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1.
J Neurosurg Spine ; : 1-14, 2021 Dec 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34905727

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: With the expanding indications for and increasing popularity of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for lumbar spinal fusion, large-scale outcomes analysis to compare MIS approaches with open procedures is warranted. METHODS: The authors queried the Quality Outcomes Database for patients who underwent elective lumbar fusion for degenerative spine disease. They performed optimal matching, at a 1:2 ratio between patients who underwent MIS and those who underwent open lumbar fusion, to create two highly homogeneous groups in terms of 33 baseline variables (including demographic characteristics, comorbidities, symptoms, patient-reported scores, indications, and operative details). The outcomes of interest were overall satisfaction, decrease in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and back and leg pain, as well as hospital length of stay (LOS), operative time, reoperations, and incidental durotomy rate. Satisfaction was defined as a score of 1 or 2 on the North American Spine Society scale. Minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in ODI was defined as ≥ 30% decrease from baseline. Outcomes were assessed at the 3- and 12-month follow-up evaluations. RESULTS: After the groups were matched, the MIS and open groups consisted of 1483 and 2966 patients, respectively. Patients who underwent MIS fusion had higher odds of satisfaction at 3 months (OR 1.4, p = 0.004); no difference was demonstrated at 12 months (OR 1.04, p = 0.67). Lumbar stenosis, single-level fusion, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification System grade, and absence of spondylolisthesis were most prominently associated with higher odds of satisfaction with MIS compared with open surgery. Patients in the MIS group had slightly lower ODI scores at 3 months (mean difference 1.61, p = 0.006; MCID OR 1.14, p = 0.0495) and 12 months (mean difference 2.35, p < 0.001; MCID OR 1.29, p < 0.001). MIS was also associated with a greater decrease in leg and back pain at both follow-up time points. The two groups did not differ in operative time and incidental durotomy rate; however, LOS was shorter for the MIS group. Revision surgery at 12 months was less likely for patients who underwent MIS (4.1% vs 5.6%, p = 0.032). CONCLUSIONS: In patients who underwent lumbar fusion for degenerative spinal disease, MIS was associated with higher odds of satisfaction at 3 months postoperatively. No difference was demonstrated at the 12-month follow-up. MIS maintained a small, yet consistent, superiority in decreasing ODI and back and leg pain, and MIS was associated with a lower reoperation rate.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34738985

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: a) Compare operative variables, complications, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with an upper instrumented vertebrae (UIV) of C2 vs. C3/4, and b) assess outcomes based on C2 screw type. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: When performing elective posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion (PCLF), spine surgeons must choose the upper instrumented vertebrae (UIV) at the subaxial cervical spine (C3/4) versus C2. Differences in long-term complications and PROs remain unknown. METHODS: A single-institution, retrospective cohort study from a prospective registry was conducted. All patients undergoing elective, degenerative PCLF from 12/2010-06/2018 were included. Patients were divided into a UIV of C2 vs. C3/4. Groups were 2:1 propensity matched for fusion extending to the thoracic spine. Demographics, operative, perioperative, complications, and 1-year PRO data were collected. RESULTS: 117 patients underwent elective PCLF and were successfully propensity matched (39 C2 vs. 78 C3/4). Groups were similar in fusion extending to the thoracic spine (p = 0.588). Expectedly, the C2 group had more levels fused (5.63 ±â€Š1.89) compared to the C3/4 group (4.50 ±â€Š0.91) (p = 0.001). The C2 group had significantly longer operative time (p < 0.001), yet no differences were seen in estimated blood loss (EBL) (p = 0.494) or length of stay (LOS) (p = 0.424). Both groups significantly improved all PROs at 1-year (EQ-5D; NRS-NP/AP; NDI). Both groups had the same percentage of surgical adverse events at 6.8% (p = 1.00. Between C2 screw type, no differences were seen in operative time, EBL, LOS, complications, or PROs. CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing elective PCLF, those instrumented to C2 had only longer operative times compared to those stopping at C3/4. No differences were seen in EBL, LOS, 1-year PROs, and complications. Type of C2 screw had no impact on outcomes. Besides increased operative time, instrumenting to C2 had no detectable difference on surgical outcomes or adverse event rates.Level of Evidence: 3.

3.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 22(1): 883, 2021 Oct 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34663295

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal postoperative relationship between physical activity, psychosocial factors, and physical function in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. METHODS: We enrolled 248 participants undergoing surgery for a degenerative lumbar spine condition. Physical activity was measured using a triaxial accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X) at 6-weeks (6wk), 6-months (6M), 12-months (12M) and 24-months (24M) following spine surgery. Physical function (computerized adaptive test domain version of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System) and psychosocial factors (pain self-efficacy, depression and fear of movement) were assessed at preoperative visit and 6wk, 6M, 12M and 24M after surgery. Structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques were utilized to analyze data, and results are represented as standardized regression weights (SRW). Overall SRW were computed across five imputed datasets to account for missing data. The mediation effect of each psychosocial factor on the effect of physical activity on physical function were computed [(SRW for effect of activity on psychosocial factor X SRW for effect of psychosocial factor on function) ÷ SRW for effect of activity on function]. Each SEM model was tested for model fit by assessing established fit indexes. RESULTS: The overall effect of steps per day on physical function (SRW ranged from 0.08 to 0.19, p<0.05) was stronger compared to the overall effect of physical function on steps per day (SRW ranged from non-existent to 0.14, p<0.01 to 0.3). The effect of steps per day on physical function and function on steps per day remained consistent after accounting for psychosocial factors in each of the mediation models. Depression and fear of movement at 6M mediated 3.4% and 5.4% of the effect of steps per day at 6wk on physical function at 12M, respectively. Pain self-efficacy was not a statistically significant mediator. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the relationship between physical activity and physical function is stronger than the relationship of function to activity. However, future research is needed to examine whether promoting physical activity during the early postoperative period may result in improvement of long-term physical function. Since depression and fear of movement had a very small mediating effect, additional work is needed to investigate other potential mediating factors such as pain catastrophizing, resilience and exercise self-efficacy.


Assuntos
Catastrofização , Exercício Físico , Medo , Humanos , Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos , Dor
4.
Clin Spine Surg ; 2021 Oct 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34711751

RESUMO

Pseudarthrosis of the cervical spine represents a common and challenging problem for spine surgeons. Rates vary greatly from as low as 0%-20% to >60% and depend heavily on patient factors, approach, and number of levels. While some patients remain asymptomatic from pseudarthrosis, many require revision surgery due to instability, continued neck pain, or radiculopathy/myelopathy. We aimed to provide a practical, narrative review of cervical pseudarthrosis to address the following areas: (1) definitions, (2) incidence, (3) risk factors, (4) presentation and workup, (5) treatment decision-making, and (6) postoperative care. It is our hope the current review provides a concise summary for how to diagnose and treat challenging cervical nonunions.

5.
J Neurosurg Spine ; 35(4): 399-409, 2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34243164

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The impact of the type of pain presentation on outcomes of spine surgery remains elusive. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of predominant symptom location (predominant arm pain vs predominant neck pain vs equal neck and arm pain) on postoperative improvement in patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: The Quality Outcomes Database cervical spine module was queried for patients undergoing 1- or 2-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for degenerative spine disease. RESULTS: A total of 9277 patients were included in the final analysis. Of these patients, 18.4% presented with predominant arm pain, 32.3% presented with predominant neck pain, and 49.3% presented with equal neck and arm pain. Patients with predominant neck pain were found to have higher (worse) 12-month Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores (coefficient 0.24, 95% CI 0.15-0.33; p < 0.0001). The three groups did not differ significantly in odds of return to work and achieving minimal clinically important difference in NDI score at the 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis from a national spine registry showed significantly lower odds of patient satisfaction and worse NDI score at 1 year after surgery for patients with predominant neck pain when compared with patients with predominant arm pain and those with equal neck and arm pain after 1- or 2-level ACDF. With regard to return to work, all three groups (arm pain, neck pain, and equal arm and neck pain) were found to be similar after multivariable analysis. The authors' results suggest that predominant pain location, especially predominant neck pain, might be a significant determinant of improvement in functional outcomes and patient satisfaction after ACDF for degenerative spine disease. In addition to confirmation of the common experience that patients with predominant neck pain have worse outcomes, the authors' findings provide potential targets for improvement in patient management for these specific populations.

6.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(10): 1873-1879, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34175276

