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1.
Annu Rev Pathol ; 15: 149-177, 2020 Jan 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977296

RESUMO

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a common disease in Western countries and has heterogeneous clinical behavior. The relevance of the genetic basis of the disease has come to the forefront recently, with genome-wide studies that have provided a comprehensive view of structural variants, somatic mutations, and different layers of epigenetic changes. The mutational landscape is characterized by relatively common copy number alterations, a few mutated genes occurring in 10-15% of cases, and a large number of genes mutated in a small number of cases. The epigenomic profile has revealed a marked reprogramming of regulatory regions in tumor cells compared with normal B cells. All of these alterations are differentially distributed in clinical and biological subsets of the disease, indicating that they may underlie the heterogeneous evolution of the disease. These global studies are revealing the molecular complexity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and provide new perspectives that have helped to understand its pathogenic mechanisms and improve the clinical management of patients.

2.
Nature ; 574(7780): 707-711, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31664194

RESUMO

In cancer, recurrent somatic single-nucleotide variants-which are rare in most paediatric cancers-are confined largely to protein-coding genes1-3. Here we report highly recurrent hotspot mutations (r.3A>G) of U1 spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) in about 50% of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) medulloblastomas. These mutations were not present across other subgroups of medulloblastoma, and we identified these hotspot mutations in U1 snRNA in only <0.1% of 2,442 cancers, across 36 other tumour types. The mutations occur in 97% of adults (subtype SHHδ) and 25% of adolescents (subtype SHHα) with SHH medulloblastoma, but are largely absent from SHH medulloblastoma in infants. The U1 snRNA mutations occur in the 5' splice-site binding region, and snRNA-mutant tumours have significantly disrupted RNA splicing and an excess of 5' cryptic splicing events. Alternative splicing mediated by mutant U1 snRNA inactivates tumour-suppressor genes (PTCH1) and activates oncogenes (GLI2 and CCND2), and represents a target for therapy. These U1 snRNA mutations provide an example of highly recurrent and tissue-specific mutations of a non-protein-coding gene in cancer.

3.
Nature ; 574(7780): 712-716, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31597163

RESUMO

Cancers are caused by genomic alterations known as drivers. Hundreds of drivers in coding genes are known but, to date, only a handful of noncoding drivers have been discovered-despite intensive searching1,2. Attention has recently shifted to the role of altered RNA splicing in cancer; driver mutations that lead to transcriptome-wide aberrant splicing have been identified in multiple types of cancer, although these mutations have only been found in protein-coding splicing factors such as splicing factor 3b subunit 1 (SF3B1)3-6. By contrast, cancer-related alterations in the noncoding component of the spliceosome-a series of small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs)-have barely been studied, owing to the combined challenges of characterizing noncoding cancer drivers and the repetitive nature of snRNA genes1,7,8. Here we report a highly recurrent A>C somatic mutation at the third base of U1 snRNA in several types of tumour. The primary function of U1 snRNA is to recognize the 5' splice site via base-pairing. This mutation changes the preferential A-U base-pairing between U1 snRNA and the 5' splice site to C-G base-pairing, and thus creates novel splice junctions and alters the splicing pattern of multiple genes-including known drivers of cancer. Clinically, the A>C mutation is associated with heavy alcohol use in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, and with the aggressive subtype of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia with unmutated immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable regions. The mutation in U1 snRNA also independently confers an adverse prognosis to patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Our study demonstrates a noncoding driver in spliceosomal RNAs, reveals a mechanism of aberrant splicing in cancer and may represent a new target for treatment. Our findings also suggest that driver discovery should be extended to a wider range of genomic regions.

4.
Nature ; 2019 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31597162

RESUMO

Recurrent somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in cancer are largely confined to protein-coding genes, and are rare in most paediatric cancers1-3. Here we report highly recurrent hotspot mutations of U1 spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) in ~50% of Sonic hedgehog medulloblastomas (Shh-MB), which were not present across other medulloblastoma subgroups. This U1-snRNA hotspot mutation (r.3a>g), was identified in <0.1% of 2,442 cancers across 36 other tumour types. Largely absent from infant Shh-MB, the mutation occurs in 97% of adults (Shhδ), and 25% of adolescents (Shhα). The U1-snRNA mutation occurs in the 5' splice site binding region, and snRNA mutant tumours have significantly disrupted RNA splicing with an excess of 5' cryptic splicing events. Mutant U1-snRNA-mediated alternative splicing inactivates tumour suppressor genes (PTCH1), and activates oncogenes (GLI2, CCND2), represents a novel target for therapy, and constitutes a highly recurrent and tissue-specific mutation of a non-protein coding gene in cancer.

5.
Cancer Res ; 79(16): 4258-4270, 2019 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31213465

RESUMO

Taxanes are the mainstay of treatment in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), with de novo and acquired resistance limiting patient's survival. To investigate the genetic basis of docetaxel resistance in TNBC, exome sequencing was performed on matched TNBC patient-derived xenografts (PDX) sensitive to docetaxel and their counterparts that developed resistance in vivo upon continuous drug exposure. Most mutations, small insertions/deletions, and copy number alterations detected in the initial TNBC human metastatic samples were maintained after serial passages in mice and emergence of resistance. We identified a chromosomal amplification of chr12p in a human BRCA1-mutated metastatic sample and the derived chemoresistant PDX, but not in the matched docetaxel-sensitive PDX tumor. Chr12p amplification was validated in a second pair of docetaxel-sensitive/resistant BRCA1-mutated PDXs and after short-term docetaxel treatment in several TNBC/BRCA1-mutated PDXs and cell lines, as well as during metastatic recurrence in a patient with BRCA1-mutated breast cancer who had progressed on docetaxel treatment. Analysis of clinical data indicates an association between chr12p amplification and patients with TNBC/basal-like breast cancer, a BRCA1 mutational signature, and poor survival after chemotherapy. Detection of chr12p amplification in a cohort of TNBC PDX models was associated with an improved response to carboplatin. Our findings reveal tumor clonal dynamics during chemotherapy treatments and suggest that a preexisting population harboring chr12p amplification is associated with the emergence of docetaxel resistance and carboplatin responsiveness in TNBC/BRCA1-mutated tumors. SIGNIFICANCE: Chr12p copy number gains indicate rapid emergence of resistance to docetaxel and increased sensitivity to carboplatin, therefore sequential docetaxel/carboplatin treatment could improve survival in TNBC/BRCA1 patients. GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT: http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/canres/79/16/4258/F1.large.jpg.

6.
Dis Model Mech ; 11(5)2018 05 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29666142

RESUMO

Understanding the mechanisms of cancer therapeutic resistance is fundamental to improving cancer care. There is clear benefit from chemotherapy in different breast cancer settings; however, knowledge of the mutations and genes that mediate resistance is incomplete. In this study, by modeling chemoresistance in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs), we show that adaptation to therapy is genetically complex and identify that loss of transcription factor 4 (TCF4; also known as ITF2) is associated with this process. A triple-negative BRCA1-mutated PDX was used to study the genetics of chemoresistance. The PDX was treated in parallel with four chemotherapies for five iterative cycles. Exome sequencing identified few genes with de novo or enriched mutations in common among the different therapies, whereas many common depleted mutations/genes were observed. Analysis of somatic mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) supported the prognostic relevance of the identified genes. A mutation in TCF4 was found de novo in all treatments, and analysis of drug sensitivity profiles across cancer cell lines supported the link to chemoresistance. Loss of TCF4 conferred chemoresistance in breast cancer cell models, possibly by altering cell cycle regulation. Targeted sequencing in chemoresistant tumors identified an intronic variant of TCF4 that may represent an expression quantitative trait locus associated with relapse outcome in TCGA. Immunohistochemical studies suggest a common loss of nuclear TCF4 expression post-chemotherapy. Together, these results from tumor xenograft modeling depict a link between altered TCF4 expression and breast cancer chemoresistance.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos , Fator de Transcrição 4/deficiência , Adaptação Fisiológica , Adulto , Animais , Sequência de Bases , Neoplasias da Mama/tratamento farmacológico , Ciclo Celular/genética , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos/genética , Feminino , Heterogeneidade Genética , Humanos , Camundongos , Mutação/genética , Prognóstico , Fator de Transcrição 4/metabolismo , Ensaios Antitumorais Modelo de Xenoenxerto
7.
Methods Mol Biol ; 1731: 1-13, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29318538

RESUMO

Proteases constitute up to 3% of all protein-coding genes in a vertebrate genome and participate in numerous physiological and pathological processes. The characterization of the degradome of one organism, the set of all genes encoding proteolytic enzymes, and the comparison to the degradome of other species have proved useful to identify genetic differences that are helpful to elucidate the molecular basis of diverse biological processes, the different susceptibility to disease, and the evolution of the structure and function of proteases. Here we describe the main procedures involved in the characterization of the degradome of an organism for which its genome sequence is available.


Assuntos
Biologia Computacional/métodos , Evolução Molecular , Genômica/métodos , Animais , Bases de Dados de Proteínas , Genoma , Humanos , Proteólise
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