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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32414676

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be complicated by post-thrombotic syndrome, which is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. The Acute Venous Thrombosis: Thrombus Removal with Adjunctive Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis (ATTRACT) was the largest and most controversial randomized controlled trial evaluating the use of pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for the prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome after acute DVT. This study aimed to evaluate clinicians' opinion on the ATTRACT trial and its impact on clinical practice. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 10 core multiple choice items and a maximum of five follow-up open-ended questions was delivered to vascular surgeons, interventional radiologists, hematologists, and interventional cardiologists affiliated with 10 international societies between April 23 and July 1, 2019. Clinicians' views on the main limitations of the ATTRACT trial, its impact on patient selection for thrombolysis and the need for a new trial were evaluated. RESULTS: Out of 15,650 contacted clinicians, 451 (3%) completed the survey, with 74% vascular surgeons, 24% interventional radiologists, 2% hematologists, and 0.2% interventional cardiologists. The majority of respondents (79%) were aware of the results of the ATTRACT trial before completing the survey and routinely performed pharmacomechanical CDT (PCDT) in their centers (70%). Only 20% of clinicians considered ATTRACT to be a well-designed and well-performed trial. The inclusion of femoropopliteal DVT was reported as the main limitation of the trial by 55% of respondents. Despite half of the participating clinicians reporting no change in their clinical practice, equal number of clinicians (14%) were encouraged and discouraged from treating iliofemoral DVT. More than one-half of the respondents thought that the use of PCDT would be defensible in a court of law despite the increased risk of bleeding reported in the study. Nearly two-thirds of participating clinicians recommended performing a trial limited to iliofemoral DVT, with a follow-up period of 5 years, quality of life as the primary outcome measure, and standardization of thrombolysis protocol across the trial sites. CONCLUSIONS: ATTRACT failed to provide the long-awaited indisputable evidence on the use of PCDT. Surveyed clinicians were aware of the limitations of this trial and the need for further evidence on the subject.

2.
BMJ ; 369: m1309, 2020 May 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32404430

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the use of graduated compression stockings (GCS) offers any adjuvant benefit when pharmaco-thromboprophylaxis is used for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients undergoing elective surgery. DESIGN: Open, multicentre, randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial. SETTING: Seven National Health Service tertiary hospitals in the United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: 1905 elective surgical inpatients (≥18 years) assessed as being at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism were eligible and consented to participate. INTERVENTION: Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) pharmaco-thromboprophylaxis alone or LMWH pharmaco-thromboprophylaxis and GCS. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was imaging confirmed lower limb deep vein thrombosis with or without symptoms, or pulmonary embolism with symptoms within 90 days of surgery. Secondary outcome measures were quality of life, compliance with stockings and LMWH, lower limb complications related to GCS, bleeding complications, adverse reactions to LMWH, and all cause mortality. RESULTS: Between May 2016 and January 2019, 1905 participants were randomised. 1858 were included in the intention to treat analysis (17 were identified as ineligible after randomisation and 30 did not undergo surgery). A primary outcome event occurred in 16 of 937 (1.7%) patients in the LMWH alone group compared with 13 of 921 (1.4%) in the LMWH and GCS group. The risk difference between the two groups was 0.30% (95% confidence interval -0.65% to 1.26%). Because the 95% confidence interval did not cross the non-inferiority margin of 3.5% (P<0.001 for non-inferiority), LMWH alone was confirmed to be non-inferior. CONCLUSIONS: For patients who have elective surgery and are at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism, administration of pharmaco-thromboprophylaxis alone is non-inferior to a combination of pharmaco-thromboprophylaxis and GCS. These findings indicate that GCS might be unnecessary in most patients undergoing elective surgery. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN13911492.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32426220