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether early postoperative walking is associated with "best outcome" and no opioid use at 1 year after lumbar spine surgery and establish a threshold for steps/day to inform clinical practice. DESIGN: Secondary analysis from randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Two academic medical centers in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: We enrolled 248 participants undergoing surgery for a degenerative lumbar spine condition (N=248). A total of 212 participants (mean age, 62.8±11.4y, 53.3% female) had valid walking data at baseline. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Disability (Oswestry Disability Index), back and leg pain (Brief Pain Inventory), and opioid use (yes vs no) were assessed at baseline and 1 year after surgery. "Best outcome" was defined as Oswestry Disability Index ≤20, back pain ≤2, and leg pain ≤2. Steps/day (walking) was assessed with an accelerometer worn for at least 3 days and 10 h/d at 6 weeks after spine surgery, which was considered as study baseline. Separate multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the association between steps/day at 6 weeks and "best outcome" and no opioid use at 1-year. Receiver operating characteristic curves identified a steps/day threshold for achieving outcomes. RESULTS: Each additional 1000 steps/d at 6 weeks after spine surgery was associated with 41% higher odds of achieving "best outcome" (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-1.74) and 38% higher odds of no opioid use (95% CI, 1.09-1.76) at 1 year. Walking ≥3500 steps/d was associated with 3.75 times the odds (95% CI, 1.56-9.02) of achieving "best outcome" and 2.37 times the odds (95% CI, 1.07-5.24) of not using opioids. CONCLUSIONS: Walking early after surgery may optimize patient-reported outcomes after lumbar spine surgery. A 3500 steps/d threshold may serve as an initial recommendation during early postoperative counseling.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Avaliação da Deficiência , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Dor Pós-Operatória/tratamento farmacológico , Dor Pós-Operatória/reabilitação , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/reabilitação , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Caminhada/estatística & dados numéricos , Acelerometria , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Laminectomia/métodos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medição da Dor , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Período Pós-Operatório , Estudos Prospectivos
7.
Global Spine J ; : 21925682211019352, 2021 May 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34036834

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate clinical improvement as measured by patient-reported outcomes (PROs) during the 1 to 2-year interval. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective Cohort. METHODS: A single-institution registry of ASD patients undergoing surgery was queried for patients with ≥6 level fusions. Demographics and radiographic variables were collected. PROs collected were the ODI and SRS-22r scores at: preoperative, 1-year and 2-years. Outcome measures of clinical improvement during the 1-2 year time interval were: 1) group medians, 2) percent minimum clinically important difference (MCID), and 3) percent minimal symptom scale (MSS)(ODI < 20 or SRS-pain + function >8). Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, chi-squared tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and logistic regression were performed. RESULTS: 157 patients undergoing ASD surgery with minimum of 1-year follow-up were included. Mean age was 53.2 and mean instrumented levels was 13.1. Preoperative alignment was: Neutral Alignment (NA) 49%, Coronal Malalignment (CM) 17%, Sagittal Malalignment (SM 17%), and Combined Coronal/Sagittal Malalignment (CCSM) 18%. Preoperative to 1-year, and preoperative to 2-years, all ODI/SRS-22r significantly improved (P < .001). In all patients, the only significant improvement in PROs between 1-and 2-year postoperative were those reaching ODI MCID (69% 1-year vs. 84% 2-years; P < .001). Subgroup analysis: ≥55 years had an improved median ODI (18 vs. 8; P = .047) and an improved percent achieving ODI MCID (73% vs. 84%, P = .048). CCSM patients experienced significant improvement in SRS-appearance score (75% vs. 100%; P = .050), along with those with severe preoperative SM >7.5 cm (73% vs. 100%; P = .032). CONCLUSIONS: Most ASD patients experience the majority of PRO improvement by 1-year postoperative. However, subsets of patients that may continue to improve up to 2-years postoperative include patients ≥55 years, combined coronal/sagittal malalignment, and those with severe sagittal malalignment ≥7.5 cm.

8.
Global Spine J ; 11(7): 1099-1103, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32748641

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective lumbar radiograph analysis. OBJECTIVE: To compare changes in lumbar lordosis in standing flexion versus seated lateral radiographs. METHODS: Standing lateral, standing flexion, and seated lateral X-rays of the lumbar spine were obtained in patients presenting with low back pain. Trauma, tumor, and revision cases were excluded. Changes in global lumbar as well as segmental lordosis were measured in each position. RESULTS: Seventy adult patients were reviewed. Overall, the greatest changes in lordosis were seen at L4-S1 in both the seated and flexion X-rays (12.5° and 6.3°, respectively). Greater kyphosis was seen in seated versus flexion X-rays (21.6° vs 15.8°); changes in lordosis from L1-L3 were similar in both positions, with little change seen at these levels (approximately 5° to 7°). On subgroup analysis, these differences were magnified in analyzing only patients that moved at least 20° globally, and there were no significant differences between sitting and flexion in "stiff" patients that moved less than 20° globally. CONCLUSION: Greater lumbar kyphosis was seen in the seated position compared to standing flexion, especially from L4-S1. Given these results we suggest the use of seated lateral X-rays to dynamically assess the lumbar spine. These findings may also guide future research into the mechanism and clinical relevance of a stiff versus mobile lumbar spine, as well as into the sensitivity of seated X-rays in detecting instability.

