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1.
BMJ ; 367: l5922, 2019 11 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31690561

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical effectiveness and safety of stand alone and blended internet based vestibular rehabilitation (VR) in the management of chronic vestibular syndromes in general practice. DESIGN: Pragmatic, three armed, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 59 general practices in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 322 adults aged 50 and older with a chronic vestibular syndrome. INTERVENTIONS: Stand alone VR comprising a six week, internet based intervention with weekly online sessions and daily exercises (10-20 minutes a day). In the blended VR group, the same internet based intervention was supplemented by face-to-face physiotherapy support (home visits in weeks 1 and 3). Participants in the usual care group received standard care from a general practitioner, without any restrictions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was vestibular symptoms after six months as measured by the vertigo symptom scale-short form (VSS-SF range 0-60, clinically relevant difference ≥3 points). Secondary outcomes were dizziness related impairment, anxiety, depressive symptoms, subjective improvement of vestibular symptoms after three and six months, and adverse events. RESULTS: In the intention-to-treat analysis, participants in the stand alone and blended VR groups had lower VSS-SF scores at six months than participants in the usual care group (adjusted mean difference -4.1 points, 95% confidence interval -5.8 to -2.5; and -3.5 points, -5.1 to -1.9, respectively). Similar differences in VSS-SF scores were seen at three months follow-up. Participants in the stand alone and blended VR groups also experienced less dizziness related impairment, less anxiety, and more subjective improvement of vestibular symptoms at three and six months. No serious adverse events related to online VR occurred during the trial. CONCLUSION: Stand alone and blended internet based VR are clinically effective and safe interventions to treat adults aged 50 and older with a chronic vestibular syndrome. Online VR is an easily accessible form of treatment, with the potential to improve care for an undertreated group of patients in general practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register NTR5712.


Assuntos
Medicina Geral/métodos , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Qualidade de Vida , Telemedicina/métodos , Doenças Vestibulares/reabilitação , Idoso , Doença Crônica/psicologia , Doença Crônica/reabilitação , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Síndrome , Resultado do Tratamento , Doenças Vestibulares/diagnóstico , Doenças Vestibulares/psicologia
2.
Ann Fam Med ; 15(3): 209-216, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28483885

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Vestibular rehabilitation is an effective intervention for dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction, but is seldom provided. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of an Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation program for older adults experiencing dizziness in primary care. METHODS: We undertook a single-center, single-blind randomized controlled trial comparing an Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation intervention (Balance Retraining, freely available from https://balance.lifeguidehealth.org) with usual primary care in patients from 54 primary care practices in southern England. Patients aged 50 years and older with current dizziness exacerbated by head movements were enrolled. Those in the intervention group accessed an automated Internet-based program that taught vestibular rehabilitation exercises and suggested cognitive behavioral management strategies. Dizziness was measured by the Vertigo Symptom Scale-Short Form (VSS-SF) at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was VSS-SF score at 6 months. RESULTS: A total of 296 patients were randomized in the trial; 66% were female, and the median age was 67 years. The VSS-SF was completed by 250 patients (84%) at 3 months and 230 patients (78%) at 6 months. Compared with the usual care group, the Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation group had less dizziness on the VSS-SF at 3 months (difference, 2.75 points; 95% CI, 1.39-4.12; P <.001) and at 6 months (difference, 2.26 points; 95% CI, 0.39-4.12; P = .02, respectively). Dizziness-related disability was also lower in the Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation group at 3 months (difference, 6.15 points; 95% CI, 2.81-9.49; P <.001) and 6 months (difference, 5.58 points; 95% CI, 1.19-10.0; P = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation reduces dizziness and dizziness-related disability in older primary care patients without requiring clinical support. This intervention has potential for wide application in community settings.


