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1.
Gastroenterol Rep (Oxf) ; 9(5): 408-417, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34733526

RESUMO

Background: Guidelines are published by international gastroenterology societies regarding the management of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) to help clinicians to provide high-quality patient care. We examined the guidelines for the quality and strength of evidence used to develop the recommendations, methods for grading evidence, differences in disease-specific recommendations, conflicts of interest, and plans for guideline updates. Methods: A systematic search was performed on PubMed using "ulcerative colitis," "Crohn's disease," and "guidelines" in April 2019. International gastroenterology society websites were searched for UC- and CD-specific guidelines. Guidelines from 12 societies were examined by two authors. Chi-squared tests were used for comparing evidence-level grades, strength of recommendations, and reported conflicts of interest. Linear-regression modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between the number of authors and the number of recommendations in a given guideline. Results: Of 28 guidelines reviewed, 25 (89%) used a total of three different systems to grade the level of evidence and 2 (7%) used an unknown system. Three (11%) reviewed guidelines did not provide a conflict-of-interest statement, while three (11%) provided a timeline for guideline updates. Of 1,265 total statements examined, 246 (19%) reported no grade of evidence quality or explicitly stated that the recommendation was based on "expert opinion." One hundred and thirty-five (22%) UC recommendations were noted to be "weak/conditional" and 95 (16%) did not have a recommendation strength. Two hundred and forty-two (37%) CD recommendations were noted to be "weak/conditional" and 151 (23%) did not have a recommendation strength. Conclusion: The majority of UC and CD guidelines are based on a low/very low quality of evidence and are further weakened due to the lack of homogeneity in specific aspects of management recommendations as well as conflicts of interest.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34467516

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Little data is available surrounding societal recommendations regarding extra-colonic malignancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As a result, we systematically analyzed these international guidelines to assess their overall quality as well as their adherence to standards for high-quality practice guidelines. METHODS: A systematic search was performed in multiple databases to identify all guidelines pertaining to extra-colonic malignancy in IBD in April 2020. All guidelines were reviewed for conflicts of interest (COI)/funding, recommendation quality and strength, external document review, use of patient representation, and plans for update-as per Institute of Medicine standards. In addition, recommendations were compared between guidelines/societies. Statistical analysis was conducted using R. RESULTS: A total of 11 recommendations on extra-colonic malignancy in IBD were put forth by 5 guidelines/societies. Zero percent of recommendations were found to be based on high-quality evidence, 36.4% of recommendations on moderate-quality evidence, and 63.6% of recommendations on low-quality evidence. 9.1% were strong recommendations, 0% were weak/conditional recommendations, and 90.9% of recommendations did not provide a strength. No guideline included patient representation or had plans for future update of their recommendations. CONCLUSION: There is a consistent lack of high-quality recommendations for extra-colonic malignancy in IBD across different societal guidelines. The need for high-quality studies to improve the strength of recommendations is eminent, as this will ultimately lead to high-quality patient care.

3.
Clin Exp Gastroenterol ; 14: 343-351, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34511961

RESUMO

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that requires sustained treatment for optimal outcomes. The 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) class of medications are first-line for the treatment of mild-to-moderate UC but suffer from suboptimal adherence rates in real-world settings. This review summarizes the literature on adherence and patient preference to 5-ASA in patients with UC. We begin by highlighting key studies that measure real-world adherence rates, as well as some of the pitfalls associated with certain techniques. We examine the data on the consequences of non-adherence, which range from decreased quality of life and higher risk of colorectal cancer at the individual level to increased costs to the overall healthcare system. We then turn to the reasons and risk factors for non-adherence and summarize the current understanding of the barriers towards adherence. Afterwards, we describe the research on patient preferences between 5-ASA formulations and dosing regimen. Finally, we summarize the evidence regarding interventions to improve 5-ASA adherence. While adherence remains a challenge in practice, understanding the current state of the field can better inform future efforts towards increasing adherence, and thus clinical outcomes, in UC.

4.
J Clin Gastroenterol ; 2021 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34516458

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The objective of our systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of tofacitinib in the treatment of moderate-severe ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central to identify articles and abstracts reporting efficacy or safety data on tofacitinib use in UC. Primary outcome assessed was remission. Secondary outcomes included clinical response, steroid free remission, and adverse events (AEs). RESULTS: A total of 26 studies were included. The rates of remission were 29.81% [95% confidence interval (CI): 22.37%-37.25%, I2: 90%] at week 8, 32.27% (95% CI: 27.67%-36.88%, I2: 42%) at 6 months and 38.03% (95% CI: 33.59%-42.48%, I2: 0%) at 1-year. Clinical response rates were 59.41% (95% CI: 55.03%-63.94%, I2: 61%) at week 8, 48.99% (95% CI: 36.92%-61.06%, I2: 91%) at 6 months and 50.87% (95% CI: 42.16%-59.58%, I2: 67%) at 1-year. Odds ratio of clinical response at week 8 in biologic naive versus biologic experienced patients was 1.59 (95% CI: 0.54-4.63). Pooled incidence rate for serious infections, major adverse cardiovascular events, and nonmelanotic squamous cell malignancies across all doses was 4.41 per 100-patient years (PYs) (95% CI: 2.32-8.38 per 100-PY, I2: 78%), 0.91 per 100-PY (95% CI: 0.43-1.93 per 100-PY, I2: 37%) and 0.91 per 100-PY (95% CI: 0.61-1.34 per 100-PY, I2: 0%), respectively. Higher dose was associated with an increased frequency of AEs. CONCLUSIONS: While the overall efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in moderate-severe UC is consistent with clinical trial data, the dose dependent increase in AEs highlights the significance of early dose de-escalation. Rate of clinical response after tofacitinb induction was similar in biologic naive and biologic experienced patients.

5.
Gastroenterology ; 161(3): 1043-1051.e4, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34416977

RESUMO

Improvements in disease management, as well as endoscopic technology and quality, have dramatically changed the way in which we conceptualize and manage inflammatory bowel disease-related dysplasia over the past 20 years. Based on evolving literature, we propose a conceptual model and best practice advice statements for the prevention, detection, and management of colorectal dysplasia in people with inflammatory bowel disease. This expert review was commissioned and approved by the American Gastroenterological Association Institute Clinical Practice Updates Committee and the American Gastroenterological Association Governing Board to provide timely guidance on a topic of high clinical importance to the American Gastroenterological Association membership. It underwent internal peer review by the Clinical Practice Updates Committee and external peer review through standard procedures of Gastroenterology.

6.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2021 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34448981

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Microscopic colitis and Celiac disease have been shown to occur concomitantly, but their relationship has yet to be systematically evaluated. Some patients with refractory microscopic colitis may have simultaneous celiac disease, and the converse is also true. AIMS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to assess the prevalence and possible association between these two conditions. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, SciELO, and CINAHL Plus were systematically searched through January 26, 2021, to include relevant observational studies assessing the prevalence of microscopic colitis in celiac disease population or vice versa. DerSimonian-Laird approach using random effects was used to pool data and compare outcomes. Pooled prevalence, 95% confidence interval (CI), and p values (where applicable) were calculated. RESULTS: Five studies (with 2589 patients, age range 39.5-52 years and females 66.6%) and 21 studies (with 7186 patients, age range 46.4-65.8 years and females 76.3%) were included assessing the prevalence of microscopic colitis in refractory celiac disease and celiac disease in refractory microscopic colitis cohort. The overall prevalence was 4.5% (2.6-6.3%) and 6.7% (5.2-8.1%), respectively. Five studies showed higher odds of celiac disease diagnosis in the refractory microscopic colitis population compared to the control group (OR 8.12, CI 4.92-13.41, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Celiac disease and microscopic colitis are concomitantly prevalent in a subset of population with either refractory diagnosis. Clinicians should explore alternate diagnosis when one condition has been appropriately treated and patients continue to have refractory symptoms.

