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1.
Radiology ; : 212151, 2022 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35916673

RESUMO

As the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in clinical practice evolves, governance structures oversee the implementation, maintenance, and monitoring of clinical AI algorithms to enhance quality, manage resources, and ensure patient safety. In this article, a framework is established for the infrastructure required for clinical AI implementation and presents a road map for governance. The road map answers four key questions: Who decides which tools to implement? What factors should be considered when assessing an application for implementation? How should applications be implemented in clinical practice? Finally, how should tools be monitored and maintained after clinical implementation? Among the many challenges for the implementation of AI in clinical practice, devising flexible governance structures that can quickly adapt to a changing environment will be essential to ensure quality patient care and practice improvement objectives.

2.
Acad Med ; 2022 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35921163

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Physician-scientists have long been considered an endangered species, and their extended training pathway is vulnerable to disruptions. This study investigated the effects of COVID-19-related challenges on the personal lives, career activities, stress levels, and research productivity of physician-scientist trainees and faculty. METHOD: The authors surveyed medical students (MS), graduate students (GS), residents/fellows (R/F), and faculty (F) using a tool distributed to 120 U.S. institutions with MD-PhD programs in April-June 2020. Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare differences between groups. Machine learning was employed to select variables for multivariate logistic regression analyses aimed at identifying factors associated with stress and impaired productivity. RESULTS: The analyses included 1,929 respondents (MS: n = 679, 35%; GS: n = 676, 35%; R/F: n = 274, 14%; F: n = 300, 16%). All cohorts reported high levels of social isolation, stress from effects of the pandemic, and negative impacts on productivity. R/F and F respondents were more likely than MS and GS respondents to report financial difficulties due to COVID-19. R/F and F respondents with a dual degree expressed more impaired productivity compared to those without a dual degree. Multivariate regression analyses identified impacted research/scholarly activities, financial difficulties, and social isolation as predictors of stress and impaired productivity for both MS and GS cohorts. For both R/F and F cohorts, impacted personal life and research productivity were associated with stress, while dual-degree status, impacted research/scholarly activities, and impacted personal life were predictors of impaired productivity. More female than male respondents reported increased demands at home. CONCLUSIONS: This national survey of physician-scientist trainees and faculty found a high incidence of stress and impaired productivity related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the challenges faced and their consequences may improve efforts to support the physician-scientist workforce in the post-pandemic period.

3.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 2022 Jul 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35871021

RESUMO

Artificial intelligence (AI)-based technologies are the most rapidly growing field of innovation in healthcare with the promise to achieve substantial improvements in delivery of patient care across all disciplines of medicine. Recent advances in imaging technology along with marked expansion of readily available advanced health information, data offer a unique opportunity for interventional radiology (IR) to reinvent itself as a data-driven specialty. Additionally, the growth of AI-based applications in diagnostic imaging is expected to have downstream effects on all image-guidance modalities. Therefore, the Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation has called upon 13 key opinion leaders in the field of IR to develop research priorities for clinical applications of AI in IR. The objectives of the assembled research consensus panel were to assess the availability and understand the applicability of AI for IR, estimate current needs and clinical use cases, and assemble a list of research priorities for the development of AI in IR. Individual panel members proposed and all participants voted upon consensus statements to rank them according to their overall impact for IR. The results identified the top priorities for the IR research community and provide organizing principles for innovative academic-industrial research collaborations that will leverage both clinical expertise and cutting-edge technology to benefit patient care in IR.

4.
Acad Radiol ; 2022 Jun 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35752573

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the New England Women in Radiology (NEWR) program, a new program aimed to generate speaking and networking opportunities for junior women radiologists in New England, by providing opportunities to speak at other academic institutions in the region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 12 academic radiology departments and 20 faculty members at various New England institutions participated in the program during its first year. An institutional survey was sent to all participating institutions and a faculty survey was sent to all participating faculty to assess their experience with the program. Experience was measured using a Likert scale. A word cloud was used to visualize common themes in free response survey questions. RESULTS: Hundred percent of participating institutions and 67% of participating faculty responded to the corresponding surveys. Hundred percent of responding faculty indicated that they would participate in the program again. Ninety-two percent of faculty said that they would recommend the program to a colleague. Fifty-eight percent found the networking opportunity valuable; while 83% believed that participation in the NEWR program would help them achieve a promotion. Hundred percent of the participating institutions who completed the survey strongly agreed that 1) the program was easy to administer, 2) participating in the program was valuable to their educational mission, and 3) participating in the program benefited the promotion of junior women faculty in their department. CONCLUSION: Initial experience with the NEWR program in its first year was positive amongst both faculty and institutional participants. To further help female junior faculty advance their careers in academia, the NEWR program could be adapted to other geographical locations to incorporate a greater number of institutions and faculty.