RESUMO

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic has resulted in diversion of healthcare resources to the management of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus. Elective interventions and surgical procedures in most countries have been postponed and operating room resources have been diverted to manage the pandemic. The Venous and Lymphatic Triage and Acuity Scale (VELTAS) was developed to provide an international standard to rationalise and harmonise the management of patients with venous and lymphatic disorders or vascular anomalies. Triage urgency was determined based on clinical assessment of urgency with which a patient would require medical treatment or surgical intervention. Clinical conditions were classified into six categories of: 1) Venous thromboembolism (VTE), 2) Chronic Venous Disease (CVD), 3) Vascular anomalies, 4) Venous trauma 5) Venous compression and 6) Lymphatic disease. Triage urgency was categorised into four groups and individual conditions were allocated to each class of triage. These included 1) Medical Emergencies (requiring immediate attendance), example massive pulmonary embolism; 2) Urgent (to be seen as soon as possible), example deep vein thrombosis ; 3) Semi-urgent (to be attended to within 30-90 days), example highly symptomatic CVD, and 4) Discretionary/Non-urgent- (to be seen within 6-12 months), example chronic lymphoedema. VELTAS aims to standardise the triage of patients with venous and lymphatic disease or vascular anomalies by providing an international consensus-based classification of clinical categories and triage urgency. The scale may be used during pandemics such as the current COVID-19 crisis but may also be used as a general framework to classify urgency of the listed conditions.

6.
Phlebology ; : 268355520913390, 2020 Mar 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32188340
9.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 8(2): 182-186, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31327742

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Post-thrombotic syndrome is a common complication of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (IFDVT). Existing evidence and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines suggest that this can be reduced by prompt thrombolytic therapy or thrombectomy. We aimed to evaluate the characteristics of IFDVT patients and to identify whether patients are being offered the recommended treatment pathway. METHODS: A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted across eight hospital sites in the North West London region, of which two were hub hospitals in their local vascular service networks. Patients with proximal DVT were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision coding during a 1-year period. Data on demographics, diagnostic methods used, interventions, and referrals were extracted from electronic and paper medical records. RESULTS: During the study period, 132 patients with IFDVT were identified (mean age, 59.4 years; 55% female); 75% of these patients had an IFDVT. In this cohort, the biggest predisposing factors were previous DVT (n = 35), malignant disease (n = 35), and immobility (n = 20). In total, 104 patients were administered anticoagulation, and 88 of these patients received anticoagulation within 24 hours. The cases of 45 patients were either discussed with or promptly referred to a vascular service, after which 20 patients were treated solely with anticoagulation, whereas 20 patients received thrombolysis of varying methods. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion (56%) of symptomatic IFDVT patients are not being appropriately referred to or discussed with vascular services. Of these, 43% would have been eligible for consideration of early thrombus removal. Adherence to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines could be improved by increasing awareness among emergency department colleagues.

10.
Int Angiol ; 2019 Dec 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31814378

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To establish a consensus for the management of acute and chronic venous obstruction among specialists in the United Kingdom. METHODS: Specialist physicians representing vascular surgery, interventional radiology and haematology were invited to 3 meetings to discuss management of acute and chronic iliofemoral obstruction. The meetings outlined controversial areas, included a topic-by-topic review; and on completion reached a consensus when greater than 80% agreement was reached on each topic. RESULTS: Physicians from 19 United Kingdom hospitals agreed on treatment protocols and highlighted areas that need development. Potential standard treatment algorithms were created. It was decided to establish a national registry of venous patients led by representatives from the treating multidisciplinary teams. CONCLUSIONS: Technical improvements have facilitated invasive treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous obstruction; however, the evidence guiding treatment is weak. Treatment should be conducted in centers with multi-disciplinary input; robust, coordinated data collection; and regular outcome analysis to ensure safe and effective treatment and a basis for future evolvement.

