Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 219
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 110(6): 1512, 2019 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31788694
2.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 19(1): 824, 2019 Nov 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31711499

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although evidence is accumulating that lifestyle modification may be cost-effective in patients with prediabetes, information is limited on the cost-effectiveness of interventions implemented in public health and primary health care settings. Evidence from well-conducted pragmatic trials is needed to gain insight into the realistic cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention interventions in real-world settings. The aim of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness of the SLIMMER lifestyle intervention targeted at patients at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with usual health care in a primary care setting in the Netherlands. METHODS: Three hundred and sixteen high-risk subjects were randomly assigned to the SLIMMER lifestyle intervention or to usual health care. Costs and outcome assessments were performed at the end of the intervention (12 months) and six months thereafter (18 months). Costs were assessed from a societal perspective. Patients completed questionnaires to assess health care utilisation, participant out-of-pocket costs, and productivity losses. Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) were calculated based on the SF-36 questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness planes and acceptability curves were generated using bootstrap analyses. RESULTS: The cost-effectiveness analysis showed that the incremental costs of the SLIMMER lifestyle intervention were €547 and that the incremental effect was 0.02 QALY, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €28,094/QALY. When cost-effectiveness was calculated from a health care perspective, the ICER decreased to €13,605/QALY, with a moderate probability of being cost-effective (56% at a willingness to pay, WTP, of €20,000/QALY and 81% at a WTP of €80,000/QALY). CONCLUSIONS: The SLIMMER lifestyle intervention to prevent type 2 diabetes had a low to moderate probability of being cost-effective, depending on the perspective taken. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The SLIMMER study is retrospectively registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT02094911) since March 19, 2014.

3.
Nutrients ; 11(11)2019 Nov 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31766194

RESUMO

Mexico is facing the double burden of malnutrition, and adolescents are not an exception. Diet plays an important role, both in causing overweight and undernutrition. This study aimed to describe the dietary patterns (DPs) of Mexican adolescents and to examine its association with nutritional status using data from adolescents aged 12-19 years (n = 7380) from the National Survey of Health and Nutrition (ENSANUT-2006). Principal component analysis was used to derivate the DPs. Associations between DP and nutritional status were determined by prevalence ratio (PR). Four DPs were identified: nontraditional and breakfast-type, Western, plant-based, and protein-rich. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher in adolescents who scored high on the Western pattern (PR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.08-1.21) or on the plant-based pattern (PR: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03-1.17). The Western pattern was positively associated with anemia in girls (PR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03-1.35), while the nontraditional and breakfast-type pattern was inversely associated with anemia in adolescents aged 12-15 years (PR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.76-0.99) and in girls (PR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.97). The Western and plant-based patterns were simultaneously associated with overweight-obesity and at least one indicator of undernutrition. In the context of the double burden of malnutrition, dietary advice must consider malnutrition in all its forms.

5.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 109(5): 1310-1318, 2019 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31051510

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data on the relationship between protein intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are conflicting. OBJECTIVE: We studied prospective associations between the intake of total, plant-based, and animal protein and the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes in 4 population-based studies included in the PREVIEW project. METHODS: Analyses were conducted with the use of data from 3 European cohorts and 1 Canadian cohort, including 78,851 participants. Protein intake was assessed through the use of harmonized data from food-frequency questionnaires or 3-d dietary records. Cohort-specific incidence ratios (IRs) were estimated for pre-diabetes and diabetes, adjusting for general characteristics, lifestyle and dietary factors, disease history, and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference; results were pooled based on a random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: Higher total protein intake (g · kg-1 · d-1) was associated with lower incidences of pre-diabetes and diabetes (pooled IRs: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.87 and 0.49; 95% CI: 0.28, 0.83, respectively); plant-based protein intake was the main determinant (pooled IRs: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.81, 0.86 and 0.53; 95% CI: 0.36, 0.76, respectively). Substituting 2 energy percentage (E%) protein at the expense of carbohydrates revealed increased risks of pre-diabetes and diabetes (pooled IRs: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.07 and 1.09; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.18, respectively). Except for the associations between intakes of total protein and plant-based protein (g · kg-1 · d-1) and diabetes, all other associations became nonsignificant after adjustment for BMI and waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS: Higher protein intake (g · kg-1 · d-1) was associated with a lower risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes. Associations were substantially attenuated after adjustments for BMI and waist circumference, which demonstrates a crucial role for adiposity and may account for previous conflicting findings. This study was registered at ISRCTN as ISRCTN31174892.

6.
Nutrients ; 11(2)2019 Feb 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30813281

RESUMO

Data on changes in dietary intake and related blood parameters throughout pregnancy are scarce; moreover, few studies have examined their association with glucose homeostasis. Therefore, we monitored intake of folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin D and iron, their status markers, and diet quality from preconception to the second trimester of pregnancy, and we examined whether these dietary factors were associated with glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. We included 105 women aged 18⁻40 years with a desire to get pregnancy or who were already <24 weeks pregnant. Women at increased gestational diabetes (GDM) risk were oversampled. Measurements were scheduled at preconception (n = 67), and 12 (n =53) and 24 weeks of pregnancy (n =66), including a fasting venipuncture, 75-grams oral glucose tolerance test, and completion of a validated food frequency questionnaire. Changes in micronutrient intake and status, and associations between dietary factors and glucose homeostasis, were examined using adjusted repeated measures mixed models. Micronutrient intake of folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin D and related status markers significantly changed throughout pregnancy, which was predominantly due to changes in the intake of supplements. Micronutrient intake or status levels were not associated with glucose homeostasis, except for iron intake (FE µg/day) with fasting glucose (ß = -0.069 mmol/L, p = 0.013) and HbA1c (ß = -0.4843 mmol, p = 0.002). Diet quality was inversely associated with fasting glucose (ß = -0.006 mmol/L for each DHD15-index point, p = 0.017). It was shown that micronutrient intakes and their status markers significantly changed during pregnancy. Only iron intake and diet quality were inversely associated with glucose homeostasis.


Assuntos
Dieta/normas , Glucose/metabolismo , Micronutrientes/administração & dosagem , Primeiro Trimestre da Gravidez , Segundo Trimestre da Gravidez , Fenômenos Fisiológicos da Nutrição Pré-Natal , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Teste de Tolerância a Glucose , Humanos , Estado Nutricional , Gravidez , Adulto Jovem
7.
Hum Genet ; 138(4): 307-326, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30820706

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies have reported 56 independently associated colorectal cancer (CRC) risk variants, most of which are non-coding and believed to exert their effects by modulating gene expression. The computational method PrediXcan uses cis-regulatory variant predictors to impute expression and perform gene-level association tests in GWAS without directly measured transcriptomes. In this study, we used reference datasets from colon (n = 169) and whole blood (n = 922) transcriptomes to test CRC association with genetically determined expression levels in a genome-wide analysis of 12,186 cases and 14,718 controls. Three novel associations were discovered from colon transverse models at FDR ≤ 0.2 and further evaluated in an independent replication including 32,825 cases and 39,933 controls. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, we found statistically significant associations using colon transcriptome models with TRIM4 (discovery P = 2.2 × 10- 4, replication P = 0.01), and PYGL (discovery P = 2.3 × 10- 4, replication P = 6.7 × 10- 4). Interestingly, both genes encode proteins that influence redox homeostasis and are related to cellular metabolic reprogramming in tumors, implicating a novel CRC pathway linked to cell growth and proliferation. Defining CRC risk regions as one megabase up- and downstream of one of the 56 independent risk variants, we defined 44 non-overlapping CRC-risk regions. Among these risk regions, we identified genes associated with CRC (P < 0.05) in 34/44 CRC-risk regions. Importantly, CRC association was found for two genes in the previously reported 2q25 locus, CXCR1 and CXCR2, which are potential cancer therapeutic targets. These findings provide strong candidate genes to prioritize for subsequent laboratory follow-up of GWAS loci. This study is the first to implement PrediXcan in a large colorectal cancer study and findings highlight the utility of integrating transcriptome data in GWAS for discovery of, and biological insight into, risk loci.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Expressão Gênica , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Frequência do Gene , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Prognóstico , Fatores de Risco
8.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 104(11): 5056-5064, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30901028

RESUMO

CONTEXT: There is an ongoing debate about whether and how fructose is involved in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A recent experimental study showed an increased intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content in mice deficient for aldolase B (aldo B-/-), the enzyme that converts fructose-1-phosphate to triose phosphates. OBJECTIVE: To translate these experimental findings to the human situation. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Outpatient clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Patients with hereditary fructose intolerance, a rare inborn error of metabolism caused by a defect in aldolase B (n = 15), and healthy persons matched for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) (n =15). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: IHTG content, assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: IHTG content was higher in aldo B-/- patients than controls (2.5% vs 0.6%; P = 0.001) on a background of lean body mass (median BMI, 20.4 and 21.8 kg/m2, respectively). Glucose excursions during an oral glucose load were higher in aldo B-/- patients (P = 0.043). Hypoglycosylated transferrin, a surrogate marker for hepatic fructose-1-phosphate concentrations, was more abundant in aldo B-/- patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Finally, plasma ß-hydroxybutyrate, a biomarker of hepatic ß-oxidation, was lower in aldo B-/- patients than controls (P = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: This study extends previous experimental findings by demonstrating that aldolase B deficiency also results in IHTG accumulation in humans. It suggests that the accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate and impairment of ß-oxidation are involved in the pathogenesis.

9.
Mol Nutr Food Res ; 63(9): e1801095, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30725537

RESUMO

SCOPE: The Mediterranean (MED) diet has been associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular diseases. It is unclear whether this health effect can be mainly contributed to high intakes of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), characteristic for the MED diet, or whether other components of a MED diet also play an important role. METHODS AND RESULTS: A randomized fully controlled parallel trial is performed to examine the effects of the consumption of a saturated fatty acid rich diet, a MUFA-rich diet, or a MED diet for 8 weeks on metabolite profiles, in 47 subjects at risk of the metabolic syndrome. A total of 162 serum metabolites are assessed before and after the intervention by using a targeted NMR platform. Fifty-two metabolites are changed during the intervention (false discovery rate [FDR] p < 0.05). Both the MUFA and MED diet decrease exactly the same fractions of LDL, including particle number, lipid, phospholipid, and free cholesterol fraction (FDR p < 0.05). The MED diet additionally decreases the larger subclasses of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), related VLDL fractions, VLDL-triglycerides, and serum-triglycerides (FDR p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The findings clearly demonstrate that the MUFA component is responsible for reducing LDL subclasses and fractions, and therefore causes an antiatherogenic lipid profile. Interestingly, consumption of the other components in the MED diet show additional health effects.


Assuntos
Dieta Mediterrânea , Ácidos Graxos Monoinsaturados/farmacologia , Lipídeos/sangue , Lipoproteínas/sangue , Síndrome Metabólica/prevenção & controle , Biomarcadores/sangue , Sangue/metabolismo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
10.
Nutr Res ; 62: 32-40, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30803505

RESUMO

Evidence on pre-pregnancy dietary micronutrient intake in relation to gestational diabetes (GDM) development is limited. Therefore, we examined the prevalence of inadequate micronutrient intake before pregnancy and the association between pre-pregnancy dietary micronutrient adequacy, i.e. meeting micronutrient intake recommendations for a range of micronutrients, and risk of developing GDM in an Australian population. We hypothesized that women with an overall higher micronutrient adequacy would have a lower risk of developing GDM. We used data from the prospective Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health cohort, in which 3607 women, aged 25-30 years at baseline in 2003 and without diabetes, were followed-up until 2015. Diet was assessed with a validated 101-item food frequency questionnaire. The Micronutrient Adequacy Ratio (MAR) was calculated as the micronutrient intake divided by its recommended dietary intake averaged over 13 micronutrients. Multivariable regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). In 6263 pregnancies, 285 cases of GDM were documented (4.6%). High prevalences of inadequate dietary micronutrient intake were observed for calcium (47.9%), folate (80.8%), magnesium (52.5%), potassium (63.8%) and vitamin E (78.6%), indicating suboptimal pre-pregnancy micronutrient intakes. Inadequate intakes of individual micronutrients were not associated with risk of developing GDM. However, women in the highest quartile of the MAR had a 39% lower risk of developing GDM compared to women in the lowest quartile (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.86, p for trend 0.01). These results highlight the importance of adequate pre-pregnancy micronutrient intake.