9.
Spine J ; 21(1): 55-63, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32736036

RESUMO

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Positive psychosocial factors early after surgery, such as resilience and self-efficacy, may be important characteristics for informing individualized postoperative care. PURPOSE: To examine the association of early postoperative resilience and self-efficacy on 12-month physical function, pain interference, social participation, disability, pain intensity, and physical activity after lumbar spine surgery. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Pooled secondary analysis of prospectively collected trial data from two academic medical centers. PATIENT SAMPLE: Two hundred and forty-eight patients who underwent laminectomy with or without fusion for a degenerative lumbar condition. OUTCOME MEASURES: Physical function, pain inference, and social participation (ability to participate in social roles and activities) were measured using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. The Oswestry Disability Index, Numeric Rating Scale, and accelerometer activity counts were used to measure disability, pain intensity, and physical activity, respectively. METHODS: Participants completed validated outcome questionnaires at 6 weeks (baseline) and 12 months after surgery. Baseline positive psychosocial factors included resilience (Brief Resilience Scale) and self-efficacy (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire). Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations between early postoperative psychosocial factors and 12-month outcomes adjusting for age, sex, study site, randomized group, fusion status, fear of movement (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), and outcome score at baseline. This study was funded by Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and Foundation for Physical Therapy Research. There are no conflicts of interest. RESULTS: Resilience at 6 weeks after surgery was associated with 12-month physical function (unstandardized beta=1.85 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29; 3.40]), pain interference (unstandardized beta=-1.80 [95% CI: -3.48; -0.12]), social participation (unstandardized beta=2.69 [95% CI: 0.97; 4.41]), and disability (unstandardized beta=-3.03 [95% CI: -6.04; -0.02]). Self-efficacy was associated with 12-month disability (unstandardized beta=-0.21 [95% CI: -0.37; -0.04]. CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative resilience and pain self-efficacy were associated with improved 12-month patient-reported outcomes after spine surgery. Future work should consider how early postoperative screening for positive psychosocial characteristics can enhance risk stratification and targeted rehabilitation management in patients undergoing spine surgery.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência , Participação Social , Avaliação da Deficiência , Humanos , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Dor , Resultado do Tratamento
10.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 46(11): 717-725, 2021 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33337676

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected registry data. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of 30% reduction to established absolute point-change values for measures of disability and pain in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies recommend using a proportional change from baseline instead of an absolute point-change value to define minimum clinically important difference (MCID). METHODS: Analyses included 13,179 patients who underwent cervical spine surgery for degenerative disease between April 2013 and February 2018. Participants completed a baseline and 12-month follow-up assessment that included questionnaires to assess disability (Neck Disability Index [NDI]), neck and arm pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS-NP/AP], and satisfaction [NASS scale]). Participants were classified as met or not met 30% reduction from baseline in each of the respective measures. The 30% reduction in scores at 12 months was compared to a wide range of established absolute point-change MCID values using receiver-operating characteristic curves, area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC), and logistic regression analyses. These analyses were conducted for the entire patient cohort, as well as for subgroups based on baseline severity and surgical approach. RESULTS: Thirty percent reduction in NDI and NRS-NP/AP scores predicted satisfaction with more accuracy than absolute point-change values for the total population and ACDF and posterior fusion procedures (P < 0.05). The largest AUROC differences, in favor of 30% reduction, were found for the lowest disability (ODI 0-20%: 16.8%) and bed-bound disability (ODI 81%-100%: 16.6%) categories. For pain, there was a 1.9% to 11% and 1.6% to 9.6% AUROC difference for no/mild neck and arm pain (NRS 0-4), respectively, in favor of a 30% reduction threshold. CONCLUSION: A 30% reduction from baseline is a valid method for determining MCID in disability and pain for patients undergoing cervical spine surgery.Level of Evidence: 3.


Assuntos
Vértebras Cervicais/cirurgia , Diferença Mínima Clinicamente Importante , Humanos , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Resultado do Tratamento
11.
Spine J ; 21(5): 829-840, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33346156