11.
Ann Surg ; 2019 Dec 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31850976

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The 21st century has witnessed a rise in the use of endovenous thermal ablation. Being highly clinically and cost-effective and improving the quality of life of patients, they are now considered to be the "gold-standard" treatment for varicose veins. Post-intervention management, especially in terms of postoperative compression, however, remains unclear. As a result, a randomized study was undertaken to investigate the effects of wearing compression stockings after varicose vein treatment. METHOD: Patients with saphenous vein reflux undergoing treatment with endothermal ablation (with or without concurrent phlebectomies) were randomized to receive either 7 days of compression stockings or no stockings. The primary outcome measure for this study was the pain score over the first 10 postoperative days. The pain scores, clinical score, time to return to normal activities, and ecchymosis were assessed. Patients were followed-up at 2 weeks and 6 months post-ablation. RESULTS: In total, 206 patients were randomized, 49% of them to the compression group. The mean age was 49.7 (±16) years and approximately 51% of the population was male. The median pain score in the compression group using a visual analog scale was significantly lower on days 2-5, compared to the no compression group. Those having concurrent phlebectomies and compression stockings also had significantly better pain scores on days 1-3, day 5, and day 7. Improvement in the median venous clinical severity score was noted at 6-month follow-up, but this was not significant. No difference in the generic- or disease-specific quality of life was observed and the time to return to activities was similar. There were no differences in the degree of ecchymosis between the 2 groups and both groups had similar occlusion rates. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that wearing compression stockings after endothermal ablation is advantageous in the first few days after treatment and is especially beneficial for those having concurrent phlebectomies.

12.
J Proteome Res ; 18(11): 3809-3820, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31617359

RESUMO

Venous thromboembolism (VTE), chronic venous disease (CVD), and venous leg ulceration (VLU) are clinical manifestations of a poorly functioning venous system. Though common, much is unknown of the pathophysiology and progression of these conditions. Metabolic phenotyping has been employed to explore mechanistic pathways involved in venous disease. A systematic literature review was performed: full text, primary research articles on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) in human participants and animals were included for qualitative synthesis. Seventeen studies applying metabolic phenotyping to venous disease were identified: six on CVD, two on VLU, and nine on VTE; both animal (n = 6) and human (n = 10) experimental designs were reported, with one study including both. NMR, MS, and MS imaging were employed to characterize serum, plasma, urine, wound fluid, and tissue. Metabolites found to be upregulated in CVD included lipids, branched chain amino acids (BCAA), glutamate, taurine, lactate, and myo-inositol identified in vein tissue. Upregulated metabolites in VLU included lactate, BCAA, lysine, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and glutamate identified in wound fluid and ulcer biopsies. VTE cases were associated with reduced carnitine levels, upregulated aromatic amino acids, 3-hydroxybutyrate, BCAA, and lipids in plasma, serum, thrombus, and vein wall; kynurenine and tricarboxylic acid pathway dysfunction were reported. Future research should focus on targeted studies with internal and external validation.

13.
Trials ; 20(1): 392, 2019 Jul 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31269978

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ambulatory phlebectomies and foam sclerotherapy are two of the most common treatments for varicose vein tributaries. Many studies have been published on these treatments, but few comparative studies have attempted to determine their relative effectiveness. METHODS/DESIGN: This is a prospective single-centre randomised clinical trial. Patients with primary truncal vein incompetence and varicose vein tributaries requiring treatment will be assigned randomly to either ambulatory phlebectomies or foam sclerotherapy. The primary outcome measure is the re-intervention rate for the varicose vein tributaries during the study period. The secondary outcomes include the degree of pain during the first two post-operative weeks and the time to return to usual activities or work. Improvements in clinical scores, quality of life scores, occlusion rates and cost-effectiveness for each intervention are other secondary outcomes. The re-intervention rate will be considered from the third month. DISCUSSION: This study compares ambulatory phlebectomies and foam sclerotherapy in the treatment of varicose vein tributaries. The re-intervention rates, safety, patient experience and the cost-effectiveness of each intervention will be assessed. This study aims to recruit 160 patients and is expected to be completed by the end of 2019. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03416413 . Registered on 31 January 2018.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios/métodos , Veia Safena/cirurgia , Soluções Esclerosantes/administração & dosagem , Escleroterapia , Varizes/terapia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/métodos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Londres , Estudos Prospectivos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Retratamento , Veia Safena/diagnóstico por imagem , Soluções Esclerosantes/efeitos adversos , Escleroterapia/efeitos adversos , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Varizes/diagnóstico por imagem , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/efeitos adversos
14.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 7(5): 756-762, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31231058

