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1.
Disabil Health J ; : 100887, 2020 Jan 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32008977

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease and all-cause death. A better understanding of sleep disparities between people with and without disabilities can help inform interventions designed to improve sleep duration among people with disabilities. OBJECTIVE: To examine population-based prevalence estimates of short sleep duration by disability status and disability type among noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years. METHODS: Data from the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to assess prevalence of short sleep duration among adults without and with disabilities (serious difficulty with cognition, hearing, mobility, or vision; any difficulty with self-care or independent living). Short sleep duration was defined as <7 h per 24-h period. We used log-binomial regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for socioeconomic and health-related characteristics. RESULTS: Adults with any disability had a higher prevalence of short sleep duration than those without disability (43.8% vs. 31.6%; p < .001). After controlling for selected covariates, short sleep was most prevalent among adults with multiple disabilities (PR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.36-1.43), followed by adults with a single disability type (range: PR 1.13, 95% CI: 1.03-1.24 [for independent living disability] to PR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.21-1.30 [for mobility disability]) compared to adults without disability. CONCLUSIONS: People with disabilities had a higher likelihood of reporting short sleep duration than those without disabilities. Assessment of sleep duration may be an important component in the provision of medical care to people with disabilities.

2.
Disabil Health J ; : 100888, 2020 Feb 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32061542

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, second edition, recommend that all adults participate in moderate-intensity equivalent aerobic physical activity at least 150-300 min/week for substantial health benefits and muscle-strengthening activities involving all major muscle groups 2 or more days a week. The prevalence of the general population meeting the Guidelines and the types of physical activity in which they engage have been described elsewhere. Similar descriptions are lacking for individuals with mobility disability whose physical activity profiles may differ from the general population. OBJECTIVE: This study examined patterns of aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity among US adults with mobility disability. METHODS: We used 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 66,635 adults with mobility disability. We estimated the percentage who engaged in any aerobic physical activity, met the aerobic and/or muscle-strengthening guidelines, and who participated in specific activities. RESULTS: Less than half (45.2%) of US adults with mobility disability reported engaging in aerobic physical activity, and 39.5% met one or both components of the physical activity guidelines. Walking was the most commonly reported activity type (34.0%). CONCLUSIONS: Walking is a common activity type among adults with mobility disability. Efforts to make walking or wheelchair rolling a safe, viable option are important to helping decrease barriers that may limit the ability of those with mobility disability to engage in walking or other physical activity types.

3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(2): 44-49, 2020 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945038

RESUMO

CDC, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), state and local health departments, and public health and clinical stakeholders continue to investigate a nationwide outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) (1). EVALI patients in Illinois, Utah, and Wisconsin acquired tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-containing products primarily from informal sources (2,3). This report updates demographic characteristics and self-reported sources of THC- and nicotine-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products derived from EVALI patient data reported to CDC by state health departments. As of January 7, 2020, among 1,979 (76%) patients with available data on substance use, a total of 1,620 (82%) reported using any THC-containing products, including 665 (34%) who reported exclusive THC-containing product use. Use of any nicotine-containing products was reported by 1,128 (57%) patients, including 264 (13%) who reported exclusive nicotine-containing product use. Among 809 (50%) patients reporting data on the source of THC-containing products, 131 (16%) reported acquiring their products from only commercial sources (i.e., recreational dispensaries, medical dispensaries, or both; vape or smoke shops; stores; and pop-up shops), 627 (78%) from only informal sources (i.e., friends, family, in-person or online dealers, or other sources), and 51 (6%) from both types of sources. Among 613 (54%) EVALI patients reporting nicotine-containing product use with available data on product source, 421 (69%) reported acquiring their products from only commercial sources, 103 (17%) from only informal sources, and 89 (15%) from both types of sources. Adolescents aged 13-17 years were more likely to acquire both THC- and nicotine-containing products from informal sources than were persons in older age groups. The high prevalence of acquisition of THC-containing products from informal sources by EVALI patients reinforces CDC's recommendation to not use e-cigarette, or vaping, products that contain THC, especially those acquired from informal sources. Although acquisition of nicotine-containing products through informal sources was not common overall, it was common among persons aged <18 years. While the investigation continues, CDC recommends that the best way for persons to ensure that they are not at risk is to consider refraining from the use of all e-cigarette, or vaping, products.


Assuntos
Surtos de Doenças , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Lesão Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Vaping/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Dronabinol/efeitos adversos , Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina , Feminino , Humanos , Lesão Pulmonar/terapia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(3): 90-94, 2020 Jan 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31971931

RESUMO

Since August 2019, CDC, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), state and local health departments, and public health and clinical stakeholders have been investigating a nationwide outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) (1). This report updates patient demographic characteristics, self-reported substance use, and hospitalization dates for EVALI patients reported to CDC by states, as well as the distribution of emergency department (ED) visits related to e-cigarette, or vaping, products analyzed through the National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP). As of January 14, 2020, a total of 2,668 hospitalized EVALI cases had been reported to CDC. Median patient age was 24 years, and 66% were male. Overall, 82% of EVALI patients reported using any tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, product (including 33% with exclusive THC-containing product use), and 57% of EVALI patients reported using any nicotine-containing product (including 14% with exclusive nicotine-containing product use). Syndromic surveillance indicates that ED visits related to e-cigarette, or vaping, products continue to decline after sharply increasing in August 2019 and peaking in September 2019. Clinicians and public health practitioners should remain vigilant for new EVALI cases. CDC recommends that persons not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products, especially those acquired from informal sources such as friends, family members, or from in-person or online dealers. Vitamin E acetate is strongly linked to the EVALI outbreak and should not be added to any e-cigarette, or vaping, products (2). However, evidence is not sufficient to rule out the contribution of other chemicals of concern, including chemicals in either THC- or non-THC-containing products, in some reported EVALI cases.


Assuntos
Surtos de Doenças , Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina , Lesão Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Vaping/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Dronabinol/toxicidade , Feminino , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lesão Pulmonar/terapia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Vitamina E/toxicidade , Adulto Jovem
5.
Am J Intellect Dev Disabil ; 124(3): 248-262, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31026202

RESUMO

Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are known to experience significant health disparities; however, few studies have described anti-hypertensive medication adherence in this population. Using administrative data from South Carolina from 2000-2014, we evaluated the odds of adherence to anti-hypertensive medication among a cohort of adults with IDD and hypertension. Approximately half (49.5%) of the study cohort were adherent to anti-hypertensive medication. Those who lived in a supervised residence, had a Medicaid waiver, and had more frequent contact with a primary care provider were more likely to be adherent. Organizations that serve people with IDD have an opportunity to increase adherence by educating these individuals, their family members, and caregivers about the importance of adherence to anti-hypertensive medication.

6.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(32): 882-887, 2018 Aug 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30114005

RESUMO

Persons with disabilities face greater barriers to health care than do those without disabilities (1). To identify characteristics of noninstitutionalized adults with six specific disability types (hearing, vision, cognition, mobility, self-care, and independent living),* and to assess disability-specific disparities in health care access, CDC analyzed 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data. The prevalences of disability overall and by disability type, and access to health care by disability type, were estimated. Analyses were stratified by three age groups: 18-44 years (young adults), 45-64 years (middle-aged adults), and ≥65 years (older adults). Among young adults, cognitive disability (10.6%) was the most prevalent type. Mobility disability was most prevalent among middle-aged (18.1%) and older adults (26.9%). Generally, disability prevalences were higher among women, American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN), adults with income below the federal poverty level (FPL), and persons in the South U.S. Census region. Disability-specific disparities in health care access were prevalent, particularly among young and middle-aged adults. These data might inform public health programs of the sociodemographic characteristics and disparities in health care access associated with age and specific disability types and guide efforts to improve access to care for persons with disabilities.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Sistema de Vigilância de Fator de Risco Comportamental , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
7.
PLoS Curr ; : e4f99c5654147a, 2012 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22866242

RESUMO

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess the desirability of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) screening, the effectiveness of the consent process, and the feasibility of conducting DMD screening in a pediatric office. Methods. Infant males who attended a 12-month routine well-child visit at a participating pediatric clinic were screened for DMD. Parents and providers completed post-screening questionnaires to assess their experiences with and attitudes toward screening. Results. A total of 264 male infants were screened for DMD. Approximately 78% of parents indicated support of voluntary DMD screening and 91% of providers were in favor of screening for DMD. About 75% of parents correctly answered three of five questions testing their knowledge of DMD screening. Conclusion. DMD screening is feasible in a pediatric office when conducted as part of a research study. Infant screening for DMD eventually could be offered in pediatric health care provider offices as an optional public health service outside of newborn screening.

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