11.
Nutr J ; 18(1): 2, 2019 01 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30621736

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is an increasing interest in estimating environmental impact of individuals' diets by using individual-level food consumption data. However, like assessment of nutrient intakes, these data are prone to substantial measurement errors dependent on the method of dietary assessment, and this often result in attenuation of associations. PURPOSE: To investigate the performance of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for estimating the environmental impact of the diet as compared to independent 24-h recalls (24hR), and to study the association between environmental impact and dietary quality for the FFQ and 24hR. METHODS: We analysed cross-sectional data from 1169 men and women, aged 20-76 years, who participated in the NQplus study, the Netherlands. They completed a 216-item FFQ and two replicates of web-based 24hR. Life cycle assessments of 207 food products were used to calculate greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy and land use, summarised into an aggregated score, pReCiPe. Validity of the FFQ was evaluated against 24hRs using correlation coefficients and attenuation coefficients. Associations with dietary quality were based on Dutch Healthy Diet 15-index (DHD15-index) and Nutrient Rich Diet score (NRD9.3). RESULTS: For pReCiPe, correlation coefficient between FFQ and 24hR was 0.33 when adjusted for covariates age, gender and BMI, and increased to 0.76 when de-attenuated for within-subject variation in the 24hR. Energy-adjustment slightly reduced these correlations (r = 0.71 for residuals of observed values and 0.59 for residuals of density values). Covariate-adjusted attenuation coefficient for the FFQ was 0.56 (ʎ1 = 0.56 and ʎ1 = 0.65 for observed and density residuals), slightly lower than without covariate adjustment. Diet-related environmental impact was inversely associated with the food-based DHD15-index for both FFQ and 24hR, while associations with the nutrient-based NRD9.3 were inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: The FFQ slightly underestimated environmental impact when compared to 24hR. Associations with dietary quality are highly dependent on the diet score used, and less dependent on the method of dietary assessment.


Assuntos
Registros de Dieta , Dieta , Meio Ambiente , Rememoração Mental , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Combustíveis Fósseis , Gases de Efeito Estufa , Dieta Saudável , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Valor Nutritivo , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
12.
Hypertension ; 73(3): 578-586, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30636547

RESUMO

We aimed to determine the effect of a Mediterranean-style diet, tailored to meet dietary recommendations for older adults, on blood pressure and arterial stiffness. In 12 months, randomized controlled trial (NU-AGE [New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe]), blood pressure was measured in 1294 healthy participants, aged 65 to 79 years, recruited from 5 European centers, and arterial stiffness in a subset of 225 participants. The intervention group received individually tailored standardized dietary advice and commercially available foods to increase adherence to a Mediterranean diet. The control group continued on their habitual diet and was provided with current national dietary guidance. In the 1142 participants who completed the trial (88.2%), after 1 year the intervention resulted in a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (-5.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, -10.7 to -0.4; P=0.03), which was evident in males (-9.2 mm Hg, P=0.02) but not females (-3.1 mm Hg, P=0.37). The -1.7 mm Hg (95% CI, -4.3 to 0.9) decrease in diastolic pressure after intervention did not reach statistical significance. In a subset (n=225), augmentation index, a measure of arterial stiffness, was improved following intervention (-12.4; 95% CI, -24.4 to -0.5; P=0.04) with no change in pulse wave velocity. The intervention also resulted in an increase in 24-hour urinary potassium (8.8 mmol/L; 95% CI, 0.7-16.9; P=0.03) and in male participants (52%) a reduction in pulse pressure (-6.1 mm Hg; 95% CI, -12.0 to -0.2; P=0.04) and 24-hour urinary sodium (-27.1 mmol/L; 95% CI, -53.3 to -1.0; P=0.04). In conclusion, a Mediterranean-style diet is effective in improving cardiovascular health with clinically relevant reductions in blood pressure and arterial stiffness. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicialtrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01754012.


