a final suite of indicators. This summary of indicator selection methods provides a foundation for the critical assessment of existing methods. It can be used to inform future efforts to construct indicator sets in WaSH and related fields.


Assuntos
Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos , Higiene/normas , Saneamento/normas , Qualidade da Água/normas , Abastecimento de Água/normas
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA