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2.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 19(2): 188-194, 2020 Feb 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32129969

RESUMO

While biologics are highly effective, most psoriasis patients do not achieve complete skin clearance with their biologic monotherapy. How to achieve complete skin clearance in psoriasis patients who fail their biologic is not well characterized. To describe treatment approaches in psoriasis patients who fail to achieve complete clearance from their biologic, we modeled and assessed the efficacy, cost, and safety of three treatment approaches­ adding a topical agent with their biologic, escalating the biologic dose, and switching to a different biologic. Efficacy of each approach was obtained from literature identifying complete clearance defined as 100% improvement in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index and/or Physician's Global Assessment score of clear. Cost of each treatment approach was calculated using medication wholesale acquisition cost obtained from Medi-Span Price Rx. Safety was assessed by adverse event (AE) rates. Complete clearance in patients not cleared on their initial biologic was achieved when adding calcipotriene/betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) foam (28%), switching to guselkumab (20%), and switching to infliximab (15.8%). Adding Cal/BD foam to the initial biologic ($3,780 per additional patient cleared) was a less costly approach compared to the lowest cost dose escalation (guselkumab; $73,370 per additional patient cleared) or switching the initial failed biologic to the lowest cost alternative biologic (infliximab; $88,250 per additional patient cleared). There were no treatment-related or serious AEs when adding Cal/BD foam. Adding a topical agent may be an efficacious, low cost, and safe approach to achieve complete clearing in psoriasis patients who previously failed to clear on their biologic. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(2)188-194. doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.3989

3.
Ann Pharmacother ; : 1060028020910439, 2020 Mar 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32126800

RESUMO

Objective: To review phase II and III clinical trial data to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the halobetasol propionate/tazarotene (HP/TAZ) combination lotion (Duobrii), a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration in April 2019 for adults with plaque psoriasis. Data Sources: A systematic search (January 2005 to July 2019) of MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE databases was performed using the terms halobetasol, tazarotene, halobetasol/tazarotene, Duobrii, and IDP-118. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant English-language articles reporting on phase II and phase III clinical trials were included. Data from the individual trials were extracted independently and then cross-checked to ensure accuracy. Data Synthesis: HP/TAZ was safe and efficacious compared with HP alone, TAZ alone, or vehicle. More patients achieved treatment success, described as a ≥2-grade improvement on Investigator Global Assessment Scale, over 8 weeks of treatment and at the 4-week follow-up after treatment cessation. The most common adverse events were dermatitis, pain, and pruritus, which occurred more often in the TAZ groups compared with the HP/TAZ cohorts. Relevance to Patient Care and Clinical Practice: The once-daily HP/TAZ combination lotion simplifies psoriasis treatment and may facilitate adherence, which may improve psoriasis outcomes. Conclusions: HP/TAZ combination lotion is efficacious and safe for plaque psoriasis treatment, with more patients achieving end points and fewer side effects than in HP, TAZ, or vehicle-treated controls. Drug synergy may play a role. Importantly, patient adherence to a once-daily combinational therapy is likely to contribute to efficacy.

5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32192366

RESUMO

Introduction: Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects 2-3% of the US population and represents a large psychosocial burden for patients. Over the last decade, highly effective targeted therapies for psoriasis have been developed - namely, those targeting interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23. The success of biologic agents targeting IL-17 and IL-23 underscores the importance of the IL-23/T helper (Th)17 cell axis in psoriasis pathogenesis. Oral small molecule drugs - such as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) inhibitors, and fumaric acid esters (FAEs) - are also being investigated for the treatment of psoriasis.Areas covered: This article reviews systemic biologic and oral small molecule drugs currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of plaque psoriasis.Expert opinion: Many patients with psoriasis have mild disease, and many with mild disease do not seek medical care for their condition. Many patients with mild disease could be adequately treated with topical treatments and phototherapy; however, adherence and feasibility have often been an issue with these treatment types. There seems to be limited room for development of novel biologics, as the existing ones are extraordinarily safe, effective, and convenient with few injections. Patients would prefer a safe, effective oral treatment; however, JAK inhibitors seem unlikely to fill this role completely.

6.
Expert Opin Pharmacother ; : 1-7, 2020 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32208940

RESUMO

Introduction: Moderate-to-severe AD burdens a large proportion of AD patients and may represent an inadequacy of treatment options available for resistant disease.Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the therapies for moderate-to-severe AD in late-stage development and in the clinic, and focuses on baricitinib as an emerging therapeutic option. Baricitinib is an orally available selective JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor that is approved for use in the treatment of moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Baricitinib decreases AD lesions, disease severity, and improves quality of life. Overall, the small molecule inhibitor is well tolerated. However, its black-box warnings in the RA population raise a concern for its long-term safety.Expert opinion: Baricitinib is a promising treatment modality for moderate-to-severe AD. Its primary advantage over dupilumab, the revolutionary biologic agent approved for AD, is that patients prefer an oral medication over an injection. However, providers will likely prescribe an injectable over an oral medication if baricitinib has an unfavorable safety profile. Insurance coverage of baricitinib will also have a major role in clinical use. Baricitinib will likely face competition from other JAK inhibitors in the future; however, it will have an advantage if it becomes the first FDA-approved medication of its kind for resistant AD.

7.
Dermatitis ; 2020 Mar 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32209867

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may occur secondary to topical antifungals containing potential allergens in their vehicles. Variation of allergenic ingredients among commonly used antifungal creams (AFCs) has not been well characterized. OBJECTIVE: The study goal was to assess the frequency of allergenic ingredients in 4 commonly used topical AFCs. METHODS: Topical AFCs (clotrimazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, and terbinafine) were selected, and the ingredient lists for these products were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration's Online Label Repository via a proprietary name search. A systematic literature review was performed using the ingredient name on MEDLINE (PubMed) database to identify reports of ACD confirmed by patch testing. RESULTS: Of the 20 ingredients analyzed, 6 had frequent allergenic potential. Propylene glycol was the most common cause of ACD identified in the literature and is an ingredient in ketoconazole 2% and miconazole nitrate 2%. Ketoconazole 2% and miconazole nitrate 2% creams contained the highest number of potential allergens (n = 3) among the 4 creams analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Of the 4 creams, terbinafine hydrochloride 1% and clotrimazole 1% contained the least number of potential allergenic ingredients. Awareness of the allergenic potential of commonly used AFCs may help health care providers when evaluating patients with ACD.

9.
Cutis ; 105(2): 89-91;E2;E3, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32186523

RESUMO

Most patients with psoriasis have limited disease that should be manageable with topical treatment. However, psoriasis often is resistant to topical treatment. The aim of our study was to determine if patients using psoriasis-resistant topical treatments can be effectively treated with topicals under conditions promoting adherence. During this open-label, randomized, single-center clinical study, 12 patients with moderate psoriasis that previously failed topical treatment were selected and treated with desoximetasone spray 0.25% for 2 weeks. Six patients were randomized to receive twice-daily telephone call reminders to further encourage good adherence. Disease severity was assessed by the visual analog scale for pruritus, psoriasis area and severity index (PASI), total lesion severity score (TLSS), and investigator global assessment (IGA). At the end of the study, most patients improved in most scores. Therefore, apparent resistance to topical treatment often is due to poor adherence and can be overcome, at least over the short term.

13.
J Cutan Med Surg ; : 1203475420906081, 2020 Feb 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32052653

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Self-application of topicals on the back can be challenging. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to assess topical back coverage using commercially available back applicators. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten subjects applied sunscreen to their back using their hands and then with 3 back applicators (large foam tip, small foam tip, roller tip). The amount of lotion used and the time it took to perform the application were recorded. The resulting distribution of sunscreen was assessed with a Wood's lamp; the area covered fluoresced less than the uncovered skin. Images were captured and then analyzed using an automated thresholding technique. RESULTS: Subjects applied more lotion when using the large foam tip (7.58 g, 95% CI 6.47-8.70 g; P < .004) and small foam tip (7.46 g, 95% CI 6.35-8.57 g; P < .006) applicators compared to hands alone (6.22 g, 95% CI 5.10-7.33 g). Application time was longer with the small foam tip applicator (113.4 s, 95% CI 96.7-130.1 s) relative to hand application (78.7 s, 95% CI 62-95.4 s) (P < .03). Coverage of the back was higher for the large foam tip (84.8%, 95% CI 78.4%-91.3%; P < .03), small foam tip (88.0%, 95% CI 81.6%-91.5%; P < .006), and roller tip (84.3%, 95% CI 77.9%-90.8%; P < .04) applicators compared to hand application (71.5%, 95% CI 65%-78%). The middle back tended to have less coverage when applying with the hands. CONCLUSIONS: Topical coverage of the back is improved with the use of applicator devices during self-application.

14.
Expert Opin Pharmacother ; : 1-11, 2020 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32100586

RESUMO

Introduction: The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) in geriatric populations of industrialized countries is currently estimated at 3-4% and continues to increase. AD is associated with significant morbidity, increased susceptibility to infection, and symptoms of pruritus and pain. Treatments may negatively affect elderly patients; thus, plans should be optimized for this population.Areas covered: This review summarizes treatment options for AD in the elderly. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the key terms atopic dermatitis, elderly, geriatric, systemic therapy, therapy, and topical therapy in PubMed. Searches yielded articles on skincare management and topical and systemic pharmacotherapies.Expert opinion: Proper use of moisturizer is crucial in all patients with AD. Topical corticosteroids are commonly prescribed; however, they carry an increased risk of adverse events such as skin atrophy. Systemic corticosteroids should be avoided in elderly patients due to questionable efficacy and increased adverse events. Topical calcineurin inhibitors and crisaborole are similarly efficacious with an excellent safety profile. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate mofetil are systemic agents available for the treatment of refractory AD; however, insufficient data exist to indicate the superiority of any one agent. Dupilumab is a safe and efficacious injectable therapy in elderly patients.

16.
Pediatr Dermatol ; 37(1): 62-63, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31997454
18.
Qual Life Res ; 29(2): 369-380, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31655974

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To assess improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with ixekizumab treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. METHODS: Adults with plaque psoriasis were enrolled in phase III, double-blind, randomised, controlled trials (UNCOVER-1, UNCOVER-2, or UNCOVER-3). All 3 protocols included a 12-week, placebo-controlled induction period; UNCOVER-2 and UNCOVER-3 also had an active-control group (50 mg etanercept) during induction. After induction, patients in UNCOVER-1 and UNCOVER-2 entered a 48-week withdrawal (maintenance) period (Weeks 12-60), during which Week-12 sPGA (0,1) responders were rerandomized to receive placebo, or 80 mg ixekizumab every 4 weeks (Q4W) or 12 weeks. As a secondary objective, HRQoL was measured by the generic Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36) at baseline and Weeks 12 and 60. Changes in mean SF-36 Physical and Mental Component Summary (PCS and MCS) and domain scores and proportions of patients reporting improvements ≥ minimal important differences in SF-36 scores were compared between groups. RESULTS: At Week 12, ixekizumab-treated patients (both dose groups in UNCOVER-1, -2, and -3) reported statistically significantly greater improvements in mean SF-36 PCS and MCS and all 8 SF-36 domain scores versus placebo. Further, more ixekizumab-treated patients than placebo-treated patients reported at least minimal treatment responses in SF-36 PCS and MCS scores and domain scores. Overall improvements in SF-36 PCS and MCS scores were maintained through Week 60. CONCLUSIONS: Ixekizumab-treated patients reported statistically significant improvements in HRQoL at 12 weeks that persisted through 1 year.

19.
J Dermatolog Treat ; : 1-8, 2020 Jan 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31714168

RESUMO

Objective: To evaluate medication discontinuation, persistence, and adherence of moderate to severe psoriasis patients treated with adalimumab, apremilast, etanercept, secukinumab, and ustekinumab.Methods: Adult patients diagnosed with psoriasis and ≥1 psoriasis pharmacy or medical claim of any of the five psoriasis medications (index date) and continuous insurance enrollment were included from the Optum Clinformatics database during the intake period (7/1/2014-9/30/2017). Medication discontinuation, persistence, medication possession ratio (MPR), and proportion of days covered (PDC) were evaluated during a 12-month post-index follow-up period, using three gap definitions.Results: Among the study population (n = 8524), 34.4% initiated adalimumab, 25.7% apremilast, 9.0% etanercept, 7.1% secukinumab, and 23.7% ustekinumab. Mean age ranged from 48.7 to 52.2 years. For all three gap definitions, discontinuation was lowest and persistence greatest among ustekinumab treated patients (48.4% and 59.8%, respectively using the default definition). A greater proportion of ustekinumab patients had an MPR ≥80% (81.8%) than adalimumab (67.9%), apremilast (54.9%), etanercept (56.4%), and secukinumab (68.0%) patients. Also, 50.6% of ustekinumab patients had a PDC ≥80% versus 35.6%, 23.9%, 19.5%, and 41.7% of adalimumab, apremilast, etanercept, and secukinumab patients, respectively.Conclusions: Although heterogeneity across cohorts may explain some medication utilization differences, ustekinumab was associated with lower discontinuation and greater persistence and adherence.

20.
J Cutan Med Surg ; 24(1): 17-22, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31409112

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Treatment of childhood atopic dermatitis (AD) is hindered by nonadherence, but caregiver reassurance may help overcome this hurdle. OBJECTIVES: To assess caregivers' willingness to treat childhood AD with a corticosteroid when presented with clinical trial evidence, anecdote, or both. METHODS: A total of 476 caregivers were recruited through a dermatology clinic and online crowdsourcing platform. Subjects were randomized to receive clinical trial evidence, anecdote, or both, using either the term "medication" or "topical steroid." Additional caregivers were queried about their willingness to treat with the doctor's recommendation or without knowledge of its safety information. Responses were recorded on a 10-point Likert scale. RESULTS: Caregivers' willingness to treat was higher in all information assignment groups compared to those not provided with safety information: clinical trial evidence of a "medication" (P = .003; Cohen's d = 0.83) or "topical steroid" (P = .030; d = 0.55), anecdote of a "medication" (P < .0001; d = 1.37) or "topical steroid" (P < .0001; d = 0.85), both clinical trial evidence and anecdote of a "medication" (P < .0001; d = 1.00) or "topical steroid" (P = .000; d = 0.89), and simply the doctor's recommendation (P < .0001; d = 0.92). Significance was corrected for multiple comparisons to 0.0018. There were no differences between caregivers of children with and without AD (P = .36). CONCLUSIONS: Providing anecdotal reassurance, even in the setting of reported high willingness to treat with the doctor's recommendation, may be an effective strategy to improve caregivers' perceptions of starting new medications.

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