RESUMO

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Effective alternatives to lumbar fusion for degenerative conditions have remained elusive. Anterior total disc replacement does not address facet pathology or central/recess stenosis, resulting in limited indications. A posterior-based motion-preserving option that allows for neural decompression, facetectomy, and reconstruction of the disc and facets may have a role. PURPOSE: The purpose was to compare one-year patient-reported outcomes for a novel, all-posterior, lumbar total joint replacement (LTJR - replacing both the disc and facet joints) against transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for degenerative lumbar conditions warranting fusion (degenerative spondylolisthesis, recurrent disc herniation, severe foraminal stenosis requiring facet removal, and adjacent segment degeneration). STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data comparing outcomes for LTJR patients to TLIF patients at an academic teaching hospital. PATIENT SAMPLE: Analysis was conducted on 156 adult TLIF patients who were propensity matched to the 52 LTJR patients for a total sample of 208. OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for back and leg pain were compared preoperatively, 3 months and 1 year after surgery. METHODS: The implant is a motion-preserving lumbar reconstruction that replaces the function of both the disc and facets and is implanted using a bilateral transforaminal approach with complete facetectomies. Adult patients with degenerative lumbar pathology undergoing either LTJR or open TLIF were analyzed. These degenerative conditions included: grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis, recurrent disc herniation, adjacent segment disease, disc degeneration with severe foraminal stenosis). Trauma, tumor, grade 2 or higher spondylolisthesis, spinal deformity, and infection cases were excluded. Propensity score matching was performed to ensure parity between the cohorts. Multivariable regression analyses were done to compare the 1-year results as measured by 3 different standards to assess procedure success. RESULTS: At 3 months, both the LTJR and TLIF cohorts showed significant and similar improvements in ODI and NRS back and leg pain. At 1 year, the LTJR cohort showed continued improvement in ODI and NRS back pain, while the TLIF group showed a plateau for ODI, back and leg pain. In a series of three multivariable logistic regressions, LTJR was shown to provide 3.3 times greater odds of achieving the minimal clinical symptom state in disability and pain (ODI <20%, NRS back and leg pain <2) and 2.4 and 4.1 times greater odds of achieving substantial clinical benefit (18% reduction in ODI) and minimal clinically important difference (30% reduction in ODI) as compared to TLIF. CONCLUSIONS: Here we present a comparative analysis for the first 52 patients undergoing a novel, posterior-based LTJR for the lumbar spine versus TLIF for degenerative pathology. The approach for the LTJR allows for wide neural decompression, facetectomy, and complete discectomy, with the implant working to replace the function of the disc and facets to preserve motion. At 1 year, the LTJR cohort showed significant improvement in ODI and NRS back and leg pain as compared to TLIF. These results suggest that wide neural decompression combined with motion preservation using this novel LTJR may represent a viable alternative to TLIF for treating certain degenerative conditions. A prospective controlled trial is under development to further evaluate the efficacy, safety, and durability of this procedure.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Substituição , Degeneração do Disco Intervertebral , Fusão Vertebral , Espondilolistese , Adulto , Dor nas Costas , Humanos , Degeneração do Disco Intervertebral/cirurgia , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Espondilolistese/cirurgia , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
Physiother Theory Pract ; 37(10): 1096-1108, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31663795

RESUMO

Objective: To describe the safety, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes of an early telephone-supported home exercise program (HEP) performed within the first 6 weeks after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery.Methods: Eight patients (mean ± SD age = 53.4 ± 14.9 years, 5 females) were enrolled in this case series. Immediately after surgery, patients began a 6-week HEP including daily walking, deep breathing, distraction techniques, and cervical and upper body exercises. The HEP was supported by weekly telephone calls by a physical therapist. Safety for performing early exercise was examined with radiographic imaging at 6 months. Adverse events were assessed through weekly calls with a physical therapist. HEP adherence and acceptability data were obtained by patient self-report. Clinical measures were assessed preoperatively, at 6 weeks and at 6 months, and included the Neck Disability Index, Numeric Rating Scale for pain, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and accelerometry for physical activity.Results: Early radiographic imaging showed no signs of nonunion at 6 months. There were no reports of serious adverse events. At 6 months, all patients reported clinically significant changes in pain catastrophizing. Seven (88%) patients had clinically significant changes in disability and arm pain, six (75%) patients for neck pain and pain self-efficacy, and five (53%) patients for fear of movement. Only three (43%) of seven patients showed increased physical activity at 6 months.Conclusion: Based on this small case series, an early telephone-supported HEP appears safe for patients, feasible to implement, and promising for clinical benefits.