Assuntos
Pressão Sanguínea/fisiologia , Dieta Mediterrânea , Hipertensão/tratamento farmacológico , Rigidez Vascular/fisiologia , Idoso , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Hipertensão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Análise de Onda de Pulso , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sístole , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
13.
Nutrients ; 10(12)2018 Dec 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30518044

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean Diet has been proposed as an effective strategy to reduce inflammaging, a chronic low grade inflammatory status, and thus, to slow down the aging process. We evaluated whether a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern specifically targeting dietary recommendations of people aged over 65 years (NU-AGE diet) could be effective to shift dietary intake of older adults towards a healthful diet. METHODS: Adults aged 65⁻80 years across five EU-centers were randomly assigned to a NU-AGE diet group or control group. The diet group followed one year of NU-AGE dietary intervention specifying consumption of 15 food groups plus the use of a vitamin D supplement. Participants in the diet group received counselling and individually tailored dietary advice, food products and a vitamin D supplement. Dietary intake was assessed by means of seven-day food records at baseline and one-year follow-up. A continuous NU-AGE index (0⁻160 points) was developed to assess NU-AGE diet adherence. RESULTS: In total 1296 participants were randomized and 1141 participants completed the intervention (571 intervention, 570 control). After one year, the diet group improved mean intake of 13 out of 16 NU-AGE dietary components (p < 0.05), with a significant increase in total NU-AGE index (difference in mean change = 21.3 ± 15.9 points, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The NU-AGE dietary intervention, based on dietary recommendations for older adults, consisting of individual dietary counselling, free healthy foods and a vitamin D supplement, may be a feasible strategy to improve dietary intake in an aging European population.

14.
Nutrients ; 11(1)2018 Dec 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30577531

RESUMO

Dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) are indices used to quantify the effect of carbohydrate quality and quantity on postprandial glycaemia. GI/GL-health associations are widely studied but data on the validity of integrated GI/GL measurements are scarce. We evaluated the performance of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) specifically developed to assess GI/GL. In total, 263 Dutch men and 212 women (aged 55 ± 11 years) completed a 58-item GI-FFQ, an 183-item general-FFQ and a 2-day 24 h-recall and donated blood for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) determination. The level of agreement between these methods was evaluated by (1) cross-classification, (2) correlations and (3) Bland and Altman plots. The three dietary assessment methods provided comparable mean intake estimates for total carbohydrates (range: 214⁻237 g/day), mono/disaccharides (100⁻107 g/day), polysaccharides (114⁻132 g/day), as well as bread, breakfast cereals, potatoes, pasta, rice, fruit, dairy, cakes/cookies and sweets. Mean (±SD) GI estimates were also comparable between the GI-FFQ (54 ± 3), general-FFQ (53 ± 4) and 24 h-recalls (53 ± 5). Mean (±SD) GI-FFQ GL (117 ± 37) was slightly lower than the general-FFQ GL (126 ± 38) and 24 h-recalls GL (127 ± 37). Classification of GI in quartiles was identical for the GI-FFQ and general-FFQ for 43% of the population (r = 0.58) and with 24 h-recalls for 35% of the population (de-attenuated r = 0.64). For GL, this was 48% (r = 0.65) and 44% (de-attenuated r = 0.74). Correlations between GI and HbA1c were low (r = -0.09 for GI-FFQ, r = -0.04 for general-FFQ and r = 0.07 for 24 h-recalls). In conclusion, compared to a general-FFQ and 24 h-recalls, the GI-FFQ showed a moderate to good relative validity for carbohydrates, carbohydrate-rich foods and GI/GL. No metric predicted HbA1c.


Assuntos
Inquéritos sobre Dietas/normas , Carboidratos da Dieta/análise , Índice Glicêmico , Carga Glicêmica , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Adulto , Idoso , Dieta/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos sobre Dietas/métodos , Ingestão de Alimentos , Feminino , Hemoglobina A Glicada/análise , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
15.
Nutr Res ; 59: 80-89, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30442236

