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1.
Transpl Infect Dis ; : e13195, 2019 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31610077

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite being considered a high-risk population for invasive fungal disease, specific features of candidemia among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients remain poorly characterized. METHODS: We compiled prospective data from two multicenter studies on candidemia performed over two consecutive periods in Spain: the CANDIPOP Study (2010-2011) and the CANDI-Bundle Study (2016-2018). Episodes diagnosed in adult SOT recipients in 10 participating centers were included. Risk factors for clinical failure (all-cause 7-day mortality and/or persistent candidemia for ≥72 hours) and 30-day mortality were investigated by univariate analysis. RESULTS: We included 55 episodes of post-transplant candidemia (32 and 23 of which occurred during the first and second periods). Kidney (38.2%) and liver recipients (30.9%) were the most common populations. Candida albicans accounted for 27.3% of episodes. The proportion of C glabrata increased over time (18.8% vs 30.4% for the first and second periods). There were no differences in the rate of fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (50.0% vs 60.0%, respectively). Clinical failure and 30-day mortality occurred in 25.5% and 27.3% of episodes and were associated with the severity of candidemia (Pitt score and severe sepsis/septic shock). Kidney transplantation (unadjusted odds ratio [uOR]: 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.85; P-value = .020), early catheter removal (uOR: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.03-0.76; P-value = .013), and appropriate early antifungal therapy (uOR: 0.14; 95% CI: 0.02-0.89; P-value = .041) were protective for 30-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: High rates of non-albicans species and fluconazole non-susceptibility must be taken into account to optimize therapeutic management and outcomes in SOT recipients with candidemia.

2.
Am J Transplant ; 2019 Sep 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31550408

RESUMO

Oral fosfomycin may constitute an alternative for the treatment of lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), particularly in view of recent safety concerns with fluroquinolones. Specific data on the efficacy and safety of fosfomycin in KTR are scarce. We performed a retrospective study in 14 Spanish hospitals including KTRs treated with oral fosfomycin (calcium and trometamol salts) for posttransplant cystitis between January 2005 and December 2017. A total of 133 KTRs developed 143 episodes of cystitis. Most episodes (131 [91.6%]) were produced by gram-negative bacilli (GNB), and 78 (54.5%) were categorized as multidrug resistant (including extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae [14%] or carbapenem-resistant GNB [3.5%]). A median daily dose of 1.5 g of fosfomycin (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.5-2) was administered for a median of 7 days (IQR: 3-10). Clinical cure (remission of UTI-attributable symptoms at the end of therapy) was achieved in 83.9% (120/143) episodes. Among those episodes with follow-up urine culture, microbiological cure at month 1 was achieved in 70.2% (59/84) episodes. Percutaneous nephrostomy was associated with a lower probability of clinical cure (adjusted odds ratio: 10.50; 95% confidence interval: 0.98-112.29; P = 0.052). In conclusion, fosfomycin is an effective orally available alternative for treating cystitis among KTRs.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31324467

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Torque teno virus (TTV) is a highly prevalent non-pathogenic anellovirus whose plasma levels may be a biomarker of immunosuppression. The aim of this study was to assess whether specific immune-targeting with different biologic drugs may differentially modulate TTV viremia in arthritis patients. METHODS: TTV DNA load was quantified by PCR in a cross-sectional sample of 79 patients with chronic arthritis on biologic therapy (abatacept, infliximab, rituximab or tocilizumab), 31 patients treated with conventional DMARDs (methotrexate and/or leflunomide), and 54 healthy individuals. Longitudinal changes in TTV load were analysed in a second group of 59 patients at baseline and 4-months after biologic therapy. Correlations between clinical or biological characteristics of recruited patients and TTV viremia were also analysed. RESULTS: In the cross-sectional study, TTV load was significantly higher in patients who received abatacept, infliximab or tocilizumab compared to healthy individuals. Patients treated with rituximab or conventional DMARDs showed TTV loads similar to healthy controls. In the longitudinal study, an increase in the TTV load was observed after anti-TNF, tocilizumab, abatacept and rituximab, but not after secukinumab therapy. Correlations between TTV load and clinical variables such as disease duration, concomitant glucocorticoid or DMARDs therapy, lymphocytes or previous infections were not found. A non-significant trend towards higher TTV load was observed in therapy responders. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic arthritis on biologic but not on conventional DMARD or anti-IL17 therapy have increased TTV viremia. This observation provides a basis to prospectively explore the potential value of TTV load as a potential pharmacodynamic biomarker.

