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2.
Hum Mutat ; 2019 Jul 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31343793

RESUMO

BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genetic variants that disrupt messenger RNA splicing are commonly associated with increased risks of developing breast/ovarian cancer. The majority of splicing studies published to date rely on qualitative methodologies (i.e., Sanger sequencing), but it is necessary to incorporate semi-quantitative or quantitative approaches to accurately interpret the clinical significance of spliceogenic variants. Here, we characterize the splicing impact of 31 BRCA1/2 variants using semi-quantitative capillary electrophoresis of fluorescent amplicons (CE), Sanger sequencing and allele-specific assays. A total of 14 variants were found to disrupt splicing. Allelic-specific assays could be performed for BRCA1 c.302-1G>A and BRCA2 c.516+2T>A, c.1909+1G>A, c.8332-13T>G, c.8332-2A>G, c.8954-2A>T variants, showing a monoallelic contribution to full-length transcript expression that was concordant with semi-quantitative data. The splicing fraction of alternative and aberrant transcripts was also measured by CE, facilitating variant interpretation. Following Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles criteria, we successfully classified eight variants as pathogenic (Class 5), five variants as likely pathogenic (Class 4), and 14 variants as benign (Class 1). We also provide splicing data for four variants classified as uncertain (Class 3), which produced a "leaky" splicing effect or introduced a missense change in the protein sequence, that will require further assessment to determine their clinical significance.

3.
Hum Mutat ; 40(9): 1546-1556, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31294896

RESUMO

Testing for variation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (commonly referred to as BRCA1/2), has emerged as a standard clinical practice and is helping countless women better understand and manage their heritable risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Yet the increased rate of BRCA1/2 testing has led to an increasing number of Variants of Uncertain Significance (VUS), and the rate of VUS discovery currently outpaces the rate of clinical variant interpretation. Computational prediction is a key component of the variant interpretation pipeline. In the CAGI5 ENIGMA Challenge, six prediction teams submitted predictions on 326 newly-interpreted variants from the ENIGMA Consortium. By evaluating these predictions against the new interpretations, we have gained a number of insights on the state of the art of variant prediction and specific steps to further advance this state of the art.

4.
Br J Cancer ; 121(2): 180-192, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31213659

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Height and body mass index (BMI) are associated with higher ovarian cancer risk in the general population, but whether such associations exist among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is unknown. METHODS: We applied a Mendelian randomisation approach to examine height/BMI with ovarian cancer risk using the Consortium of Investigators for the Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) data set, comprising 14,676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, with 2923 ovarian cancer cases. We created a height genetic score (height-GS) using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score (BMI-GS) using 93 BMI-associated variants. Associations were assessed using weighted Cox models. RESULTS: Observed height was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.07 per 10-cm increase in height, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.94-1.23). Height-GS showed similar results (HR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.85-1.23). Higher BMI was significantly associated with increased risk in premenopausal women with HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.06-1.48) and HR = 1.59 (95% CI: 1.08-2.33) per 5-kg/m2 increase in observed and genetically determined BMI, respectively. No association was found for postmenopausal women. Interaction between menopausal status and BMI was significant (Pinteraction < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our observation of a positive association between BMI and ovarian cancer risk in premenopausal BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is consistent with findings in the general population.

5.
Hum Mutat ; 40(9): 1593-1611, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31112341

RESUMO

BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) germline variants disrupting the DNA protective role of these genes increase the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Correct identification of these variants then becomes clinically relevant, because it may increase the survival rates of the carriers. Unfortunately, we are still unable to systematically predict the impact of BRCA1/2 variants. In this article, we present a family of in silico predictors that address this problem, using a gene-specific approach. For each protein, we have developed two tools, aimed at predicting the impact of a variant at two different levels: Functional and clinical. Testing their performance in different datasets shows that specific information compensates the small number of predictive features and the reduced training sets employed to develop our models. When applied to the variants of the BRCA1/2 (ENIGMA) challenge in the fifth Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI 5) we find that these methods, particularly those predicting the functional impact of variants, have a good performance, identifying the large compositional bias towards neutral variants in the CAGI sample. This performance is further improved when incorporating to our prediction protocol estimates of the impact on splicing of the target variant.

