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2.
BMC Bioinformatics ; 21(1): 23, 2020 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31964336

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Network inference is an important aim of systems biology. It enables the transformation of OMICs datasets into biological knowledge. It consists of reverse engineering gene regulatory networks from OMICs data, such as RNAseq or mass spectrometry-based proteomics data, through computational methods. This approach allows to identify signalling pathways involved in specific biological functions. The ability to infer causality in gene regulatory networks, in addition to correlation, is crucial for several modelling approaches and allows targeted control in biotechnology applications. METHODS: We performed simulations according to the approximate Bayesian computation method, where the core model consisted of a steady-state simulation algorithm used to study gene regulatory networks in systems for which a limited level of details is available. The simulations outcome was compared to experimentally measured transcriptomics and proteomics data through approximate Bayesian computation. RESULTS: The structure of small gene regulatory networks responsible for the regulation of biological functions involved in biomining were inferred from multi OMICs data of mixed bacterial cultures. Several causal inter- and intraspecies interactions were inferred between genes coding for proteins involved in the biomining process, such as heavy metal transport, DNA damage, replication and repair, and membrane biogenesis. The method also provided indications for the role of several uncharacterized proteins by the inferred connection in their network context. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of fast algorithms with high-performance computing allowed the simulation of a multitude of gene regulatory networks and their comparison to experimentally measured OMICs data through approximate Bayesian computation, enabling the probabilistic inference of causality in gene regulatory networks of a multispecies bacterial system involved in biomining without need of single-cell or multiple perturbation experiments. This information can be used to influence biological functions and control specific processes in biotechnology applications.

3.
Front Microbiol ; 10: 2579, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31787958

RESUMO

Coastal zones are important transitional areas between the land and sea, where both terrestrial and phytoplankton supplied dissolved organic matter (DOM) are respired or transformed. As climate change is expected to increase river discharge and water temperatures, DOM from both allochthonous and autochthonous sources is projected to increase. As these transformations are largely regulated by bacteria, we analyzed microbial community structure data in relation to a 6-month long time-series dataset of DOM characteristics from Roskilde Fjord and adjacent streams, Denmark. The results showed that the microbial community composition in the outer estuary (closer to the sea) was largely associated with salinity and nutrients, while the inner estuary formed two clusters linked to either nutrients plus allochthonous DOM or autochthonous DOM characteristics. In contrast, the microbial community composition in the streams was found to be mainly associated with allochthonous DOM characteristics. A general pattern across the land-to-sea interface was that Betaproteobacteria were strongly associated with humic-like DOM [operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to family Comamonadaceae], while distinct populations were instead associated with nutrients or abiotic variables such as temperature (Cyanobacteria genus Synechococcus) and salinity (Actinobacteria family Microbacteriaceae). Furthermore, there was a stark shift in the relative abundance of OTUs between stream and marine stations. This indicates that as DOM travels through the land-to-sea interface, different bacterial guilds continuously degrade it.

4.
Sci Data ; 6(1): 207, 2019 10 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31619684

RESUMO

Natural sulfide rich deposits are common in coastal areas worldwide, including along the Baltic Sea coast. When artificial drainage exposes these deposits to atmospheric oxygen, iron sulfide minerals in the soils are rapidly oxidized. This process turns the potential acid sulfate soils into actual acid sulfate soils and mobilizes large quantities of acidity and leachable toxic metals that cause severe environmental problems. It is known that acidophilic microorganisms living in acid sulfate soils catalyze iron sulfide mineral oxidation. However, only a few studies regarding these communities have been published. In this study, we sampled the oxidized actual acid sulfate soil, the transition zone where oxidation is actively taking place, and the deepest un-oxidized potential acid sulfate soil. Nucleic acids were extracted and 16S rRNA gene amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes generated to gain a detailed insight into the communities and their activities. The project will be of great use to microbiologists, environmental biologists, geochemists, and geologists as there is hydrological and geochemical monitoring from the site stretching back for many years.

5.
mBio ; 10(4)2019 08 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31409677

RESUMO

Life in water-filled bedrock fissures in the continental deep biosphere is broadly constrained by energy and nutrient availability. Although these communities are alive, robust studies comparing active populations and metabolic processes across deep aquifers are lacking. This study analyzed three oligotrophic Fennoscandian Shield groundwaters, two "modern marine" waters that are replenished with organic carbon from the Baltic Sea and are likely less than 20 years old (171.3 and 415.4 m below sea level) and an extremely oligotrophic "thoroughly mixed" water (448.8 m below sea level) of unknown age that is composed of very old saline and marine waters. Cells were captured either using a sampling device that rapidly fixed RNA under in situ conditions or by filtering flowing groundwater over an extended period before fixation. Comparison of metatranscriptomes between the methods showed statistically similar transcript profiles for the respective water types, and they were analyzed as biological replicates. Study of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA confirmed active populations from all three domains of life, with many potentially novel unclassified populations present. Statistically supported differences between communities included heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria in the modern marine water at 171.3 m below sea level that has a higher organic carbon content than do largely autotrophic populations in the H2- and CO2-fed thoroughly mixed water. While this modern marine water had signatures of methanogenesis, syntrophic populations were predominantly in the thoroughly mixed water. The study provides a first statistical evaluation of differences in the active microbial communities in groundwaters differentially fed by organic carbon or "geogases."IMPORTANCE Despite being separated from the photosynthesis-driven surface by both distance and time, the deep biosphere is an important driver for the earth's carbon and energy cycles. However, due to the difficulties in gaining access and low cell numbers, robust statistical omics studies have not been carried out, and this limits the conclusions that can be drawn. This study benchmarks the use of two separate sampling systems and demonstrates that they provide statistically similar RNA transcript profiles, importantly validating several previously published studies. The generated data are analyzed to identify statistically valid differences in active microbial community members and metabolic processes. The results highlight contrasting taxa and growth strategies in the modern marine waters that are influenced by recent infiltration of Baltic Sea water versus the hydrogen- and carbon dioxide-fed, extremely oligotrophic, thoroughly mixed water.

6.
Front Microbiol ; 10: 1642, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31379789

RESUMO

The ability to conserve energy in the presence or absence of oxygen provides a metabolic versatility that confers an advantage in natural ecosystems. The switch between alternative electron transport systems is controlled by the fumarate nitrate reduction transcription factor (FNR) that senses oxygen via an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S]2+ iron-sulfur cluster. Under O2 limiting conditions, FNR plays a key role in allowing bacteria to transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyles. This is thought to occur via transcriptional activation of genes involved in anaerobic respiratory pathways and by repression of genes involved in aerobic energy production. The Proteobacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a model species for extremely acidophilic microorganisms that are capable of aerobic and anaerobic growth on elemental sulfur coupled to oxygen and ferric iron reduction, respectively. In this study, an FNR-like protein (FNRAF) was discovered in At. ferrooxidans that exhibits a primary amino acid sequence and major motifs and domains characteristic of the FNR family of proteins, including an effector binding domain with at least three of the four cysteines known to coordinate an [4Fe-4S]2+ center, a dimerization domain, and a DNA binding domain. Western blotting with antibodies against Escherichia coli FNR (FNREC) recognized FNRAF. FNRAF was able to drive expression from the FNR-responsive E. coli promoter PnarG, suggesting that it is functionally active as an FNR-like protein. Upon air exposure, FNRAF demonstrated an unusual lack of sensitivity to oxygen compared to the archetypal FNREC. Comparison of the primary amino acid sequence of FNRAF with that of other natural and mutated FNRs, including FNREC, coupled with an analysis of the predicted tertiary structure of FNRAF using the crystal structure of the related FNR from Aliivibrio fisheri as a template revealed a number of amino acid changes that could potentially stabilize FNRAF in the presence of oxygen. These include a truncated N terminus and amino acid changes both around the putative Fe-S cluster coordinating cysteines and also in the dimer interface. Increased O2 stability could allow At. ferrooxidans to survive in environments with fluctuating O2 concentrations, providing an evolutionary advantage in natural, and engineered environments where oxygen gradients shape the bacterial community.