4.
World J Gastroenterol ; 25(26): 3291-3298, 2019 Jul 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31341356

RESUMO

Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the best treatment option for end-stage organ disease. Newer immunosuppressive agents have reduced the incidence of graft rejection but have increased the risk of infection, particularly due to the reactivation of latent infections due to opportunistic agents such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Active tuberculosis (TB) after SOT is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Most cases of posttransplant TB are secondary to reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. Risk minimization strategies have been developed to diagnose LTBI and initiate treatment prior to transplantation. Isoniazid with vitamin B6 supplementation is the treatment of choice. However, liver transplantation (LT) candidates and recipients have an increased risk of isoniazid-induced liver toxicity, leading to lower treatment completion rates than in other SOT populations. Fluoroquinolones (FQs) exhibit good in vitro antimycobacterial activity and a lower risk of drug-induced liver injury than isoniazid. In the present review, we highlight the disease burden posed by posttransplant TB and summarize the emerging clinical evidence supporting the use of FQs for the treatment of LTBI in LT recipients and candidates.

7.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 38(5): 977-983, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30924012

RESUMO

CoNS is the main cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). Current guidelines recommend catheter withdrawal followed by antibiotics for at least 5 days. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of a shorter course of antibiotherapy in patients with CoNS CRBSI. All proven cases of CoNS CRBSI at our institution (Jan 12/Dec 17) were retrospectively analysed. Comparison of clinical characteristics and outcomes between patients receiving a short (SC ≤ 3 days) versus long antibiotic course (LC > 3 days) was performed. Cox regression models predicting the risk for complications (including propensity score [PS] for treatment assignment as covariate) were designed to adjust baseline differences among both treatment groups. A total of 79 cases were included. Most patients (75.9%) showed clinical response at day 7 after catheter removal. Complications occurred in 3.8% (three cases of septic thrombophlebitis) with no cases of endocarditis. Microbiological relapse (MR) occurred in 13 patients (16.5%). SC and LC were administered to 25 (31.6%) and 54 (68.4%) patients, respectively, with no significant differences in MR-free survival between SC and LC groups (87.8 vs 86.3%; P = 0.6). In PS-adjusted Cox regression analyses, a tunnelled catheter as the source of CRBSI was the only independent risk factor for MR (hazard ratio, 5.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-21) whereas the duration of therapy had no apparent impact. Shortening antibiotic therapy to ≤ 3 days is not associated with a poorer outcome or a greater risk of MR in patients with CoNS CRBI with catheter withdrawal.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Bacteriemia/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/tratamento farmacológico , Remoção de Dispositivo , Infecções Estafilocócicas/tratamento farmacológico , Staphylococcus/isolamento & purificação , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Bacteriemia/microbiologia , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/microbiologia , Cateteres Venosos Centrais/efeitos adversos , Criança , Coagulase/deficiência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva , Estudos Retrospectivos , Infecções Estafilocócicas/microbiologia , Staphylococcus/enzimologia , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
9.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 16(12): 939-956, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30388900

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The advent, more than two decades ago, of monoclonal antibodies and soluble receptors targeting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has revolutionized the therapeutic approach to otherwise difficult-to-treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, due to the pleiotropic functions played by this pro-inflammatory cytokine (with particular relevance in granuloma maintenance), TNF-α blockade may increase the incidence of serious infections. Areas covered: The present review summarizes the biological rationale supporting the impact of anti-TNF-α therapy on the host's susceptibility to infection. The structure, mode of action, and indications of available agents are reviewed, as well as the clinical evidence coming from clinical trials and observational registries. We discuss the impact of patient- and disease-related factors influencing the occurrence of infection. Finally, strategies for risk minimization are also covered, with particular attention to recommendations for screening of latent tuberculosis infection and management of chronic hepatitis B infection. Expert commentary: Methodological limitations (confounding by indication bias, patient dropout, or switching therapies) should be considered when interpreting observational data. Clinicians must individualize the infection risk assessment not only on the basis of the specific anti-TNF-α agent used or the expected duration of therapy, but also by taking into account the baseline susceptibility of a given patient.