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Athletes are generally young, high-functioning individuals. Pathology in this cohort is associated with a decrease in function and consequently has major implications on quality of life. Venous disorders can be attributed to a combination of vascular compression with a high burden of activity. OBJECTIVE: This article promotes increased awareness of these uncommon conditions specific to the athlete by summarizing pathophysiology, clinical features, investigation, and treatment protocols for use in clinical practice. Prognostic outcomes of these management regimens are also discussed, allowing for clinicians to counsel these high-functioning individuals appropriately. With the aim of providing an overview of sport-related venous pathology, a literature review was undertaken identifying articles that were independently reviewed by the authors. RESULTS: Lower limb venous thrombosis has been identified in young, high-functioning athletes attributed to both compression-related venous trauma, associated with repetitive movements resulting in intimal damage, and blunt trauma. The diagnosis and treatment follow the same protocols as for the general population. Of note, early ambulation is advocated, with an aim to return to premorbid (noncontact) function within 6 weeks. Athletes performing high-intensity repetitive upper limb movement, such as baseball players, are predisposed to upper limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Diagnosis follows the same protocols as for lower extremity DVT; however, the optimal treatment strategy remains debated. Current guidelines advocate the use of anticoagulation alone. A specific subset of primary upper limb DVT is effort thrombosis, where there is compression at the level of the thoracic outlet. Thrombolysis with first rib resection is indicated in the acute setting within 14 days. In cases of complete occlusion, surgical decompression with venous reconstruction may be required. Popliteal vein entrapment syndrome is also discussed. This entity has been identified as an overuse injury associated with popliteal vein compression. Duplex ultrasound examination is indicated as a first-line investigation, with conservative noninvasive options considered as an initial management strategy. Chronic venous insufficiency or persistent symptoms may require subsequent surgical decompression. CONCLUSIONS: Key conditions including upper extremity and lower extremity venous thrombosis, venous aneurysms, Paget-Schroetter syndrome (effort thrombosis), and popliteal vein entrapment syndrome are discussed. Further studies evaluating long-term outcomes on morbidity for current treatment regimens in upper extremity DVT, effort thrombosis, venous thoracic outlet syndrome, and popliteal venous entrapment syndrome are required.

15.
Health Technol Assess ; 23(24): 1-96, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31140402

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Venous ulceration is a common and costly health-care issue worldwide, with poor healing rates greatly affecting patient quality of life. Compression bandaging has been shown to improve healing rates and reduce recurrence, but does not address the underlying cause, which is often superficial venous reflux. Surgical correction of the reflux reduces ulcer recurrence; however, the effect of early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux on ulcer healing is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of compression therapy with early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux compared with compression therapy with deferred endovenous ablation in patients with venous ulceration. DESIGN: A pragmatic, two-arm, multicentre, parallel-group, open randomised controlled trial with a health economic evaluation. SETTING: Secondary care vascular centres in England. PARTICIPANTS: Patients aged ≥ 18 years with a venous leg ulcer of between 6 weeks' and 6 months' duration and an ankle-brachial pressure index of ≥ 0.8 who could tolerate compression and were deemed suitable for endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomised 1 : 1 to either early ablation (compression therapy and superficial endovenous ablation within 2 weeks of randomisation) or deferred ablation (compression therapy followed by endovenous ablation once the ulcer had healed). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was time from randomisation to ulcer healing, confirmed by blinded assessment. Secondary outcomes included 24-week ulcer healing rates, ulcer-free time, clinical success (in addition to quality of life), costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). All analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. RESULTS: A total of 450 participants were recruited (224 to early and 226 to deferred superficial endovenous ablation). Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Time to ulcer healing was shorter in participants randomised to early superficial endovenous ablation than in those randomised to deferred ablation [hazard ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13 to 1.68; p = 0.001]. Median time to ulcer healing was 56 (95% CI 49 to 66) days in the early ablation group and 82 (95% CI 69 to 92) days in the deferred ablation group. The ulcer healing rate at 24 weeks was 85.6% in the early ablation group, compared with 76.3% in the deferred ablation group. Median ulcer-free time was 306 [interquartile range (IQR) 240-328] days in the early ablation group and 278 (IQR 175-324) days in the deferred endovenous ablation group (p = 0.002). The most common complications of superficial endovenous ablation were pain and deep-vein thrombosis. Differences in repeated measures of Aberdeen Varicose Vein Questionnaire scores (p < 0.001), EuroQol-5 Dimensions index values (p = 0.03) and Short Form questionnaire-36 items body pain (p = 0.05) over the follow-up period were observed, in favour of early ablation. The mean difference in total costs between the early ablation and deferred ablation groups was £163 [standard error (SE) £318; p = 0.607]; however, there was a substantial and statistically significant gain in QALY over 1 year [mean difference between groups 0.041 (SE 0.017) QALYs; p = 0.017]. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of early ablation at 1 year was £3976 per QALY, with a high probability (89%) of being more cost-effective than deferred ablation at conventional UK decision-making thresholds (currently £20,000 per QALY). Sensitivity analyses using alternative statistical models give qualitatively similar results. LIMITATIONS: Only 7% of screened patients were recruited, treatment regimens varied significantly and technical success was assessed only in the early ablation group. CONCLUSIONS: Early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux, in addition to compression therapy and wound dressings, reduces the time to healing of venous leg ulcers, increases ulcer-free time and is highly likely to be cost-effective. FUTURE WORK: Longer-term follow-up is ongoing and will determine if early ablation will affect recurrence rates in the medium and long term. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN02335796. FUNDING: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 23, No. 24. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.