5.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 33(8): 987-992, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35500832

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To identify the variables associated with patient discharge disposition to optimize postprocedural care and discharge planning following lower extremity arterial interventions for peripheral artery disease (PAD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The 2014-2017 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried using current procedural terminology codes for endovascular infrainguinal interventions for PAD. The main outcome variable of interest was nonhome discharge. Covariates included patient sociodemographic variables, age quartile (upper quartile, ≥77 years), comorbidities (diabetes, renal disease, bleeding disorder, congestive heart failure [CHF], and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), presence of an open wound before a procedure, type of procedure, operative time, symptom severity, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and baseline functional status. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were performed on Stata/SE 15.1. RESULTS: A total of 3,190 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 664 (20.8%) had nonhome discharge. Multivariate regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.9 for the upper age quartile [>77 years]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-2.50), operative time (OR, 1.2 per increase in quartile; 95% CI, 1.09-1.30), preoperative wound (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.24-1.90), renal failure (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.30-2.14), CHF (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.51-3.24), symptom severity (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.46-1.98), and independent functional status (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.59-0.92; P = .007) were associated with nonhome discharge. All P values were ≤.001 unless otherwise stated. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged procedural time, the presence of preprocedural wound and patient comorbidities, symptomatology, and baseline functional status may be used to identify patients who will require a nonhome discharge and early discharge planning.


Assuntos
Alta do Paciente , Doença Arterial Periférica , Idoso , Humanos , Extremidade Inferior/irrigação sanguínea , Doença Arterial Periférica/diagnóstico por imagem , Doença Arterial Periférica/cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/cirurgia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares
7.
Acad Radiol ; 2022 May 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35606258

RESUMO

In 2019, the journal Radiology: Artificial Intelligence introduced its Trainee Editorial Board (TEB) to offer formal training in medical journalism to medical students, radiology residents and fellows, and research-career trainees. The TEB aims to build a community of radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and researchers in fields related to artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology. The program presented opportunities to learn about the editorial process, improve skills in writing and reviewing, advance the field of AI in radiology, and help translate and disseminate AI research. To meet these goals, TEB members contribute actively to the editorial process from peer review to publication, participate in educational webinars, and create and curate content in a variety of forms. Almost all of the contact has been mediated through the web. In this article, we share initial experiences and identify future directions and opportunities.

8.
Surgery ; 172(1): 470-475, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35489978

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Delays in admitting high-risk emergency surgery patients to the intensive care unit result in worse outcomes and increased health care costs. We aimed to use interpretable artificial intelligence technology to create a preoperative predictor for postoperative intensive care unit need in emergency surgery patients. METHODS: A novel, interpretable artificial intelligence technology called optimal classification trees was leveraged in an 80:20 train:test split of adult emergency surgery patients in the 2007-2017 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Demographics, comorbidities, and laboratory values were used to develop, train, and then validate optimal classification tree algorithms to predict the need for postoperative intensive care unit admission. The latter was defined as postoperative death or the development of 1 or more postoperative complications warranting critical care (eg, unplanned intubation, ventilator requirement ≥48 hours, cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and septic shock). An interactive and user-friendly application was created. C statistics were used to measure performance. RESULTS: A total of 464,861 patients were included. The mean age was 55 years, 48% were male, and 11% developed severe postoperative complications warranting critical care. The Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application was created as the user-friendly interface of the complex optimal classification tree algorithms. The number of questions (ie, tree depths) needed to predict intensive care unit admission ranged from 2 to 11. The Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application had excellent discrimination for predicting the need for intensive care unit admission (C statistics: 0.89 train, 0.88 test). CONCLUSION: We recommend the Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application as an accurate, artificial intelligence-based tool for predicting severe complications warranting intensive care unit admission after emergency surgery. The Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application can prove useful to triage patients to the intensive care unit and to potentially decrease failure to rescue in emergency surgery patients.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Smartphone , Adulto , Cuidados Críticos , Feminino , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
9.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol ; 45(5): 633-640, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35322303