7.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 36(12): 2629-2635, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34363511

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Despite being the most common healthcare-related infection in the US, nationwide data on readmission, healthcare consumption, and mortality in Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) remain limited. We examined these outcomes in a US-based cohort of patients with CDI. METHODS: We queried the 2017 Nationwide Readmission Database using ICD-10-CM codes to identify all adult patients admitted with a principal diagnosis of CDI. Primary outcomes were 30- and 90-day readmission rates. Secondary outcomes included mortality rates and healthcare consumption. RESULTS: Of the 83,865 patients discharged from an index hospitalization for CDI, 22.37% were readmitted within 30 days, and an additional 15.01% were readmitted within 90 days. Recurrent CDI was responsible for more than 30% of readmissions at both 30 and 90 days. Compared to the index hospitalization, readmissions were characterized by higher mortality (1.41% index vs. 4.86% 30-day vs. 4.40% 90-day) and increased hospital length of stay and charges. Medicaid insurance (HR 1.16), cirrhosis (HR 1.31), Type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR 1.38), and end-stage renal disease (HR 1.36) were independently associated with 30-day readmission (all p < 0.01), with similar findings in 90-day readmissions. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cohort of patients hospitalized for CDI, we found that approximately 1 in 5 were readmitted within 30-days, and more than 1 in 3 within 90-days. Readmission was characterized by increased mortality and greater healthcare consumption. Additionally, we found independent associations for readmission that may help identify patients at high-risk. Prospective investigation is needed to identify means to reduce the healthcare consumption and mortality in CDI.


Assuntos
Infecções por Clostridium , Readmissão do Paciente , Clostridioides , Infecções por Clostridium/epidemiologia , Infecções por Clostridium/terapia , Estudos de Coortes , Atenção à Saúde , Hospitalização , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
8.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 2021 Jul 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34245270

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Owing to the increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), numerous societies developed preventative guidelines. We aimed to assess the overall quality of CRC prevention guidelines in IBD. METHODS: A systematic search was performed in multiple databases to identify all guidelines pertaining to CRC prevention in IBD in September 2020. All guidelines were reviewed for conflicts of interest (COIs)/funding, recommendation quality/strength, external guideline review, use of patient representation, and plans for update-as per Institute of Medicine standards. In addition, recommendations were compared amongst societies. RESULTS: One hundred forty-nine recommendations from 14 different guidelines/societies were included. Not all guidelines provided recommendations on key elements surrounding (1) screening initiation and surveillance, (2) screening modality, (3) pharmacological chemoprevention, (4) dysplasia management and follow-up, and (5) molecular marker use. Only 71% of guidelines disclosed COIs, 43% reported industry funding, 14% were externally reviewed, 7% included patient representation, and 36% had plans for update. Of the total recommendations, 7.4%, 23.5%, and 69.1% were based on high,- moderate-, and low-quality evidence, respectively. Additionally, 20.1% of recommendations were strong, 14.1%, were weak/conditional, and 65.8% did not provide a strength. The proportion of high-quality evidence (P = 0.34) and strong recommendations (P = 0.57) did not significantly differ across societies. CONCLUSIONS: Many guidelines do not provide recommendations on key aspects of CRC prevention in IBD. Over 90% of recommendations are based on low- to moderate-quality evidence; therefore, further studies on CRC prevention in IBD are needed to improve the overall quality of evidence.

10.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 36(12): 2599-2602, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34272995