10.
Am J Transplant ; 2018 Oct 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30378749

RESUMO

Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a soluble pattern recognition molecule involved in complement activation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 gene have been associated with susceptibility to infection, although data in solid organ transplant recipients remains inconclusive. This meta-analysis was primarily aimed at investigating the association between post-transplant bacterial and fungal infection and variant alleles of MBL2 gene SNPs in the promoter/5' untranslated region and exon 1. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and/or disease were considered secondary outcomes. PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant articles up to August 2018. Eleven studies (comprising 1,858 patients) were included, with liver transplant [LT] recipients accounting for 80.4% of the pooled population. As compared to high-MBL expression haplotypes (YA/YA, YA/XA), any MBL-deficient haplotype was associated with an increased risk of post-transplant bacterial and fungal infections (risk ratio [RR]: 1.30; P-value = 0.04). Low/null-MBL expression haplotypes (XA/O, O/O) also increased the risk of primary outcome (RR: 1.51; P-value = 0.008) and CMV events (RR: 1.50; P-value = 0.006). No effect was observed for individual promoter SNPs. In conclusion, MBL-deficient haplotypes are associated with a significant, albeit moderate, increase in the risk of post-transplant infection, with this association being mainly restricted to LT recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

11.
Med Mycol ; 2018 Nov 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30418567

RESUMO

We aimed to analyze whether the lack of inclusion of specific recommendations for the management of candidemia is an independent risk factor for early and overall mortality. Multicenter study of adult patients with candidemia in 13 hospitals. We assessed the proportion of patients on whom nine specific ESCMID and IDSA guidelines recommendations had been applied, and analyzed its impact on mortality. 455 episodes of candidemia were documented. Patients who died within the first 48 hours were excluded. Sixty-two percent of patients received an appropriate antifungal treatment. Either echinocandin or amphotericin B therapy were administered in 43% of patients presenting septic shock and in 71% of those with neutropenia. Sixty-one percent of patients with breakthrough candidemia underwent a change in antifungal drug class. Venous catheters were removed in 79% of cases. Follow-up blood cultures were performed in 72% of cases. Ophthalmoscopy and echocardiogram were performed in 48% and 50% of patients, respectively. Length of treatment was appropriate in 78% of cases. Early (2-7 days) and overall (2-30 days) mortality were 8% and 27.7%, respectively. Inclusion of less than 50% of the specific recommendations was independently associated with a higher early (HR = 7.02, 95% CI: 2.97-16.57; P < .001) and overall mortality (HR = 3.55, 95% CI: 2.24-5.64; P < .001). In conclusion, ESCMID and IDSA guideline recommendations were not performed on a significant number of patients. Lack of inclusion of these recommendations proved to be an independent risk factor for early and overall mortality.

12.
J Clin Microbiol ; 2018 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30463889

RESUMO

Objectives: To evaluate the predictive value of PCR cycle threshold (Ct) for recurrence/severity, compared to toxin detection plus clinical variables.Methods: First episodes of CDI diagnosed during 2015 at our institution were included. Samples were tested for GDH and toxin A/B with a single EIA. Xpert® C. difficile PCR assay was performed to GDH positive samples. Medical data were reviewed by investigators blinded to diagnostic results to compare patients with/without recurrence or poor outcome (severe/severe-complicated CDI episode and all-cause death). We generated two sets of predictive models by incorporating to clinical variables the presence of a positive toxin EIA ("EIA-including model") and the optimal PCR Ct cut-off value ("PCR-including model"), respectively.Results: Among 227 episodes of CDI included, the rates of recurrence and poor outcome were 15.8% and 30.8%. Mean PCR Ct was lower in episodes with recurrence (24.00±3.28 vs. 26.02±4.54; P-value=0.002) and poor outcome (24.9 ± 4.24 vs. 26.05 ± 4.47; P-value = 0.07). The optimal cut-off value for recurrence was 25.65 [sensitivity 77.8% (95% CI: 60.9-89.9), specificity 46.6% (95% CI: 39.4-53.9)]. The auROC for the "PCR-including model" was similar to that of the "EIA-including model" (0.785 vs. 0.775, respectively). The optimal PCR Ct value was 27.55 [sensitivity 78.6% (95% CI: 67.1-87.5), specificity of 35.7% (95% CI: 28.2-43.7)]. The auROC of the "PCR-including model" was again similar to that of the "EIA-including model" (0.804 vs. 0.801).Conclusions: Despite the inverse correlation between PCR Ct and the risk of CDI recurrence/severity, this determination does not meaningfully increase the predictive value of clinical variables plus toxin EIA.

