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1.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 9(5): e17795, 2020 May 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32441660

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Interdisciplinary pain treatment (IPT) is a complex intervention; its outcomes are very diverse, as are the methodologies for handling those outcomes. This diversity may hamper evidence-based decision making. Presently, there is no gold standard recommendation of how to select reported outcomes in published systematic reviews and meta-analyses to explicitly demonstrate the effectiveness of IPT. OBJECTIVE: In this systematic overview, we aim to evaluate the reported outcome domains and measurements across published systematic reviews and meta-analyses and to identify any methods, considerations, and discussion regarding the handling of the chosen outcome domains and measurements. METHODS: This article describes the protocol for a systematic overview of the outcomes reported in published systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized control trials for the effectiveness of IPT versus any control. To this end, we searched the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Epistemonikos databases from inception to December 2019. Two independent investigators screened the titles, the abstracts of the identified records, and the full texts of the potentially eligible systematic reviews and meta-analyses, performed data extraction according to predefined forms, and rated the quality of the included systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The quality of the included systematic reviews and meta-analyses will be rated with AMSTAR (A MeaSurement Tool to Assess systematic Reviews) 2. Data will be analyzed descriptively and stratified by AMSTAR 2. RESULTS: We introduced the rationale and design of a systematic overview to summarize and map the chosen IPT outcome domains and the methods of handling these outcomes reported in published systematic reviews and meta-analyses. As of December 2019, we collected 5229 systematic reviews, of which 147 (2.81%) were examined in-depth for eligibility. Topline results are anticipated by September 2020. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study will be published as soon as they are available. Our results will fill a gap in the related literature and will be used to inform the development of a set of recommendations that can be applied in systematic reviews and hopefully serve as a gold standard. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): PRR1-10.2196/17795.

2.
BMC Geriatr ; 20(1): 95, 2020 Mar 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32143637

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The healthcare for older adults is insufficient in many countries, not designed to meet their needs and is often described as disorganized and reactive. Prediction of older persons at risk of admission to hospital may be one important way for the future healthcare system to act proactively when meeting increasing needs for care. Therefore, we wanted to develop and test a clinically useful model for predicting hospital admissions of older persons based on routine healthcare data. METHODS: We used the healthcare data on 40,728 persons, 75-109 years of age to predict hospital in-ward care in a prospective cohort. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify significant factors predictive of unplanned hospital admission. Model fitting was accomplished using forward selection. The accuracy of the prediction model was expressed as area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, AUC. RESULTS: The prediction model consisting of 38 variables exhibited a good discriminative accuracy for unplanned hospital admissions over the following 12 months (AUC 0.69 [95% confidence interval, CI 0.68-0.70]) and was validated on external datasets. Clinically relevant proportions of predicted cases of 40 or 45% resulted in sensitivities of 62 and 66%, respectively. The corresponding positive predicted values (PPV) was 31 and 29%, respectively. CONCLUSION: A prediction model based on routine administrative healthcare data from older persons can be used to find patients at risk of admission to hospital. Identifying the risk population can enable proactive intervention for older patients with as-yet unknown needs for healthcare.

3.
Eur J Pain ; 23(10): 1839-1849, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31343806

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Throughout the world many people have both obesity and chronic pain, comorbidities that decrease Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). It is uncertain whether patients with comorbid obesity can maintain improved HRQoL after Interdisciplinary Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation (IMMPR). METHODS: Data from 2016, 2017, and 2018 were obtained from a national pain database for Swedish specialized pain clinics and collected at three time points: Pre-IMMPR; Post- IMMPR; and 12-month follow-up (FU-IMMPR). Participants (N = 872) reported body weight, height, pain aspects, and HRQoL (RAND 36-Item Health Survey). Severe obesity (Body Mass Index, BMI ≥35 kg/m2 ) was defined according to WHO classifications. We used linear mixed regression models to examine BMI group differences in HRQoL over time. RESULTS: More than 25% of patients (224/872) were obese and nearly 30% (63/224) of these were severely obese. All BMI groups improved significantly in both physical and mental composites of HRQoL after IMMPR (Pre- vs. Post-IMMPR, p < .001). The improvements were maintained at a 12-month follow-up (Post- vs. FU-IMMPR, p > .05). The severe obesity group had the lowest physical health score and least improvement (pre- vs. FU-IMMPR, Cohen's d = o.422, small effect size). Severe obesity had negative impact on physical health (ß = -4.39, p < .05) after controlling for sociodemographic factors and pain aspects. CONCLUSION: Improvements in HRQoL after IMMPR were achieved and maintained across all weights, including patients with comorbid obesity. Only severe obesity was negatively associated with physical health aspects of HRQoL. SIGNIFICANCE: Patients with chronic pain and comorbid obesity achieve sustained Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) improvements from Interdisciplinary Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation (IMMPR). This finding suggests that rehabilitation professionals should consider using IMMPR for patients with comorbid obesity even though their improvement may not reach the same level as for non-obese patients.

4.
Scand J Pain ; 2019 May 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31150362

RESUMO

Background and aims Although literature concerning chronic pain patients indicates that cognitive behavioural variables, specifically acceptance and fear of movement/(re)injury, are related to life impact, the relative roles of these factors in relation to pain characteristics (e.g. intensity and spreading) and emotional distress are unclear. Moreover, how these variables affect rehabilitation outcomes in different subgroups is insufficiently understood. This study has two aims: (1) to investigate how pain, cognitive behavioural, and emotional distress variables intercorrelate and whether these variables can regress aspects of life impact and (2) to analyse whether these variables can be used to identify clinically meaningful subgroups at baseline and which subgroups benefit most from multimodal rehabilitation programs (MMRP) immediately after and at 12-month follow-up. Methods Pain aspects, background variables, psychological distress, cognitive behavioural variables, and two life impact variables were obtained from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP) for chronic pain patients. These data were analysed mainly using advanced multivariate methods. Results The study includes 22,406 chronic pain patients. Many variables, including acceptance variables, showed important contributions to the variation in clinical presentations and in life impacts. Based on the statistically important variables considering the clinical presentation, three clusters/subgroups of patients were identified at baseline; from the worst clinical situation to the relatively good situation. These clusters showed significant differences in outcomes after participating in MMRP; the subgroup with the worst situation at baseline showed the most significant improvements. Conclusions Pain intensity/severity, emotional distress, acceptance, and life impacts were important for the clinical presentation and were used to identify three clusters with marked differences at baseline (i.e. before MMRP). Life impacts showed complex relationships with acceptance, pain intensity/severity, and emotional distress. The most significant improvements after MMRP were seen in the subgroup with the lowest level of functioning before treatment, indicating that patients with complex problems should be offered MMRP. Implications This study emphasizes the need to adopt a biopsychosocial perspective when assessing patients with chronic pain. Patients with chronic pain referred to specialist clinics are not homogenous in their clinical presentation. Instead we identified three distinct subgroups of patients. The outcomes of MMRP appears to be related to the clinical presentation. Thus, patients with the most severe clinical presentation show the most prominent improvements. However, even though this group of patients improve they still after MMRP show a complex situation and there is thus a need for optimizing the content of MMRP for these patients. The subgroup of patients with a relatively good situation with respect to pain, psychological distress, coping and life impact only showed minor improvements after MMRP. Hence, there is a need to develop other complex interventions for them.

5.
BMJ Open ; 9(5): e027847, 2019 05 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31122995

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The provision of healthcare services is not dedicated to promoting maintenance of function and does not target frail older persons at high risk of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a proactive medical and social intervention in comparison with conventional care on a group of persons aged 75 and older selected by statistical prediction. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In a pragmatic multicentre primary care setting (n=1600), a prediction model to find elderly (75+) persons at high risk of complex medical care or hospitalisation is used, followed by proactive medical and social care, in comparison with usual care. The study started in April 2017 with a run-in period until December 2017, followed by a 2-year continued intervention phase that will continue until the end of December 2019. The intervention includes several tools (multiprofessional team for rehabilitation, social support, medical care home visits and telephone support). Primary outcome measures are healthcare cost, number of hospital care episodes, hospital care days and mortality. Secondary outcome measures are number of outpatient visits, cost of social care and informal care, number of prescribed drugs, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, sense of security, functional status and ability. We also study the care of elderly persons in a broader sense, by covering the perspectives of the patients, the professional staff and the management, and on a political level, by using semistructured interviews, qualitative methods and a questionnaire. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Approved by the regional ethical review board in Linköping (Dnr 2016/347-31). The results will be presented in scientific journals and scientific meetings during 2019-2022 and are planned to be used for the development of future care models. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03180606.

6.
J Pain Res ; 12: 891-908, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30881099

RESUMO

Background: Chronic pain patients frequently suffer from psychological symptoms. There is no consensus concerning the prevalence of severe anxiety and depressive symptoms and the strength of the associations between pain intensity and psychological distress. Although an important aspect of the clinical picture is understanding how the pain condition impacts life, little is known about the relative importance of pain and psychological symptoms for individual's life impact. The aims of this study were to identify subgroups of pain patients; to analyze if pain, psychological distress, and life impact variables influence subgrouping; and to investigate how patients in the subgroups benefit from treatments. Methods: Background variables, pain aspects (intensity/severity and spreading), psychological distress (depressive and anxiety symptoms), and two life impact variables (pain interference and perceived life control) were obtained from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation for chronic pain patients and analyzed mainly using advanced multivariate methods. Results: Based on >35,000 patients, 35%-40% had severe anxiety or depressive symptoms. Severe psychological distress was associated with being born outside Europe (21%-24% vs 6%-8% in the category without psychological distress) and low education level (20.7%-20.8% vs 26%-27% in the category without psychological distress). Dose relationships existed between the two psychological distress variables and pain aspects, but the explained variances were generally low. Pain intensity/severity and the two psychological distress variables were significantly associated (R 2=0.40-0.48; P>0.001) with the two life impact variables (pain interference and life control). Two subgroups of patients were identified at baseline (subgroup 1: n=15,901-16,119; subgroup 2: n=20,690-20,981) and the subgroup with the worst situation regarding all variables participated less in an MMRP (51% vs 58%, P<0.001) but showed the largest improvements in outcomes. Conclusion: The results emphasize the need to assess both pain and psychological distress and not take for granted that pain involves high psychological stress in the individual case. Not all patients benefit from MMRP. A better matching between common clinical pictures and the content of MMRPs may help improve results. We only partly found support for treatment resistance in patients with psychological distress burden.

7.
BMC Geriatr ; 18(1): 270, 2018 11 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30409125

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity and chronic pain are common comorbidities and adversely influence each other. Advanced age is associated with more comorbidities and multi-morbidities. In this study, we investigated the burden of overweight/obesity and its comorbidities and their associations with chronic pain in a random population sample of Swedish older adults. METHODS: The cross-sectional analysis involved a random sample of a population ≥ 65 years in south-eastern Sweden (N = 6243). Data were collected from a postal questionnaire that addressed pain aspects, body mass index (BMI), and health experiences. Chronic pain was defined as pain during the previous three months. According to the 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale, pain scored ≥7 corresponds to severe pain. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the variables associated to pain aspects. RESULTS: A total of 2633 (42%) reported chronic pain. More obese older adults (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) experienced chronic pain (58%) than those who were low-normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2, 39%) or overweight (25 ≤ BMI < 30 kg/m2, 41%). Obese elderly more frequently had pain in extremities and lower back than their peers. In the multivariate model, obesity (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.59, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.33-1.91) but not overweight (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22) was associated with chronic pain. Obesity (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16-2.01) was also significantly related to severe pain. We also found other comorbidities - i.e., traumatic history (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.99-3.19), rheumatic diseases (OR 5.21, 95% CI 4.54-5.97), age ≥ 85 years (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.22-2.25), and depression or anxiety diagnosis (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.32-2.53) - showed stronger associations with pain aspects than weight status. CONCLUSION: In older adults, excess weight (BMI 30 or above) is a potentially modifiable factor but not the only risk factor that is associated with chronic pain and severe pain. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of interventions that treat comorbid pain and obesity in older adults.


Assuntos
Dor Crônica/epidemiologia , Comorbidade/tendências , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Índice de Massa Corporal , Dor Crônica/etiologia , Dor Crônica/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Razão de Chances , Sobrepeso/complicações , Sobrepeso/psicologia , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Suécia/epidemiologia
8.
Scand J Pain ; 18(3): 417-429, 2018 07 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29794267

RESUMO

Background and aims Health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) reflects the burden of a condition on an overarching level. Pain intensity, disability and other factors influence how patients with chronic pain perceive their condition, e.g. Hr-QoL. However, the relative importance of these factors is unclear and there is an ongoing debate as to what importance pain measures have in this group. We investigated the importance of current pain level and mood on aspects of Hr-QoL in patients with chronic pain and investigated whether such relationships are influenced by demographics. Methods Data was obtained from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP), between 2008 and 2016 on patients ≥18 years old who suffered from chronic pain and were referred to participating specialist clinics. Dependent variables were general Hr-QoL [using two scales from European Quality of Life instrument: EQ5D Index and the European Quality of Life instrument health scale (EQ thermometer)] and specific Hr-QoL [from the Short Form Health Survey (SF36) the physical component summary (SF36-PCS) and the mental (psychological) component summary (SF36-MCS)]. Independent variables were sociodemographic variables, pain variables, psychological distress and pain attitudes. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate correlation analyses of all investigated variables and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Regression (OPLS) for multivariate regressions on health aspects. Results There was 40,518 patients (72% women). Pain intensity and interference showed the strongest multivariate correlations with EQ5D Index, EQ thermometer and SF36-PCS. Psychological distress variables displayed the strongest multivariate correlations with SF36-MCS. Demographic properties did not significantly influence variations in the investigated Hr-QoL variables. Conclusions Pain, mood and pain attitudes were significantly correlated with Hr-QoL variables, but these variables cannot explain most of variations in Hr-QoL variables. The results pinpoint that broad assessments (including pain intensity aspects) are needed to capture the clinical presentation of patients with complex chronic pain conditions.


Assuntos
Dor Crônica/epidemiologia , Dor Crônica/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Sistema de Registros/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Dor Crônica/fisiopatologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Suécia/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
BMC Geriatr ; 13: 120, 2013 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24195643

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As life expectancy continues to rise, more elderly are reaching advanced ages (≥80 years). The increasing prevalence of multimorbidity places additional demands on health-care resources for the elderly. Previous studies noted the impact of multimorbidity on the use of health services, but the effects of multimorbidity patterns on health-service use have not been well studied, especially for very old people. This study determines patterns of multimorbidity associated with emergency-room visits and hospitalization in an 85-year-old population. METHODS: Health and living conditions were reported via postal questionnaire by 496 Linköping residents aged 85 years (189 men and 307 women). Diagnoses of morbidity were reviewed in patients' case reports, and the local health-care register provided information on the use of health services. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to evaluate patterns of multimorbidity with gender stratification. Factors associated with emergency-room visits and hospitalization were analyzed using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Cluster analyses revealed five clusters: vascular, cardiopulmonary, cardiac (only for men), somatic-mental (only for men), mental disease (only for women), and three other clusters related to aging (one for men and two for women). Heart failure in men (OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1-5.7) and women (OR = 3, 95% CI = 1.3-6.9) as a single morbidity explained more variance than morbidity clusters in models of emergency-room visits. Men's cardiac cluster (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1-2.7) and women's cardiopulmonary cluster (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2-2.4) were significantly associated with hospitalization. The combination of the cardiopulmonary cluster with the men's cardiac cluster (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1-2.4) and one of the women's aging clusters (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8) showed interaction effects on hospitalization. CONCLUSION: In this 85-year-old population, patterns of cardiac and pulmonary conditions were better than a single morbidity in explaining hospitalization. Heart failure was superior to multimorbidity patterns in explaining emergency-room visits. A holistic approach to examining the patterns of multimorbidity and their relationships with the use of health services will contribute to both local health care policy and geriatric practice.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Serviços Médicos de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Serviços de Saúde para Idosos/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitalização/tendências , Pneumopatias/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Doenças Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico , Doenças Cardiovasculares/terapia , Comorbidade , Feminino , Humanos , Pneumopatias/diagnóstico , Pneumopatias/terapia , Masculino , Suécia/epidemiologia
10.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 60(2): 243-50, 2012 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22283806

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether being overweight or obese is associated with significant health outcomes in an 85-year-old population. DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study. SETTING: Linköping, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred thirty-eight people born in 1922 were identified using the local authority's register. MEASUREMENTS: Data related to sociodemographic characteristics, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), assistance use, and the presence of diseases were collected using a postal questionnaire. Anthropometry and functional status were assessed during home and geriatric clinic visits. Diseases were double-checked in the electronic medical records, and information about health service consumption was obtained from the local healthcare register. RESULTS: Overweight (body mass index (BMI) 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m(2)) participants perceived more difficulty performing instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) and had more comorbidity than their normal-weight counterparts (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), but their overall HRQoL and health service costs did not differ from those of normal-weight participants. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, being overweight did not influence IADLs or any comorbidity, but obese participants were more likely to perceive greater difficulty in performing outdoor activities (odds ratio (OR) = 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-4) and cleaning (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.2-4.2) than their normal-weight counterparts. Although obesity was also associated with multimorbidity (OR = 3, 95% CI = 1.2-8), the health service cost of each case of multimorbidity (n = 251) was highest in normal-weight participants and nearly three times as much as in obese participants (ratio: 2.9, 95% CI = 1.1-8.1). CONCLUSION: For 85-year-olds, being obese, as opposed to overweight, is associated with self-reported activity limitations and comorbidities. Overweight older adults living in their own homes in this population had well-being similar to that of those with normal weight.


Assuntos
Sobrepeso/complicações , Atividades Cotidianas , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade/complicações , Estudos Prospectivos , Suécia
11.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 54(2): 391-7, 2012.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21640394

RESUMO

The aim of this population-based study was to (1) describe living conditions and actual health care utilization among 85 year olds; (2) determine factors that affect hospital admissions in this age. The study was conducted on 85-year-old residents in Linköping municipality, Sweden. The data collected included medical records, health care utilization during the preceding 12 months and a postal questionnaire on assistance, assistive technology, functional impairment, feelings of loneliness, worries and health-related quality of life measured by the EQ-5D. Out of 650 eligible individuals, 496 (78% of those alive) participated. Despite the prevalence of multi-morbidity (68%) and mental discomfort, the majority managed self-care (85%), usual activities (74%) and had high (>60/100) self-rated health evaluated by a visual analog scale (VAS). The non-hospitalized group reported a better health status than the hospitalized group in terms of medical aspects, living conditions and subjective estimation. Factors associated with in-patient care were an increased number of general practitioner visits, more assistive technology, community assistance, multimorbidity and/or diagnosed congestive heart failure and arrhythmia.


Assuntos
Idoso/estatística & dados numéricos , Nível de Saúde , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Atividades Cotidianas , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Doença Crônica/epidemiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Qualidade de Vida , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Suécia/epidemiologia
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