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1.
J Clin Microbiol ; 58(5)2020 Apr 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32132192

RESUMO

Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae at the pharyngeal, urogenital, and anorectal sites is recommended for men who have sex with men (MSM). Combining the three individual-site samples into a single pooled sample could result in significant cost savings, provided there is no significant sensitivity reduction. The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity of pooled samples for detecting chlamydia and gonorrhea in asymptomatic MSM using a nucleic acid amplification test. Asymptomatic MSM who tested positive for chlamydia or gonorrhoea were invited to participate. Paired samples were obtained from participants prior to administration of treatment. To form the pooled sample, the anorectal swab was agitated in the urine specimen transport tube and then discarded. The pharyngeal swab and 2 ml of urine sample were then added to the tube. The difference in sensitivity between testing of pooled samples and individual-site testing was calculated against an expanded gold standard, where an individual is considered positive if either pooled-sample or individual-site testing returns a positive result. All samples were tested using the Aptima Combo 2 assay. A total of 162 MSM were enrolled in the study. Sensitivities of pooled-sample testing were 86% (94/109; 95% confidence interval [CI], 79 to 92%]) for chlamydia and 91% (73/80; 95% CI, 83 to 96%) for gonorrhea. The sensitivity reduction was significant for chlamydia (P = 0.02) but not for gonorrhea (P = 0.34). Pooling caused 22 infections (15 chlamydia and 7 gonorrhoea) to be missed, and the majority were single-site infections (19/22). Pooling urogenital and extragenital samples from asymptomatic MSM reduced the sensitivity of detection by approximately 10% for chlamydia but not for gonorrhea.

2.
J Med Microbiol ; 69(2): 244-248, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31958047

RESUMO

Introduction. Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted organism with high levels of resistance to the recommended first-line therapy, azithromycin. The ResistancePlus MG test concurrently detects M. genitalium, and the presence of macrolide-resistance mutations (MRM). European, UK and Australian guidelines recommend a diagnostic test that reports MRM to optimize treatment through resistance-guided therapy. Hence, for samples collected for use on other platforms, reflex testing using the ResistancePlus MG test would be beneficial.Aim. To validate the ResistancePlus MG assay using samples collected in Aptima buffer for testing on the Hologic Panther.Methodology. Positive (n=99) and negative (n=229) clinical samples collected in Aptima buffer were extracted on the MagNA Pure 96 (Roche Diagnostics), and tested with the ResistancePlus MG test on the LightCycler 480 II (Roche Diagnostics). Results were compared to matched samples collected using standard sample collection (urine or swab resuspended in PBS), with positive percent agreement (PPA), negative percent agreement (NPA) and Cohen's Kappa statistic.Results. The ResistancePlus MG test had high performance with a 200 µl input volume (PPA/NPA for M. genitalium detection, 92.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI): 85.5-96.9]/100 % [95 % CI: 97.9-100], MRM detection, 96.9 % [95 % CI: 88.2-99.5]/85.7 % [95 % CI: 66.4-95.3]) and for 1 ml input volume (PPA/NPA for M. genitalium detection, 95.9%/96.6%, MRM detection, 98.4%/90.3%). Samples remained positive after storage at room temperature beyond the manufacturer-recommended storage of <60 days (mean storage time for 1 ml extraction: 129 days).Conclusion. Samples collected using Aptima collection kits are suitable for reflex testing using the ResistancePlus MG test, allowing detection of macrolide resistance.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/métodos , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana , Infecções por Mycoplasma/microbiologia , Mycoplasma genitalium/efeitos dos fármacos , Mycoplasma genitalium/isolamento & purificação , Austrália , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/instrumentação , Humanos , Macrolídeos/farmacologia , Infecções por Mycoplasma/diagnóstico , Mycoplasma genitalium/genética , Kit de Reagentes para Diagnóstico , Manejo de Espécimes
3.
Sex Transm Infect ; 96(1): 10-18, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31217322

