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1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(2): 25-29, 2020 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945037

RESUMO

Birth defects are a leading cause of infant mortality in the United States, accounting for 20.6% of infant deaths in 2017 (1). Rates of infant mortality attributable to birth defects (IMBD) have generally declined since the 1970s (1-3). U.S. linked birth/infant death data from 2003-2017 were used to assess trends in IMBD. Overall, rates declined 10% during 2003-2017, but decreases varied by maternal and infant characteristics. During 2003-2017, IMBD rates decreased 4% for infants of Hispanic mothers, 11% for infants of non-Hispanic black (black) mothers, and 12% for infants of non-Hispanic white (white) mothers. In 2017, these rates were highest among infants of black mothers (13.3 per 10,000 live births) and were lowest among infants of white mothers (9.9). During 2003-2017, IMBD rates for infants who were born extremely preterm (20-27 completed gestational weeks), full term (39-40 weeks), and late term/postterm (41-44 weeks) declined 20%-29%; rates for moderate (32-33 weeks) and late preterm (34-36 weeks) infants increased 17%. Continued tracking of IMBD rates can help identify areas where efforts to reduce IMBD are needed, such as among infants born to black and Hispanic mothers and those born moderate and late preterm (32-36 weeks).


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/mortalidade , Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Anormalidades Congênitas/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Lactente Extremamente Prematuro , Recém-Nascido , Criança Pós-Termo , Recém-Nascido Prematuro , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
2.
NCHS Data Brief ; (323): 1-8, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30475685

RESUMO

Since the most recent peak in the total fertility rate (the estimated number of lifetime births expected per 1,000 women) in 2007, the United States has experienced a decreasing total fertility rate and an increasing mean, or average, age of mothers at first birth (1-4). Previous research shows rural areas have persistently higher fertility and worse birth outcomes compared with metropolitan (metro) areas (2,5-8). This report describes trends and differences in total fertility rates and mean maternal age at first birth overall, and by race and Hispanic origin, between rural and small or medium metro, and rural and large metro counties, from 2007 through 2017.


Assuntos
Ordem de Nascimento , Coeficiente de Natalidade/tendências , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Idade Materna , População Rural/tendências , População Urbana/tendências , Afro-Americanos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
3.
NCHS Data Brief ; (326): 1-8, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30475688

RESUMO

Infant mortality is an important public health measure in the United States and other countries (1-3). The United States' infant mortality rate started to decline in 2007 (the most recent high), but has remained relatively unchanged in recent years (4,5). Previous research shows differences in infant mortality rates by age at death (i.e., neonatal, or deaths to infants aged 0-27 days, and postneonatal, or deaths to infants aged 28-364 days), age and race and Hispanic origin of the mother, and leading causes of death (4-6). This report examines infant mortality rates for the United States by age at death in 2016, by maternal age and race and Hispanic origin, and for the five leading causes of neonatal and postneonatal mortality.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , Afro-Americanos , Causas de Morte , Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Índios Norte-Americanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido de Baixo Peso , Recém-Nascido , Idade Materna , Mortalidade Perinatal/tendências , Morte Súbita do Lactente/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
4.
NCHS Data Brief ; (300): 1-8, 2018 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29638212

RESUMO

The leading causes of infant death vary by age at death but were consistent from 2005 to 2015 (1-6). Previous research shows higher infant mortality rates in rural counties compared with urban counties and differences in cause of death for individuals aged 1 year and over by urbanization level (4,5,7,8). No research, however, has examined if mortality rates from the leading causes of infant death differ by urbanization level. This report describes the mortality rates for the five leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death in the United States across rural, small and medium urban, and large urban counties defined by maternal residence, as reported on the birth certificate for combined years 2013-2015.


Assuntos
Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos , Anormalidades Congênitas/mortalidade , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido de Baixo Peso , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Mortalidade Perinatal/tendências , Gravidez , Complicações na Gravidez/mortalidade , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Morte Súbita do Lactente/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Ferimentos e Lesões/mortalidade
5.
NCHS Data Brief ; (295): 1-8, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29319472

RESUMO

Infant mortality has long been a basic measure of public health for countries around the world (1­3). While the overall infant mortality rate in the United States is lower than a decade ago, declining 14% from 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005, a recent high, to 5.90 in 2015, the rate in 2015 was not statistically different from that in 2014 (5.82) (4­6). The variability in infant mortality rates by state and by race and Hispanic origin continues to receive attention (7,8). This report uses linked birth and infant death data from 2013 through 2015 to describe infant mortality rates in the United States by state, and for race and Hispanic-origin groups by state.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Mães , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
NCHS Data Brief ; (285): 1-8, 2017 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29155685

RESUMO

The infant mortality rate is often used as a measure of a country's health because similar factors influence population health and infant mortality (1). Although infant mortality has declined in the United States, disparities still exist across geographic areas and demographic groups (2­4). Urbanization level, based on the number and concentration of people in a county, can impact health outcomes (3­9). Previous research indicates that infant mortality rates vary by urbanization level and also by maternal and infant characteristics (3­9). This report describes differences in infant mortality among rural, small and medium urban, and large urban counties in the United States by infant's age at death, mother's age, and race and Hispanic origin in 2014.


Assuntos
Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Afro-Americanos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Idade Materna , Mortalidade Perinatal/etnologia , Mortalidade Perinatal/tendências , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
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