RESUMO

Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) has been suggested to reduce the risk of age-related cognitive decline. Therefore, we hypothesized that adults consuming a more Mediterranean-like diet were more likely to have better cognitive scores. We investigated cross-sectional associations between MedDiet adherence and cognitive performance using data of 1607 Dutch men and women aged 20-70 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a 183-item Food Frequency Questionnaire. MedDiet adherence was defined by a 0-9 point scale; which was based on intakes of vegetables, legumes, fruits/nuts, cereals, fish/seafood, meat/poultry, dairy, ethanol and the MUFA:SFA ratio. Cognitive function was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Linear regression analyses adjusted for relevant covariates showed a significant inverse association between MedDiet adherence and everyday memory: specifically ß = -0.107 ± 0.046 points (P = .02) for the total population and ß = -0.139 ± 0.055 points (P = .01) for those aged ≥50 years. Further exploration of the individual MedDiet food groups suggested that the association between MedDiet and every day memory was predominantly driven by the MUFA:SFA ratio. Moreover, associations were observed between higher ethanol intake with better semantic memory and language production (ß = 0.016 ± 0.008 P = .05), higher vegetable intake with better processing speed (ß = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = .02), and higher legumes intake with poorer processing speed (ß = -0.014 ± 0.006, P = .03). Thus, in this Dutch cohort, higher MedDiet adherence was associated with poorer everyday memory.

16.
Diabetes ; 2018 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30352877

RESUMO

This study aims to investigate the causal relation between circulating phylloquinone (vitamin K1) concentrations and type 2 diabetes using a Mendelian Randomization (MR) approach. We used data from thee cohorts: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study, Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) and the UK Biobank, resulting in 69,647 type 2 diabetes cases. We calculated a weighted genetic risk score including four genetic variants previously found to be associated with circulating phylloquinone concentrations. Inverse-variance weighted analysis was used to obtain a risk ratio (RR) for the causal relation between circulating phylloquinone concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes. Presence of pleiotropy and the robustness of the results were assessed using MR-Egger and weighted-median analyses. Genetically-predicted concentrations of circulating phylloquinone was associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes with a RR of 0.93 (95% confidence interval: 0.89;0.97) per every ln-nmol/L unit increase in circulating phylloquinone. The MR-Egger and weighted median analyses showed RRs of 0.94 (0.86;1.02) and 0.93 (0.88;0.98), respectively, indicating no pleiotropy. In conclusion, our study supports that higher circulating phylloquinone may be causally related with lower risk of type 2 diabetes, highlighting the importance of sufficient phylloquinone in the human diet.

17.
Nutrients ; 10(10)2018 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30326609

RESUMO

Despite the potential for improving iron status and child growth in low- and middle-income settings, concerns on the safety of high iron dosages of Micronutrient Powders (MNP currently limit their applicability in programs. We examined the effectiveness and risks of an integrated complementary feeding program with low iron dose (6 mg/serving) MNP among 6⁻23-month-old Ethiopian children using a quasi-experimental study design comparing children from five intervention districts (n = 1172) to those from four matched non-intervention districts (n = 1137). Haemoglobin concentrations increased in intervention and decreased in non-intervention children (group-difference +3.17 g/L), but without improvement in iron stores. Intervention children were 2.31 times more likely to have diarrhoea and 2.08 times more likely to have common cold and flu, but these differences decreased towards the end of the intervention. At end line, intervention children had higher mean Height-for-Age Zscore (HAZ) and a 51% reduced odds of being stunted compared to non-intervention children. MNP with low iron dose, when provided combined with other Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) interventions, marginally improved haemoglobin status and resulted in a remarkable improvement in linear growth in 6⁻23-month-old children. These benefits likely outweigh the relatively small increase in the risk of diarrhoea.