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: To date, no large studies examining the temporal relationship between colorectal cancer (CRC) and the subsequent development of depressive disorders exist. We aimed to assess the incidence of depression post-colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. METHODS: To conduct this longitudinal study, we searched the large US population-based database, Explorys (IBM), from January 1, 1999, to January 1, 2021. We investigated new-onset depression and its associated mortality as well as the role of the mental health provider post-CRC diagnosis. Confidence intervals were calculated for all outcomes and multivariate regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Incident depression post-CRC diagnosis was 20.8 vs 8.9 per 100 person-years [OR 3.46, p < 0.0001] in the general population and conferred a 123% increased risk of all-cause mortality [P < 0.0001]. Male patients (OR: 1.89) were more likely to become depressed post-CRC diagnosis as compared to females. Moreover, the absolute number of male patients with post-CRC depression was significantly higher than that of females (68% vs 32%; P < 0.0001). In addition, depression after CRC was more common among Whites (OR: 1.68) and patients aged > 65 years (OR: 5.17). Referral to a mental health provider resulted in significantly lower all-cause mortality (3.6% vs 26.9%; p < 0.0001). DISCUSSION: Our findings advocate for initiating depression screening for high-risk patients post-CRC diagnosis and prompt mental health provider referral.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Depressão , Neoplasias Colorretais/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Depressão/diagnóstico , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino
11.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 36(9): 2051-2055, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34131784

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remain highly concerned that either their disease or medications-namely, biologics-may increase the risk of severe coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to assess the safety of biologics in Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We systematically reviewed multiple databases to find relevant articles reporting the effect of biologics on "severe" COVID-19 in IBD patients. Those in the form of case series (> 10 patients), case-control, and cohort studies were included. Severe COVID-19 was defined as intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and/or mortality. Pooled analysis with multivariate regression was performed. RESULTS: A total of 12 studies with 2681 patients were included. The proportion of females was (48.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 47.0-49.5%). The proportion of UC patients was (44.8%, 95% CI 41.0-48.5%). Overall, in IBD patients, the need for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and mortality was 5.1%, 6.1%, and 4.5%, respectively. Use of biologics did not show a moderating effect on mechanical ventilation (p = 0.68), ICU admission (p = 0.27), or mortality (p = 0.20). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings advocate for the continued biologic therapy in IBD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nevertheless, the incidence, severity, and outcomes related to COVID-19 in IBD patients' needs to be reassessed as data continues to emerge.


Assuntos
Produtos Biológicos , COVID-19 , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais , Produtos Biológicos/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Tech Innov Gastrointest Endosc ; 23(3): 234-243, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34007972

RESUMO

Background: Patients' perception regarding the risks of COVID-19 infection with gastrointestinal (GI) and the preventive measures taken in GI endoscopy units to mitigate infection risk remains unclear. We aimed to assess patients' perception regarding risks of COVID-19 with GI endoscopy and the changes in the endoscopy unit as a result of the ongoing pandemic. Methods: Outpatients undergoing GI endoscopy at our institution were categorized into those scheduled to undergo GI endoscopy (preprocedure) and those who had recently undergone GI endoscopy during the pandemic (postprocedure). Two separate but similar survey instruments were designed. Patients were asked to respond on a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were stratified as "low," "neutral," and "high" for analysis. Results: A total of 150 and 355 respondents completed the preprocedure and postprocedure surveys, with a combined response rate of 82.5%. Non-white ethnicity was associated with reporting a "high" level of concern for endoscopy related COVID-19 exposure in both the preprocedure (OR 4.09, 95% CI 1.54-10.82) and postprocedure cohorts (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.04-4.29). 42% of patients in the preprocedure cohort and 11.8% in the postprocedure cohort reported their level of concern for COVID exposure as "high." Among the postprocedure cohort, 88% of the patients were likely to undergo repeat endoscopy during the pandemic if recommended. Conclusion: Patients are willing to undergo GI endoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Non-white and older patients, and those undergoing screening examinations were more concerned with the GI endoscopy related COVID-19 transmission risk.

13.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(6): JC65, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34058102

RESUMO

SOURCE CITATION: Du C, Luo Y, Walsh S, Grinspan A. Oral fecal microbiota transplant capsules are safe and effective for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2021;55:300-8. 33471490.