7.
Res Microbiol ; 170(6-7): 288-295, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31279086

RESUMO

Due to land uplift after the last ice age, previously stable Baltic Sea sulfidic sediments are becoming dry land. When these sediments are drained, the sulfide minerals are exposed to air and can release large amounts of metals and acid into the environment. This can cause severe ecological damage such as fish kills in rivers feeding the northern Baltic Sea. In this study, five sites were investigated for the occurrence of acid sulfate soils and their geochemistry and microbiology was identified. The pH and soil chemistry identified three of the areas as having classical acid sulfate soil characteristics and culture independent identification of 16S rRNA genes identified populations related to acidophilic bacteria capable of catalyzing sulfidic mineral dissolution, including species likely adapted to low temperature. These results were compared to an acid sulfate soil area that had been flooded for ten years and showed that the previously oxidized sulfidic materials had an increased pH compared to the unremediated oxidized layers. In addition, the microbiology of the flooded soil had changed such that alkalinity producing ferric and sulfate reducing reactions had likely occurred. This suggested that flooding of acid sulfate soils mitigates their environmental impact.


Assuntos
Bactérias/metabolismo , Sedimentos Geológicos/química , Sedimentos Geológicos/microbiologia , Microbiota/efeitos dos fármacos , Poluentes do Solo/análise , Solo/química , Ácidos/análise , Bactérias/genética , Ferro/análise , Metais/análise , Microbiologia do Solo , Sulfatos/análise , Sulfetos/análise
8.
Biotechnol Rep (Amst) ; 22: e00321, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30949441

RESUMO

Background: Deep neural networks have been successfully applied to diverse fields of computer vision. However, they only outperform human capacities in a few cases. Methods: The ability of deep neural networks versus human experts to classify microscopy images was tested on biofilm colonization patterns formed on sulfide minerals composed of up to three different bioleaching bacterial species attached to chalcopyrite sample particles. Results: A low number of microscopy images per category (<600) was sufficient for highly efficient computational analysis of the biofilm's bacterial composition. The use of deep neural networks reached an accuracy of classification of ∼90% compared to ∼50% for human experts. Conclusions: Deep neural networks outperform human experts' capacity in characterizing bacterial biofilm composition involved in the degradation of chalcopyrite. This approach provides an alternative to standard, time-consuming biochemical methods.

9.
Front Microbiol ; 10: 603, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31019493

RESUMO

This study was motivated by surprising gaps in the current knowledge of microbial inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake and assimilation at acidic pH values (pH < 3). Particularly striking is the limited understanding of the differences between Ci uptake mechanisms in acidic versus circumneutral environments where the Ci predominantly occurs either as a dissolved gas (CO2) or as bicarbonate (HCO3 -), respectively. In order to gain initial traction on the problem, the relative abundance of transcripts encoding proteins involved in Ci uptake and assimilation was studied in the autotrophic, polyextreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans whose optimum pH for growth is 2.5 using ferrous iron as an energy source, although they are able to grow at pH 5 when using sulfur as an energy source. The relative abundance of transcripts of five operons (cbb1-5) and one gene cluster (can-sulP) was monitored by RT-qPCR and, in selected cases, at the protein level by Western blotting, when cells were grown under different regimens of CO2 concentration in elemental sulfur. Of particular note was the absence of a classical bicarbonate uptake system in A. ferrooxidans. However, bioinformatic approaches predict that sulP, previously annotated as a sulfate transporter, is a novel type of bicarbonate transporter. A conceptual model of CO2 fixation was constructed from combined bioinformatic and experimental approaches that suggests strategies for providing ecological flexibility under changing concentrations of CO2 and provides a portal to elucidating Ci uptake and regulation in acidic conditions. The results could advance the understanding of industrial bioleaching processes to recover metals such as copper at acidic pH. In addition, they may also shed light on how chemolithoautotrophic acidophiles influence the nutrient and energy balance in naturally occurring low pH environments.

