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1.
RMD Open ; 7(1)2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33547229

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The rheumatoid arthritis impact of disease (RAID) questionnaire comprises seven patient-important domains of disease impact (pain, function, fatigue, sleep disturbance, emotional well-being, physical well-being, coping). RAID was validated as a pooled-weighted score. Its seven individual items separately could provide a valuable tool in clinical practice to guide interventions targeting the patient's experience of the disease. The aim was to separately assess the psychometric properties of each of the seven numeric rating scale (NRS) of the RAID (RAID.7). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Post hoc analyses of data from the cross-sectional RAID study and from the Rainbow study, an open-label 12-week trial of etanercept in patients with RA. Construct validity of each NRS was assessed cross-sectionally in the RAID data set by Spearman's correlation with the respective external instrument of reference. Using the rainbow data set, we assessed reliability through intraclass correlation coefficient between the screening and the baseline visits and responsiveness (sensitivity to change) by standardised response mean between baseline and 12 weeks. RESULTS: A total of 671 patients with RA with features of established disease were analysed, 563 and 108 from RAID and Rainbow, respectively. The NRS correlated moderately to strongly with the respective external instrument of reference (r=0.62-0.81). Reliability ranged from 0.64 (0.51-0.74) (pain) to 0.83 (0.76-0.88) (sleep disturbance) and responsiveness from 0.93 (0.73-1.13) (sleep disturbance) to 1.34 (1.01-1.64) (pain). CONCLUSION: The separate use of the individual NRS of RAID (RAID.7) is valid, feasible, reliable and sensitive to change, representing an opportunity to improve the assessment and treatment of disease impact with minimal questionnaire burden. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00768053.

3.
Rheumatol Int ; 2021 Feb 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625544

RESUMO

To study the association of smoking status and the level of seropositivity in RA patients from COMORA Cohort. A post hoc analysis of COMORA database included 3439 RA patients was performed. Current smokers or recently quitted (< 3 years) were initially compared to those who never smoked or stopped > 3 years (Group I vs. II) regarding their seropositivity status (high positive, low positive and negative) for Rheumatoid Factor (RF) or Anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA). A further comparison was made between current smokers (Group III) and never smoked patients (Group IV). Analysis was also done on the individual country level for the 17 countries included in the COMORA study. Out of 3439 RA patients, 705 (20.5%) were smokers (group I), and 2734 (79.5%) were non-smokers (group II). Significantly more patients in group I, 442 (62.7%), had high levels of seropositivity than those in group II, 1556 (56.9%), [P = 0.006, OR 1.27 (95% CI, 1.07-1.5)]. More current smoker patients (group III-286 out of 456 "62.7%") had high levels of seropositivity than never smoked patients (group IV-1236 out of 2191 "56.4%"), with significant difference [P = 0.013, OR 1.3 (95% CI, 1.06-1.6)]. In 11 countries, higher proportions of patients with high level of seropositivity in group I was found, with statistical significance in four countries. Smoking was associated with higher level of seropositivity in patients with RA in this post hoc analysis, both on a global level and in certain individual countries. As smoking is a modifiable risk factor, studying the effects of quitting smoking on level of seropositivity and other disease parameters is warranted.

4.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 23(1): 43, 2021 01 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33514428

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Limited information is available on the impact of treatment with a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) on structural lesions in patients with recent-onset axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). We compared 2-year structural lesion changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) of patients with recent-onset axSpA receiving etanercept in a clinical trial (EMBARK) to similar patients not receiving biologics in a cohort study (DESIR). We also evaluated the relationship between the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) and change in MRI structural parameters. METHODS: The difference between etanercept (EMBARK) and control (DESIR) in the net percentage of patients with structural lesion change was determined using the SpondyloArthritis Research Consortium of Canada SIJ Structural Score, with and without adjustment for baseline covariates. The relationship between sustained ASDAS inactive disease, defined as the presence of ASDAS < 1.3 for at least 2 consecutive time points 6 months apart, and structural lesion change was evaluated. RESULTS: This study included 163 patients from the EMBARK trial and 76 from DESIR. The net percentage of patients with erosion decrease was significantly greater for etanercept vs control: unadjusted: 23.9% vs 5.3%; P = 0.01, adjusted: 23.1% vs 2.9%; P = 0.01. For the patients attaining sustained ASDAS inactive disease on etanercept, erosion decrease was evident in significantly more than erosion increase: 34/104 (32.7%) vs 5/104 (4.8%); P < 0.001. A higher proportion had erosion decrease and backfill increase than patients in other ASDAS status categories. However, the trend across ASDAS categories was not significant and decrease in erosion was observed even in patients without a sustained ASDAS response. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that a greater proportion of patients achieved regression of erosion with versus without etanercept. However, the link between achieving sustained ASDAS inactive disease and structural lesion change on MRI could not be clearly established. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EMBARK: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01258738 , Registered 13 December 2010; DESIR: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01648907 , Registered 24 July 2012.

5.
RMD Open ; 7(1)2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33462157

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To characterise peripheral musculoskeletal involvement in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) including psoriatic arthritis (PsA), across the world. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 24 participating countries. Patients with a diagnosis of axial SpA (axSpA), peripheral SpA (pSpA) or PsA according to their rheumatologist were included. The investigators were asked which diagnosis out of a list of six (axSpA, PsA, pSpA, inflammatory bowel disease-associated SpA, reactive arthritis or juvenile SpA (Juv-SpA)) fitted the patient best. Peripheral manifestations (ie, peripheral joint disease, enthesitis, dactylitis and root joint disease), their localisation and treatments were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 4465 patients were included (61% men, mean age 44.5 years) from four geographic areas: Latin America (n=538), Europe plus North America (n=1677), Asia (n=975) and the Middle East plus North Africa (n=1275). Of those, 78% had ever suffered from at least one peripheral musculoskeletal manifestation; 57% had peripheral joint disease, 44% had enthesitis and 15% had dactylitis. Latin American had far more often peripheral joint disease (80%) than patients from other areas. Patients with PsA had predominantly upper limb and small joint involvement (52%).Hip and shoulder involvement was found in 34% of patients. The prevalence of enthesitis ranged between 41% in patients with axSpA and 65% in patients with Juv-SpA. Dactylitis was most frequent among patients with PsA (37%). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that all peripheral features can be found in all subtypes of SpA, and that differences are quantitative rather than qualitative. In a high proportion of patients, axial and peripheral manifestations coincided. These findings reconfirm SpA clinical subtypes are descendants of the same underlying disease, called SpA.

6.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2020 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33268443

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Antitumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy has revolutionised treatment of several chronic inflammatory diseases, including spondyloarthritis (SpA). However, TNF inhibitors (TNFi) are not effective in all patients and the biological basis for treatment failure remains unknown. We have analysed induced immune responses to define the mechanism of action of TNF blockers in SpA and to identify immunological correlates of responsiveness to TNFi. METHODS: Immune responses to microbial and pathway-specific stimuli were analysed in peripheral blood samples from 80 patients with axial SpA before and after TNFi treatment, using highly standardised whole-blood stimulation assays. Cytokines and chemokines were measured in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory, and gene expression was monitored using nCounter assays. RESULTS: Anti-TNF therapy induced profound changes in patients' innate immune responses. TNFi action was selective, and had only minor effects on Th1/Th17 immunity. Modular transcriptional repertoire analysis identified prostaglandin E2 synthesis and signalling, leucocyte recirculation, macrophage polarisation, dectin and interleukin (IL)-1 signalling, as well as the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) transcription factor family as key pathways targeted by TNF blockers in vivo. Analysis of induced immune responses before treatment initiation revealed that expression of molecules associated with leucocyte adhesion and invasion, chemotaxis and IL-1 signalling are correlated with therapeutic responses to anti-TNF. CONCLUSIONS: We show that TNFi target multiple immune cell pathways that cooperate to resolve inflammation. We propose that immune response profiling provides new insight into the biology of TNF-blocker action in patients and can identify signalling pathways associated with therapeutic responses to biological therapies.

7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33320245

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To explore the 10-year tolerability profile of GC use in patients with early RA. METHODS: Analysis of 10-year outcome from the early arthritis ESPOIR cohort. Patients were stratified in two groups, without or with GC treatment at least once during their follow-up. The primary outcome was a composite of deaths, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), severe infections and fractures. The weighted Cox time-dependent analysis model was used with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) propensity score method. RESULTS: Among the 608 patients (480 women, mean age of 47.5 ± 12.1 years), 397 (65%) received low-dose GC (median 1.9 mg/day [IQR 0.6-4.2], mean cumulative prednisone dose 8468 mg ±8376, mean duration 44.6 months ± 40.1). In univariate analysis, over 95 total events (10 deaths, 18 CVDs, 32 fractures and 35 severe infections), patients taking GC experienced more events (n = 71) than those without GC (n = 24) (p= 0.035). Highest cumulative exposure of GC (≥8.4 g) was associated with highest risk of occurrence of the primary outcome (24.3%, p= 0.007), CVDs (7.9%, p= 0.001) and severe infections (9.9%, p= 0.024). The risk of events over time was significantly associated with GC, age, hypertension and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The risk associated with GC treatment increased between the first follow-up visit (HR at 1 year = 0.46, 95% CI 0.23 - 0.90) and 10 years (HR = 6.83, 95% CI 2.29-20.35). CONCLUSION: The 10-year analysis of this prospective early RA cohort supports a dose and time-dependent impact of low-dose GC treatment, with a long-term high risk of severe outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: (NCT03666091).

8.
RMD Open ; 6(3)2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33188136

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Review of efficacy and safety of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibition in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). METHODS: A systematic literature research (SLR) of all publications on JAK inhibitors (JAKi) treatment published until March 2019 using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Efficacy and safety were assessed in randomised controlled trials (RCTs), integrating long-term extension periods additionally for safety evaluation. RESULTS: 3454 abstracts were screened with 85 included in the final analysis (efficacy and RCT safety: n=72; safety only: n=13). Efficacy of RCTs investigating tofacitinib (TOFA, n=27), baricitinib (BARI, n=9), upadacitinib (UPA, n=14), filgotinib (FILGO, n=7), decernotinib (DEC, n=3) and peficitinib (PEF, n=7) was evaluated. Six head-to-head trials comparing JAKi with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) were included. Efficacy of JAKi was shown in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for all agents, psoriatic arthritis (TOFA, FILGO), ankylosing spondylitis (TOFA, FILGO), systemic lupus erythematosus (BARI), chronic plaque psoriasis (TOFA, BARI, PEF), ulcerative colitis (TOFA, UPA), Crohn's disease (UPA, FILGO) and atopic dermatitis (TOFA, BARI, UPA). Safety analysis of 72 RCTs, one cohort study and 12 articles on long-term extension studies showed increased risks for infections, especially herpes zoster, serious infections and numerically higher rates of venous thromboembolic events. No increased malignancy rates or major adverse cardiac events were observed. CONCLUSION: JAKi provide good efficacy compared to placebo (and to TNFi in RA and Pso) across various IMIDs with an acceptable safety profile. This SLR informed the task force on points to consider for the treatment of IMIDs with JAKi with the available evidence.

9.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2020 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33158881

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Janus kinase inhibitors (JAKi) have been approved for use in various immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. With five agents licensed, it was timely to summarise the current understanding of JAKi use based on a systematic literature review (SLR) on efficacy and safety. METHODS: Existing data were evaluated by a steering committee and subsequently reviewed by a 29 person expert committee leading to the formulation of a consensus statement that may assist the clinicians, patients and other stakeholders once the decision is made to commence a JAKi. The committee included patients, rheumatologists, a gastroenterologist, a haematologist, a dermatologist, an infectious disease specialist and a health professional. The SLR informed the Task Force on controlled and open clinical trials, registry data, phase 4 trials and meta-analyses. In addition, approval of new compounds by, and warnings from regulators that were issued after the end of the SLR search date were taken into consideration. RESULTS: The Task Force agreed on and developed four general principles and a total of 26 points for consideration which were grouped into six areas addressing indications, treatment dose and comedication, contraindications, pretreatment screening and risks, laboratory and clinical follow-up examinations, and adverse events. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were determined based on the SLR and levels of agreement were voted on for every point, reaching a range between 8.8 and 9.9 on a 10-point scale. CONCLUSION: The consensus provides an assessment of evidence for efficacy and safety of an important therapeutic class with guidance on issues of practical management.

10.
Joint Bone Spine ; : 105100, 2020 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33166730

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Uveitis is a frequent extra rheumatological manifestation in axial Spondyloarthritis (SpA). The aim of study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of uveitis over the first five years of a prospective nationwide cohort of patients with high suspicion of early axial SpA, and to evaluate its associated factors. METHODS: DESIR is a prospective observational cohort of patients with recent onset inflammatory back pain (more than 3 months, less than 3 years), suggestive of axial SpA, All available factors in the database were compared between patients with and without uveitis at 5 years, by uni and then multivariate analysis. Baseline factors associated with new cases of uveitis occurrence over the 5 years were also analyzed. SIGNIFICANCE: p less than 0.05. RESULTS: After 5 years, 91 patients (out of 480 with complete follow-up) had at least one uveitis episode, giving an estimated prevalence of 18.9% [95% CI : 15.4-22.4]. In multivariate analysis, uveitis was significantly associated with dactylitis, and elevated ESR. New incident uveitis occurred in 31 cases over 5 years, giving an estimated incidence rate of 1.29 [0.84 - 1.74] / 100 patient-years. Incidence of new uveitis was associated in multivariate analysis with baseline factors: diagnosis of SpA, sacro iliac MRI inflammatory SPARCC score, dactylitis, syndesmophyte score. No significant association was found with HLA-B27, DMARDs, BASDAI, ASDAS, BASFI. CONCLUSION: Five-years data of the DESIR cohort allowed an estimation of incidence rate of uveitis of 1.3/100p-y; over five years, uveitis was associated with dactylitis, biologic and sacro iliac MRI inflammation.

11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33200220

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of once-daily baricitinib 4 mg in patients with active RA who were either naïve to DMARDs or who had inadequate response (IR) to MTX. METHODS: Analyses of data from two completed 52-week, phase III studies, RA-BEGIN (DMARD-naïve) and RA-BEAM (MTX-IR), and one ongoing long-term extension (LTE) study (RA-BEYOND) were performed (148 total weeks). At week 52, DMARD-naïve patients treated with MTX monotherapy or baricitinib 4 mg+MTX in RA-BEGIN were switched to open-label baricitinib 4 mg monotherapy; MTX-IR patients treated with adalimumab (+MTX) in RA-BEAM were switched to open-label baricitinib 4 mg (+MTX) in the LTE. Patients who received placebo (+MTX) were switched to baricitinib 4 mg (+MTX) at week 24. Low disease activity (LDA) [Simple Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤11], clinical remission (SDAI ≤ 3.3), and physical functioning [Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) ≤ 0.5] were assessed. Data were assessed using a non-responder imputation. RESULTS: At week 148, SDAI LDA was achieved in up to 61% of DMARD-naïve patients and 59% of MTX-IR patients initially treated with baricitinib, and SDAI remission was achieved in up to 34% of DMARD-naïve patients and 24% of MTX-IR patients; HAQ-DI ≤ 0.5 was reached in up to 48% of DMARD-naïve patients and 38% of MTX-IR patients initially treated with baricitinib. Over 148 weeks, 3.6% and 10.7% of MTX-IR patients discontinued across treatment groups due to lack of efficacy or due to adverse events, respectively; discontinuation rates were similar in the DMARD-naïve population. CONCLUSION: Treatment with baricitinib 4 mg demonstrated efficacy for up to 3 years and was well tolerated.

12.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 2020 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33124563

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: In spondyloarthritis (SpA), improving patients' knowledge on their biologics is a key factor to enhance adherence. The information given to the patient has to ensure the acquisition of safety skills regarding their treatment. The aims of this trial were to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist's educational interview on knowledge and adherence to biologics in these patients. METHODS: Consecutive adult patients with well-controlled axial SpA, stable on biologics were enrolled in a randomised, controlled, single-centre, open-label, 6-month trial. A pharmacist's educational interview provided information on biologics management at baseline in the intervention group and at month 6 in the control group. The changes in a weighted knowledge score concerning the management of biologics and the change in the Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) at month-6 were primary outcomes. The changes in disease activity (BASDAI) and patients' satisfaction regarding the pharmacists' interview were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Patients' characteristics at baseline were comparable among the 89 included patients (46 in the intervention group, 43 in the control group). The patient's knowledge score concerning biologics management improved at a greater magnitude in the educational group (+11.0±11.5 vs. +3.0 ±10.6 in the intervention versus the control group, respectively, p<0.0001). There was also a trend in a better adherence (+2.2±13.9 vs. -0.6±18.9 in the intervention versus the control group, respectively, p=0.691). The disease activity remained stable in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study is strongly in favour of the benefit of a pharmacist's educational interview in the management of patients with axial SpA.

13.
Adv Ther ; 2020 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33034006

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To provide additional clinical evidence in regulatory submissions for a modified-release (MR) once-daily (QD) tofacitinib formulation, we compared real-world adherence and effectiveness between patients initiating the MR QD formulation and patients initiating an immediate-release (IR) twice-daily (BID) formulation. METHODS: Two noninterventional cohort studies were conducted. First, adherence and two effectiveness proxies were compared between patients with RA who newly initiated tofacitinib MR 11 mg QD or IR 5 mg BID in the IBM® MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Supplemental US insurance claims databases (March 2016-October 2018). Second, using data collected in the Corrona US RA Registry (February 2016-August 2019), two Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI)-based measures of effectiveness were compared between tofacitinib MR 11 mg QD and IR 5 mg BID, and against noninferiority criteria derived from placebo-controlled clinical trials of the tofacitinib IR formulation. Multiple sensitivity analyses of the registry data were conducted to reassure regulators of consistent results across different assumptions. RESULTS: In each study, approximately two-thirds of patients initiated the MR formulation. In the claims database study, improved adherence and at least comparable effectiveness were observed with tofacitinib MR vs IR over 12 months, particularly in patients without prior advanced therapy. In the registry study, the noninferiority of tofacitinib MR vs IR was demonstrated for both CDAI outcomes at ~6 months; this finding was robust across multiple sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate the value of real-world evidence from complementary data sources in understanding the impact of medication adherence with a QD formulation in clinical practice. These analyses were suitable for regulatory consideration as an important component of evidence for the comparability of tofacitinib MR 11 mg QD vs IR 5 mg BID in patients with RA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Claims database study: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT04018001, retrospectively registered July 12, 2019. Corrona US RA Registry study: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT04267380, retrospectively registered February 12, 2020.

14.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33004335

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite treatment according to the current management recommendations, a significant proportion of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain symptomatic. These patients can be considered to have 'difficult-to-treat RA'. However, uniform terminology and an appropriate definition are lacking. OBJECTIVE: The Task Force in charge of the "Development of EULAR recommendations for the comprehensive management of difficult-to-treat rheumatoid arthritis" aims to create recommendations for this underserved patient group. Herein, we present the definition of difficult-to-treat RA, as the first step. METHODS: The Steering Committee drafted a definition with suggested terminology based on an international survey among rheumatologists. This was discussed and amended by the Task Force, including rheumatologists, nurses, health professionals and patients, at a face-to-face meeting until sufficient agreement was reached (assessed through voting). RESULTS: The following three criteria were agreed by all Task Force members as mandatory elements of the definition of difficult-to-treat RA: (1) Treatment according to European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendation and failure of ≥2 biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)/targeted synthetic DMARDs (with different mechanisms of action) after failing conventional synthetic DMARD therapy (unless contraindicated); (2) presence of at least one of the following: at least moderate disease activity; signs and/or symptoms suggestive of active disease; inability to taper glucocorticoid treatment; rapid radiographic progression; RA symptoms that are causing a reduction in quality of life; and (3) the management of signs and/or symptoms is perceived as problematic by the rheumatologist and/or the patient. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed EULAR definition for difficult-to-treat RA can be used in clinical practice, clinical trials and can form a basis for future research.

15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33063096

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a nurse-led program of self-management and self-assessment of disease activity in axial spondyloarthritis. METHODS: Prospective, randomized, controlled, open, 12-month trial (NCT02374749). Participants were consecutive axial spondyloarthritis patients (according to the rheumatologist) and nurses having participated in a 1-day training meeting. The program included self-management: educational video and specific video of graduated, home-based exercises for patients; and self-assessment: video presenting the rationale of tight monitoring of disease activity with composite scores (Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease activity Score, ASDAS/Bath Ankyslosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, BASDAI). The nurse trained patients to collect, calculate and report (monthly) ASDAS/BASDAI. Treatment allocation was by random allocation to this program or a comorbidities assessment (not presented here and considered here as the control group). RESULTS: A total of 502 patients (250 and 252 in the active and control groups, respectively) were enrolled (age: 46.7 (12.2) years, male gender: 62.7%, disease duration: 13.7 (11.0) years). After the one-year follow-up period, the adherence to the self-assessment program was considered good (i.e. 79% reported scores >6 times). Despite a lack of statistical significance in the primary outcome (e.g. coping) there was a statistically significant difference in favor of this program for the following variables: change in BASDAI, number and duration of the home exercises in the active group, and physical activity (international physical activity score, IPAQ). CONCLUSION: This study suggests a short-term benefit of a nurse-led program on self-management and self-assessment for disease activity in a young axial spondyloarthritis population in terms of disease activity, exercises and physical activity.

17.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 2020 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32888052

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To describe the switch to biosimilar etanercept (bETN), evaluate factors associated with this switch, and evaluate the efficacy of this switch in a real-life setting METHODS: We included patients, from October 2016 to April 2017, with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) who received innovator ETN (iETN) for at least 6 months. After receiving information on biosimilars, all physicians were invited to propose a switch from iETN to bETN. Factors associated with bETN discontinuation were explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. We estimated the proportion of patients still on bETN over time by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. We assessed serum trough concentrations of iETN and bETN and anti-drug antibodies to ETN. RESULTS: Overall, 183 outpatients were eligible for a potential switch; 94 (51.6%) switched from iETN to bETN. The probability of a switch was greater with an older than younger aged physician (mean [SD] age 50.4 [14.3] with a switch vs 44.8 [11.3] with no switch, p = 0.005) and the physician having a full-time academic position than other position (56.4% with a switch vs 13.5% with no switch, p < 0.001). After a 6-month follow-up, bETN retention rate was 83% (95% CI: 0.76-0.92). The first cause of bETN discontinuation was inefficacy (50%). On multivariate analysis, no factor was independently associated with a bETN switch or discontinuation. Drug trough levels did not significantly differ by discontinuation or continuation of bETN. No patient showed anti-drug antibodies. CONCLUSION: The probability of switching from iETN to bETN was likely related to physician characteristics.

19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32976683

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the sensitivity to change of different imaging scoring methods in patients with early axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). METHODS: Patients from the DESIR cohort fulfilling the ASAS axSpA criteria were included. Radiographs and MRI of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) and spine were obtained at baseline, 1, 2 and 5 years. Each image was scored by 2 or 3 readers in 3 separate 'reading-waves'. The rate of change of outcomes measuring spinal and SIJ inflammation (e.g. SPARCC score) and structural damage on MRI (e.g. ≥3 fatty lesions) and radiographs (e.g. mNY grading) was assessed using multilevel generalized estimating equations (GEE) models (taking all readers and waves into account). To allow comparisons across outcomes, rates were standardized (difference between the individual's value and the population mean divided by the standard deviation). RESULTS: In total, 345 patients were included. Inflammation on MRI-SIJ (standardized rate range: -0.278; -0.441) was more sensitive to change compared to spinal inflammation (range: -0.030; -0.055). Structural damage in the SIJ showed a higher standardized rate of change on MRI-SIJ (range: 0.015-0.274) compared to X-SIJ (range: 0.043-0.126). MRI-SIJ damage defined by ≥3 fatty lesions showed the highest sensitivity to change (0.274). Spinal structural damage slowly progressed over time with no meaningful difference between radiographic (range: 0.037-0.043) and MRI structural outcomes (range: 0.008-0.027). CONCLUSION: Structural damage assessed in pelvic radiographs has low sensitivity to change, while fatty lesions detected on MRI-SIJ are a promising alternative. In contrast, MRI-spine is not better than X-spine in detecting structural changes in early axSpA patients.

20.
Joint Bone Spine ; : 105075, 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32947013

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Only scarce data is available regarding pregnancy outcomes in early axSpA, particularly little is known about the impact of disease activity. The objective is to identify (a) the factors associated with the occurrence of a clinical pregnancy during follow-up and (b) the risk factors for an unfavorable pregnancy outcome (e.g. miscarriage, medical termination or pre-term delivery) in an early axSpA population. METHODS: Observational prospective French cohort (DESIR) with 6 years of follow-up including 381 TNFi-naïve women with early axSpA. Factors associated with a clinical pregnancy occurring over follow-up and risk factors for an unfavorable pregnancy outcome were estimated by multivariable multilevel models (i.e. Frailty Shared Models and Mixed Models). RESULTS: During follow-up, 124 pregnancies occurred. Patients who got pregnant during follow-up were more likely to have discontinued their TNFi treatment in the 6 months preceding the pregnancy (HR=2.0 [95% CI 1.1-3.3], P=0.01) and to have an increased CRP at the previous visit (HR=1.7 [95% CI 1.2-2.5], P=0.01). Full-term delivery was by far the most frequent pregnancy outcome (75% of all pregnancies), and only NSAID use in the 6 months prior to the outcome was associated with an unfavorable outcome (OR=2.5 [95% CI 1.1-5.0], P=0.02). No association was found between TNFi use and an unfavorable pregnancy outcome. CONCLUSION: Full-term delivery was the most frequent pregnancy outcome. NSAID use within 6 months of outcome, but not TNFi use, was associated with an unfavorable pregnancy outcome in this early axSpA cohort.

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