Assuntos
Tontura/terapia , Atenção Primária à Saúde/métodos , Doenças Vestibulares/reabilitação , Idoso , Tontura/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Método Simples-Cego , Resultado do Tratamento , Doenças Vestibulares/complicações
3.
Psychol Health ; 32(11): 1327-1347, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28399681

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Factors influencing engagement with self-managed rehabilitation are not well understood, but evidence suggests they may change over time. Despite increasing digitalisation of self-managed interventions, little is known about the role of internet-based interventions in patients' experiences of self-directed rehabilitation. This longitudinal qualitative study investigated individuals' ongoing experiences of internet-guided, self-managed rehabilitation within the context of rehabilitation for dizziness. METHODS: Eighteen adults aged fifty and over who experienced dizziness used the 'Balance Retraining' internet intervention for six weeks. Participants took part in semi-structured telephone interviews at two-week intervals to explore their experiences. Data were inductively thematically analysed. RESULTS: The internet intervention was reported to facilitate engagement with rehabilitation exercises, providing motivation to continue through symptom reduction and simple but helpful strategies. It was perceived as informative, reassuring, visually pleasing and easy to use. Barriers to engagement included practicalities, symptoms and doubts about exercise efficacy. Participants' perceptions did not always remain consistent over time. CONCLUSION: The internet intervention may be a feasible method of supporting self-managed vestibular rehabilitation. More generally, longitudinal findings suggest that appearance-related perceptions of online interventions may be especially important for initial engagement. Furthermore, intervention features targeting self-efficacy seem important in overcoming barriers to engagement.


Assuntos
Tontura/reabilitação , Terapia por Exercício/psicologia , Internet , Terapia Assistida por Computador , Idoso , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Satisfação do Paciente , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Autocuidado/psicologia
4.
BMJ Open ; 7(1): e015479, 2017 01 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28110290

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Dizziness is a common symptom in general practice with a high prevalence among older adults. The most common cause of dizziness in general practice is peripheral vestibular disease. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a safe and effective treatment for peripheral vestibular disease that entails specific exercises to maximise the central nervous system compensation for the effects of vestibular pathology. An internet-based VR intervention has recently been shown to be safe and effective. Online interventions are low cost and easily accessible, but prone to attrition and non-adherence. A combination of online and face-to-face therapy, known as blended care, may balance these advantages and disadvantages. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A single-blind, three-arm, randomised controlled trial among patients aged 50 years and over presenting with dizziness of vestibular origin in general practice will be performed. In this study, we will compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of stand-alone internet-based VR and internet-based VR with physiotherapeutic support ('blended care') with usual care during 6 months of follow-up. We will use a translated Dutch version of a British online VR intervention. Randomisation will be stratified by dizziness severity. The primary outcome measure is the Vertigo Symptoms Scale-Short Form. Intention-to-treat analysis will be performed, adjusting for confounders. The economic evaluation will be conducted from a societal perspective. We will perform an additional analysis on the data to identify predictors of successful treatment in the same population to develop a clinical decision rule for general practitioners. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The ethical committee of the VU University Medical Center approved ethics and dissemination of the study protocol. The insights and results of this study will be widely disseminated through international peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Pre-results, NTR5712.


Assuntos
Tontura/reabilitação , Terapia por Exercício , Internet , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Vertigem/reabilitação , Doenças Vestibulares/reabilitação , Vestíbulo do Labirinto/patologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Protocolos Clínicos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Equilíbrio Postural , Projetos de Pesquisa , Resultado do Tratamento
5.
Disabil Rehabil ; 39(6): 519-534, 2017 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27097761