10.
J Hazard Mater ; 363: 197-204, 2019 Feb 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30308358

RESUMO

Several industrial processes produce toxic sulfide containing streams that are often scrubbed using caustic solutions. An alternative, cost effective sulfide treatment method is bioelectrochemical sulfide removal. For the first time, a haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing microbial consortium was introduced to the anodic chamber of a microbial electrolysis cell operated at alkaline pH and with 1.0 M sodium ions. Under anode potential control, the highest sulfide removal rate was 2.16 mM/day and chemical analysis supported that the electrical current generation was from the sulfide oxidation. Biotic operation produced a maximum current density of 3625 mA/m2 compared to 210 mA/m2 while under abiotic operation. Furthermore, biotic electrical production was maintained for a longer period than for abiotic operation, potentially due to the passivation of the electrode by elemental sulfur during abiotic operation. The use of microorganisms reduced the energy input in this study compared to published electrochemical sulfide removal technologies. Sulfide-oxidizing populations dominated both the planktonic and electrode-attached communities with 16S rRNA gene sequences aligning within the genera Thioalkalivibrio, Thioalkalimicrobium, and Desulfurivibrio. The dominance of the Desulfurivibrio-like population on the anode surface offered evidence for the first haloalkaliphilic bacterium able to couple electrons from sulfide oxidation to extracellular electron transfer to the anode.

11.
Microb Ecol ; 77(2): 288-303, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30019110

RESUMO

Two annual Baltic Sea phytoplankton blooms occur in spring and summer. The bloom intensity is determined by nutrient concentrations in the water, while the period depends on weather conditions. During the course of the bloom, dead cells sink to the sediment where their degradation consumes oxygen to create hypoxic zones (< 2 mg/L dissolved oxygen). These zones prevent the establishment of benthic communities and may result in fish mortality. The aim of the study was to determine how the spring and autumn sediment chemistry and microbial community composition changed due to degradation of diatom or cyanobacterial biomass, respectively. Results from incubation of sediment cores showed some typical anaerobic microbial processes after biomass addition such as a decrease in NO2- + NO3- in the sediment surface (0-1 cm) and iron in the underlying layer (1-2 cm). In addition, an increase in NO2- + NO3- was observed in the overlying benthic water in all amended and control incubations. The combination of NO2- + NO3- diffusion plus nitrification could not account for this increase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the addition of cyanobacterial biomass during autumn caused a large increase in ferrous iron-oxidizing archaea while diatom biomass amendment during spring caused minor changes in the microbial community. Considering that OTUs sharing lineages with acidophilic microorganisms had a high relative abundance during autumn, it was suggested that specific niches developed in sediment microenvironments. These findings highlight the importance of nitrogen cycling and early microbial community changes in the sediment due to sinking phytoplankton before potential hypoxia occurs.


Assuntos
Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Cianobactérias/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Diatomáceas/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Sedimentos Geológicos/microbiologia , Fitoplâncton/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética , Biomassa , Cianobactérias/classificação , Cianobactérias/genética , Cianobactérias/isolamento & purificação , Diatomáceas/classificação , Diatomáceas/genética , Diatomáceas/isolamento & purificação , Eutrofização , Sedimentos Geológicos/química , Nitratos/análise , Nitratos/metabolismo , Nitritos/análise , Nitritos/metabolismo , Filogenia , Fitoplâncton/classificação , Fitoplâncton/genética , Fitoplâncton/isolamento & purificação , Estações do Ano , Água do Mar/química , Água do Mar/microbiologia
12.
Front Microbiol ; 9: 2945, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30568637

RESUMO

Mining and processing of metal sulfide ores produces waters containing metals and inorganic sulfur compounds such as tetrathionate and thiosulfate. If released untreated, these sulfur compounds can be oxidized to generate highly acidic wastewaters [termed 'acid mine drainage (AMD)'] that cause severe environmental pollution. One potential method to remediate mining wastewaters is the maturing biotechnology of 'microbial fuel cells' that offers the sustainable removal of acid generating inorganic sulfur compounds alongside producing an electrical current. Microbial fuel cells exploit the ability of bacterial cells to transfer electrons to a mineral as the terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration by replacing the mineral with a solid anode. In consequence, by substituting natural minerals with electrodes, microbial fuel cells also provide an excellent platform to understand environmental microbe-mineral interactions that are fundamental to element cycling. Previously, tetrathionate degradation coupled to the generation of an electrical current has been demonstrated and here we report a metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of the microbial community. Reconstruction of inorganic sulfur compound metabolism suggested the substrate tetrathionate was metabolized by the Ferroplasma-like and Acidithiobacillus-like populations via multiple pathways. Characterized Ferroplasma species do not utilize inorganic sulfur compounds, suggesting a novel Ferroplasma-like population had been selected. Oxidation of intermediate sulfide, sulfur, thiosulfate, and adenylyl-sulfate released electrons and the extracellular electron transfer to the anode was suggested to be dominated by candidate soluble electron shuttles produced by the Ferroplasma-like population. However, as the soluble electron shuttle compounds also have alternative functions within the cell, it cannot be ruled out that acidophiles use novel, uncharacterized mechanisms to mediate extracellular electron transfer. Several populations within the community were suggested to metabolize intermediate inorganic sulfur compounds by multiple pathways, which highlights the potential for mutualistic or symbiotic relationships. This study provided the genetic base for acidophilic microbial fuel cells utilized for the remediation of inorganic sulfur compounds from AMD.