16.
J Vasc Surg ; 70(2): 641-650, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31113722

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Sport-related vascular trauma is an important consequence of increased physical activity. Repetitive, high-intensity movements predispose athletes to vascular disease, including arterial pathology, by exerting increased pressure on neurovascular structures. This is an important source of morbidity in an otherwise young and healthy population. Arterial pathology associated with repetitive trauma is often misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal injury. This article increases awareness of sport-related arterial disease by reviewing the symptomatology, investigation, and treatment modalities of this pathology. In addition, prognostic outcomes specific to the athlete are discussed. RESULTS: Arterial thoracic outlet syndrome and vascular quadrilateral space syndrome are associated with athletes involved in overhead throwing exercises. Sport-related arterial pathology of the lower limb include external iliac artery endofibrosis (EIAE), popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES), and adductor canal syndrome. Vascular stress and kinking secondary to vessel tethering are important contributors to pathology in EIAE. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome must also be considered, presenting with clinical features similar to PAES. In addition, athletes are predisposed to blunt mechanical trauma. Hypothenar hammer syndrome is one such example, contributing to a high burden of morbidity in this population. CONCLUSIONS: In arterial thoracic outlet syndrome and vascular quadrilateral space syndrome, surgery is advocated in symptomatic individuals, with postoperative outcomes favorable for the athlete. Acute limb ischemia may occur as a result of secondary thrombosis or embolization, often without preceding claudication. PAES and adductor canal syndrome are associated with functional entrapment in the athlete, secondary to muscular hypertrophy. Surgical exploration may be indicated. Poorer outcomes are noted when this process is associated with vascular reconstruction. Surgical treatment of EIAE follows failure of conservative management, with limited data available on postoperative prognosis. Investigations for all these conditions should be targeted based on clinical suspicion. A delay in diagnosis can have severe consequences on return to competition in these high-functioning individuals.


Assuntos
Artérias/patologia , Atletas , Traumatismos em Atletas/patologia , Lesões do Sistema Vascular/patologia , Artérias/diagnóstico por imagem , Artérias/lesões , Traumatismos em Atletas/diagnóstico por imagem , Traumatismos em Atletas/etiologia , Traumatismos em Atletas/terapia , Humanos , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Volta ao Esporte , Fatores de Risco , Resultado do Tratamento , Lesões do Sistema Vascular/diagnóstico por imagem , Lesões do Sistema Vascular/etiologia , Lesões do Sistema Vascular/terapia
17.
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg ; 57(6): 851-857, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30850282