18.
Front Physiol ; 9: 1359, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30327612

RESUMO

Methods for measuring diet composition and quantifying nutrient intake with sufficient validity are essential to study the association between nutrition and health outcomes and risk of diseases. 7-day food records provides a quantification of food actually and currently consumed and is interesting for its use in intervention studies to monitor diet in a short-term period and to guide participants toward changing their intakes. The objective of this study is to analyze the correlation/association between the daily intake of selected nutrients (collected by a 7-day food records plus a mineral/vitamin supplementation questionnaire) and estimates of energy expenditure as well as blood and urine biomarkers of dietary intakes in 1,140 healthy elderly subjects (65-79 years) at baseline of the NU-AGE intervention study (NCT01754012, clinicaltrials.gov). The results show that: the daily intake of energy correlated significantly with predicted total energy expenditure (pTEE) (ρ = 0.459, p < 0.001, and q < 0.001); protein intake correlated significantly with the ratio of 24 h urinary urea to creatinine excretion (ρ = 0.143 for total protein intake, ρ = 0.296 for animal protein intake, and ρ = 0.359 for protein intake/body weight, p < 0.001 and q < 0.001 for each correlation); vitamin B12 and folate intakes correlated significantly with their serum concentrations (ρ = 0.151 and ρ = 0.363, respectively; p < 0.001 and q < 0.001 for each correlation); sodium and potassium intakes correlated significantly with their 24 h urinary excretion (ρ = 0.298 and ρ = 0.123, respectively; p < 0.001 and q < 0.001 for each correlation); vitamin B12 and folate intakes were negatively associated with plasma homocysteine measure (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively); stratifying subjects by gender, the correlations between energy intake and pTEE and between potassium intake and its 24 h urinary excretion lost their significance in women. Even if the plasma and urinary levels of these nutrients depend on several factors, the significant correlations between daily reported intake of nutrients (protein, vitamin B12, folate, and sodium) and their blood/urinary markers confirmed that the 7-day food records (plus a supplementation questionnaire) provides reliable data to evaluate short-term current dietary intake in European elderly subjects and it can be exploited to guide and monitor NU-AGE participants through the shift of their diet according NU-AGE recommendations.

19.
Eur J Clin Nutr ; 2018 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30254242

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Taste is of key importance in food choice and dietary patterns, but studies on taste profiles are limited. We previously assessed dietary taste patterns by 24 h recalls (24hR), but for epidemiological studies food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) may also be suitable. This study compared dietary taste patterns based on FFQ against 24hR and biomarkers of exposure. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A taste database including 467 foods' sweet, sour, bitter, salt, umami and fat sensation values was combined with food intake data to assess dietary taste patterns: the contribution to energy intake of 6 taste clusters. The FFQ's reliability was assessed against 3-d 24hR and urinary biomarkers for sodium (Na) and protein intake (N) in Dutch men (n = 449) and women (n = 397) from the NQplus validation study (mean age 53 ± 11 y, BMI 26 ± 4 kg/m2). RESULTS: Correlations of dietary taste patterns ranged from 0.39-0.68 between FFQ and 24hR (p < 0.05). Urinary Na levels, but not N levels, were positively associated with % energy intake from 'salt, umami & fat' tasting foods (Na; FFQ, r = 0.24, 24hR, r = 0.23, p < 0.001, N; FFQ, r = 0.08, p = 0.1394, 24hR, r = 0.05, p = 0.3427). CONCLUSIONS: The FFQ's reliability against 24hR was acceptable to good for ranking of adults' dietary taste patterns. Associations between dietary taste patterns and urinary Na and N were similar for FFQ and 24hR. These findings suggests that both FFQ and 24hR can be used in combination with our taste database, to investigate potential relationships between dietary taste patterns and subgroups at risk of obesity and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

20.
Mol Nutr Food Res ; : e1800384, 2018 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30176196

RESUMO

The life sciences are currently being transformed by an unprecedented wave of developments in molecular analysis, which include important advances in instrumental analysis as well as biocomputing. In light of the central role played by metabolism in nutrition, metabolomics is rapidly being established as a key analytical tool in human nutritional studies. Consequently, an increasing number of nutritionists integrate metabolomics into their study designs. Within this dynamic landscape, the potential of nutritional metabolomics (nutrimetabolomics) to be translated into a science, which can impact on health policies, still needs to be realized. A key element to reach this goal is the ability of the research community to join, to collectively make the best use of the potential offered by nutritional metabolomics. This article, therefore, provides a methodological description of nutritional metabolomics that reflects on the state-of-the-art techniques used in the laboratories of the Food Biomarker Alliance (funded by the European Joint Programming Initiative "A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life" (JPI HDHL)) as well as points of reflections to harmonize this field. It is not intended to be exhaustive but rather to present a pragmatic guidance on metabolomic methodologies, providing readers with useful "tips and tricks" along the analytical workflow.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA