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1.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 2019 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31792714

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare star rating system has been proposed as a means to assess hospital quality performance. The current study aimed to investigate outcomes and payments among patients undergoing surgery for colorectal, lung, esophageal, pancreatic, and liver cancer across hospital star rating groups. METHODS: The Medicare Standard Analytic Files (SAF) from 2013 to 2015 were used to derive the analytic cohort. The association of star ratings to perioperative outcomes and expenditures was examined. RESULTS: Among 119,854 patients, the majority underwent surgery at a 3-star (n = 34,901, 29.1%) or 4-star (n = 30,492, 25.4%) hospital. Only 12.2% (n = 14,732) were treated at a 5-star hospital. Across all procedures examined, patients who underwent surgery at a 1-star hospital had greater odds of death within 90 days than patients who had surgery at a 5-star hospital (colorectal, 1.41 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.25-1.60]; lung, 1.97 [95% CI 1.56-2.48]; esophagectomy, 1.83 [95% CI 0.81-4.16]; pancreatectomy, 1.70 [95% CI 1.20-2.41]; hepatectomy, 1.63 [95% CI 0.96-2.77]). A similar trend was noted for failure to rescue (FTR), with the greatest odds of FTR associated with 1-star hospitals. The median expenditure associated with an abdominal operation was $1661 more at a 1-star hospital than at a 5-star hospital (1-star: $17,399 vs 5-star: $15,738). A similar trend was noted for thoracic operations. CONCLUSION: The risk of FTR, 90-day mortality, and increased hospital expenditure were all higher at a 1-star hospital. Further research is needed to investigate barriers to care at 5-star-rated hospitals and to target specific interventions to improve outcomes at 1-star hospitals.

2.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31792898

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Safety-net hospitals are critical to the US health system as they provide care to vulnerable patients. The effect of hospital safety-net burden on patient outcomes in hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) surgery was examined. METHODS: Discharge data between 2004 and 2014 from the National Inpatient Sample were utilized. Hospitals with a safety-net burden were divided into tertiles: low (LBH) (< 13.6%), medium (MBH) (13.6-33.3%), and high (HBH) (> 33.3%). The association of hospital safety-net burden with complications, in-hospital mortality, never events, and costs were defined. RESULTS: Nearly 5% of the analytic cohort (n = 65,032) had surgery at a HBH. Patients treated at HBH were younger (median age, HBH 55 years vs LBH 62 years; p < 0.001), black or Hispanic (HBH 40.5% vs LBH 12.7%; p < 0.001), and of lowest income quartile (HBH 38.4% vs LBH 19.6%; p < 0.001). One-third of patients at HBH experienced a complication compared with only a quarter of patients at LBH (p < 0.001). HBH had higher rates of in-hospital mortality (HBH 6.5% vs. LBH 2.8%; p < 0.001), never events (HBH 5.4% vs. LBH 1.4%; p < 0.001), and a higher cost of surgery (HBH $30,716 vs. LBH $28,054; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Perioperative outcomes were worse at HBH, highlighting that efforts are needed to improve their delivery of care.

3.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 2019 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31696396

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is an ongoing debate about expanding the resection criteria for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) beyond the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) guidelines. We sought to determine the factors that held the most prognostic weight in the pre- and postoperative setting for each BCLC stage by applying a machine learning method. METHODS: Patients who underwent resection for BCLC-0, A and B HCC between 2000 and 2017 were identified from an international multi-institutional database. A Classification and Regression Tree (CART) model was used to generate homogeneous groups of patients relative to overall survival (OS) based on pre- and postoperative factors. RESULTS: Among 976 patients, 63 (6.5%) had BCLC-0, 745 (76.3%) had BCLC-A, and 168 (17.2%) had BCLC-B HCC. Five-year OS among BCLC-0/A and BCLC-B patients was 64.2% versus 50.2%, respectively (p = 0.011). The preoperative CART model selected α-fetoprotein (AFP) and Charlson comorbidity score (CCS) as the first and second most important preoperative factors of OS among BCLC-0/A patients, whereas radiologic tumor burden score (TBS) was the best predictor of OS among BCLC-B patients. The postoperative CART model revealed lymphovascular invasion as the best postoperative predictor of OS among BCLC-0/A patients, whereas TBS remained the best predictor of long-term outcomes among BCLC-B patients in the postoperative setting. On multivariable analysis, pathologic TBS independently predicted worse OS among BCLC-0/A (hazard ratio [HR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.07) and BCLC-B patients (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.06-1.19) undergoing resection. CONCLUSION: Prognostic stratification of patients undergoing resection for HCC within and beyond the BCLC resection criteria should include assessment of AFP and comorbidities for BCLC-0/A patients, as well as tumor burden for BCLC-B patients.

4.
J Surg Oncol ; 2019 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31742706

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Systemic chemotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with unresectable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC), however, the survival benefit of chemotherapy is limited. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been associated with improved survival among patients with advanced ECC, yet utilization of PDT remains low. We sought to compare the outcomes of patients with unresectable ECC following treatment with PDT versus chemotherapy. METHODS: A review of the National Cancer Database was conducted to identify patients with ECC who were nonsurgically managed between 2004 and 2013. Overall survival (OS) of patients receiving PDT vs systemic chemotherapy was compared using propensity score matching. RESULTS: After propensity matching (PDT, n = 59; chemotherapy, n = 177), 5-year OS was 17.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.0%-28.6%) among patients who underwent PDT vs 3.8% (95%CI, 0.4%-14.0%) among patients receiving chemotherapy (P < .001). On multivariable analysis PDT was associated with an OS benefit (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95%CI, 0.52-0.998; P = .048). Subset analysis of patients receiving PDT only (n = 45) and patients receiving chemotherapy demonstrated similar results. In subset analysis of patients undergoing PDT-only vs PDT-chemotherapy, OS was comparable. CONCLUSION: PDT was associated with a survival benefit compared with chemotherapy alone among patients with unresectable ECC.

5.
J Surg Oncol ; 120(8): 1327-1334, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31680251

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite the popularity of the U.S. News and World Report (USNWR) hospital rankings among the general public, the relationship between hospital rankings and actual patient outcomes for major cancers remains poorly investigated. METHODS: Medicare Inpatient Standard Analytic Files were queried from 2013-2015 to assess the relationship of postoperative outcomes and Medicare expenditures among patients undergoing surgery for colorectal, lung, esophageal, pancreatic, and liver cancer at hospitals ranked in the top-50 USNWR vs hospitals ranked below 50. RESULTS: Among 94 599 patients, 13 217 vs 81 382 patients underwent surgery at a top-50 hospital versus a non-top 50 ranked hospital. Other than among patients who underwent colorectal surgery, the odds of postoperative complications were lower at top ranked vs non-top ranked hospitals (colorectal: OR, 1.46, 95% CI, 1.28-1.65; lung: OR, 0.73, 95% CI, 0.61-0.87; esophagus: OR, 0.70, 95% CI, 0.52-0.94; pancreas: OR, 0.81, 95% CI, 0.70-0.94; liver: OR, 0.85, 95% CI, 0.69-1.04). Moreover, the odds of 90-day mortality were lower at top ranked hospitals vs non-top ranked hospitals (colorectal: OR, 0.59, 95% CI, 0.48-74; lung: OR, 0.66, 95% CI, 0.53-0.82; esophagus: OR, 0.56, 95% CI, 0.40-0.80; pancreas: OR, 0.51, 95% CI, 0.40-0.65; liver: OR, 0.61, 95% CI, 0.44-0.84). Outcomes were comparable among hospitals within the top-50 rank. CONCLUSION: Mortality rates were lower at hospitals in the top-50 USNWR versus non-top ranked, yet hospitals within the top-50 USNWR rankings had comparable outcomes.


Assuntos
Hospitais/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias/mortalidade , Neoplasias/cirurgia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Falha da Terapia de Resgate/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Masculino , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Am J Surg ; 2019 Oct 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31619377

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The Affordable Care Act introduced restrictions on the creation of new physician-owned hospitals (POH). We sought to define whether POH status was associated with differences in care. METHODS: Patients undergoing one of ten surgical procedures were identified using Medicare Standard Analytic Files. Patient and hospital-level characteristics and outcomes between POH and non-POH were compared. RESULTS: Among 1,255,442 patients identified, 14,560 (1.2%) were treated at POH. A majority of POHs were in urban areas (n = 30, 90.9%) and none were in low socioeconomic status areas. Patients at POH were slightly younger (POH:72, IQR:68-77 vs. non-POH:73, IQR:69-79) and healthier (CCI; POH:2; IQR: 1-3 vs. non-POH: 3; IQR: 1-4). Patients at non-POH had higher odds of postoperative complications (OR:1.67, 95%CI:1.55-1.80) and slightly higher medical expenditures (POH:$11,347, IQR:$11,139-$11,936 vs. non-POH:$13,389, IQR:$11,381-$19,592). CONCLUSIONS: POH were more likely to be located in socioeconomic advantaged areas, treat healthier patients and have lower associated expenditures.

7.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31621025

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The USA has one of the largest known income-based health disparities, with low-income adults being up to five times more likely to report being in poor health. We evaluated the association of hospital zip-code-based distressed communities index (DCI) with post-surgical outcomes following hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgery. METHODS: Adults undergoing HPB surgery were identified in the National Inpatient Sample. The association between hospital socioeconomic distress and outcomes including complications, mortality, failure to rescue (FTR), and never events were compared between high-distress facilities (HDF) and low-distress facilities (LDF). RESULTS: A total of 11,119 (37.8%) patients underwent an operation at an HDF. Patients treated at HDF were younger (18-39 years, HDF: n = 1261, 11.3% vs. LDF: n = 966, 9.0%; p < 0.001), Black/Hispanic (HDF: n = 2060, 18.5% vs. LDF: n = 1440, 11.4%; p < 0.001) and in the lowest income quartile (HDF: n = 2825, 25.4% vs. LDF: n = 1116, 10.8%; p < 0.001). While complications were comparable at HDF versus LDF (HDF: n = 2483, 22.3% vs. LDF: n = 2370, 22.0%; p = 0.28), patients treated at HDF had higher odds of in-hospital mortality (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07-1.59), FTR (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.02-1.52), and a never event (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.29-2.39; all p < 0.001). Hospitals having advanced internal medicine services had reduced odds of mortality (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.47-0.80) whereas high nurse-to-patient ratio was associated with reduced odds of a complication (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81-0.98). CONCLUSION: Approximately 40% of patients were admitted to HDF. These patients were more likely to be Black/Hispanic and underinsured. Perioperative outcomes were worse at HDF following HPB surgery.

8.
Clin Chem ; 65(10): 1216-1218, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31570412
9.
J Surg Oncol ; 120(8): 1358-1364, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31614000

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Little data regarding the selection of nonsurgical therapies for localized intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) are available. METHODS: A cohort of nonsurgically managed patients with American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage I/II ICC in the United States from 2004 to 2013 were identified in the National Cancer Database. Overall survival (OS) was compared according to treatment options (radiofrequency ablation [RFA] vs chemoradiotherapy) using propensity-score matching. RESULTS: Among 505 patients, 86 patients were treated with RFA and 419 patients were treated with chemoradiotherapy. After propensity matching (n = 84, each group), 5-year OS was 17.6% among patients who underwent RFA vs 3.8% among patients receiving chemoradiotherapy (P < .001). On bivariate analysis, RFA was related to an OS benefit (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.66; P < .001). Specifially, a stage-specific subgroup analysis revealed a survival benefit in favor of RFA among stage I patients (5-year OS; RFA: 20.1% vs chemoradiotherapy: 3.7%, P < .001), whereas no difference in OS was noted among patients with stage II disease. CONCLUSION: Among ICC patients with small (≤5 cm), solitary ICC without vascular invasion, RFA was associated with better survival compared with chemoradiotherapy.