Assuntos
Radiculopatia , Fusão Vertebral , Adulto , Idoso , Vértebras Cervicais/diagnóstico por imagem , Vértebras Cervicais/cirurgia , Discotomia/efeitos adversos , Terapia por Exercício , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cervicalgia/diagnóstico , Fusão Vertebral/efeitos adversos , Telefone , Resultado do Tratamento
13.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 21(1): 783, 2020 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33246446

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this prospective case series study was to compare changes in early postoperative physical activity and physical function between 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months after lumbar spine surgery. METHODS: Fifty-three patients (mean [95% confidence interval; CI] age = 59.2 [56.2, 62.3] years, 64% female) who underwent spine surgery for a degenerative lumbar condition were assessed at 6 weeks and 3- and 6-months after surgery. The outcomes were objectively-measured physical activity (accelerometry) and patient-reported and objective physical function. Physical activity was assessed using mean steps/day and time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) over a week. Physical function measures included Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and 10-Meter Walk (10 MW). We compared changes over time in physical activity and function using generalized estimating equations with robust estimator and first-order autoregressive covariance structure. Proportion of patients who engaged in meaningful physical activity (e.g., walked at least 4400 and 6000 steps/day or engaged in at least 150 min/week in MVPA) and achieved clinically meaningful changes in physical function were compared at 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: After surgery, 72% of patients initiated physical therapy (mean [95%CI] sessions =8.5 [6.6, 10.4]) between 6 weeks and 3 months. Compared to 6 weeks post-surgery, no change in steps/day or time in MVPA/week was observed at 3 or 6 months. From 21 to 23% and 9 to 11% of participants walked at least 4400 and 6000 steps/day at 3 and 6 months, respectively, while none of the participants spent at least 150 min/week in MVPA at these same time points. Significant improvements were observed on ODI, SF-12, TUG and 10 MW (p <  0.05), with over 43 to 68% and 62 to 87% achieving clinically meaningful improvements on these measures at 3 and 6 months, respectively. CONCLUSION: Limited improvement was observed in objectively-measured physical activity from 6 weeks to 6 months after spine surgery, despite moderate to large function gains. Early postoperative physical therapy interventions targeting physical activity may be needed.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Vértebras Lombares , Feminino , Humanos , Vértebras Lombares/diagnóstico por imagem , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Período Pós-Operatório , Estudos Prospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
14.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 45(23): E1556-E1563, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32890302

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of randomized controlled trial data. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine whether preoperative physical performance is an independent predictor of patient-reported disability and pain at 12 months after lumbar spine surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are commonly used to assess clinical improvement after lumbar spine surgery. However, there is evidence in the orthopedic literature to suggest that PROMs should be supplemented with physical performance tests to accurately evaluate long-term outcomes. METHODS: A total of 248 patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spine conditions were recruited from two institutions. Physical performance tests (5-Chair Stand and Timed Up and Go) and PROMs of disability (Oswestry Disability Index: ODI) and back and leg pain (Brief Pain Inventory) were assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: Physical performance tests and PROMs significantly improved over 12 months following lumbar spine surgery (P < 0.01). Weak correlations were found between physical performance tests and disability and pain (ρ = 0.15 to 0.32, P < 0.05). Multivariable regression analyses controlling for age, education, preoperative outcome score, fusion, previous spine surgery, depressive symptoms, and randomization group found that preoperative 5-Chair Stand test was significantly associated with disability and back pain at 12-month follow-up. Each additional 10 seconds needed to complete the 5-Chair Stand test were associated with six-point increase in ODI (P = 0.047) and one-point increase in back pain (P = 0.028) scores. The physical performance tests identified an additional 14% to 19% of patients as achieving clinical improvement that were not captured by disability or pain questionnaires. CONCLUSION: Results indicate that physical performance tests may provide distinct information in both predicting and assessing clinical outcomes in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Our findings suggest that the 5-Chair Stand test may be a useful test to include within a comprehensive risk assessment before surgery and as an outcome measure at long-term follow-up. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.


Assuntos
Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Desempenho Físico Funcional , Adulto , Idoso , Dor nas Costas/cirurgia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos , Medição da Dor , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 45(22): 1541-1552, 2020 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32796461

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected registry data. OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate prediction models for 12-month patient-reported outcomes of disability, pain, and myelopathy in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Predictive models have the potential to be utilized preoperatively to set expectations, adjust modifiable characteristics, and provide a patient-centered model of care. METHODS: This study was conducted using data from the cervical module of the Quality Outcomes Database. The outcomes of interest were disability (Neck Disability Index:), pain (Numeric Rating Scale), and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score for myelopathy. Multivariable proportional odds ordinal regression models were developed for patients with cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy. Patient demographic, clinical, and surgical covariates as well as baseline patient-reported outcomes scores were included in all models. The models were internally validated using bootstrap resampling to estimate the likely performance on a new sample of patients. RESULTS: Four thousand nine hundred eighty-eight patients underwent surgery for radiculopathy and 2641 patients for myelopathy. The most important predictor of poor postoperative outcomes at 12-months was the baseline Neck Disability Index score for patients with radiculopathy and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score for patients with myelopathy. In addition, symptom duration, workers' compensation, age, employment, and ambulatory and smoking status had a statistically significant impact on all outcomes (P < 0.001). Clinical and surgical variables contributed very little to predictive models, with posterior approach being associated with higher odds of having worse 12-month outcome scores in both the radiculopathy and myelopathy cohorts (P < 0.001). The full models overall discriminative performance ranged from 0.654 to 0.725. CONCLUSIONS: These predictive models provide individualized risk-adjusted estimates of 12-month disability, pain, and myelopathy outcomes for patients undergoing spine surgery for degenerative cervical disease. Predictive models have the potential to be used as a shared decision-making tool for evidence-based preoperative counselling. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.


