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1.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(9): 778-787, 2020 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32379118

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is no consensus whether the interim antibiotic spacer utilized in the 2-stage exchange arthroplasty should immobilize the joint or allow for motion. The purpose of this multicenter, randomized clinical trial was to compare static and articulating spacers as part of the 2-stage exchange arthroplasty for the treatment of chronic periprosthetic joint infection complicating total knee arthroplasty as defined with use of Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria. METHODS: Sixty-eight patients undergoing 2-stage exchange arthroplasty were randomized to either a static (32 patients) or an articulating (36 patients) spacer. An a priori power analysis determined that 28 patients per group would be necessary to detect a 13° difference in range of motion between groups. Six patients were excluded after randomization, 6 died, and 7 were lost to follow-up before 2 years. RESULTS: Patients in the static group had a hospital length of stay that was 1 day greater than the articulating group after stage 1 (6.1 compared with 5.1 days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3 to 6.9 days and 4.6 to 5.6 days, respectively; p = 0.032); no other differences were noted perioperatively. At a mean of 3.5 years (range, 2.0 to 6.4 years), 49 patients were available for evaluation. The mean motion arc was 113.0° (95% CI, 108.4° to 117.6°) in the articulating spacer group, compared with 100.2° (95% CI, 94.2° to 106.1°) in the static spacer group (p = 0.001). The mean Knee Society Score was higher in the articulating spacer cohort (79.4 compared with 69.8 points; 95% CI, 72.4 to 86.3 and 63.6 to 76.1, respectively; p = 0.043). Although not significantly different with the sample size studied, static spacers were associated with a greater need for an extensile exposure at the time of reimplantation (16.7% compared with 4.0%; 95% CI, 0.6% to 38.9% and 0.5% to 26.3%, respectively; p = 0.189) and a higher rate of reoperation (25.0% compared with 8.0%; 95% CI, 9.8% to 46.7% and 1.0% to 26.0%, respectively; p = 0.138). CONCLUSIONS: Articulating spacers provided significantly greater range of motion and higher Knee Society scores at a mean of 3.5 years. Static spacers were associated with a longer hospital stay following removal of the infected implant. When the soft-tissue envelope allows and if there is adequate osseous support, an articulating spacer is associated with improved outcomes. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

2.
J Arthroplasty ; 2020 Mar 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32229148

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A contemporary, porous-coated acetabular implant designed for uncemented insertion was introduced in Europe and Australia in 2007. A similar previous acetabular system was found in several studies at 10 to 15-year follow-up to demonstrate accelerated polyethylene wear, osteolysis, and early failure. The current study was conducted to determine the midterm safety and effectiveness of this contemporary acetabular system using highly crosslinked polyethylene and ceramic liners at 5-year follow-up. METHODS: A prospective, nonrandomized study was conducted at 8 sites in Canada and the United States. All 148 study participants received a contemporary acetabular shell with proprietary porous coating. The primary outcome was the requirement for revision surgery at 5 years postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included a survival analysis, patient-reported outcome measures, radiographic failure, and postoperative adverse events. RESULTS: At 5-year follow-up there was 1 cup revised for deep infection. No cups were revised for loosening and none were found to be radiographically loose. The overall survival rate with reoperation for any reason was 97.1%. The success rate was 96.8% for polyethylene and 100% for ceramic with no difference in the success rate between either bearing surface (P = 1.0). The mean patient-reported outcome measures all improved significantly between preoperative and 5-year postoperative scores (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Results from this 5-year, multicenter, prospective study indicate excellent survivorship for this acetabular system when used with crosslinked polyethylene or ceramic bearing surfaces.

3.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 2020 Apr 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32251139

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Unused opioid pills are a danger to patients and their loved ones as they may be diverted for abuse or misuse. The purpose of this study was to determine the baseline rate of proper disposal of unused opioids among patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty and to determine how education impacts disposal rates. METHODS: In this study, 563 patients undergoing primary total joint arthroplasty (183 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty, 293 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, and 87 patients undergoing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty) were cluster-randomized to groups that received no education, educational pamphlets, or educational pamphlets plus text messages. Patients were randomized by education class and were blinded to participation to avoid behavioral modifications. Patients were surveyed at 6 weeks postoperatively to determine if they disposed of their unused opioid pills using a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-recommended method, which was the primary outcome. Assuming a 15% difference in opioid disposal rates as clinically relevant, power analysis determined that 76 patients with unused opioids were required per group (228 total). An as-treated analysis was conducted with the Fisher exact text and analysis of variance with alpha = 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 539 patients (95.7%) completed the survey, and 342 patients (63.5%) had unused opioid pills at 6 weeks postoperatively: 89 patients in the no education group, 128 patients in the pamphlet group, and 125 patients in the pamphlet and text message group. Of these 342 patients, 9.0% of patients in the no education group, 32.8% of patients in the pamphlet group, and 38.4% of patients in the pamphlet and text message group properly disposed of their unused opioids (p = 0.001 for each educational intervention compared with no education). Unused opioid pills were kept by 82.0% of patients in the no education group, 64.1% of patients in the pamphlet group, and 54.4% of patients in the pamphlet and text message group (p < 0.001 for the no education group compared with either educational strategy group). Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty were more likely to properly dispose of their unused opioids compared with those who underwent total knee arthroplasty (odds ratio, 2.1; p = 0.005). There were no demographic differences between groups, including inpatient opioid use, refills, and preoperative opioid use, other than sex (41.5% male patients in the no education group, 55.0% male patients in the pamphlet group, and 37.4% male patients in the pamphlet and text message group; p = 0.001), suggesting appropriate randomization. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of opioid disposal is very low after total joint arthroplasty. Education on opioid disposal more than triples opioid disposal rates compared with no education. To help to prevent diversion of unused opioid pills, all patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty should be educated on the proper disposal of unused opioids.

4.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(6S): S246-S251, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32146109

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether posterior hip precautions after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) reduce the incidence of early postoperative dislocation. METHODS: We performed a prospective randomized study to evaluate the effect of hip precautions on incidence of early dislocation after primary THA using a posterior approach. Between January 2016 and April 2019, 587 patients (594 hips) were consented and randomized into restricted or unrestricted groups. No significant demographic or surgical differences existed between groups. The restricted group was instructed to refrain from hip flexion >90°, adduction across midline, and internal rotation for 6 weeks. 98.5% (585 of 594) of hips were available for minimum 6-week follow-up (291 restricted and 294 unrestricted). Power analysis showed that 579 hips per group are needed to demonstrate an increase in dislocation rate from 0.5% to 2.5% with 80% power. RESULTS: At average follow-up of 15 weeks (range, 6-88), there were 5 dislocations (incidence, 0.85%). Three posterior dislocations occurred in the restricted group at a mean of 32 days (range, 17-47), and 2 posterior dislocations occurred in the unrestricted group at a mean of 112 days (range, 21-203), with no difference in dislocation rate between groups (1.03% vs 0.68%; odds ratio, 0.658; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-3.96; P = .647). At 6 weeks, unrestricted patients endorsed less difficulty with activities of daily living, earlier return to driving, and more time spent side sleeping (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Preliminary analysis suggests that removal of hip precautions after primary THA using a posterior approach was not associated with early dislocation and facilitated return to daily functions. Investigation to appropriate power is warranted.

5.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(6S): S359-S363, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32209287

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic femur fracture remains a leading mode of early failure following cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study is to determine if a specific femoral morphology is associated with an increased risk of acute, periprosthetic fracture after cementless THA. METHODS: An institutional arthroplasty registry was used to identify 32 primary, cementless THAs revised for acute, postoperative periprosthetic fracture ("fracture" cohort) within 3 months of the index procedure. Patients were matched 1:2 to 64 THAs without fracture ("control" cohort) for age, body mass index, gender, and stem design. Preoperative radiographic measurements performed on anteroposterior pelvis and femur radiographs included the neck-shaft angle, endosteal width at 4 locations, and external cortical diameter at 2 locations. These measurements were used to calculate the morphological cortical index, canal flare index, canal calcar ratio, and canal bone ratio. Postoperative measurements included canal fill and stem alignment. Statistical analyses included clustered regressions, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t-test. RESULTS: The mean endosteal width at 10 cm distal to the lesser trochanter was greater in fracture patients, although not statistically significant (P = .1). However, this resulted in differences in the canal flare index (P = .03), canal calcar ratio (P = .03), and canal bone ratio (P = .03) between the 2 cohorts. These ratios indicate decreased meta-diaphyseal taper in fracture patients. Preoperative femoral neck-shaft angle was more varus in fracture patients (P = .04). CONCLUSION: Patients sustaining an acute, periprosthetic fracture with cementless femoral fixation after THA had thinner distal cortices and a decreased meta-diaphyseal taper.

6.
J Arthroplasty ; 2020 Jan 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32057605

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Implementation of rapid recovery protocols and value-based programs in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has required changes in preoperative management, such as optimization, education, and coordination. This study aimed to quantify the work burden associated with preoperative TJA care. METHODS: Two web-based surveys were distributed to surgeon members of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. The first questionnaire (265 respondents) consisted of questions related to preoperative patient care in TJA and the associated work burden by orthopedic surgeons and their financially dependent health care providers. The second survey (561 respondents) consisted of questions related to relative change in preoperative patient care work burden since 2013. RESULTS: Greater than 98% of survey respondents reported providing some level of preoperative medical optimization to their patients. The mean amount of reported time spent by the surgeon and/or a qualified health care provider in preoperative activities not included in work captured in current procedural terminology or hospital billing codes was 153 minutes. The mean amount of reported time spent by ancillary clinical staff in preoperative activities was 177 minutes. Most surgeons reported an increase in work burden for total knee (86%) and total hip (87%) arthroplasty since 2013, with a large portion reporting a 20% or greater increase in work (knee 66%, hip 64%). CONCLUSION: To provide quality arthroplasty care with marked reductions in complication rates, lengths of stay, and readmissions, members of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons report a substantial preoperative work burden that is not included in current coding metrics. Policy makers should account for this time in coding models to continue to promote pathway improvements.

7.
Instr Course Lect ; 69: 167-182, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32017727

RESUMO

Joint arthroplasty is increasingly being performed in ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Enabled by enhanced recovery protocols and multimodal pain management, and incentivized by the implementation of value-based payment models, this trend is projected to continue, with more than half of total joint replacements predicted to be outpatient by 2026.1 Like any advance in healthcare, this transition offers both new advantages and new challenges. ASCs provide opportunities to improve patient satisfaction and outcomes while lowering costs, but realizing these advantages requires a new level of presurgery preparation for both surgeons and patients. This chapter outlines key considerations for success when transitioning to performing joint arthroplasty at ASCs. Paramount among these are patient selection and preparation. Additional considerations include protocol optimization through data tracking and iterative refinement. A clear understanding of the differences in performing joints at an ASC versus a hospital outpatient setting enables surgeons to make the transition smoothly, maintain a high-quality patient experience, and deliver optimum outcomes.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Substituição , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios , Assistência à Saúde , Humanos , Manejo da Dor
8.
Instr Course Lect ; 69: 209-226, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32017729

RESUMO

The undesirable burden periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) inflicts on patients and the healthcare system is increasingly acknowledged. The strenuous course of treatment required to manage PJI negatively affects patients' quality of life and results in an increased demand for physical, psychological, and socioeconomic support. With total joint arthroplasty set to become one of the most frequently performed elective surgical procedures in North America, further advancement on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of PJI is essential.1 This chapter presents recent findings from the scientific literature and updated perspectives on the management of PJI.


Assuntos
Artrite Infecciosa , Infecções Relacionadas à Prótese , Artroplastia de Quadril , Artroplastia do Joelho , Humanos , Qualidade de Vida
9.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(3S): S24-S30, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32046827

RESUMO

Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most devastating complications following total joint arthroplasty, accounting for a projected 10,000 revision surgeries per year by 2030. Chronic PJI is complicated by the presence of bacterial biofilm, requiring removal of components, thorough debridement, and administration of antibiotics for effective eradication. Chronic PJI is currently managed with single-stage or 2-stage revision surgery. To date, there are no randomized, prospective studies available evaluating eradication rates and functional outcomes between the 2 techniques. In this review, both treatment options are described with the most current literature to guide effective surgical decision-making that is cost-effective while decreasing patient morbidity.

10.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 2020 Feb 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32079876

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is no consensus whether the interim antibiotic spacer utilized in the 2-stage exchange arthroplasty should immobilize the joint or allow for motion. The purpose of this multicenter, randomized clinical trial was to compare static and articulating spacers as part of the 2-stage exchange arthroplasty for the treatment of chronic periprosthetic joint infection complicating total knee arthroplasty as defined with use of Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria. METHODS: Sixty-eight patients undergoing 2-stage exchange arthroplasty were randomized to either a static (32 patients) or an articulating (36 patients) spacer. An a priori power analysis determined that 28 patients per group would be necessary to detect a 13° difference in range of motion between groups. Six patients were excluded after randomization, 6 died, and 7 were lost to follow-up before 2 years. RESULTS: Patients in the static group had a hospital length of stay that was 1 day greater than the articulating group after stage 1 (6.1 compared with 5.1 days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3 to 6.9 days and 4.6 to 5.6 days, respectively; p = 0.032); no other differences were noted perioperatively. At a mean of 3.5 years (range, 2.0 to 6.4 years), 49 patients were available for evaluation. The mean motion arc was 113.0° (95% CI, 108.4° to 117.6°) in the articulating spacer group, compared with 100.2° (95% CI, 94.2° to 106.1°) in the static spacer group (p = 0.001). The mean Knee Society Score was higher in the articulating spacer cohort (79.4 compared with 69.8 points; 95% CI, 72.4 to 86.3 and 63.6 to 76.1, respectively; p = 0.043). Although not significantly different with the sample size studied, static spacers were associated with a greater need for an extensile exposure at the time of reimplantation (16.7% compared with 4.0%; 95% CI, 0.6% to 38.9% and 0.5% to 26.3%, respectively; p = 0.189) and a higher rate of reoperation (25.0% compared with 8.0%; 95% CI, 9.8% to 46.7% and 1.0% to 26.0%, respectively; p = 0.138). CONCLUSIONS: Articulating spacers provided significantly greater range of motion and higher Knee Society scores at a mean of 3.5 years. Static spacers were associated with a longer hospital stay following removal of the infected implant. When the soft-tissue envelope allows and if there is adequate osseous support, an articulating spacer is associated with improved outcomes. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

11.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(7): 301-307, 2020 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977344

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Preoperative opioid use is detrimental to outcomes after hip and knee arthroplasty. This study aims to identify the prevalence of preoperative opioid prescriptions and the specialty and practice setting of the prescriber, as well as the percentage of patients who do not report their opioid prescriptions and any variables associated with preoperative opioid prescriptions. METHODS: A total of 461 consecutive new patients evaluated for an arthritic hip or knee were retrospectively studied using institutional data from a tertiary-care, urban center at a university-affiliated private-practice and the state Prescription Monitoring Program to identify opioid prescriptions (including medication, number of pills and dosage, refills, prescriber specialty, and practice setting) within 6 months before their first appointment. Demographic data included age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, joint, laterality, diagnosis, Charlson Comorbidity Index, duration of symptoms, decision to have surgery, number of days from the first visit to surgery, smoking status, alcohol use, mental health diagnoses, preoperative outcome scores, nonopioid medications, and opioid medications. Patients were separated into opioid and nonopioid cohorts (opioid receivers were further subdivided into those who reported their opioid prescription and those who did not) for statistical analysis to analyze demographic differences using t-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests for continuous variables, the Fisher exact test for categorical variables, and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: One hundred five patients (22.8%) received an opioid before the appointment. Fifty-two (11.3%) received schedule II or III opioids, 43 (9.3%) received tramadol, and 10 (2.2%) received both. Primary care physicians were the most common prescriber (59.5%, P < 0.001) followed by pain medicine specialists (11.3%) and orthopaedic surgeons (11.3%). More prescribers practiced in the community than academic setting (63.8% versus 36.2%, P < 0.001). Seventy-eight patients (74.3%) self-reported their opioid prescriptions, with the remaining 27 patients (25.7%; 14 schedule II or III opioids and 13 tramadol) identified only after query of the Prescription Monitoring Program. In regression analysis, higher body mass index, diagnosis other than osteoarthritis, and benzodiazepine use were associated with receiving opioids (P < 0.05), while antidepressant use decreased the likelihood of self-reporting opioid prescriptions (P = 0.044). DISCUSSION: A striking number of patients are being treated with opioids for hip and knee arthritis. Furthermore, many patients who have received opioids within 6 months do not report their prescriptions. Although primary care physicians prescribed most opioids for nonsurgical treatment of arthritis, a substantial percentage came from orthopaedic surgeons. Further education of physicians and patients on the ill effects of opioids when used for the nonsurgical treatment of hip and knee arthritis is warranted. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, retrospective cohort study.