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: There are limited data on the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium (Mgen) coinfection with rectal chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis (CT)) and rectal gonorrhoea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG)) infections and few studies examining the prevalence of pharyngeal Mgen in men who have sex with men (MSM). Using transcription-mediated amplification assay, this study aimed to determine the proportion of rectal CT and rectal NG infections in MSM who are coinfected with rectal Mgen, and the proportion of MSM with Mgen detected in the pharynx in order to inform clinical practice. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in Australia. Consecutively collected rectal swabs from MSM that tested positive for CT (n=212) or NG (n=212), and consecutively collected pharyngeal samples (n=480) from MSM were tested for Mgen using the Aptima Mycoplasma genitalium Assay (Hologic, San Diego). Samples were linked to demographic data and symptom status. RESULTS: Rectal Mgen was codetected in 27 of 212 rectal CT (13%, 95% CI 9 to 18) and in 29 of 212 rectal NG (14%, 95% CI 9 to 19) samples, with no difference in the proportion positive for Mgen. MSM with rectal CT/Mgen coinfection had more sexual partners than those with rectal CT monoinfection (mean 6 vs 11, p=0.06). MSM with rectal NG/Mgen coinfection were more likely to be HIV-positive than those with rectal NG monoinfection (OR=2.96, 95% CI 1.21 to 7.26, p=0.023). MSM with rectal CT/Mgen coinfection were more likely to be using pre-exposure prophylaxis than MSM with rectal NG/Mgen coinfection (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.65, p=0.002). Pharyngeal Mgen was uncommon and detected in 8 of 464 samples (2%, 95% CI 1% to 3%). Pharyngeal Mgen was associated with having a rectal STI (OR=10.61, 95% CI 2.30 to 48.87, p=0.002), and there was a borderline association with being HIV-positive (p=0.079). CONCLUSION: These data indicate one in seven MSM treated for rectal CT or rectal NG will have undiagnosed Mgen that is potentially exposed to azithromycin during treatment of these STIs. Rectal Mgen coinfection was associated with specific risk factors which may inform testing practices. Pharyngeal Mgen was uncommon.


Assuntos
Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Mycoplasma/epidemiologia , Doenças Retais/epidemiologia , Reto/microbiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Austrália/epidemiologia , Infecções por Chlamydia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Chlamydia/microbiologia , Chlamydia trachomatis/classificação , Chlamydia trachomatis/genética , Chlamydia trachomatis/isolamento & purificação , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/microbiologia , Estudos Transversais , Gonorreia/epidemiologia , Gonorreia/microbiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infecções por Mycoplasma/microbiologia , Mycoplasma genitalium/classificação , Mycoplasma genitalium/genética , Mycoplasma genitalium/isolamento & purificação , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/classificação , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genética , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolamento & purificação , Faringe/microbiologia , Doenças Retais/microbiologia , Comportamento Sexual , Adulto Jovem
4.
J Clin Microbiol ; 58(1)2019 Dec 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31694973

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to determine whether Chlamydia trachomatis could be detected in saliva and if infection is specific to an anatomical site in the oropharynx. Men who have sex with men (MSM) who were diagnosed with oropharyngeal chlamydia at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in 2017-2018 were invited to participate upon returning for treatment. Swabs at the tonsillar fossae and posterior oropharynx and a saliva sample were collected. Throat samples were tested for C. trachomatis by the Aptima Combo 2 assay. The bacterial loads of C. trachomatis in all samples were assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) detecting the ompA gene. We calculated the positivity and bacterial load of C. trachomatis for all samples. Forty-two MSM were included. The median age was 28 years (interquartile range [IQR], 24 to 33 years). Thirty-two participants (76.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 60.5% to 87.9%) had C. trachomatis detected by qPCR at both the tonsillar fossae and the posterior oropharynx, followed by 9.5% (n = 4; 95% CI, 2.7% to 22.6%) positive at the posterior oropharynx only and 4.8% (n = 2; 95% CI, 0.58% to 16.2%) positive at the tonsillar fossae only. Twenty-nine MSM had C. trachomatis detected in saliva (69.0%; 95% CI, 52.9% to 82.3%). The median C. trachomatis load in saliva was 446 copies/ml (IQR, 204 to 1,390 copies/ml), that in the tonsillar fossae was 893 copies/swab (IQR, 390 to 13,224 copies/ml), and that in the posterior oropharynx was 1,204 copies/swab (IQR, 330 to 16,211). There was no significant difference in C. trachomatis load between the tonsillar fossae and the posterior oropharynx (P = 0.119). Among MSM with oropharyngeal chlamydia, nearly three-quarters had chlamydia DNA detected in saliva, although the viability and implications for transmission are unknown.

5.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 6(9): ofz326, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31660405

RESUMO

Improved knowledge of factors that promote outbreaks of enteric pathogens among men who have sex with men (MSM) could enable targeted public health interventions. We detected enteric pathogens in 57 of 519 (11%) asymptomatic MSM, and we found that enteric pathogen detection was associated with both oroanal sex (rimming) and group sex.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31383663

RESUMO

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major public health problem. Traditionally, AMR surveillance programs for N. gonorrhoeae have focused mainly on laboratory data to describe the prevalence and trends of resistance. However, integrating individual-level risk factors (e.g., sexual orientation or international travel) with laboratory data provides important insights into factors promoting the spread of resistant N. gonorrhoeae Here, over a 12-year period, we assessed the trends and risk factors for resistant N. gonorrhoeae in individuals attending a large publicly funded sexual health center in Melbourne, Australia. A total of 7,588 N. gonorrhoeae isolates were cultured from 5,593 individuals between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2018. The proportion of isolates with penicillin resistance decreased from 49.5% in 2007 to 18.3% in 2018 (p trend < 0.001) and from 63.5% in 2007 to 21.1% in 2018 for ciprofloxacin resistance (p trend < 0.001). In contrast, the proportion of isolates displaying decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone increased from 0.5% in 2007 to 2.9% in 2018 (p trend < 0.001), with a significant increase in low-level azithromycin resistance, from 2.5% in 2012 to 8.2% in 2018 (p trend < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified risk factors for multidrug-resistant (MDR) N. gonorrhoeae, namely, female sex and country of birth, with MDR isolates more common in individuals born in northeast Asia, further highlighting the importance of this region and international travel as factors in the cross-border transmission of MDR N. gonorrhoeae Future surveillance work should incorporate additional epidemiological and genomic data to provide a comprehensive overview of the emergence and spread of resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

7.
Sex Transm Infect ; 95(6): 398-401, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31113904

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Victorian legislation requires sex workers to have quarterly screening for genital chlamydia and gonorrhoea, but screening for oropharyngeal infection is not mandatory in Victoria, Australia. In 2017, oropharyngeal screening for gonorrhoea and chlamydia was added as part of the routine quarterly screening for sex workers attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC). The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea and chlamydia among female sex workers (FSW). METHODS: We included females who (1) self-identified as sex workers or were attended MSHC for a sex work certificate and (2) had tested for any STI or HIV, between March 2015 and December 2017. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhoea was calculated. RESULTS: There were 8538 FSW consultations among 2780 individuals during the study period. There was a twofold increase in genital gonorrhoea (from 0.5% (95% CI 0.3% to 0.9%) to 1.1% (95% CI 0.8% to 1.5%); ptrend=0.047) and a 1.5-fold increase in genital chlamydia (from 2.2% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.8%) to 3.2% (95% CI 2.6% to 3.8%); ptrend=0.031) during the period. Overall, the prevalence of HIV (0.2% (95% CI 0.1% to 0.3%)) and syphilis (0.1% (95% CI 0.0% to 0.2%)) remained low and did not change over time. In 2017, the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea was 2.0% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.6%) and oropharyngeal chlamydia was 2.1% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.7%). Among FSW who were tested positive for gonorrhoea and chlamydia, 55% (n=41) and 34% (n=45) only tested positive in the oropharynx but not genital for gonorrhoea and chlamydia, respectively. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea and chlamydia is similar to the prevalence at genital sites and is often independent of genital infection. It is important to test the oropharynx and genital site for chlamydia and gonorrhoea among FSW.


Assuntos
Infecções por Chlamydia/diagnóstico , Genitália/microbiologia , Gonorreia/diagnóstico , Orofaringe/microbiologia , Profissionais do Sexo/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Austrália/epidemiologia , Infecções por Chlamydia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Chlamydia/microbiologia , Chlamydia trachomatis/classificação , Chlamydia trachomatis/genética , Chlamydia trachomatis/isolamento & purificação , Feminino , Gonorreia/epidemiologia , Gonorreia/microbiologia , Humanos , Programas de Rastreamento , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/classificação , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genética , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolamento & purificação , Prevalência , Sífilis/diagnóstico , Sífilis/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
8.
Sex Transm Dis ; 45(2): 103-106, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29329179

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To help inform screening guidelines, we estimated the proportion of asymptomatic men who have sex with men (MSM) with oropharyngeal chlamydia. STUDY DESIGN: An audit of asymptomatic MSM attending a sexual health service from March 2015 to April 2016 was conducted. They each had an oropharyngeal swab that was tested for Chlamydia trachomatis by transcription-mediated nucleic acid amplification. In addition, a random sample of 17 swabs that initially tested positive had confirmatory testing to determine the likelihood of true positivity. RESULTS: We collected 4877 oropharyngeal swabs: 72 (1.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.9) were diagnosed positive for chlamydia. Most (n = 56 [78%]; 95% CI, 67-86) only had oropharyngeal chlamydia detected (i.e., no concurrent extraoropharyngeal chlamydia and/or gonorrhea). Of the 17 samples that underwent confirmation, all confirmed positive (100%; 95% CI, 82-100). CONCLUSIONS: Although oropharyngeal chlamydia prevalence was low among asymptomatic MSM, most oropharyngeal chlamydia cases had no chlamydia at other sites, and these cases would have been missed and not treated if routine oropharyngeal chlamydia testing was not done.


Assuntos
Infecções por Chlamydia/diagnóstico , Chlamydia trachomatis/isolamento & purificação , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Doenças Assintomáticas , Infecções por Chlamydia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Chlamydia/microbiologia , Estudos Transversais , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Orofaringe/microbiologia , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos
9.
Sex Transm Dis ; 44(2): 114-117, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27984552

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This before-and-after study measured the impact of a change in testing methods from culture to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) on the detection of pharyngeal and rectal gonorrhea in men who have sex with men (MSM) on a sexual health service level, including the effect on subgroups anticipated to have higher rates of gonorrhea. METHODS: In March 2015, Melbourne Sexual Health Centre changed its laboratory method for gonococcal testing from culture to NAAT using the Aptima Combo 2 and Aptima GC tests. We compared the proportion of tests positive for rectal and pharyngeal gonorrhea in MSM using culture in 2014 with those using NAAT in 2015. RESULTS: The proportion of tests positive for rectal gonorrhea by NAAT was double that obtained by culture (8% vs 3.9%; prevalence ratio [PR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-2.4) and 5-fold for pharyngeal gonorrhea (8.3% vs 1.6%; PR, 5.2; 95% CI, 4.2-6.4). Similar increases in test positivity were observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative men. By NAAT, test positivity for rectal gonorrhea was higher in HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative men (15.4% vs 7.3%; PR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.7-2.6). Culture and NAAT had similar test positivity for rectal gonorrhea among men who reported contact with gonorrhea (24.9% vs 25.3%, PR 1.0, 95% CI 0.8-1.4) and men who presented with symptoms of proctitis (22.2% vs 27.9%, PR 1.3, 95% CI 0.8-2.0). CONCLUSIONS: A switch from culture to Aptima Combo 2 testing for extragenital gonorrhea in MSM increased detection and was most marked for pharyngeal infections.


Assuntos
Gonorreia/diagnóstico , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolamento & purificação , Técnicas de Amplificação de Ácido Nucleico/métodos , Doenças Faríngeas/diagnóstico , Doenças Retais/diagnóstico , Gonorreia/microbiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genética , Doenças Faríngeas/microbiologia , Faringe/microbiologia , Prevalência , Doenças Retais/epidemiologia , Doenças Retais/microbiologia , Reto/microbiologia , Comportamento Sexual , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Vitória/epidemiologia
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