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Severe peripheral artery disease (PAD) may result in lower extremity amputation or require multiple procedures to achieve limb salvage. Current prediction models for major amputation risk have had limited performance at the individual level. We developed an interpretable machine learning model that will allow clinicians to identify patients at risk of amputation and optimize treatment decisions for PAD patients. METHODS: We utilized the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to collect preoperative clinical and laboratory information on 14,444 patients who underwent lower extremity endovascular procedures for PAD from 2011 to 2018. Using data from 2011 to 2017 for training and data from 2018 for testing, we developed a machine learning model to predict 30 day amputation in this patient population. We present performance metrics overall and stratified by race, sex, and age. We also demonstrate model interpretability using Gini importance and SHapley Additive exPlanations. RESULTS: A random forest machine learning model achieved an area under the receiver-operator curve (AU-ROC) of 0.81. The most important features of the model were elective surgery designation, claudication, open wound/wound infection, white blood cell count, and albumin. The model performed equally well on white and non-white patients (Delong p-value = 0.189), males and females (Delong p-value = 0.572), and patients under age 65 and patients age 65 and older (Delong p-value = 0.704). CONCLUSION: We present a machine learning model that predicts 30 day major amputation events in PAD patients undergoing lower extremity endovascular procedures. This model can optimize clinical decision-making for patients with PAD.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Endovasculares , Doença Arterial Periférica , Idoso , Amputação , Procedimentos Endovasculares/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Salvamento de Membro/métodos , Extremidade Inferior/irrigação sanguínea , Extremidade Inferior/cirurgia , Aprendizado de Máquina , Masculino , Doença Arterial Periférica/diagnóstico por imagem , Doença Arterial Periférica/cirurgia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
10.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(2 Pt B): 359-365, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35152961

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Synchronous virtual visits are an emerging model of care, and their feasibility has been demonstrated in radiology. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of point-of-care virtual radiology primary care consultations for atherosclerotic vascular disease management. METHODS: In this institutional review board-approved study, 107 age- and gender-matched patients were assigned to control (n = 62) and intervention (n = 45) arms with the following inclusion criteria: (1) age > 45 years, (2) consult with a primary care physician (PCP), and (3) recent CT of the chest or abdomen demonstrating atherosclerotic calcification. In the intervention arm, virtual real-time radiology consultation with referring PCPs and patients was conducted, with review of CT images focused on the extent of vascular atherosclerosis. Patients in the control arm followed the current standard of care of PCPs' discussing relevant imaging results, if any. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients in the intervention arm and 31 patients in the control arm completed the study (control: 64.5% women; mean age, 68 years; intervention: 67.7% women; mean age, 67 years). Discussion of imaging findings occurred with all patients in the intervention arm (discussion with PCP and virtual consultation with radiologist) and with 45% of patients in the control arm (PCP only; P < .001). All patients in the intervention arm indicated that seeing or discussing their images improved their understanding of their disease, compared with 85% of patients in the control arm (P = .04). In the intervention arm, 10 of 31 patients (32.2%) left the visit with changes in prescriptions for statins or antihypertensive medications, compared with only 4 of 31 patients (13%) in the control arm (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Point-of-care radiology virtual visits enhance patient understanding and may influence the longitudinal management of atherosclerotic disease in primary care.


Assuntos
Aterosclerose , Radiologia , Idoso , Aterosclerose/diagnóstico por imagem , Aterosclerose/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Encaminhamento e Consulta
11.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 33(5): 578-585.e3, 2022 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35114399

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study sought to define gender-related differences in attitudes, perceptions, and aspirations among trainees interested in interventional radiology (IR) and to analyze their experiences in research and mentorship. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among the members of the Society of Interventional Radiology Resident, Fellow, and Student section and Medical Student section in the summer of 2020. The anonymous, internally validated 27-item survey assessed demographics, research attitudes and experiences, mentorship, and career aspirations. Descriptive statistics were calculated using Fisher exact analyses and Student t-tests. The institutional review board approved the protocols for this study. RESULTS: Of 105 respondents who indicated their gender, 30% were women and 70% were men. Although both genders reported similar levels of research experience, female trainees were less likely to feel valued and encouraged by their institution to engage in research (2.79 out of 4 vs 3.16 out of 4, P = .02) and were less likely to indicate that their program required them to participate in research (2.47 vs 3.06, P = .01). Female residents and fellows reported more difficulty in finding a mentor (2.88 vs 3.28, P = .04) and received less mentorship relating to IR education (29% vs 64%, P = .002). CONCLUSIONS: This work provides a perspective on the perceived obstacles faced by female trainees in pursuing research and finding effective mentorship in the field of IR. These data may guide future interventions to boost interest and engagement in IR research and residency programs in a way that promotes gender diversity and equity in the field.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Tutoria , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Tutoria/métodos , Mentores , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 219(1): 164-165, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35080459

RESUMO

We describe our experience in synchronous virtual radiologist consultations, whereby a radiologist at the PACS uses a conferencing platform to join a primary care visit between a patient at home and a referring provider, at home or at clinic, to directly explain imaging results and partner with the referrer in forming management recommendations. We explore the model's significance in the context of patient-centered care. Implementation, obstacles, and potential impact on health care disparities are also discussed.