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Self-managed, home-based physical therapy (HBPT) is an increasingly common element of physical therapy rehabilitation programmes but non-adherence can reach 70%. Understanding factors that influence patients' adherence to HBPTs could help practitioners support better adherence. Research to date has focussed largely on clinic-based physiotherapy. The objective of this review, therefore, was to identify specific factors, which influence adherence to home-based, self-managed physical therapies. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted, in which eight online databases were searched using combinations of key terms relating to physical therapies, adherence and predictors. Matching records were screened against eligibility criteria and 30 quantitative articles were quality assessed and included in the final review. Relevant data were extracted and a narrative synthesis approach was taken to aggregating findings across studies. RESULTS: There was relatively strong evidence that the following factors predicted adherence to HBPTs: intention to engage in the HBPT, self-motivation, self-efficacy, previous adherence to exercise-related behaviours and social support. CONCLUSIONS: This review has identified a range of factors that appear to be related to patients' adherence to their self-managed physical rehabilitation therapies. Awareness of these factors may inform design of interventions to improve adherence. Implications for Rehabilitation Non-adherence to physical rehabilitation therapies is often high - particularly in self-managed, home-based programmes, despite good adherence being important in achieving positive outcomes. The findings of this systematic review indicate that greater self-efficacy, self-motivation, social support, intentions and previous adherence to physical therapies predict higher adherence to HBPTs. Assessment of these domains before providing individuals with their HBPT regimes may allow identification of 'risk factors' for poor adherence. These can then potentially be addressed or managed prior to, or alongside, the therapy. Interventions to support patients' self-managed physical rehabilitation should include elements designed to enhance patients' self-efficacy, self-motivation and social support given the evidence that these factors are good predictors of adherence.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar , Cooperação do Paciente , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Autocuidado , Humanos
6.
Am J Audiol ; 24(3): 276-9, 2015 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26649529

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This article outlines the rationale and development process for an online intervention based on vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT). The intervention aims to assist adults aged 50 years and older t o self-manage and reduce dizziness symptoms. METHOD: The intervention was developed according to the person-based approach to digital intervention design focused on accommodating perspectives of target users. A prototype version of the intervention was provided to 18 adults (11 women, 7 men) aged 50 years and older with dizziness. These adults were invited to use the intervention over a 6-week period and, during this time, took part in a think-aloud session. This session sought to understand users' perceptions of how acceptable, engaging, and easy to use they found the online intervention. RESULTS: Users were extremely positive regarding how easy to navigate, visually appealing, and informative they found the intervention. Think-aloud sessions provided valuable data for informing small amendments to further enhance acceptability of the intervention for target users. CONCLUSIONS: Informed by these development-phase data, a finalized version of the intervention is now being investigated in a primary care-based randomized controlled trial. Results should provide an understanding of whether VRT can be effectively-especially, cost-effectively-delivered via an online intervention to adults aged 50 years and older.


Assuntos
Tontura/reabilitação , Internet , Equilíbrio Postural , Autocuidado/métodos , Transtornos das Sensações/reabilitação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
7.
BMJ Open ; 4(7): e005871, 2014 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25052178

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Dizziness is highly prevalent in older adults and can lead to falls, fear of falling, loss of confidence, anxiety and depression. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) exercises are effective in reducing dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction, but access to trained therapists is limited. Providing dizzy patients with booklets teaching them how to carry out VR exercises has been shown to be a cost-effective way of managing dizziness in primary care. Internet-based intervention delivery has many advantages over paper-based methods, including the provision of video instructions, automated tailoring and symptom-related feedback. This trial will examine whether an internet-based VR intervention is (1) effective in reducing dizziness and (2) a cost-effective primary care treatment option. METHODS/ANALYSIS: This will be a single blind, randomised controlled trial carried out in UK primary care. A stand-alone internet-based VR intervention will be compared with routine care in 262 dizzy patients aged 50 years and over. Measures will be taken at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Our primary outcome measure will be the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing dizziness symptoms compared with routine care at 6 months. Cost-effectiveness will be examined along with the effect of the intervention on dizziness-related disability and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Psychological process variables including expectancy, self-efficacy and acceptance will be explored in relation to adherence and symptom reduction. ETHICS/DISSEMINATION: This trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by an NHS Research Ethics Committee, Southampton A REC Reference: 13/SC/0119. The findings of this trial will be disseminated to the scientific community through presentations at national and international conferences, and by publishing in peer review journals. Findings will be disseminated to the public through targeted press releases. This trial will provide valuable information on the role of internet interventions in facilitating self-management in older adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER ISRCTN: 86912968.


Assuntos
Tontura/reabilitação , Terapia por Exercício , Internet , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Idoso , Análise Custo-Benefício , Tontura/economia , Terapia por Exercício/economia , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Projetos de Pesquisa , Método Simples-Cego
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