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: The aim was to summarise the evidence for the relationship between vein diameters and clinical severity, and elucidate the relationship between diameters and health related quality of life (HRQoL) METHODS: A systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines. The MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched from 1946 to 31 August 2018. Reference lists of included studies were searched for further relevant papers. Full text studies in English reporting the relationship between great and small saphenous vein diameters and clinical severity and/or HRQoL scores measured using validated instruments were included. All study designs were included. Studies that did not include relationships between these parameters, non-English studies, and studies focusing on non-truncal veins were excluded. Two reviewers independently performed the study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. RESULTS: Eleven eligible studies were identified, reporting on 2,732 limbs (range 22-681). Four studies correlated truncal vein diameter with both clinical severity and HRQoL, while seven reported only on clinical severity measures. Multiple instruments were used to quantify HRQoL and clinical severity. Seven studies assessed the relationship with CEAP class, with the majority observing a positive correlation between vein diameter and disease severity. Four studies found weak correlations with VCSS, with one showing correlations with VCSS components. No significant relationship between diameters and HRQoL scores was reported. One study also revealed no correlation with Aberdeen Varicose Vein Questionnaire improvements post-treatment. The majority of studies failed to include C0 and C1 participants. CONCLUSIONS: While further studies are required to improve the level of evidence, the existing literature suggests that truncal vein diameters correlate with clinical severity. Diameters are a poor predictor of HRQoL, with no relationship to patients' perceived impact of chronic venous disease. As such, vein diameter should not be used as a measure to decide who needs venous intervention.


Assuntos
Doenças Vasculares Periféricas/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças Vasculares Periféricas/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Veia Safena/diagnóstico por imagem , Doença Crônica , Tomada de Decisão Clínica , Humanos , Seleção de Pacientes , Doenças Vasculares Periféricas/terapia , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Prognóstico , Fatores de Risco , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
Adv Ther ; 36(Suppl 1): 5-12, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30758738

RESUMO

Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a prevalent condition that tends to worsen with age. Patients initially seek treatment to relieve symptoms of leg pain, discomfort, heaviness and swelling, all of which impact their quality of life. As the disease increases in severity to include varicose veins, skin changes, and venous ulcer, the demand for treatment increases while the quality of life further diminishes. The prevalence of CVD is highest in Western countries where it already consumes up to 2% of healthcare budgets. With the aging of the global population, the prevalences of CVD and severe CVD are projected to increase substantially, foretelling unsustainably large increases in the healthcare resources and costs needed to treat CVD patients in the coming decades. Effective venoactive drug treatments and ablation procedures are available that provide symptom relief, improve quality of life, slow disease progression, and promote ulcer healing. In addition, venoactive drug treatments may be highly cost-effective. However, there is evidence that physician awareness of CVD is suboptimal and that many patients with CVD are not being treated or referred to specialists according to established guidelines. To decrease this treatment gap and prevent unnecessary disease progression, international guidelines are available to help physicians consider CVD treatment options and refer patients when warranted. Improved disease awareness and appropriate early treatment may help reduce the coming burden of CVD.Funding: Servier.


Assuntos
Extremidade Inferior/irrigação sanguínea , Qualidade de Vida , Doenças Vasculares/epidemiologia , Doença Crônica , Progressão da Doença , Humanos , Resultado do Tratamento , Doenças Vasculares/psicologia , Veias/fisiopatologia , Insuficiência Venosa/epidemiologia
20.
J Vasc Surg ; 69(5): 1567-1573, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30792054

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical efficacy of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) device to improve the absolute walking distance in patients with intermittent claudication as an adjunct to the local standard care available at the study sites compared with local standard care alone. METHODS: This open, multicenter, randomized controlled trial included eight participating centers in England. Sites are equally distributed between those that provide supervised exercise therapy programs and those that do not. Patients with intermittent claudication meeting the eligibility criteria and providing consent will be randomized, depending on the center type, to either NMES and locally available standard care or standard care alone. The primary end point is change in absolute walking distance at 3 months (the end of the intervention period) by treadmill testing. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, compliance with the interventions, economic evaluation of the NMES device, and lower limb hemodynamic measures to further the understanding of underlying mechanisms. Recruitment commenced in March 2018 and will continue for a total of 15 months. The Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Improves the Absolute Walking Distance in Patients with Intermittent Claudication trial is funded by the UK Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme, Medical Research Council, and National Institute for Health Research partnership.


Assuntos
Terapia por Estimulação Elétrica/métodos , Terapia por Exercício , Tolerância ao Exercício , Claudicação Intermitente/terapia , Músculo Esquelético/inervação , Terapia por Estimulação Elétrica/efeitos adversos , Inglaterra , Terapia por Exercício/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Claudicação Intermitente/diagnóstico , Claudicação Intermitente/fisiopatologia , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Teste de Caminhada
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