6.
Int J Cancer ; 145(10): 2682-2691, 2019 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30927264

RESUMO

Multigene panels provide a powerful tool for analyzing several genes simultaneously. We evaluated the frequency of pathogenic variants (PV) in customized predefined panels according to clinical suspicion by phenotype and compared it to the yield obtained in the analysis of our clinical research gene panel. We also investigated mutational yield of opportunistic testing of BRCA1/2 and mismatch repair (MMR) genes in all patients. A total of 1,205 unrelated probands with clinical suspicion of hereditary cancer were screened for germline mutations using panel testing. Overall, 1,048 females and 157 males were analyzed, mean age at cancer diagnosis was 48; 883 had hereditary breast/ovarian cancer-suspicion, 205 hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)-suspicion, 73 adenomatous-polyposis-suspicion and 44 with other/multiple clinical criteria. At least one PV was found in 150 probands (12%) analyzed by our customized phenotype-driven panel. Tumoral MMR deficiency predicted for the presence of germline MMR gene mutations in patients with HNPCC-suspicion (46/136 vs. 0/56 in patients with and without MMR deficiency, respectively). Opportunistic testing additionally identified five MSH6, one BRCA1 and one BRCA2 carriers (0.6%). The analysis of the extended 24-gene panel provided 25 additional PVs (2%), including in 4 out of 51 individuals harboring MMR-proficient colorectal tumors (2 CHEK2 and 2 ATM). Phenotype-based panels provide a notable rate of PVs with clinical actionability. Opportunistic testing of MMR and BRCA genes leads to a significant straightforward identification of MSH6, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and endorses the model of opportunistic testing of genes with clinical utility within a standard genetic counseling framework.

7.
Int J Cancer ; 145(2): 401-414, 2019 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30623411

RESUMO

A subset of genetic variants found through screening of patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome impact RNA splicing. Through target enrichment of the transcriptome, it is possible to perform deep-sequencing and to identify the different and even rare mRNA isoforms. A targeted RNA-seq approach was used to analyse the naturally-occurring splicing events for a panel of 8 breast and/or ovarian cancer susceptibility genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51C, RAD51D, PTEN, STK11, CDH1, TP53), 3 Lynch syndrome genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6) and the fanconi anaemia SLX4 gene, in which monoallelic mutations were found in non-BRCA families. For BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51C and RAD51D the results were validated by capillary electrophoresis and were compared to a non-targeted RNA-seq approach. We also compared splicing events from lymphoblastoid cell-lines with those from breast and ovarian fimbriae tissues. The potential of targeted RNA-seq to detect pathogenic changes in RNA-splicing was validated by the inclusion of samples with previously well characterized BRCA1/2 genetic variants. In our study, we update the catalogue of normal splicing events for BRCA1/2, provide an extensive catalogue of normal RAD51C and RAD51D alternative splicing, and list splicing events found for eight other genes. Additionally, we show that our approach allowed the identification of aberrant splicing events due to the presence of BRCA1/2 genetic variants and distinguished between complete and partial splicing events. In conclusion, targeted-RNA-seq can be very useful to classify variants based on their putative pathogenic impact on splicing.

8.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 174(2): 543-550, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30552643

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Disruption of splicing motifs by genetic variants can affect the correct generation of mature mRNA molecules leading to aberrant transcripts. In some cases, variants may alter the physiological transcription profile composed of several transcripts, and an accurate in vitro evaluation is crucial to establish their pathogenicity. In this study, we have characterized a novel PALB2 variant c.3201+5G>T identified in a breast cancer family. METHODS: Peripheral blood RNA was analyzed in two carriers and ten controls by RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. The splicing profile was also characterized by semi-quantitative capillary electrophoresis and quantitative PCR. RAD51 foci formation and PALB2 LOH status were evaluated in primary breast tumor samples from the carriers. RESULTS: PALB2 c.3201+5G>T disrupts intron 11 donor splice site and modifies the abundance of several alternative transcripts (∆11, ∆12, and ∆11,12), also present in control samples. All transcripts are predicted to encode for non-functional proteins. Semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of PALB2 full-length transcript indicated haploinsufficiency in carriers. One tumor exhibited PALB2 LOH and RAD51 assay indicated homologous recombination deficiency in both tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support a pathogenic classification for PALB2 c.3201+5G>T, highlighting the impact of variants causing an imbalanced expression of natural RNA isoforms in cancer susceptibility.


Assuntos
Processamento Alternativo , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Proteína do Grupo de Complementação N da Anemia de Fanconi/genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Feminino , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Perda de Heterozigosidade , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Linhagem , Análise de Sequência de RNA
9.
EMBO Mol Med ; 2018 Oct 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30377213

RESUMO

Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (PARPi) are effective in cancers with defective homologous recombination DNA repair (HRR), including BRCA1/2-related cancers. A test to identify additional HRR-deficient tumors will help to extend their use in new indications. We evaluated the activity of the PARPi olaparib in patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs) from breast cancer (BC) patients and investigated mechanisms of sensitivity through exome sequencing, BRCA1 promoter methylation analysis, and immunostaining of HRR proteins, including RAD51 nuclear foci. In an independent BC PDX panel, the predictive capacity of the RAD51 score and the homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) score were compared. To examine the clinical feasibility of the RAD51 assay, we scored archival breast tumor samples, including PALB2-related hereditary cancers. The RAD51 score was highly discriminative of PARPi sensitivity versus PARPi resistance in BC PDXs and outperformed the genomic test. In clinical samples, all PALB2-related tumors were classified as HRR-deficient by the RAD51 score. The functional biomarker RAD51 enables the identification of PARPi-sensitive BC and broadens the population who may benefit from this therapy beyond BRCA1/2-related cancers.

10.
J Med Genet ; 2018 Nov 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30472649

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 for the diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) is commonly restricted to coding regions and exon-intron boundaries. Although germline pathogenic variants in these regions explain about ~20% of HBOC cases, there is still an important fraction that remains undiagnosed. We have screened BRCA1/2 deep intronic regions to identify potential spliceogenic variants that could explain part of the missing HBOC susceptibility. METHODS: We analysed BRCA1/2 deep intronic regions by targeted gene sequencing in 192 high-risk HBOC families testing negative for BRCA1/2 during conventional analysis. Rare variants (MAF <0.005) predicted to create/activate splice sites were selected for further characterisation in patient RNA. The splicing outcome was analysed by RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing, and allelic imbalance was also determined when heterozygous exonic loci were present. RESULTS: A novel transcript was detected in BRCA1 c.4185+4105C>T variant carrier. This variant promotes the inclusion of a pseudoexon in mature mRNA, generating an aberrant transcript predicted to encode for a non-functional protein. Quantitative and allele-specific assays determined haploinsufficiency in the variant carrier, supporting a pathogenic effect for this variant. Genotyping of 1030 HBOC cases and 327 controls did not identify additional carriers in Spanish population. CONCLUSION: Screening of BRCA1/2 intronic regions has identified the first BRCA1 deep intronic variant associated with HBOC by pseudoexon activation. Although the frequency of deleterious variants in these regions appears to be low, our study highlights the importance of studying non-coding regions and performing comprehensive RNA assays to complement genetic diagnosis.

11.
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol ; 144(12): 2495-2513, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30306255

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Few and small studies have been reported about multigene testing usage by massively parallel sequencing in European cancer families. There is an open debate about what genes should be tested, and the actionability of some included genes is under research. METHODS: We investigated a panel of 34 known high/moderate-risk cancer genes, including 16 related to breast or ovarian cancer (BC/OC) genes, and 63 candidate genes to BC/OC in 192 clinically suspicious of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) Spanish families without pathogenic variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2). RESULTS: We identified 16 patients who carried a high- or moderate-risk pathogenic variant in eight genes: 4 PALB2, 3 ATM, 2 RAD51D, 2 TP53, 2 APC, 1 BRIP1, 1 PTEN and 1 PMS2. These findings led to increased surveillance or prevention options in 12 patients and predictive testing in their family members. We detected 383 unique variants of uncertain significance in known cancer genes, of which 35 were prioritized in silico. Eighteen loss-of-function variants were detected in candidate BC/OC genes in 17 patients (1 BARD1, 1 ERCC3, 1 ERCC5, 2 FANCE, 1 FANCI, 2 FANCL, 1 FANCM, 1 MCPH1, 1 PPM1D, 2 RBBP8, 3 RECQL4 and 1 with SLX4 and XRCC2), three of which also carry pathogenic variants in known cancer genes. CONCLUSIONS: Eight percent of the BRCA1/2 negative patients carry pathogenic variants in other actionable genes. The multigene panel usage improves the diagnostic yield in HBOC testing and it is an effective tool to identify potentially new candidate genes.