Assuntos
Radiologia , Humanos , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , Radiografia , Radiologistas , Radiologia/métodos , Encaminhamento e Consulta
13.
Acad Radiol ; 29(3): 402-408, 2022 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34116925

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To characterize the use of gender-specific (chairman) and non-inclusive terminology (chief) to describe departmental and divisional/sectional leadership within academic radiology department and radiological society websites. METHODS: From a total of 157 unique institutions identified, we gathered a list of 123 departments with functioning websites. We screened for use of "chairman" and "chief" on departmental home pages, welcome messages, faculty listings, and residency program pages, noting location on websites, and alternative terms, if present. We also assessed for use of "chairman" through a list of 14 radiological society websites. The overall usage of these terms was determined and the relationships between geographic region, faculty gender, and use of terminology were assessed. RESULTS: "Chairman" is common among radiology department websites, with 42.1% (51/121) of websites using the term at least once. Usage of "chairman" was higher in departments whose chairs were men (OR 4.32, 95% CI: 1.36-13.69) and lower in those located in the Midwest (versus Northeast, OR 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12-0.96). Use of "chief" is extremely common among departments listing divisional leadership, at 82.7% (67/81). Alternative terms used included "chair," "head," "chairperson," and "director." Among departments, the proportion of women in leadership roles is low, representing 19.7% (22/122) of chairs and 31.1% (272/874) of other leadership. Radiological societies were unlikely to use "chairman," with only one website using the term. CONCLUSION: Use of "chairman" and "chief" is frequent among academic radiology departments. Further efforts should be made to assess the usage of non-inclusive terminology and its potential impact within academic radiology departments.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Serviço Hospitalar de Radiologia , Radiologia , Docentes , Docentes de Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Masculino , Estados Unidos
14.
Acad Radiol ; 29(2): 175-180, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33293255

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Although the evidence for the benefits of breastfeeding is strong, parents are often unable to continue breastfeeding upon returning from maternity leave for a variety of reasons. Breastfeeding parents in medicine face unique challenges upon returning to the workforce after maternity leave. Current research on breastfeeding radiologists is limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate breastfeeding barriers and identify potential solutions to help radiologists reach their breastfeeding goals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 17-question survey was developed from validated surveys and pilot tested using focus groups. The survey was emailed to members of the American Association for Women in Radiology and promoted through social media. Bivariate analyses were performed using chi-square tests. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Institutional review board deemed that this anonymous voluntary survey met criteria for exemption. RESULTS: 50 respondents met criteria for study inclusion (estimated response rate 42%). Of the respondents, 60% were trainees, 80% practiced in academic institutions and 92% were full-time. 100% intended to breastfeed, of whom 56% met personal breastfeeding goals (12-month median duration). Available lactation facilities included: Dedicated lactation room (38%), private space (58%), hospital grade pump (30%), refrigerator (46%), dedicated PACS (8%). Cited workplace challenges included lack of time (82%), lack of space (34%), and unsupportive work culture (42%). Having adequate time was associated with meeting breastfeeding goals (p = 0.028). No other factors were statistically significant (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Almost half of breastfeeding radiologists (44%) did not meet breastfeeding goals, citing a variety of facility-based and institutional barriers. Among these, having sufficient time to pump/breastfeed was associated with achieving breastfeeding goals. Given the barriers faced by breastfeeding radiologists, there is an opportunity to make structural and cultural changes to provide lactation support at work.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , Radiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactação , Gravidez , Radiologistas , Apoio Social , Local de Trabalho
15.
Int J Hyperthermia ; 39(1): 34-39, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34937523

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To assess the impact of periprocedural factors, including adverse events, on overall patient survival following image-guided liver tumor cryoablation procedures. METHODS: In this retrospective single-institution study, 143 patients (73 male, 70 female, ages 29-88) underwent 169 image-guided liver tumor cryoablation procedures between October 1998 and August 2014. Patient, tumor and procedural variables were recorded. The primary outcome was overall survival post-procedure (Kaplan-Meier analysis). Secondary outcomes were the impact of 15 variables on patient survival, which were assessed with multivariate cox regression and log-rank tests. RESULTS: Mean tumor diameter was 2.5 ± 1.2 cm. 26 of 143 (18.2%) patients had primary hepatic malignancies; 117 of 143 (81.8%) had liver metastases. Survival analysis revealed survivor functions at 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 years post-ablation of 0.54, 0.37, 0.30, 0.17 and 0.06, with mean survival time of 40.8 ± 4.9 months. Tumor size ≥4 cm (p = .018), pre-procedural platelet count <100 × 103/µL (p = .023), and prior local radiation therapy (p = .014) were associated with worse overall patient survival. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were not associated with reduced survival (p = .49). CONCLUSIONS: All variables associated with overall survival were patient-related and none were associated with the cryoablation procedure. Pre-procedural thrombocytopenia, larger tumor size and history of prior local radiation therapy were independent risk factors for reduced overall survival in patients undergoing hepatic cryoablation. Adverse events related to hepatic cryoablation were not associated with decreased survival.


Assuntos
Criocirurgia , Neoplasias Hepáticas , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criocirurgia/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Neoplasias Hepáticas/etiologia , Neoplasias Hepáticas/radioterapia , Neoplasias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Acad Radiol ; 2021 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34862123

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To ascertain the perceived obstacles that medical students and Interventional Radiology (IR) residents face performing IR research during training and incorporating research into their future careers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was reviewed and exempt from Institutional Review Board review. Participants' attitudes and perceived barriers toward performing IR research, and experience with mentorship in IR were assessed using a 27-item survey sent to all members of the Society of Interventional Radiology Resident, Fellow and Student (SIR-RFS, n = 445), and Medical Student Council (SIR-MSC, n = 267) sections between July and September 2020. Descriptive statistics were computed for all assessed categorical variables. Fisher's exact tests were performed to measure the significance of association between categorical variables. RESULTS: Of the 712 students and residents surveyed, 151 (∼21%) responded. Of respondents, 100% reported that conducting research is important to advancing the field of IR. The highest ranked factors and obstacles to performing IR research were increased clinical demands (67.9%), lack of time (46.2%), lack of institutional support (41.5%), and lack of research experience (35.8%). Interestingly, those with a mentor were more likely to report an interest in pursuing a career in IR compared to those without a mentor (98.6% vs 41.0%, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, those with a mentor were more likely to report an interest in pursuing IR research compared to those without a mentor (32.5% vs 14.4%, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: There are many obstacles to performing IR research. Strong mentorship is an avenue to address these deterrents. The deployment of mentorship programs in IR is needed to ensure trainees can overcome the barriers outlined in this study and successfully pursue research careers in IR.

17.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 591, 2021 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34823508

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Though the proportion of women in medical schools has increased, gender disparities among those who pursue research careers still exists. In this study, we seek to better understand the main factors contributing to the existing gender disparities among medical students choosing to pursue careers in medical research. METHODS: A secondary cross-sectional cohort analysis of previously published data was conducted using a 70-item survey that was sent to 16,418 medical students at 32 academic medical centers, and was IRB exempt from the need for ethical approval at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania. Data was collected from September 2012 to December 2014. Survey results were analyzed using chi-square tests and Cramer's V to determine gender differences in demographic characteristics (training stage, race/ethnicity, marital status, parental status, financial support, and parental career background), career sector choice, career content choice, specialty choice, foreseeable career obstacles, and perceptions about medical research careers. RESULTS: Female respondents were more likely to be enrolled in MD-only programs, while male respondents were more likely to be enrolled in MD/PhD programs. More male students selected academia as their first-choice career sector, while more female respondents selected hospitalist as their first-choice career sector. More female respondents identified patient care and opportunities for community service as their top career selection factors, while more male respondents identified research and teaching as their top career selection factors. Student loan burden, future compensation, and work/life balance were the most reported obstacles to pursuing a career in medical research. CONCLUSIONS: There are many factors from a medical student's perspective that may contribute to the existing gender disparities in pursuing a career in medical research. While much progress has been made in attracting nearly equal numbers of men and women to the field of medicine, active efforts to bridge the gap between men and women in medical research careers are needed.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica , Estudantes de Medicina , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(11): 1581-1584, 2021 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34391700

Assuntos
Liderança
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