12.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(2): 538-543.e1, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31575448

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial is to determine whether dilute betadine lavage compared to normal saline lavage reduces the rate of acute postoperative periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) in aseptic revision total knee (TKA) and hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: A total of 478 patients undergoing aseptic revision TKA and THA were randomized to receive a 3-minute dilute betadine lavage (0.35%) or normal saline lavage before surgical wound closure. Fifteen patients were excluded following randomization (3.1%) and six were lost to follow-up (1.3%), leaving 457 patients available for study. Of them, 234 patients (153 knees, 81 hips) received normal saline lavage and 223 (144 knees, 79 hips) received dilute betadine lavage. The primary outcome was PJI within 90 days of surgery with a secondary assessment of 90-day wound complications. A priori power analysis determined that 285 patients per group were needed to detect a reduction in the rate of PJI from 5% to 1% with 80% power and alpha of 0.05. RESULTS: There were eight infections in the saline group and 1 in the betadine group (3.4% vs 0.4%, P = .038). There was no difference in wound complications between groups (1.3% vs 0%, P = .248). There were no differences in any baseline demographics or type of revision procedure between groups, suggesting appropriate randomization. CONCLUSION: Dilute betadine lavage before surgical wound closure in aseptic revision TKA and THA appears to be a simple, safe, and effective measure to reduce the risk of acute postoperative PJI. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level I.

13.
Hip Int ; : 1120700019882922, 2019 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31615288

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is an alternative to conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA) with potential advantages of preserving femoral bone stock and the ability to participate in higher impact activities. This study compares outcomes, satisfaction and preference in patients who underwent HRA in 1 hip and THA on the contralateral side. METHODS: 62 Patients with an HRA in 1 hip and a contralateral THA were retrospectively identified at 3 centres, consisting of 38 males and 24 females with 53 patients (85.5%) undergoing HRA first. A survey regarding satisfaction and preference for each procedure and outcome scores were obtained. RESULTS: Patients were younger (51.5 vs. 56.6 years, p = 0.002) and had longer follow-up on the HRA hip (11.0 vs. 6.0 years, p < 0.001). HRA was associated with larger increase in Harris Hip Score from preoperative to final follow-up (35.8 vs. 30.6, p = 0.035). 18 Patients (29.0%) preferred HRA, 19 (30.6%) preferred THA and 25 (40.3%) had no preference (p = 0.844). When asked what they would choose if they could only have 1 surgery again, 41 (66.1%, p < 0.001) picked HRA. Overall satisfaction (p = 0.504), willingness to live with their HRA versus THA for the rest of their life (p = 0.295) and recommendation to others (p = 0.097) were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Although HRA is associated with risks related to metal-on-metal bearings, it showed greater increase in patient-reported outcomes and a small subjective preference amongst patients who have undergone both conventional and resurfacing arthroplasty.

14.
Arthroplast Today ; 5(3): 341-347, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31516979

RESUMO

Background: The most common indications for revision total hip arthroplasty are instability/dislocation and mechanical loosening. Efforts to address this have included the use of dual mobility (DM) articulations. The aim of this study is to report on the use of cemented DM cups in complex acetabular revision total hip arthroplasty cases with a high risk of recurrent instability. Methods: A multicenter, retrospective study was conducted. Patients who received a novel acetabular construct consisting of a monoblock DM cup cemented into a fully porous metal shell were included. Outcome data included 90-day complications and readmissions, revision for any reason, and Harris Hip Scores. Results: Thirty-eight hips in 38 patients were included for this study. At a median follow-up of 215.5 days (range 6-783), the Harris Hip Score improved from a mean of 50 ± 12.2 to 78 ± 11.2 (P < .001). One (2.6%) patient experienced a dislocation on postoperative day 1, and was closed reduced with no further complications. There was 1 (2.6%) reoperation for periprosthetic joint infection treated with a 2-stage exchange. Conclusions: In this complex series of patients, cementation of a monoblock DM cup into a newly implanted fully porous revision shell reliably provided solid fixation with a low risk of dislocation at short-term follow-up. Although longer term follow-up is needed, utilization of this novel construct should be considered in patients at high risk for instability.

15.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(12): 2872-2877.e2, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31371038

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to survey the current analgesia and anesthesia practices used by total joint arthroplasty surgeon members of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS). METHODS: A survey of 28 questions was created and approved by the AAHKS Research Committee. The survey was distributed to all 2208 board-certified adult reconstruction surgeon members of AAHKS in November 2018. RESULTS: There were 622 responses (28.2%) to the survey. A majority of respondents (93.2%, n = 576) use preemptive analgesia prior to total joint arthroplasty. Most respondents use a spinal for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (74.4%) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) (72.6%). A peripheral nerve block is routinely used by 68.7% of respondents in primary TKA. Periarticular injection or local infiltration anesthesia is routinely used by 80.3% of respondents for both TKA and THA patients. The average number of opioid pills prescribed postoperatively after TKA is 49 pills (range 0-200) and after THA is 44 pills (range 0-200). Most surgeons (58%) expect that this prescription should last for 2 weeks. A majority of respondents (74.0%) use multimodal analgesics in addition to opioids. CONCLUSION: There is no consensus regarding the optimal multimodal anesthetic and analgesic regimen for total joint arthroplasty among surveyed board-certified arthroplasty surgeon members of AAHKS. Understanding current practice patterns in anesthesia, analgesia, and opioid prescribing may serve as a platform for future work aimed at establishing best clinical practices of maximizing effective postoperative pain control and minimizing the risks associated with prescribing opioids.

16.
Bone Joint J ; 101-B(7_Supple_C): 10-16, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31256650

RESUMO

AIMS: Tranexamic acid (TXA) is proven to reduce blood loss following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but there are limited data on the impact of similar dosing regimens in revision TKA. The purpose of this multicentre randomized clinical trial was to determine the optimal regimen to maximize the blood-sparing properties of TXA in revision TKA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From six-centres, 233 revision TKAs were randomized to one of four regimens: 1 g of intravenous (IV) TXA given prior to the skin incision, a double-dose regimen of 1 g IV TXA given both prior to skin incision and at time of wound closure, a combination of 1 g IV TXA given prior to skin incision and 1 g of intraoperative topical TXA, or three doses of 1950 mg oral TXA given two hours preoperatively, six hours postoperatively, and on the morning of postoperative day one. Randomization was performed based on the type of revision procedure to ensure equivalent distribution among groups. Power analysis determined that 40 patients per group were necessary to identify a 1 g/dl difference in the reduction of haemoglobin postoperatively between groups with an alpha of 0.05 and power of 0.80. Per-protocol analysis involved regression analysis and two one-sided t-tests for equivalence. RESULTS: In total, one patient withdrew, five did not undergo surgery, 16 were screening failures, and 25 did not receive the assigned treatment, leaving 186 patients for analysis. There was no significant difference in haemoglobin reduction among treatments (2.8 g/dl for single-dose IV TXA, 2.6 g/dl for double-dose IV TXA, 2.6 g/dl for combined IV/topical TXA, 2.9 g/dl for oral TXA; p = 0.38). Similarly, calculated blood loss (p = 0.65) and transfusion rates (p = 0.95) were not significantly different between groups. Equivalence testing assuming a 1 g/dl difference in haemoglobin change as clinically relevant showed that all possible pairings were statistically equivalent. CONCLUSION: Despite the higher risk of blood loss in revision TKA, all TXA regimens tested had equivalent blood-sparing properties. Surgeons should consider using the lowest effective dose and least costly TXA regimen in revision TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2019;101-B(Supple 7):10-16.


Assuntos
Artroplastia do Joelho/métodos , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle , Hemorragia Pós-Operatória/prevenção & controle , Ácido Tranexâmico/administração & dosagem , Antifibrinolíticos/administração & dosagem , Vias de Administração de Medicamentos , Feminino , Seguimentos , Hemoglobinas/metabolismo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reoperação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(11): 2730-2736.e1, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31279603