12.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2018 10 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30312457

RESUMO

Background: BRCA1/2 mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast cancer, although other factors may modify this risk. Whether height or body mass index (BMI) modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remains unclear. Methods: We used Mendelian randomization approaches to evaluate the association of height and BMI on breast cancer risk, using data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 with 14 676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, including 11 451 cases of breast cancer. We created a height genetic score using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score using 93 BMI-associated variants. We examined both observed and genetically determined height and BMI with breast cancer risk using weighted Cox models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Observed height was positively associated with breast cancer risk (HR = 1.09 per 10 cm increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0 to 1.17; P = 1.17). Height genetic score was positively associated with breast cancer, although this was not statistically significant (per 10 cm increase in genetically predicted height, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93 to 1.17; P = .47). Observed BMI was inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.90 to 0.98; P = .007). BMI genetic score was also inversely associated with breast cancer risk (per 5 kg/m2 increase in genetically predicted BMI, HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.98; P = .02). BMI was primarily associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Conclusion: Height is associated with overall breast cancer and BMI is associated with premenopausal breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Incorporating height and BMI, particularly genetic score, into risk assessment may improve cancer management.

13.
Front Genet ; 9: 366, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30233647

RESUMO

In silico tools for splicing defect prediction have a key role to assess the impact of variants of uncertain significance. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of a set of commonly used splicing in silico tools comparing the predictions against RNA in vitro results. This was done for natural splice sites of clinically relevant genes in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome. A study divided into two stages was used to evaluate SSF-like, MaxEntScan, NNSplice, HSF, SPANR, and dbscSNV tools. A discovery dataset of 99 variants with unequivocal results of RNA in vitro studies, located in the 10 exonic and 20 intronic nucleotides adjacent to exon-intron boundaries of BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, ATM, BRIP1, CDH1, PALB2, PTEN, RAD51D, STK11, and TP53, was collected from four Spanish cancer genetic laboratories. The best stand-alone predictors or combinations were validated with a set of 346 variants in the same genes with clear splicing outcomes reported in the literature. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value (NPV) and Mathews Coefficient Correlation (MCC) scores were used to measure the performance. The discovery stage showed that HSF and SSF-like were the most accurate for variants at the donor and acceptor region, respectively. The further combination analysis revealed that HSF, HSF+SSF-like or HSF+SSF-like+MES achieved a high performance for predicting the disruption of donor sites, and SSF-like or a sequential combination of MES and SSF-like for predicting disruption of acceptor sites. The performance confirmation of these last results with the validation dataset, indicated that the highest sensitivity, accuracy, and NPV (99.44%, 99.44%, and 96.88, respectively) were attained with HSF+SSF-like or HSF+SSF-like+MES for donor sites and SSF-like (92.63%, 92.65%, and 84.44, respectively) for acceptor sites. We provide recommendations for combining algorithms to conduct in silico splicing analysis that achieved a high performance. The high NPV obtained allows to select the variants in which the study by in vitro RNA analysis is mandatory against those with a negligible probability of being spliceogenic. Our study also shows that the performance of each specific predictor varies depending on whether the natural splicing sites are donors or acceptors.

14.
Hum Mutat ; 39(12): 2025-2039, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30204945

RESUMO

The widespread use of next generation sequencing for clinical testing is detecting an escalating number of variants in noncoding regions of the genome. The clinical significance of the majority of these variants is currently unknown, which presents a significant clinical challenge. We have screened over 6,000 early-onset and/or familial breast cancer (BC) cases collected by the ENIGMA consortium for sequence variants in the 5' noncoding regions of BC susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, and identified 141 rare variants with global minor allele frequency < 0.01, 76 of which have not been reported previously. Bioinformatic analysis identified a set of 21 variants most likely to impact transcriptional regulation, and luciferase reporter assays detected altered promoter activity for four of these variants. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that three of these altered the binding of proteins to the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 promoter regions, including NFYA binding to BRCA1:c.-287C>T and PAX5 binding to BRCA2:c.-296C>T. Clinical classification of variants affecting promoter activity, using existing prediction models, found no evidence to suggest that these variants confer a high risk of disease. Further studies are required to determine if such variation may be associated with a moderate or low risk of BC.

15.
Cancer Res ; 78(18): 5419-5430, 2018 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30054336

RESUMO

Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 35 loci associated with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. The majority of GWAS-identified disease susceptibility variants are located in noncoding regions, and causal genes underlying these associations remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a transcriptome-wide association study to search for novel genetic loci and plausible causal genes at known GWAS loci. We used RNA sequencing data (68 normal ovarian tissue samples from 68 individuals and 6,124 cross-tissue samples from 369 individuals) and high-density genotyping data from European descendants of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx V6) project to build ovarian and cross-tissue models of genetically regulated expression using elastic net methods. We evaluated 17,121 genes for their cis-predicted gene expression in relation to EOC risk using summary statistics data from GWAS of 97,898 women, including 29,396 EOC cases. With a Bonferroni-corrected significance level of P < 2.2 × 10-6, we identified 35 genes, including FZD4 at 11q14.2 (Z = 5.08, P = 3.83 × 10-7, the cross-tissue model; 1 Mb away from any GWAS-identified EOC risk variant), a potential novel locus for EOC risk. All other 34 significantly associated genes were located within 1 Mb of known GWAS-identified loci, including 23 genes at 6 loci not previously linked to EOC risk. Upon conditioning on nearby known EOC GWAS-identified variants, the associations for 31 genes disappeared and three genes remained (P < 1.47 × 10-3). These data identify one novel locus (FZD4) and 34 genes at 13 known EOC risk loci associated with EOC risk, providing new insights into EOC carcinogenesis.Significance: Transcriptomic analysis of a large cohort confirms earlier GWAS loci and reveals FZD4 as a novel locus associated with EOC risk. Cancer Res; 78(18); 5419-30. ©2018 AACR.

16.
Hum Mutat ; 39(9): 1155-1160, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29969168

RESUMO

Many BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genetic variants have been studied at mRNA level and linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer due to splicing alteration. In silico tools are reliable when assessing variants located in consensus splice sites, but we may identify variants in complex genomic contexts for which bioinformatics is not precise enough. In this study, we characterize BRCA2 c.7976 + 5G > T variant located in intron 17 which has an atypical donor site (GC). This variant was identified in three unrelated Spanish families and we have detected exon 17 skipping as the predominant transcript occurring in carriers. We have also detected several isoforms (Δ16-18, Δ17,18, Δ18, and ▼17q224 ) at different expression levels among carriers and controls. This study remarks the challenge of interpreting genetic variants when multiple alternative isoforms are present, and that caution must be taken when using in silico tools to identify potential spliceogenic variants located in GC-AG introns.

17.
Med. clín (Ed. impr.) ; 151(2): 80.e1-80.e10, jul. 2018. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-173778

RESUMO

El diagnóstico genético de los síndromes de cáncer hereditario ofrece la oportunidad de establecer unas medidas de predicción/prevención eficaces en el paciente y sus familiares que se traducen en una disminución de la morbimortalidad por cáncer en las familias de alto riesgo genético. La secuenciación masiva (NGS) ofrece una considerable mejora de la eficiencia del diagnóstico genético, permitiendo un aumento del rendimiento diagnóstico con una reducción sustancial del tiempo de respuesta y costes económicos. En consecuencia, la implementación de esta nueva tecnología es una gran oportunidad de mejora en el manejo clínico de las familias afectas. El objetivo de la presente guía es establecer un marco de recomendaciones útiles para una implementación planificada y controlada de la NGS en el contexto de la predisposición hereditaria a cáncer, que permita potenciar las fortalezas y oportunidades que ofrece dicha tecnología y minimizar las debilidades y amenazas que puedan derivarse de su uso. Está inspirada en las recomendaciones de sociedades internacionales, habiendo sido adaptada a nuestro entorno, y teniendo en cuenta aspectos coyunturales a nivel organizativo y biojurídico. Se aportan 41 declaraciones agrupadas en 6 apartados: utilidad clínica y diagnóstica, consentimiento informado y asesoramiento genético pretest y postest, validación de los procedimientos analíticos, informe de resultados, gestión de la información y distinción entre ámbito de investigación y ámbito asistencial. Esta guía ha sido elaborada por la Asociación Española de Genética Humana (AEGH), la Sociedad Española de Medicina de Laboratorio (SEQC-ML) y la Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica (SEOM)


Genetic diagnosis of hereditary cancer syndromes offers the opportunity to establish more effective predictive and preventive measures for the patient and their families. The ultimate objective is to decrease cancer morbidity and mortality in high genetic risk families. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers an important improvement in the efficiency of genetic diagnosis, allowing an increase in diagnostic yield with a substantial reduction in response times and economic costs. Consequently, the implementation of this new technology is a great opportunity for improvement in the clinical management of affected families. The aim of these guidelines is to establish a framework of useful recommendations for planned and controlled implementation of NGS in the context of hereditary cancer. These will help to consolidate the strengths and opportunities offered by this technology, and minimise the weaknesses and threats which may derive from its use. The recommendations of international societies have been adapted to our environment, taking the Spanish context into account at organisational and juridical levels. Forty-one statements are grouped under six headings: clinical and diagnostic utility, informed consent and genetic counselling pre-test and post-test, validation of analytical procedures, results report, management of information and distinction between research and clinical context. This guide has been developed by the Spanish Association of Human Genetics (AEGH), the Spanish Society of Laboratory Medicine (SEQC-ML) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM)


Assuntos
Neoplasias/genética , Análise de Sequência/métodos , Neoplasias/diagnóstico , Testes Genéticos/métodos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto
18.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 967, 2018 03 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29511213

RESUMO

BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor that regulates DNA repair by homologous recombination. Germline mutations in BRCA1 are associated with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer and BRCA1 deficient tumors are exquisitely sensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Therefore, uncovering additional components of this DNA repair pathway is of extreme importance for further understanding cancer development and therapeutic vulnerabilities. Here, we identify EDC4, a known component of processing-bodies and regulator of mRNA decapping, as a member of the BRCA1-BRIP1-TOPBP1 complex. EDC4 plays a key role in homologous recombination by stimulating end resection at double-strand breaks. EDC4 deficiency leads to genome instability and hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-linking drugs and PARP inhibitors. Lack-of-function mutations in EDC4 were detected in BRCA1/2-mutation-negative breast cancer cases, suggesting a role in breast cancer susceptibility. Collectively, this study recognizes EDC4 with a dual role in decapping and DNA repair whose inactivation phenocopies BRCA1 deficiency.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Reparo do DNA , Proteínas/metabolismo , Proteína BRCA1/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Proteínas de Transporte/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo , Feminino , Recombinação Homóloga , Humanos , Mutação , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/metabolismo , Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerase-1/genética , Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerase-1/metabolismo , Ligação Proteica , Proteínas/genética , Capuzes de RNA/genética , Capuzes de RNA/metabolismo
19.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 151(2): 80.e1-80.e10, 2018 Jul 23.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29439875

RESUMO

Genetic diagnosis of hereditary cancer syndromes offers the opportunity to establish more effective predictive and preventive measures for the patient and their families. The ultimate objective is to decrease cancer morbidity and mortality in high genetic risk families. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers an important improvement in the efficiency of genetic diagnosis, allowing an increase in diagnostic yield with a substantial reduction in response times and economic costs. Consequently, the implementation of this new technology is a great opportunity for improvement in the clinical management of affected families. The aim of these guidelines is to establish a framework of useful recommendations for planned and controlled implementation of NGS in the context of hereditary cancer. These will help to consolidate the strengths and opportunities offered by this technology, and minimise the weaknesses and threats which may derive from its use. The recommendations of international societies have been adapted to our environment, taking the Spanish context into account at organisational and juridical levels. Forty-one statements are grouped under six headings: clinical and diagnostic utility, informed consent and genetic counselling pre-test and post-test, validation of analytical procedures, results report, management of information and distinction between research and clinical context. This guide has been developed by the Spanish Association of Human Genetics (AEGH), the Spanish Society of Laboratory Medicine (SEQC-ML) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM).

20.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 161(1): 117-134, 2017 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27796716

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10-6). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. CONCLUSION: We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.


Assuntos
Alelos , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Heterozigoto , Mutação , Biomarcadores Tumorais , Cromossomos Humanos Par 11 , Feminino , Expressão Gênica , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Humanos , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Risco
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