13.
Front Microbiol ; 9: 2880, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30538690

RESUMO

The continental deep biosphere is suggested to contain a substantial fraction of the earth's total biomass and microorganisms inhabiting this environment likely have a substantial impact on biogeochemical cycles. However, the deep microbial community is still largely unknown and can be influenced by parameters such as temperature, pressure, water residence times, and chemistry of the waters. In this study, 21 boreholes representing a range of deep continental groundwaters from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory were subjected to high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize how the different water types influence the microbial communities. Geochemical parameters showed the stability of the waters and allowed their classification into three groups. These were (i) waters influenced by infiltration from the Baltic Sea with a "modern marine (MM)" signature, (ii) a "thoroughly mixed (TM)" water containing groundwaters of several origins, and (iii) deep "old saline (OS)" waters. Decreasing microbial cell numbers positively correlated with depth. In addition, there was a stronger positive correlation between increased cell numbers and dissolved organic carbon for the MM compared to the OS waters. This supported that the MM waters depend on organic carbon infiltration from the Baltic Sea while the ancient saline waters were fed by "geogases" such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The 16S rRNA gene relative abundance of the studied groundwaters revealed different microbial community compositions. Interestingly, the TM water showed the highest dissimilarity compared to the other two water types, potentially due to the several contrasting water types contributing to this groundwater. The main identified microbial phyla in the groundwaters were Gammaproteobacteria, unclassified sequences, Campylobacterota (formerly Epsilonproteobacteria), Patescibacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria. Many of these taxa are suggested to mediate ferric iron and nitrate reduction, especially in the MM waters. This indicated that nitrate reduction may be a neglected but important process in the deep continental biosphere. In addition to the high number of unclassified sequences, almost 50% of the identified phyla were archaeal or bacterial candidate phyla. The percentage of unknown and candidate phyla increased with depth, pointing to the importance and necessity of further studies to characterize deep biosphere microbial populations.

14.
mBio ; 9(6)2018 11 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30459191

RESUMO

The continental subsurface is suggested to contain a significant part of the earth's total biomass. However, due to the difficulty of sampling, the deep subsurface is still one of the least understood ecosystems. Therefore, microorganisms inhabiting this environment might profoundly influence the global nutrient and energy cycles. In this study, in situ fixed RNA transcripts from two deep continental groundwaters from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (a Baltic Sea-influenced water with a residence time of <20 years, defined as "modern marine," and an "old saline" groundwater with a residence time of thousands of years) were subjected to metatranscriptome sequencing. Although small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and mRNA transcripts aligned to all three domains of life, supporting activity within these community subsets, the data also suggested that the groundwaters were dominated by bacteria. Many of the SSU rRNA transcripts grouped within newly described candidate phyla or could not be mapped to known branches on the tree of life, suggesting that a large portion of the active biota in the deep biosphere remains unexplored. Despite the extremely oligotrophic conditions, mRNA transcripts revealed a diverse range of metabolic strategies that were carried out by multiple taxa in the modern marine water that is fed by organic carbon from the surface. In contrast, the carbon dioxide- and hydrogen-fed old saline water with a residence time of thousands of years predominantly showed the potential to carry out translation. This suggested these cells were active, but waiting until an energy source episodically becomes available.IMPORTANCE A newly designed sampling apparatus was used to fix RNA under in situ conditions in the deep continental biosphere and benchmarks a strategy for deep biosphere metatranscriptomic sequencing. This apparatus enabled the identification of active community members and the processes they carry out in this extremely oligotrophic environment. This work presents for the first time evidence of eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial activity in two deep subsurface crystalline rock groundwaters from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory with different depths and geochemical characteristics. The findings highlight differences between organic carbon-fed shallow communities and carbon dioxide- and hydrogen-fed old saline waters. In addition, the data reveal a large portion of uncharacterized microorganisms, as well as the important role of candidate phyla in the deep biosphere, but also the disparity in microbial diversity when using standard microbial 16S rRNA gene amplification versus the large unknown portion of the community identified with unbiased metatranscriptomes.