13.
Rev Med Virol ; : e2017, 2018 Oct 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30358016

RESUMO

Knowledge of donor and recipient (D/R) cytomegalovirus (CMV) serostatus is critical for risk stratification of CMV infection and disease in transplant recipients, particularly in the solid organ transplantation (SOT) setting. Despite its broad availability and the success of it use, the risk stratification based on the D/R serostatus is not free of limitations since there are a nondepreciable number of patients that are not accurately categorized by this approach. In fact, up to 20% of seropositive SOT recipients, classically considered at intermediate risk, develop episodes of CMV infection and disease after transplantation. Here, we provide an overview of additional donor and recipient factors that may have utility in identifying patients at risk for post-transplant CMV infection. Specifically, we summarize our current understanding regarding the potential use of use CMV-specific T-cell-mediated immunity, neutralizing antibodies and host genetics that may influence the risk of CMV infection and disease. We provide an overview of the benefits and limitations associated with using these immunological factors in risk stratification and propose specific variables that could be analyzed at the pretransplant evaluation to improve the identification of patients with increased individual susceptibility.

14.
Infect Dis (Lond) ; : 1-10, 2018 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30325676

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated improved survival when the management of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is compliant with evidence-based therapeutic interventions. Whether this effect extends to low-risk sources, such as catheter-related BSI, remains unclear. METHODS: We retrospectively included 225 episodes of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus catheter-related BSI diagnosed in our centre during two non-consecutive periods: 2002-2004 (first period (101 episodes)) and 2009-2013 (second period (124 episodes)). We evaluated the adherence (percentage of compliance = (no. of interventions performed/no. of interventions recommended) × 100) to the following bundle: early catheter removal (≤72 hours), early initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy, adequate sampling of follow-up blood cultures, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) during hospitalization and adequate duration of therapy. RESULTS: Patients in the second period had a higher burden of comorbidities and more severe underlying conditions. All-cause 30-day mortality was 9.3%, with a significant difference between the first and second periods (13.9% versus 5.6%; p value = .035). Bundle adherence was significantly higher in the second period, particularly for follow-up blood cultures (26.7% versus 48.4%; p value = .001), performance of TTE (45.5% versus 84.7%; p value < .001) and appropriate duration of therapy (34.7% versus 50.0%; p value = .022). Bundle adherence ≥ 55% was associated with lower 30-day mortality (hazard ratio: 0.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.76). This effect remained significant across propensity score-based models adjusted for septic shock, study period and underlying conditions. CONCLUSIONS: There was a survival benefit in adhering to a bundle of evidence-based interventions in the specific setting of catheter-related BSI due to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus.

15.
Am J Transplant ; 2018 Oct 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30346659

RESUMO

The replication kinetics of nonpathogenic anelloviruses belonging to the Alphatorquevirus genus (such as torque teno virus) might reflect the overall state of posttransplant immunosuppression. We analyzed 221 kidney transplant (KT) recipients in whom plasma alphatorquevirus DNA load was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction at baseline and regularly through the first 12 posttransplant months. Study outcomes included posttransplant infection and a composite of opportunistic infection and/or de novo malignancy (immunosuppression-related adverse event [iRAE]). Alphatorquevirus DNA loads at month 1 were higher among patients who subsequently developed posttransplant infection (P  = .023) or iRAE (P  = .009). Likewise, those with iRAE beyond months 3 and 6 also exhibited higher peak viral loads over the preceding periods. Areas under the curve for log10 alphatorquevirus DNAemia estimated by months 1 or 6 were significantly higher in patients experiencing study outcomes. Alphatorquevirus DNA loads above 3.15 and 4.56 log10 copies/mL at month 1 predicted the occurrence of posttransplant infection (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 2.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-7.36; P  = .027) and iRAE (aHR: 5.17; 95% CI: 2.01-13.33; P  = .001). In conclusion, posttransplant monitoring of plasma alphatorquevirus DNA kinetics may be useful to identify KT recipients at increased risk of immunosuppression-related complications.

16.
Curr Opin Infect Dis ; 31(6): 499-505, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30299353

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the best therapeutic option for both acute and chronic end-stage diseases. The development of more potent and safer immunosuppressants and the improvement of prophylactic practices have significantly diminished the morbidity and mortality associated with rejection and opportunistic infections. However, infections produced by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) have recently emerged as a significant threat. RECENT FINDINGS: The Spanish Society of Transplantation (SET), the Group for Study of Infection in Transplantation of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (GESITRA-SEIMC) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) have recently published their recommendations concerning the management of MDR GNB infections in SOT recipients. We review this guideline, and also the most recent available evidence, focusing on donor-derived infections, colonized recipients and therapeutic approaches. SUMMARY: Overall, donor and recipient colonization is associated with an increased risk of infection by MDR GNB, although none of these circumstances constitutes an absolute contraindication to transplantation. SOT recipients with risk factors for MDR GNB infection should receive an empirical treatment which includes potentially active antibiotics. Targeted therapy should be adjusted according to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and severity of infection.

17.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 20(6): e12988, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30187601

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have reported an increased susceptibility to infection among vitamin D-deficient kidney transplant (KT) recipients, although methodological concerns remain. METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in 246 KT recipients at post-transplant months 1, 3, 6 and 12. Vitamin D status was analysed in terms of deficiency (Endocrine Society [<20 ng/mL] and Institute of Medicine [IoM, <12 ng/mL] criteria) and as a continuous variable. Cox models for overall, bacterial and opportunistic infection were adjusted for nutritional status and immunosuppression-related covariates. RESULTS: Median serum 25(OH)D increased from month 1 (10.5 ng/mL) to month 6 (16.3 ng/mL; P-value = 0.001). Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency at month 1 ranged from 87.0% to 61.0% (depending on the diagnostic criteria) and significantly decreased over the next months. After adjustment for age and nutritional status, vitamin D deficiency (serum 25(OH)D < 12 ng/mL) at month 1 was an independent risk factor for overall (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-2.69; P-value = 0.023) and opportunistic infection (HR: 4.05; 95% CI: 1.57-10.46; P-value = 0.004), but not for bacterial infection. A protective effect for overall (adjusted HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63-0.93; P-value = 0.007) and opportunistic infection (adjusted HR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.45-0.86; P-value = 0.004) was observed when 25(OH)D levels were analyzed per one-quartile increases. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D status influences the risk of infection among KT recipients, with the association being particularly evident for opportunistic events and mainly restricted to the early post-transplant period.

18.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 16(10): 781-791, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30198355

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The development of biologic therapies for treating patients with rheumatic, hematologic, or oncological diseases has increased in the last few years, spreading their use in clinical practice. Areas covered: Clinical experience has evidenced substantial risks for some viral infections and/or reactivations such as viral hepatitis, herpetic infections, and other viruses, as a consequence of specific immune pathway blockages. Biological therapies produce a variable risk of reactivation of viral infections, which is particularly uncertain in the case of the most recently introduced agents. Here we make an extensive review of the viral infections associated with the use of biological drugs and provide a series of recommendations for its prevention and management. Expert commentary: To prevent these infections/reactivations, the practitioner must be aware of the infection-risk profile, performing accurate screening during and after the use of any biologic agent. In some instances, expert recommendations are made for some therapies, while in other scenarios recommendations have not yet been defined making experimental and clinical research an essential approach to elucidate multiple issues yet not resolved in this field.

19.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29960829

RESUMO

Aspergillus infection is a significant cause of morbi-mortality in an at-risk population. The Study Group of Fungal Infections (GEMICOMED) from the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) has reviewed announcements made in invasive aspergillosis management. We have organized our recommendations in such a way as to provide a guide in resolving different clinical situations concerning the entire spectrum of invasive diseases caused by Aspergillus in various populations. Diagnostic approach, treatment and preventions strategies are outlined. It is not our aim that these guidelines supplant clinical judgment with respect to specific patients; however, it is our objective to perform a comprehensive summary of quality of care evidence for invasive aspergillosis management in different settings.

20.
Am J Transplant ; 2018 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29947163

RESUMO

Uncontrolled donation after circulatory death (uDCD) increases organ availability for kidney transplant (KT) with short-term outcomes similar to those obtained from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. However, heterogeneous results in the long term have been reported. We compared 10-year outcomes between 237 KT recipients from uDCD donors maintained by normothermic extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (nECMO) and 237 patients undergoing KT from standard criteria DBD donors during the same period at our institution. We further analyzed risk factors for death-censored graft survival in the uDCD group. Delayed graft function (DGF) was more common in the uDCD group (73.4% vs 46.4%; P < .01), although glomerular filtration rates at the end of follow-up were similar in the 2 groups. uDCD and DBD groups had similar rates for 10-year death-censored graft (82.1% vs 80.4%; P = .623) and recipient survival (86.2% vs 87.6%; P = .454). Donor age >50 years was associated with graft loss in the uDCD group (hazard ratio: 1.91; P = .058), whereas the occurrence of DGF showed no significant effect. uDCD KT under nECMO support resulted in similar graft function and long-term outcomes compared with KT from standard criteria DBD donors. Increased donor age could negatively affect graft survival after uDCD donation.

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