Assuntos
Infecções por Clostridium , Transplante de Microbiota Fecal , Cápsulas , Infecções por Clostridium/terapia , Humanos , Recidiva , Resultado do Tratamento
14.
Gastroenterology ; 161(3): 1011-1029.e11, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34029569

RESUMO

This guideline provides updated recommendations on the role of preprocedure testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) in individuals undergoing endoscopy in the post-vaccination period and replaces the prior guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) (released July 29, 2020). Since the start of the pandemic, our increased understanding of transmission has facilitated the implementation of practices to promote patient and health care worker (HCW) safety. Simultaneously, there has been increasing recognition of the potential harm associated with delays in patient care, as well as inefficiency of endoscopy units. With widespread vaccination of HCWs and the general population, a re-evaluation of AGA's prior recommendations was warranted. In order to update the role of preprocedure testing for SARS-CoV2, the AGA guideline panel reviewed the evidence on prevalence of asymptomatic SARS-CoV2 infections in individuals undergoing endoscopy; patient and HCW risk of infections that may be acquired immediately before, during, or after endoscopy; effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine in reducing risk of infections and transmission; patient and HCW anxiety; patient delays in care and potential impact on cancer burden; and endoscopy volumes. The panel considered the certainty of the evidence, weighed the benefits and harms of routine preprocedure testing, and considered burden, equity, and cost using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework. Based on very low certainty evidence, the panel made a conditional recommendation against routine preprocedure testing for SARS-CoV2 in patients scheduled to undergo endoscopy. The panel placed a high value on minimizing additional delays in patient care, acknowledging the reduced endoscopy volumes, downstream impact on delayed cancer diagnoses, and burden of testing on patients.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Endoscopia , Programas de Rastreamento/normas , Pandemias , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/terapia , Vacinas contra COVID-19/uso terapêutico , Endoscopia/normas , Gastroenterologia/normas , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Vacinação
15.
J Crohns Colitis ; 15(11): 1807-1815, 2021 Nov 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33999137

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Rates of obesity are rising in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. We conducted a US population-based study to determine the effects of obesity on outcomes in hospitalised patients with IBD. METHODS: We searched the Nationwide Readmissions Database 2016-2017 to identify all adult patients hospitalised for IBD, using ICD-10 codes. We compared obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30) vs non-obese [BMI < 30] patients with IBD to evaluate the independent effects of obesity on readmission, mortality, and other hospital outcomes. Multivariate regression and propensity matching were performed. RESULTS: We identified 143 190 patients with IBD, of whom 9.1% were obese. Obesity was independently associated with higher all-cause readmission at 30 days {18% vs 13% (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.16, p = 0.005)} and 90 days (29% vs 21% [aOR 1.27, p < 0.0001]), as compared with non-obese patients, with similar findings upon a propensity-matched sensitivity analysis. Obese and non-obese patients had similar risks of mortality on index admission [0.24% vs 0.31%, p = 0.18] and readmission [1.5% vs 1.8% p = 0.3]. Obese patients had longer [5.3 vs 4.9 days] and more expensive [USD12,195 vs USD11,154] hospitalisations on index admission. Obesity did not affect the risk of intestinal surgery or bowel obstruction. Compared with index admissions, readmissions were characterised by increased mortality [6-fold], health care use, and bowel obstruction [3-fold] [all p < 0.0001]. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity in IBD appears to be associated with increased early readmission, characterised by a higher burden, despite the introduction of weight-based therapeutics. Prevention of obesity should be a focus in the treatment of IBD to decrease readmission and health care burden.