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The guidelines for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) introduced by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons served the orthopedic community well. However, they have never been validated and do not account for newer diagnostic modalities. Our aim was to update current guidelines and develop an evidence-based and validated diagnostic algorithm. METHODS: This multi-institutional study examined total joint arthroplasty patients from 3 institutions. Patients fulfilling major criteria for infection as defined by Musculoskeletal Infection Society were considered infected (n = 684). Patients undergoing aseptic revision for a noninfective indication and did not show evidence of PJI or undergo reoperation within 2 years served as a noninfected control group (n = 820). The algorithm was validated on a separate cohort of 422 cases. RESULTS: The first step in evaluating PJI should include a physical examination, followed by serum C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and D-dimer. If at least one of these tests are elevated, or if high clinical suspicion exists, joint aspiration should be performed, sending the fluid for a white blood cell count, leukocyte esterase, polymorphonuclear percentage, and culture. Alpha defensin did not show added benefit as a routine diagnostic test. In inconclusive cases, intraoperative findings including gross purulence, histology, and next-generation sequencing or a single positive culture can aid in making the diagnosis. The proposed algorithm demonstrated a high sensitivity (96.9%) and specificity (99.5%). CONCLUSION: This validated, evidence-based algorithm for diagnosing PJI should guide clinicians in the workup of patients undergoing revision arthroplasty and improve clinical practice. It also has the potential to reduce cost.

19.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(10): 2392-2397, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178387

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients between 45 and 54 years old will be the fastest-growing cohort seeking total knee arthroplasty (TKA) over the next 15 years. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the clinical outcomes of TKA in patients less than 50 years old at a minimum of 10 years. We hypothesized that this patient population would have a high rate of survivorship that is similar to that of older patients. METHODS: We reviewed 298 consecutive TKAs on 242 patients at a minimum of 10 years postoperatively. Twenty patients died and 30 TKAs were lost to follow-up leaving 248 TKAs in 202 patients (91 male, 111 female) with a mean age of 45.7 years (range, 26-49) at the time of surgery. Patient-reported outcomes, survivorship, causes of reoperation, and initial postoperative radiographic parameters were collected. RESULTS: At a mean of 13.0 years, there were 9 revisions for tibial loosening (3.6%), 8 for deep infection (3.2%), 7 for polyethylene wear (2.8%), and 3 for failed ingrowth of a cementless femoral component (1.2%). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated 92.0% survivorship with failures defined as aseptic component revision and 83.9% survivorship for all-cause reoperation at 13 years. Patients with tibial alignment of 4° or more of varus or 10° or more of posterior slope were found to have increased rate of failure. CONCLUSION: While overall durability was good in this young patient population, tibial fixation and deep infection were relatively common causes of failure. In addition, increased tibial varus and slope were found to increase the rate of failure. Furthermore, the nearly 3% risk of revision for wear suggests that the use of more wear-resistant bearing surfaces may reduce the risk of failure in this patient population.

20.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(8): 1677-1681, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31056443

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The ability to identify patients at risk of dissatisfaction after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains elusive. This study's purpose was to determine the external validity of a recently published prediction model for patient satisfaction (PMPS) with the hypothesis that it would achieve similar predictive success in our study sample. METHODS: A 10-question PMPS statistically derived from 5 patient-reported outcome questionnaires was tested for external validity in this prospective cohort investigation. The PMPS incorporates gender, age, stiffness, noise, and pain catastrophizing, with a score of 20 or greater predictive of satisfaction. As in the original study, to determine satisfaction the 2011 Knee Society Score (KSS) satisfaction subscale was collected at 3 months postoperatively. Two hundred seventy-four patients were administered the PMPS preoperatively, and 145 patients completed the KSS at 3 months postoperatively (53.0% response rate; 59% female; age, 64.9; body mass index, 32.5). A Bland-Altman analysis to assess agreement was performed. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-three patients (91.7%) were satisfied and 12 (8.3%) were dissatisfied based on their postoperative KSS. The mean difference between the PMPS and KSS was 3.6 ± 8, but with a 95% prediction interval of -15.3 to 22.1 signifying almost no correlation. The PMPS did not predict any of the 12 dissatisfied patients postoperatively, and falsely predicted 5 patients to be dissatisfied of which 4 actually had a maximum postoperative KSS of 40. CONCLUSION: A previously published, internally validated 10-question PMPS was unable to predict satisfaction after TKA in our external study sample. This study emphasizes the difficulty of developing a simple, but robust questionnaire that consistently predicts patient satisfaction after TKA.

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