Assuntos
Vértebras Cervicais/cirurgia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/normas , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Radiculopatia/cirurgia , Doenças da Medula Espinal/cirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Vértebras Cervicais/diagnóstico por imagem , Bases de Dados Factuais/normas , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Radiculopatia/diagnóstico por imagem , Sistema de Registros/normas , Estudos Retrospectivos , Doenças da Medula Espinal/diagnóstico por imagem , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Indenização aos Trabalhadores/normas
16.
J Neurosurg Spine ; : 1-10, 2020 Aug 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32823267

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: National databases collect large amounts of clinical information, yet application of these data can be challenging. The authors present the NeuroPoint Alliance and Institute for Healthcare Improvement (NPA-IHI) program as a novel attempt to create a quality improvement (QI) tool informed through registry data to improve the quality of care delivered. Reducing the length of stay (LOS) and readmission after elective lumbar fusion was chosen as the pilot module. METHODS: The NPA-IHI program prospectively enrolled patients undergoing elective 1- to 3-level lumbar fusions across 8 institutions. A three-pronged approach was taken that included the following phases: 1) Research Phase, 2) Development Phase, and 3) Implementation Phase. Primary outcomes were LOS and readmission. From January to June 2017, a learning system was created utilizing monthly conference calls, weekly data submission, and continuous refinement of the proposed QI tool. Nonparametric tests were used to assess the impact of the QI intervention. RESULTS: The novel QI tool included the following three areas of intervention: 1) preoperative discharge assessment (location, date, and instructions), 2) inpatient changes (LOS rounding checklist, daily huddle, and pain assessments), and 3) postdischarge calls (pain, primary care follow-up, and satisfaction). A total of 209 patients were enrolled, and the most common procedure was a posterior laminectomy/fusion (60.2%). Seven patients (3.3%) were readmitted during the study period. Preoperative discharge planning was completed for 129 patients (61.7%). A shorter median LOS was seen in those with a known preoperative discharge date (67 vs 80 hours, p = 0.018) and clear discharge instructions (71 vs 81 hours, p = 0.030). Patients with a known preoperative discharge plan also reported significantly increased satisfaction (8.0 vs 7.0, p = 0.028), and patients with increased discharge readiness (scale 0-10) also reported higher satisfaction (r = 0.474, p < 0.001). Those receiving postdischarge calls (76%) had a significantly shorter LOS than those without postdischarge calls (75 vs 99 hours, p = 0.020), although no significant relationship was seen between postdischarge calls and readmission (p = 0.342). CONCLUSIONS: The NPA-IHI program showed that preoperative discharge planning and postdischarge calls have the potential to reduce LOS and improve satisfaction after elective lumbar fusion. It is our hope that neurosurgical providers can recognize how registries can be used to both develop and implement a QI tool and appreciate the importance of QI implementation as a separate process from data collection/analysis.

17.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 45(15): 1081-1088, 2020 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32675616

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal Cohort Study OBJECTIVE.: The aim of this study was to determine whether duration of postoperative opioids is associated with long-term outcomes, and if initial postoperative opioid dosage is associated with opioid cessation after spine surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Preoperative opioid use is associated with poor outcomes, but little evidence exists regarding the implications of opioid dosage and duration after spine surgery. METHODS: Data from our state's prescription drug database was linked to our prospective clinical spine registry to analyze opioid dispensing and outcomes in elective surgical spine patients between 2010 and 2017. Patients were stratified based on preoperative chronic opioid use and multivariable regression was used to assess associations between duration of postoperative opioids and outcomes at one year, including satisfaction, chronic opioid use, and meaningful improvements in pain, disability, and quality of life. In a secondary aim, a Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine whether initial postoperative opioid dosage was associated with time to opioid cessation. RESULTS: Of 2172 patients included, 35% had preoperative chronic opioid use. In patients without preoperative chronic opioid use, a postoperative opioid duration of 31 to 60 days was associated with chronic opioid use at 1 year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.1 [1.7-9.8]) and no meaningful improvement in extremity pain (aOR: 1.8 [1.3-2.6]) or axial pain (aOR: 1.6 [1.1-2.2]); cessation between 61 and 90 days was associated with no meaningful improvement in disability (aOR: 2 [1.3-3]) and dissatisfaction (aOR:1.8 [1-3.1]). In patients with preoperative chronic opioid use, postoperative opioids for ≥90 days was associated with dissatisfaction. Cox regression analyses showed lower initial postoperative opioid dosages were associated with faster opioid cessation in both groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a shorter duration of postoperative opioids may result in improved 1-year patient-reported outcomes, and that lower postoperative opioid dosages may lead to faster opioid cessation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/administração & dosagem , Dor Pós-Operatória/tratamento farmacológico , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Estudos de Coortes , Esquema de Medicação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/efeitos adversos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/etiologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/prevenção & controle , Dor Pós-Operatória/etiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Tempo
18.
Phys Ther ; 100(10): 1793-1804, 2020 09 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32556249