Assuntos
Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/mortalidade , Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/terapia , Colangiocarcinoma/mortalidade , Colangiocarcinoma/terapia , Ablação por Radiofrequência , Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/patologia , Quimiorradioterapia , Colangiocarcinoma/patologia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Análise por Pareamento
10.
Case Rep Oncol ; 12(3): 728-736, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31616281

RESUMO

Medical literature does not have clear consensus on inter-rater reliability of PS assessment by different oncology health care professionals (HCPs) although it plays an important role in treatment decision and prognosis for oncology patients. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores are commonly used for this purpose by oncology HCPs around the world. This study was conducted to find variability or similarities in assessment of PS among the different oncology HCPs. A survey based on four hypothetical clinical scenarios was devised and sent to 50 oncology HCPs to assess the PS using ECOG PS tool. No significant variations in PS assessment by oncology HCPs was noted in our study sample.

11.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Oct 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31630368

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The value of routine ICU admission after elective surgery has been debated due to the lack of robust evidence supporting its benefit, as well as the increased incurred costs. We sought to analyze outcomes of patients undergoing hepatectomy who were routinely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) compared with surgical ward admission. METHODS: Patients were identified in the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database from 2010 to 2016. Routine postoperative ICU admission was defined as ICU admission for ≤ 24 h on postoperative day 0. Potential association between routine ICU admission with extended length-of-stay (LOS), failure-to-rescue, and total inpatient costs was analyzed. RESULTS: In total 7970 patients underwent hepatectomy; 37.7% (n = 3001) had routine ICU admission and 62.3% (n = 4969) surgical ward admission. Among the 3001 patients who had routine ICU admission, 1137 (37.9%) had a major and 1864 (62.1%) had a minor hepatectomy. Routine ICU admission was not associated with lower failure-to-rescue (routine ICU 4.9% vs. ward 1.8%; p < 0.001). Patients routinely admitted to the ICU had longer median LOS (routine ICU 7 days, IQR 5-15 days vs. ward 5 days, IQR 4-7 days; p < 0.001). Median payments were higher for routine ICU admission than for surgical ward admission ($50,501, IQR $34,270-$80,459 vs. $39,774, IQR $28,555-$58,270, respectively). CONCLUSION: Routine ICU admission was associated with longer LOS and higher hospital payments, yet did not translate into lower failure-to-rescue among patients undergoing hepatectomy.

12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31638468

RESUMO

Background: Increasing urbanization, mechanization, and rural-to-urban migration has led to deranged sleeping patterns, surplus energy intake, and sedentary lifestyles in South Asian young people. This shift poses an insidious health risk for the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Early detection is needed because in the South Asian population, this syndrome carries an increased risk of comorbidities compared to people without the syndrome. This study was designed to elucidate the prevalence of MetS and its risk factors in young people in urban areas of Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four undergraduate institutions in Lahore, Pakistan. Five hundred and nine young people participated, and each provided their informed consent for the collection of data on their demographic, physical, and biochemical characteristics along with information on their dietary, sleep, and physical activity habits. Results: Most participants reported consuming greater-than-recommended amounts of protein and smaller-than-recommended amounts of vegetables and fruits. The International Diabetes Federation criteria for MetS were fulfilled by 6.1% of the students. Hypertension (67.7%) and hypo-HDL-emia (64.5%) were the most common risk factors. More than 50% of the respondents slept fewer hours per day than recommended, and 33% had a sedentary lifestyle. Men, participants with a family history of metabolic illness and those with low physical activity levels had higher odds of a positive result on screening for MetS. Conclusions: The early detection of MetS and early identification of probable risk factors may make beneficial contributions to both public health and clinical interventions directed at high-risk individuals. Establishing and using cutoff values for modified waist circumference and specific body mass index in Asian populations may aid in early detection.

14.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 143(12): 1450-1454, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31509454

RESUMO

CONTEXT.­: With widespread screening for colorectal cancer, the number of early-stage colorectal cancers is increasing. Local excision of pT1 tumors is associated with considerably less morbidity and mortality, but this must be weighed against risk of lymph node metastases. OBJECTIVE.­: To understand histologic prognostic factors associated with adverse outcome in malignant polyps. DATA SOURCES.­: Pertinent literature regarding histologic features of prognostic significance in malignant polyps and low-stage colorectal carcinomas is summarized and our institute's cases are used to highlight these histologic features. CONCLUSIONS.­: Poor prognostic factors for malignant polyps include high tumor grade, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor less than 1 mm from resection margin, submucosal invasion deeper than 1 mm, and high tumor budding. These features should be assessed by the pathologist and communicated to the clinical team in order to allow proper management.

15.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Aug 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31396842

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Given the need to increase female representation in hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgery, as well as the need to increase the academic pipeline of women in this subspecialty, we sought to characterize the prevalence of female authorship in the HPB literature. In particular, the objective of the current study was to determine the proportion of women who published HPB research articles as first, second, or last author over the last decade. METHODS: All articles pertaining to hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) surgery appearing in seven surgical journals (Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Surgery, JAMA Surgery, Annals of Surgical Oncology, HPB (Oxford), Surgery, and Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery) were reviewed for the years 2008 and 2018. Information on sex of author, country of author's institution, and article type was collected and entered into a computerized database. RESULTS: Among the 1473 index articles included in the final analytic cohort, 414 (28%) publications had a woman as the first or last author, while the vast majority (n = 1,059, 72%) had a man as the first or last author. The number of female first authors increased from 15.6% (n = 92/591) in 2008 to 25.7% (n = 227/882) in 2018 (p < 0.001). There were no differences in the proportion of second (n = 123/536, 23.0% vs n = 214/869, 24.6%, p = 0.47) or last (n = 44/564, 7.8% vs n = 88/875, 10.1%, p = 0.15) authors. Women were more likely to publish papers appearing in medium-impact journals (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04-1.88) and articles with a female author were more likely to be from a North American institution (referent: North America, Asia OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.31-0.59 vs Europe OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.87). CONCLUSION: Women first/last authors in HPB research articles have increased over the past 10 years from 22 to 32%. Women as last authors remain low, however, as only 1 in 10 papers had a senior woman author. These data should prompt HPB leaders to find solutions to the gap in female authorship including mentorship of young female researchers and surgeons.

16.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Aug 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31385172

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment for patients with colorectal, liver, and pancreatic cancers. Although these procedures are performed with low mortality, rates of complications remain relatively high following hepatopancreatic and colorectal surgery. METHODS: The American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program was utilized to identify patients undergoing liver, pancreatic and colorectal surgery from 2014 to 2016. Decision tree models were utilized to predict the occurrence of any complication, as well as specific complications. To assess the variability of the performance of the classification trees, bootstrapping was performed on 50% of the sample. RESULTS: Algorithms were derived from a total of 15,657 patients who met inclusion criteria. The algorithm had a good predictive ability for the occurrence of any complication, with a C-statistic of 0.74, outperforming the ASA (C-statistic 0.58) and ACS-Surgical Risk Calculator (C-statistic 0.71). The algorithm was able to predict with high accuracy thirteen out of the seventeen complications analyzed. The best performance was in the prediction of stroke (C-statistic 0.98), followed by wound dehiscence, cardiac arrest, and progressive renal failure (all C-statistic 0.96). The algorithm had a good predictive ability for superficial SSI (C-statistic 0.76), organ space SSI (C-statistic 0.76), sepsis (C-statistic 0.79), and bleeding requiring transfusion (C-statistic 0.79). CONCLUSION: Machine learning was used to develop an algorithm that accurately predicted patient risk of developing complications following liver, pancreatic, or colorectal surgery. The algorithm had very good predictive ability to predict specific complications and demonstrated superiority over other established methods.

17.
J Surg Oncol ; 120(6): 946-955, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31410852

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The objective of the current study was to characterize patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) undergoing curative-intent surgery with discordant preoperative and postoperative prediction scores and determine factors associated with prediction discrepancy. METHODS: Patients who underwent hepatectomy for ICC between 1990 and 2016 were identified in a multi-institutional international database. Preoperative and postoperative prognostic models were designed and discordant prognostic scores were identified. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was completed to determined factors associated with score discordance. RESULTS: Among 1149 patients, those who had concordant prediction scores were older (median age, 60 vs 56), and more likely to have a smaller median tumor size (6.0 vs 7.5 cm) (all P < .05). On multivariable logistic analysis, patients with higher neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.19), higher CEA levels (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04-1.50), larger tumors (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.15) and suspicious lymph nodes (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.25-3.36) were more likely to have preoperative and postoperative score discordance. Older patients had decreased odds of having score discordance (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99). Patients with score discordance had worse overall survival compared with patients with concordant scores (median:15.9 vs 21.7 months, P < .05). CONCLUSION: Score discordance may reflect an aggressive variant of ICC that would benefit from early integration of multidisciplinary treatment strategies.


Assuntos
Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/patologia , Colangiocarcinoma/patologia , Hepatectomia/mortalidade , Modelos Estatísticos , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios , Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/cirurgia , Colangiocarcinoma/cirurgia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Taxa de Sobrevida
18.
Cureus ; 11(6): e4833, 2019 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31403019

RESUMO

A cause of acute intestinal obstruction in adults, midgut volvulus can be categorized into two types: primary type with no identifiable underlying cause, and secondary type that occurs in the presence of a predisposing condition such as, postoperative adhesions. Primary midgut volvulus can lead to bowel ischemia and necrosis, making an extensive bowel resection imminent. A potential consequence of bowel resection is short-bowel syndrome - a failure of digestion and absorption by the intestines, leading to malnutrition and other complications. As such, we report the diagnosis and management of primary midgut volvulus - a rare entity in adults - occurring in an adult patient.

19.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Jul 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31325139

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although the role of annual surgeon volume on perioperative outcomes after liver resection (LR) has been investigated, there is a paucity of data regarding the impact of surgeon volume on outcomes of minimally invasive LR (MILR) versus open LR (OLR). METHODS: Patients undergoing LR between 2013 and 2015 were identified in the Medicare inpatient Standard Analytic Files. Patients were classified into three groups based on surgeons' annual caseload: low (≤ 2 cases), medium (3-5 cases), or high (≥ 6 cases). Short-term outcomes and expenditures of LR, stratified by surgeon volume and minimally invasive surgery (MIS), were examined. RESULTS: Among 3403 surgeons performing LR on 7169 patients, approximately 90% of surgeons performed less than 5 liver resections per year for Medicare patients. Only 7.1% of patients underwent MILR (n = 506). After adjustment, the likelihood of experiencing a complication and death within 90 days decreased with increasing surgeon volume. Outcomes of open and MILR among low- or high-volume surgeon groups, including rates of complications, 30- and 90-day readmission and mortality were similar. However, the difference of average total episode payment between open and MIS was higher in the high-volume surgeon group (low volume: $2929 vs. medium volume: $2333 vs. high volume: $7055). CONCLUSION: Annual surgeon volume was an important predictor of outcomes following LR. MILR had comparable results to open LR among both the low- and high-volume surgeons.

20.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2019 Jul 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31292889

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: While patient- and hospital-level factors affecting outcomes of patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) have been well described separately, the relative impact of these factors on in-hospital mortality has not been comprehensively assessed. METHODS: Retrospective review of the National Inpatient Sample database (January 2004-December 2014) was conducted to identify patients undergoing PD. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality after PD were analyzed after adjusting for previously defined patient- and hospital-level risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 9639 patients who underwent a PD at 2325 hospitals were identified. Median patient age was 57 years (IQR 66-73). Overall, mortality following PD was 3.2%. When patient- and hospital-level characteristics were analyzed in the same model, patient-level characteristic associated with increased odds of in-hospital mortality included increasing patient age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.06/per 5 years increase), male sex (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.16-1.86), the presence of liver disease (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.99-4.61), chronic kidney disease (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.18-2.68), and congestive heart failure (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.65-3.74). The only hospital characteristic associated with odds of mortality following PD included compliance with Leapfrog volume standards (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54-0.92). CONCLUSION: Patient-level factors, such as advanced comorbidities, male sex, and increased age, contributed the most to increased risk of mortality after PD. Hospital volume was the only hospital-level factor contributing to risk of in-hospital mortality following PD.

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