Assuntos
Ambientes Extremos , Água Subterrânea/microbiologia , Microbiota/genética , Transcriptoma , Microbiologia da Água , Archaea/genética , Bactérias/genética , Biodiversidade , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Genes de RNAr , Filogenia , RNA Mensageiro/genética , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Água do Mar/microbiologia , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Dióxido de Silício
15.
Front Microbiol ; 9: 2308, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30323799

RESUMO

Thiocyanate is a toxic compound produced by the mining and metallurgy industries that needs to be remediated prior to its release into the environment. If the industry is situated at high altitudes or near the poles, economic factors require a low temperature treatment process. Microbial fuel cells are a developing technology that have the benefits of both removing such toxic compounds while recovering electrical energy. In this study, simultaneous thiocyanate degradation and electrical current generation was demonstrated and it was suggested that extracellular electron transfer to the anode occurred. Investigation of the microbial community by 16S rRNA metatranscriptome reads supported that the anode attached and planktonic anolyte consortia were dominated by a Thiobacillus-like population. Metatranscriptomic sequencing also suggested thiocyanate degradation primarily occurred via the 'cyanate' degradation pathway. The generated sulfide was metabolized via sulfite and ultimately to sulfate mediated by reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase, APS reductase, and sulfate adenylyltransferase and the released electrons were potentially transferred to the anode via soluble electron shuttles. Finally, the ammonium from thiocyanate degradation was assimilated to glutamate as nitrogen source and carbon dioxide was fixed as carbon source. This study is one of the first to demonstrate a low temperature inorganic sulfur utilizing microbial fuel cell and the first to provide evidence for pathways of thiocyanate degradation coupled to electron transfer.

16.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 84(20)2018 10 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30076195

RESUMO

Industrial biomining processes are currently focused on metal sulfides and their dissolution, which is catalyzed by acidophilic iron(II)- and/or sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. Cell attachment on metal sulfides is important for this process. Biofilm formation is necessary for seeding and persistence of the active microbial community in industrial biomining heaps and tank reactors, and it enhances metal release. In this study, we used a method for direct quantification of the mineral-attached cell population on pyrite or chalcopyrite particles in bioleaching experiments by coupling high-throughput, automated epifluorescence microscopy imaging of mineral particles with algorithms for image analysis and cell quantification, thus avoiding human bias in cell counting. The method was validated by quantifying cell attachment on pyrite and chalcopyrite surfaces with axenic cultures of Acidithiobacillus caldus, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans. The method confirmed the high affinity of L. ferriphilum cells to colonize pyrite and chalcopyrite surfaces and indicated that biofilm dispersal occurs in mature pyrite batch cultures of this species. Deep neural networks were also applied to analyze biofilms of different microbial consortia. Recent analysis of the L. ferriphilum genome revealed the presence of a diffusible soluble factor (DSF) family quorum sensing system. The respective signal compounds are known as biofilm dispersal agents. Biofilm dispersal was confirmed to occur in batch cultures of L. ferriphilum and S. thermosulfidooxidans upon the addition of DSF family signal compounds.IMPORTANCE The presented method for the assessment of mineral colonization allows accurate relative comparisons of the microbial colonization of metal sulfide concentrate particles in a time-resolved manner. Quantitative assessment of the mineral colonization development is important for the compilation of improved mathematical models for metal sulfide dissolution. In addition, deep-learning algorithms proved that axenic or mixed cultures of the three species exhibited characteristic biofilm patterns and predicted the biofilm species composition. The method may be extended to the assessment of microbial colonization on other solid particles and may serve in the optimization of bioleaching processes in laboratory scale experiments with industrially relevant metal sulfide concentrates. Furthermore, the method was used to demonstrate that DSF quorum sensing signals directly influence colonization and dissolution of metal sulfides by mineral-oxidizing bacteria, such as L. ferriphilum and S. thermosulfidooxidans.


Assuntos
Automação Laboratorial/métodos , Bactérias/metabolismo , Aderência Bacteriana , Metais/metabolismo , Microscopia/métodos , Sulfetos/metabolismo , Acidithiobacillus/metabolismo , Algoritmos , Automação Laboratorial/instrumentação , Biofilmes/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Cobre/metabolismo , Ferro/metabolismo , Consórcios Microbianos , Enxofre/metabolismo
17.
Geobiology ; 16(5): 556-574, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29947123

RESUMO

In the deep biosphere, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is exploited for energy. Here, we show that, in fractured continental crystalline bedrock in three areas in Sweden, this process produced sulfide that reacted with iron to form pyrite extremely enriched in 34 S relative to 32 S. As documented by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) microanalyses, the δ34 Spyrite values are up to +132‰V-CDT and with a total range of 186‰. The lightest δ34 Spyrite values (-54‰) suggest very large fractionation during MSR from an initial sulfate with δ34 S values (δ34 Ssulfate,0 ) of +14 to +28‰. Fractionation of this magnitude requires a slow MSR rate, a feature we attribute to nutrient and electron donor shortage as well as initial sulfate abundance. The superheavy δ34 Spyrite values were produced by Rayleigh fractionation effects in a diminishing sulfate pool. Large volumes of pyrite with superheavy values (+120 ± 15‰) within single fracture intercepts in the boreholes, associated heavy average values up to +75‰ and heavy minimum δ34 Spyrite values, suggest isolation of significant amounts of isotopically light sulfide in other parts of the fracture system. Large fracture-specific δ34 Spyrite variability and overall average δ34 Spyrite values (+11 to +16‰) lower than the anticipated δ34 Ssulfate,0 support this hypothesis. The superheavy pyrite found locally in the borehole intercepts thus represents a late stage in a much larger fracture system undergoing Rayleigh fractionation. Microscale Rb-Sr dating and U/Th-He dating of cogenetic minerals reveal that most pyrite formed in the early Paleozoic era, but crystal overgrowths may be significantly younger. The δ13 C values in cogenetic calcite suggest that the superheavy δ34 Spyrite values are related to organotrophic MSR, in contrast to findings from marine sediments where superheavy pyrite has been proposed to be linked to anaerobic oxidation of methane. The findings provide new insights into MSR-related S-isotope systematics, particularly regarding formation of large fractions of 34 S-rich pyrite.


Assuntos
Sedimentos Geológicos/química , Ferro/química , Sulfetos/química , Isótopos de Enxofre/química
18.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol ; 94(8)2018 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29931252

RESUMO

The deep biosphere is the largest 'bioreactor' on earth, and microbes inhabiting this biome profoundly influence global nutrient and energy cycles. An important question for deep biosphere microbiology is whether or not specific populations are viable. To address this, we used quantitative PCR and high throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing of total and viable cells (i.e. with an intact cellular membrane) from three groundwaters with different ages and chemical constituents. There were no statistically significant differences in 16S rRNA gene abundances and microbial diversity between total and viable communities. This suggests that populations were adapted to prevailing oligotrophic conditions and that non-viable cells are rapidly degraded and recycled into new biomass. With higher concentrations of organic carbon, the modern marine and undefined mixed waters hosted a community with a larger range of predicted growth strategies than the ultra-oligotrophic old saline water. These strategies included fermentative and potentially symbiotic lifestyles by candidate phyla that typically have streamlined genomes. In contrast, the old saline waters had more 16S rRNA gene sequences in previously cultured lineages able to oxidize hydrogen and fix carbon dioxide. This matches the paradigm of a hydrogen and carbon dioxide-fed chemolithoautotrophic deep biosphere.


Assuntos
Bactérias/metabolismo , Crescimento Quimioautotrófico/fisiologia , Água Subterrânea/microbiologia , Nutrientes/metabolismo , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética , Biodiversidade , Biomassa , Ecossistema , Filogenia , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Reciclagem
19.
Sci Total Environ ; 625: 39-49, 2018 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29287211

RESUMO

Naturally occurring sulfide rich deposits are common along the northern Baltic Sea coast that when exposed to air, release large amounts of acid and metals into receiving water bodies. This causes severe environmental implications for agriculture, forestry, and building of infrastructure. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of ultrafine-grained calcium carbonate and peat (both separately and in combination) to mitigate acid and metal release. The experiments were carried out aerobically that mimicked summer conditions when the groundwater level is low and acid sulfate soils are exposed to oxygen, and anaerobically that is similar to autumn to spring conditions. The ultrafine-grained calcium carbonate dissipated well in the soil and its effect alone and when mixed with peat raised the pH and reduced pyrite dissolution while peat alone was similar to the controls and did not halt metal and acid release. High throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified populations most similar to characterized acidophiles in the control and peat treated incubations while the acidophilic like populations were altered in the calcium carbonate alone and calcium carbonate plus peat treated acid sulfate soils. Coupled with the geochemistry data, it was suggested that the acidophiles were inactivated by the high pH in the presence of calcium carbonate but catalyzed pyrite dissolution in the controls and peat incubations. In conclusion, the anaerobic conditions during winter would likely be sufficient to mitigate acid production and metal release from acid sulfate soils and in the summer, treatment with calcium carbonate was the best mitigation method.


Assuntos
Ácidos/análise , Carbonato de Cálcio/química , Recuperação e Remediação Ambiental/métodos , Metais/análise , Microbiologia do Solo , Poluentes do Solo/análise , Solo/química , Água Subterrânea , Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio , Ferro , RNA Ribossômico 16S , Sulfatos/química , Sulfetos
20.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 84(3)2018 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29150517

RESUMO

Leptospirillum ferriphilum plays a major role in acidic, metal-rich environments, where it represents one of the most prevalent iron oxidizers. These milieus include acid rock and mine drainage as well as biomining operations. Despite its perceived importance, no complete genome sequence of the type strain of this model species is available, limiting the possibilities to investigate the strategies and adaptations that Leptospirillum ferriphilum DSM 14647T (here referred to as Leptospirillum ferriphilum T) applies to survive and compete in its niche. This study presents a complete, circular genome of Leptospirillum ferriphilum T obtained by PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) long-read sequencing for use as a high-quality reference. Analysis of the functionally annotated genome, mRNA transcripts, and protein concentrations revealed a previously undiscovered nitrogenase cluster for atmospheric nitrogen fixation and elucidated metabolic systems taking part in energy conservation, carbon fixation, pH homeostasis, heavy metal tolerance, the oxidative stress response, chemotaxis and motility, quorum sensing, and biofilm formation. Additionally, mRNA transcript counts and protein concentrations were compared between cells grown in continuous culture using ferrous iron as the substrate and those grown in bioleaching cultures containing chalcopyrite (CuFeS2). Adaptations of Leptospirillum ferriphilum T to growth on chalcopyrite included the possibly enhanced production of reducing power, reduced carbon dioxide fixation, as well as elevated levels of RNA transcripts and proteins involved in heavy metal resistance, with special emphasis on copper efflux systems. Finally, the expression and translation of genes responsible for chemotaxis and motility were enhanced.IMPORTANCE Leptospirillum ferriphilum is one of the most important iron oxidizers in the context of acidic and metal-rich environments during moderately thermophilic biomining. A high-quality circular genome of Leptospirillum ferriphilum T coupled with functional omics data provides new insights into its metabolic properties, such as the novel identification of genes for atmospheric nitrogen fixation, and represents an essential step for further accurate proteomic and transcriptomic investigation of this acidophile model species in the future. Additionally, light is shed on adaptation strategies of Leptospirillum ferriphilum T for growth on the copper mineral chalcopyrite. These data can be applied to deepen our understanding and optimization of bioleaching and biooxidation, techniques that present sustainable and environmentally friendly alternatives to many traditional methods for metal extraction.


Assuntos
Bactérias/genética , Genoma Bacteriano , Ferro/metabolismo , Proteoma , RNA Bacteriano/genética , Transcriptoma , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/metabolismo , Cobre/metabolismo , Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio , Oxirredução , Filogenia , Proteômica , RNA Bacteriano/metabolismo
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