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Changing Behavior through Physical Therapy (CBPT), a cognitive-behavioral-based program, has been shown to improve outcomes after lumbar spine surgery in patients with a high psychosocial risk profile; however, little is known about potential mechanisms associated with CBPT treatment effects. The purpose of this study was to explore potential mediators underlying CBPT efficacy after spine surgery. METHODS: In this secondary analysis, 86 participants were enrolled in a randomized trial comparing a postoperative CBPT (n = 43) and education program (n = 43). Participants completed validated questionnaires at 6 weeks (baseline) and 3 and 6 months following surgery for back pain (Brief Pain Inventory), disability (Oswestry Disability Index), physical health (12-Item Short-Form Health Survey), fear of movement (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and pain self-efficacy (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire). Parallel multiple mediation analyses using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) were conducted to examine whether 3- and 6-month changes in fear of movement, pain catastrophizing, and pain self-efficacy mediate treatment outcome effects at 6 months. RESULTS: Six-month changes, but not 3-month changes, in fear of movement and pain self-efficacy mediated postoperative outcomes at 6 months. Specifically, changes in fear of movement mediated the effects of CBPT treatment on disability (indirect effect = -2.0 [95% CI = -4.3 to 0.3]), whereas changes in pain self-efficacy mediated the effects of CBPT treatment on physical health (indirect effect = 3.5 [95% CI = 1.2 to 6.1]). CONCLUSIONS: This study advances evidence on potential mechanisms underlying cognitive-behavioral strategies. Future work with larger samples is needed to establish whether these factors are a definitive causal mechanism. IMPACT: Fear of movement and pain self-efficacy may be important mechanisms to consider when developing and testing psychologically informed physical therapy programs.


Assuntos
Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental/métodos , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Modalidades de Fisioterapia/estatística & dados numéricos , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/terapia , Adulto , Avaliação da Deficiência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dor Pós-Operatória/prevenção & controle , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Neurosurgery ; 87(5): 1037-1045, 2020 10 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32521016

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The impact of symptom characteristics on outcomes of spine surgery remains elusive. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of symptom location, severity, and duration on outcomes following lumbar spine surgery. METHODS: We queried the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) for patients undergoing elective lumbar spine surgery for lumbar degenerative spine disease. Multivariable regression was utilized to determine the impact of preoperative symptom characteristics (location, severity, and duration) on improvement in disability, quality of life, return to work, and patient satisfaction at 1 yr. Relative predictor importance was determined using an importance metric defined as Wald χ2 penalized by degrees of freedom. RESULTS: A total of 22 022 subjects were analyzed. On adjusted analysis, we found patients with predominant leg pain were more likely to be satisfied (P < .0001), achieve minimum clinically important difference (MCID) in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (P = .002), and return to work (P = .03) at 1 yr following surgery without significant difference in Euro-QoL-5D (EQ-5D) (P = .09) [ref = predominant back pain]. Patients with equal leg and back pain were more likely to be satisfied (P < .0001), but showed no significant difference in achieving MCID (P = .22) or return to work (P = .07). Baseline numeric rating scale-leg pain and symptom duration were most important predictors of achieving MCID and change in EQ-5D. Predominant symptom was not found to be an important determinant of return to work. Worker's compensation was found to be most important determinant of satisfaction and return to work. CONCLUSION: Predominant symptom location is a significant determinant of functional outcomes following spine surgery. However, pain severity and duration have higher predictive importance. Return to work is more dependent on sociodemographic features as compared to symptom characteristics.


Assuntos
Degeneração do Disco Intervertebral/cirurgia , Dor Lombar/cirurgia , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Avaliação de Sintomas , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto , Idoso , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Humanos , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos , Satisfação do Paciente , Qualidade de Vida
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