17.
Gastroenterology ; 160(7): 2512-2556.e9, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34051985

RESUMO

The incidence and prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD) is rising globally. Patients with moderate to severe CD are at high risk for needing surgery and hospitalization and for developing disease-related complications, corticosteroid dependence, and serious infections. Optimal management of outpatients with moderate to severe luminal and/or fistulizing (including perianal) CD often requires the use of immunomodulator (thiopurines, methotrexate) and/or biologic therapies, including tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists, vedolizumab, or ustekinumab, either as monotherapy or in combination (with immunomodulators) to mitigate these risks. Decisions about optimal drug therapy in moderate to severe CD are complex, with limited guidance on comparative efficacy and safety of different treatments, leading to considerable practice variability. Since the last iteration of these guidelines published in 2013, significant advances have been made in the field, including the regulatory approval of 2 new biologic agents, vedolizumab and ustekinumab. Therefore, the American Gastroenterological Association prioritized updating clinical guidelines on this topic. To inform the clinical guidelines, this technical review was completed in accordance with the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) framework. The review addressed the following focused questions (in adult outpatients with moderate to severe luminal CD): overall and comparative efficacy of different medications for induction and maintenance of remission in patients with or without prior exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists, comparative efficacy and safety of biologic monotherapy vs combination therapy with immunomodulators, comparative efficacy of a top-down (upfront use of biologics and/or immunomodulator therapy) vs step-up treatment strategy (acceleration to biologic and/or immunomodulator therapy only after failure of mesalamine), and the role of corticosteroids and mesalamine for induction and/or maintenance of remission. Finally, in adult outpatients with moderate to severe fistulizing CD, this review addressed the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions for achieving fistula and the role of adjunctive antibiotics without clear evidence of active infection.

19.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 36(8): 1759-1764, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33733312

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of venous thrombotic events. The impact IBD has on arterial thrombosis is not well characterized. We aimed to identify the impact of IBD on hospital outcomes in patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study utilizing the 2017 National Inpatient Sample. We identified all adult patients with a principal diagnosis of AIS and compared those with a concurrent diagnosis of IBD to those without-subgrouped by ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Outcomes were mortality and healthcare usage among IBD patients with AIS. Multivariate analysis was used to control for confounders. Analyses were performed using STATA. RESULTS: Five hundred twenty-four thousand and forty-five patients were admitted for AIS in 2017; of them 2200 (0.41%) had a concurrent diagnosis of IBD. The presence of IBD did not significantly affect in-hospital mortality (4.09% vs. 4.01%) among patients admitted for AIS [OR 1.07 95% CI: 0.65-1.76], with similar findings upon subgroup analysis of UC [OR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.39-2.09] and CD [OR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.62-2.19]. Mean hospital length of stay and charges/costs in AIS were similar irrespective of IBD. CONCLUSIONS: UC and CD do not appear to be associated with a higher risk of mortality or increased healthcare usage in AIS. AIS risk assessment in patients with IBD is important but should be done in a similar fashion to the general population.


Assuntos
Isquemia Encefálica , Colite Ulcerativa , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais , AVC Isquêmico , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Colite Ulcerativa/complicações , Colite Ulcerativa/epidemiologia , Hospitais , Humanos , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/complicações , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia
20.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2021 Mar 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33710436

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Age greater than 65 years is a well-defined risk factor for increased mortality in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVGIB). Endoscopy is indicated in most patients at any age but presents unique risks in the elderly cohort, and ideal timing is unclear. This study examined the association between outcomes and early (within 24 h) esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) among elderly patients with NVGIB. METHODS: All patients over age 65 admitted primarily for NVGIB who underwent EGD were included from the National Inpatient Sample 2016-2017. Clinical outcomes stratified by early EGD versus late EGD were compared after adjustment for comorbidities and bleeding severity using inverse probability of treatment weighting with survey-adjusted linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Out of estimated 625,530 admissions with a primary diagnosis of NVGIB, 120,835 met eligibility criteria; 24,830 underwent early EGD. Mean length of stay and total charges decreased by 1.17 days (95%CI 1.04-1.30, P < 0.001) and $5717.24 (95%CI 4034.57-7399.91, P < 0.001), respectively, in the early EGD group. Early EGD increased the odds ratio of death 1.32 (95%CI 1.06-1.64, P 0.01) and transfer to other hospitals 1.48 (95%CI 1.22-1.81, P < 0.001). No change was seen in the requirement for surgery or angiography. Rates of discharge to a nursing facility or home health were similar. CONCLUSION: In a comprehensive cohort of geriatric patients with NVGIB, early EGD is associated with decreased hospital stay and charges, but also with increased mortality and inter-hospital transfer. Further research is needed to determine the optimal management of this vulnerable population.

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