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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31710506

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Interleukin (IL) 18 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family and elevated blood IL-18 concentrations associate with disease activity in Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS) and poor clinical outcomes in severe inflammatory and septic conditions. OBJECTIVE: While recent investigations provide mechanistic evidence for a contribution of IL-18 to (hyper)inflammation in sepsis and MAS, we sought to study regulatory mechanisms underlying human IL-18 expression. METHODS: Samples from in vivo and in vitro endotoxin re-challenge experiments, inflammatory disease patients and isolated human monocytes treated with various stimulants and drugs were tested for cytokine gene and protein expression. Serum IL-18 expression with or without JAK/STAT-inhibition was analyzed in two MAS mouse models as well as a patient with recurrent MAS. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Peripheral blood as well as monocytic IL-18 expression escaped lipopolysacharide (LPS)-induced immunoparalysis. LPS-stimulated primary human monocytes revealed a specific IL-18 expression kinetics controlled by IFNα/ß-signaling. JAK/STAT-inhibition or IFNß-neutralization during LPS-stimulation blunted cytokine expression. Similarly, microtubule destabilizing drugs abrogated LPS-induced IL18 expression, which could be fully reversed by addition of IFNα/ß. Ex vivo analysis of inflammatory disease patients' whole blood revealed strong correlation of type I interferon score and IL18 expression, while JAK/STAT-inhibition in two MAS mouse models as well as a patient with recurrent MAS strongly reduced IL-18 serum levels. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that IL-18 (but not IL-1ß) production from human monocytes requires cooperate toll-like receptor and IFNα/ß-signaling. Interference with IFNα/ß-expression or signaling following JAK/STAT-inhibition may control catastrophic hyperinflammation in MAS.

2.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2019 Oct 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31599092

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the reported association of IL1RN polymorphisms with response to IL-1 blockade in a German cohort of patients with systemic idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) and to assess other factors on treatment response. METHODS: Sixty-one patients with SJIA who had received IL-1 blockade were identified within the German Autoinflammatory Disease (AID) registry and DNA biobank. Response to IL-1 blockade was assessed by (1) clinical response (at least initial response compared to poor response), (2) switch to anti-IL-6 receptor therapy following IL-1 blockade or not (3) clinically inactive disease within 6 months of IL-1 blockade, (4) modified juvenile disease activity score and (5) reaching of a glucocorticoid free state. Basic demographic data, key features of the disease course, laboratory data, and IL1RN single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed. RESULTS: Six out of 7 IL1RN SNPs reported to be associated with response to anakinra therapy were analyzed. These 6 IL1RN SNPs were inherited as haplotypes. We could not confirm an association of IL1RN haplotypes and SNPs with response to IL-1 blockade. Patients who received tocilizumab therapy following IL-1 blockade had a longer duration from disease onset to diagnosis than those who did not (median 0.27 years to 0.08 years). CONCLUSION: In this study, we could not confirm an impact of IL1RN SNPs on response to therapy with anakinra or canakinumab in a cohort of patients with SJIA. However, we observed that a longer timeframe from onset to diagnosis was associated with a poorer long-term treatment response, supporting the "window of opportunity" hypothesis.

3.
J Vis Exp ; (151)2019 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31609337

RESUMO

In this protocol, we describe a method to purify human calcium-binding protein S100A12 and its ion-induced oligomers from Escherichia coli culture for immune cell stimulations. This protocol is based on a two-step chromatography strategy, which comprises protein pre-purification on an anion-exchange chromatography column and a subsequent polishing step on a hydrophobic-interaction column. This strategy produces S100A12 protein of high purity and yield at manageable costs. For functional assays on immune cells eventual remnant endotoxin contamination requires careful monitoring and further cleaning steps to obtain endotoxin-free protein. The majority of endotoxin contaminations can be excluded by anion-exchange chromatography. To deplete residual contaminations, this protocol describes a removal step with centrifugal filters. Depending on the available ion-strength S100A12 can arrange into different homomultimers. To investigate the relationship between structure and function, this protocol further describes ion-treatment of S100A12 protein followed by chemical crosslinking to stabilize S100A12 oligomers and their subsequent separation by size-exclusion chromatography. Finally, we describe a cell-based assay that confirms the biological activity of the purified protein and confirms LPS-free preparation.

4.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 2019 Sep 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31560043

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The inhibition of Janus kinases (JAKs) and subsequent signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) by tofacitinib represents a new therapeutic strategy in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as clinical trials have led to approval of tofacitinib for ulcerative colitis (UC) and hint at a possible efficacy for Crohn`s disease (CD). However, the impact of tofacitinib on cellular response of monocytes, which are key players in inflammatory responses, has not been investigated so far. We aimed to analyze JAK/STAT-inhibition by tofacitinib in monocytes of IBD patients and healthy controls. METHODS: Primary monocytes of IBD patients with active disease and healthy controls (n = 18) were analyzed for cytokine expression and phenotype after granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interferon (IFN)γ-stimulation and tofacitinib pretreatment (1-1000 nM) and capacity to induce Foxp3+-regulatory T cells (Tregs) in cocultures. In total, 20 UC patients and 21 CD patients were included. Additionally, dose-dependent inhibition of JAK/STAT-phosphorylation was analyzed in controls. RESULTS: Pro-inflammatory costimulation with GM-CSF/IFNγ resulted in significant tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-6 increase, whereas IL-10 expression decreased in monocytes. Tofacitinib modulated the responses of activated monocytes toward a regulatory phenotype through reduced TNFα and IL-6 secretion and enhanced Treg induction in cocultures. However, in monocytes from active IBD patients, higher tofacitinib dosages were needed for blockade of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Tofacitinib induced stronger regulatory phenotypes in monocytes of UC patients, including more effective inhibition of pro-inflammatory pathways and better restoration of anti-inflammatory mechanisms as compared with CD-derived monocytes. CONCLUSION: Tofacitinib dose-dependently reprograms monocytes toward a more regulatory cell type. This beneficial effect possibly results from selective JAK/STAT-blockade by adequate tofacitinib dosage with inhibition of pro-inflammatory responses and permission of a balance-shift toward regulatory pathways.

5.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2019 Sep 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31524322

RESUMO

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a form of arthritis in childhood that is initially dominated by innate driven systemic inflammation and is thus considered a polygenic autoinflammatory disease. However, sJIA can progress towards an adaptive immunity driven afebrile arthritis. Based on this observation of bi-phasic disease progression, a "window-of-opportunity" for optimal, individualized and target-directed treatment has been proposed. This hypothesis requires testing and in this review we summarize current evidence regarding molecular factors that may contribute to the progression from an initially predominantly autoinflammatory disease phenotype to autoimmune arthritis. We consider the involvement of innately adaptive γδT and NKT cells that express γδ or αß T cell receptors but can be neither classified as purely innate or adaptive cells, versus classical B and T lymphocytes in this continuum. Finally, we discuss our understanding of how and why some primarily autoinflammatory conditions can progress towards autoimmune-mediated disorders over the disease course while others do not and how this knowledge may be used to offer individualized treatment.

6.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 3545, 2019 08 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31391467

RESUMO

Tens of millions suffer from insulin deficiency (ID); a defect leading to severe metabolic imbalance and death. The only means for management of ID is insulin therapy; yet, this approach is sub-optimal and causes life-threatening hypoglycemia. Hence, ID represents a great medical and societal challenge. Here we report that S100A9, also known as Calgranulin B or Myeloid-Related Protein 14 (MRP14), is a leptin-induced circulating cue exerting beneficial anti-diabetic action. In murine models of ID, enhanced expression of S100A9 alone (i.e. without administered insulin and/or leptin) slightly improves hyperglycemia, and normalizes key metabolic defects (e.g. hyperketonemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation; FAO), and extends lifespan by at least a factor of two. Mechanistically, we report that Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is required, at least in part, for the metabolic-improving and pro-survival effects of S100A9. Thus, our data identify the S100A9/TLR4 axis as a putative target for ID care.

7.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(11): 1969-1970, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31233293
8.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(8): 1025-1032, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31018962

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Different diagnostic and classification criteria are available for hereditary recurrent fevers (HRF)-familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS)-and for the non-hereditary, periodic fever, aphthosis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA). We aimed to develop and validate new evidence-based classification criteria for HRF/PFAPA. METHODS: Step 1: selection of clinical, laboratory and genetic candidate variables; step 2: classification of 360 random patients from the Eurofever Registry by a panel of 25 clinicians and 8 geneticists blinded to patients' diagnosis (consensus ≥80%); step 3: statistical analysis for the selection of the best candidate classification criteria; step 4: nominal group technique consensus conference with 33 panellists for the discussion and selection of the final classification criteria; step 5: cross-sectional validation of the novel criteria. RESULTS: The panellists achieved consensus to classify 281 of 360 (78%) patients (32 CAPS, 36 FMF, 56 MKD, 37 PFAPA, 39 TRAPS, 81 undefined recurrent fever). Consensus was reached for two sets of criteria for each HRF, one including genetic and clinical variables, the other with clinical variables only, plus new criteria for PFAPA. The four HRF criteria demonstrated sensitivity of 0.94-1 and specificity of 0.95-1; for PFAPA, criteria sensitivity and specificity were 0.97 and 0.93, respectively. Validation of these criteria in an independent data set of 1018 patients shows a high accuracy (from 0.81 to 0.98). CONCLUSION: Eurofever proposes a novel set of validated classification criteria for HRF and PFAPA with high sensitivity and specificity.

9.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(8): 1107-1113, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31005900

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The International League of Associations for Rheumatology classification criteria define systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) by the presence of fever, rash and chronic arthritis. Recent initiatives to revise current criteria recognise that a lack of arthritis complicates making the diagnosis early, while later a subgroup of patients develops aggressive joint disease. The proposed biphasic model of SJIA also implies a 'window of opportunity' to abrogate the development of chronic arthritis. We aimed to identify novel SJIA biomarkers during different disease phases. METHODS: Children with active SJIA were subgrouped clinically as systemic autoinflammatory disease with fever (SJIA syst ) or polyarticular disease (SJIA poly ). A discovery cohort of n=10 patients per SJIA group, plus n=10 with infection, was subjected to unbiased label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and immunoassay screens. In a separate verification cohort (SJIA syst , n=45; SJIA poly , n=29; infection, n=32), candidate biomarkers were measured by multiple reaction monitoring MS (MRM-MS) and targeted immunoassays. RESULTS: Signatures differentiating the two phenotypes of SJIA could be identified. LC-MS/MS in the discovery cohort differentiated SJIA syst from SJIA poly well, but less effectively from infection. Targeted MRM verified the discovery data and, combined with targeted immunoassays, correctly identified 91% (SJIA syst vs SJIA poly ) and 77% (SJIA syst vs infection) of all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular signatures differentiating two phenotypes of SJIA were identified suggesting shifts in underlying immunological processes in this biphasic disease. Biomarker signatures separating SJIA in its initial autoinflammatory phase from the main differential diagnosis (ie, infection) could aid early-stage diagnostic decisions, while markers of a phenotype switch could inform treat-to-target strategies.

10.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(10): 1747-1755, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31008556

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Individuals with deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2), a recently recognized autosomal recessive disease, present with various systemic vascular and inflammatory manifestations, often with young age at disease onset or with early onset of recurrent strokes. Their clinical features and histologic findings overlap with those of childhood-onset polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), a primary "idiopathic" systemic vasculitis. Despite similar clinical presentation, individuals with DADA2 may respond better to biologic therapy than to traditional immunosuppression. The aim of this study was to screen an international registry of children with systemic primary vasculitis for variants in ADA2. METHODS: The coding exons of ADA2 were sequenced in 60 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of PAN, cutaneous PAN, or unclassifiable vasculitis (UCV), any chronic vasculitis with onset at age 5 years or younger, or history of stroke. The functional consequences of the identified variants were assessed by ADA2 enzyme assay and immunoblotting. RESULTS: Nine children with DADA2 (5 with PAN, 3 with UCV, and 1 with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis) were identified. Among them, 1 patient had no rare variants in the coding region of ADA2 and 8 had biallelic, rare variants (minor allele frequency <0.01) with a known association with DADA2 (p.Gly47Arg and p.Gly47Ala) or a novel association (p.Arg9Trp, p.Leu351Gln, and p.Ala357Thr). The clinical phenotype varied widely. CONCLUSION: These findings support previous observations indicating that DADA2 has extensive genotypic and phenotypic variability. Thus, screening ADA2 among children with vasculitic rash, UCV, PAN, or unexplained, early-onset central nervous system disease with systemic inflammation may enable an earlier diagnosis of DADA2.

11.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(7): 1163-1173, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30848528

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a multifactorial autoinflammatory disease with a historically poor prognosis. With current treatment regimens, approximately half of patients still experience active disease after 1 year of therapy. This study was undertaken to evaluate a treat-to-target approach using recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1Ra; anakinra) as first-line monotherapy to achieve early inactive disease and prevent damage. METHODS: In this single-center, prospective study, patients with new-onset systemic JIA with an unsatisfactory response to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs received rIL-1Ra monotherapy according to a treat-to-target strategy. Patients with an incomplete response to 2 mg/kg rIL-1Ra subsequently received 4 mg/kg rIL-1Ra or additional prednisolone, or switched to alternative therapy. For patients in whom inactive disease was achieved, rIL-1Ra was tapered after 3 months and subsequently stopped. RESULTS: Forty-two patients, including 12 who had no arthritis at disease onset, were followed up for a median of 5.8 years. The median time to achieve inactive disease was 33 days. At 1 year, 76% had inactive disease, and 52% had inactive disease while not receiving medication. High neutrophil counts at baseline and a complete response after 1 month of rIL-1Ra were highly associated with inactive disease at 1 year. After 5 years of follow-up, 96% of the patients included had inactive disease, and 75% had inactive disease while not receiving medication. Articular or extraarticular damage was reported in <5%, and only 33% of the patients received glucocorticoids. Treatment with rIL-1Ra was equally effective in systemic JIA patients without arthritis at disease onset. CONCLUSION: Treatment to target, starting with first-line, short-course monotherapy with rIL-1Ra, is a highly efficacious strategy to induce and sustain inactive disease and to prevent disease- and glucocorticoid-related damage in systemic JIA.

12.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 3(4): 255-263, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30819662

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, the characteristics and burden of childhood arthritis have never been studied on a worldwide basis. We aimed to investigate, with a cross-sectional study, the prevalence of disease categories, treatment methods, and disease status in patients from across different geographical areas and from countries with diverse wealth status. METHODS: In this multinational, cross-sectional, observational cohort study, we asked international paediatric rheumatologists from specialised centres to enrol children with a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria, who were seen consecutively for a period of 6 months. Each patient underwent retrospective and cross-sectional assessments, including measures of disease activity and damage and questionnaires on the wellbeing and quality of life of the children. We qualitatively compared the collected data across eight geographical areas, and we explored an association between disease activity and damage and a country's gross domestic product (GDP) with a multiple logistic regression analysis. FINDINGS: Between April 4, 2011, and Nov 21, 2016, 9081 patients were enrolled at 130 centres in 49 countries, grouped into eight geographical areas. Systemic arthritis (125 [33·0%] of 379 patients) and enthesitis-related arthritis (113 [29·8%] of 379) were more common in southeast Asia, whereas oligoarthritis was more prevalent in southern Europe (1360 [56·7%] of 2400) and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis was more frequent in North America (165 [31·5%] of 523) than in the other areas. Prevalence of uveitis was highest in northern Europe (161 [19·1%] of 845 patients) and southern Europe (450 [18·8%] of 2400) and lowest in Latin America (54 [6·4%] of 849), Africa and Middle East (71 [5·9%] of 1209), and southeast Asia (19 [5·0%] of 379). Median age at disease onset was lower in southern Europe (3·5 years, IQR 1·9-7·3) than in other regions. Biological, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were prescribed more frequently in northern Europe and North America than in other geographical settings. Patients living in countries with lower GDP had greater disease activity and damage than those living in wealthier countries. Damage was associated with referral delay. INTERPRETATION: Our study documents a variability in prevalence of disease phenotypes and disparities in therapeutic choices and outcomes across geographical areas and wealth status of countries. The greater disease burden in lower-resource settings highlights the need for public health efforts aimed at improving equity in access to effective treatments and care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. FUNDING: IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini.

13.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(5): 792-804, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30447136

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute vasculitis of childhood, predominantly affecting the coronary arteries. S100A12, a granulocyte-derived agonist of both the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), is strongly up-regulated in KD. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential contributions of S100A12 to the pathogenesis of KD. METHODS: Serum samples from patients with KD (n = 30) at different stages pre- and post-intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment were analyzed for the expression of S100A12, cytokines, chemokines, and soluble markers of endothelial cell activation. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were analyzed for responsiveness to direct stimulation with S100A12 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of cytokine and endothelial cell adhesion molecule messenger RNA expression. Alternatively, HCAECs were cultured in conditioned medium obtained from primary human monocytes that were stimulated with LPS or S100A12 in the absence or presence of IVIG or cytokine antagonists. RESULTS: In the serum of patients with KD, pretreatment S100A12 levels were associated with soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 titers in the course of IVIG therapy (rs = -0.6, P = 0.0003). Yet, HCAECs were not responsive to direct S100A12 stimulation, despite the presence of appropriate receptors (RAGE, TLR-4). HCAECs did, however, respond to supernatants obtained from S100A12-stimulated primary human monocytes, as evidenced by the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. This response was strictly dependent on interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) signaling (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In its role as a highly expressed mediator of sterile inflammation in KD, S100A12 appears to activate HCAECs in an IL-1ß-dependent manner. These data provide new mechanistic insights into the contributions of S100A12 and IL-1ß to disease pathogenesis, and may therefore support current IL-1-targeting studies in the treatment of patients with KD.

14.
Ocul Immunol Inflamm ; 27(2): 330-337, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29020495

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study analyzed the effect of adalimumab on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in uveitis. METHODS: PBMCs and serum S100A12 levels from 14 uveitis patients and 28 healthy controls were analyzed. Patient samples were taken before (w0), and 6 (w6) and 12 (w12) weeks after initiation of adalimumab therapy. RESULTS: Monocytes expressing CD124, CD86, CD39, CD115, and MHCII were decreased in patients. Adalimumab induced CD86+ and CD39+ monocytes, and further decreased the frequency of MHCII- and CD124-positive cells. Patients (w0) had increased percentages of Th1-, Th17-, and Th2 cells and T cell subsets showed a pro-inflammatory polarization (p = 0.02 ratio Th17/Treg patients w0 vs controls), which was reduced upon adalimumab treatment (p = 0.05 w0 vs w6). S100A12 levels were increased in patients (p = 0.02) and reduced under treatment (p = 0.02 for w6/w12). CONCLUSIONS: The phenotype of PBMCs from uveitis patients is modified upon adalimumab treatment. Serum S100A12 levels reflect the systemic immune response.

15.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(3): 451-459, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30225949

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between serum levels of S100A8/A9 and S100A12 and the maintenance of clinically inactive disease during anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy and the occurrence of disease flare following withdrawal of anti-TNF therapy in patients with polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: In this prospective, multicenter study, 137 patients with polyarticular-course JIA whose disease was clinically inactive while receiving anti-TNF therapy were enrolled. Patients were observed for an initial 6-month phase during which anti-TNF treatment was continued. For those patients who maintained clinically inactive disease over the 6 months, anti-TNF was withdrawn and they were followed up for 8 months to assess for the occurrence of flare. Serum S100 levels were measured at baseline and at the time of anti-TNF withdrawal. Spearman's rank correlation test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were used to assess the relationship between serum S100 levels and maintenance of clinically inactive disease and occurrence of disease flare after anti-TNF withdrawal. RESULTS: Over the 6-month initial phase with anti-TNF therapy, the disease state reverted from clinically inactive to clinically active in 24 (18%) of the 130 evaluable patients with polyarticular-course JIA; following anti-TNF withdrawal, 39 (37%) of the 106 evaluable patients experienced a flare. Serum levels of S100A8/A9 and S100A12 were elevated in up to 45% of patients. Results of the ROC analysis revealed that serum S100 levels did not predict maintenance of clinically inactive disease during anti-TNF therapy nor did they predict disease flare after treatment withdrawal. Elevated levels of S100A8/A9 were not predictive of the occurrence of a disease flare within 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, or 8 months following anti-TNF withdrawal, and elevated S100A12 levels had a modest predictive ability for determining the risk of flare within 30, 60, and 90 days after treatment withdrawal. Serum S100A12 levels at the time of anti-TNF withdrawal were inversely correlated with the time to disease flare (r = -0.36). CONCLUSION: Serum S100 levels did not predict maintenance of clinically inactive disease or occurrence of disease flare in patients with polyarticular-course JIA, and S100A12 levels were only moderately, and inversely, correlated with the time to disease flare.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Juvenil/sangue , Artrite Juvenil/tratamento farmacológico , Calgranulina A/sangue , Calgranulina B/sangue , Proteína S100A12/sangue , Adolescente , Biomarcadores/sangue , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Quimioterapia de Manutenção/métodos , Masculino , Exacerbação dos Sintomas , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Fator de Necrose Tumoral alfa/antagonistas & inibidores , Suspensão de Tratamento
16.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(6): 975-986, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30590748

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To define predictors for the 2-year outcome in terms of achieving inactivity, subsequent uveitis reactivation and occurrence of uveitis-related complications of JIA-associated uveitis. METHODS: Demographic and clinical parameters and serum samples of JIA-associated uveitis patients enrolled in ICON at ⩽1 year of JIA diagnosis were collected at study enrolment, every 3 months during the first year and subsequently every 6 months. Predictors for the 2-year outcome were evaluated by linear mixed models. RESULTS: Of 954 JIA patients included, uveitis occurred in 106 up to the first 2-year follow-up, with 98 of them having complete ophthalmological documentation. In 81.8% and 80.0% of patients, uveitis inactivity was achieved at the 1- and 2-year follow-up after uveitis onset, respectively. JIA onset after the age of 5 years, no use of topical corticosteroids, and adalimumab treatment were significantly associated with an inactive uveitis for at least 6 months (n = 57). Correlates for subsequent uveitis reactivation (n = 16, 30.2%) were age at uveitis onset ⩽5 years and active disease (clinical Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score >4.5). Uveitis-related complications were present in 29.8% of patients at first uveitis documentation and in 30.7% and 32.8% at 1- and 2-year follow-up, respectively. Older age at JIA onset, short duration between JIA and uveitis onset, high anterior chamber (AC) cell grades, poor visual acuity, and topical steroid use at first uveitis documentation correlated with uveitis-related complications. CONCLUSION: In addition to demographic risk factors, JIA disease and uveitis activity scores and adalimumab are significant predictors for the 2-year outcome of JIA-associated uveitis patients.

17.
Ocul Immunol Inflamm ; 27(5): 788-797, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29771573

RESUMO

Purpose: To characterize peripheral blood T cells in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis (JIAU). Methods: Blood samples were taken from children with JIAU (n = 18), JIA without ocular involvement (n = 11), idiopathic anterior uveitis (IAU, n = 12), and healthy controls (n = 11). Cells were stained for T cell surface markers, and intracellular cytokine staining was performed after cell stimulation and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: The Th1/Th2 ratio was increased in JIAU patients. Numbers of IL-13-expressing cells an level of IL-13 and IL-10 expression per cell were increased in all patient groups; whereas, percentages of IL-5-expressing T cells were decreased. Numbers of proinflammatory Th17 cells and T cells expressing CTLA-4 were increased in all patient groups; whereas, γ/δ T cell numbers were decreased. Results from JIA and IAU were similar. Conclusion: T cell subtypes and potential T cell function are altered in pediatric patients with uveitis and arthritis as compared to healthy children.

18.
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med ; : 1-191, 2018 Dec 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30563403

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Sepsis has a grave impact on neonatal morbidity and mortality. Proper timely diagnosis and a subsequently tailored management are crucial to improve neonatal outcome and survival. New diagnostic methods are needed and much effort is directed to this objective. In this work, we aimed to evaluate S100A12 protein as a biomarker of neonatal sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective single-center study, 118 preterm and term neonates were enrolled and assigned to four groups: controls, infants with no infection, infants with probable infection and infants with proven infection. Clinical and routine laboratory data, the serum levels of S100A12 and additional cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-18, IL-22, IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ) were assessed. Using stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, S100A12 protein was evaluated as a biomarker of neonatal infection. RESULTS: Significant differences of the parameters of complete blood count and level of C-reactive protein were documented between the study/the four groups. The studied marker S100A12 as well as IL-6 and IL-10 were highly significant (p < 0.001) between infected and control groups. S100A12 had a sensitivity of 96.8% and a specificity of 93.3%. Even after adjusting for the confounding factors sex, body weight, gestational age, mode of delivery, number of pregnancies, premature rupture of membranes and preeclampsia S100A12 remained significant between the infected and control groups. CONCLUSIONS: S100A12 may be considered as a new biomarker of neonatal sepsis.

19.
Front Pediatr ; 6: 341, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30533405

RESUMO

Objectives: Chronic primary systemic vasculitidies (CPV) are a collection of rare diseases involving inflammation in blood vessels, often in multiple organs. CPV can affect adults and children and may be life- or organ-threatening. Treatments for adult CPV, although effective, have known severe potential toxicities; safety and efficacy of these drugs in pediatric patients is not fully understood. There is an unmet need for biologic measures to assess the level of disease activity and, in turn, inform treatment choices for stopping, starting, or modifying therapy. This observational study determines if S100 calcium-binding protein A12 (S100A12) and common inflammatory indicators are sensitive markers of disease activity in children and adolescents with CPV that could be used to inform a minimal effective dose of therapy. Methods: Clinical data and sera were collected from 56 participants with CPV at study visits from diagnosis to remission. Serum concentrations of S100A12, C-reactive protein (CRP) and hemoglobin (Hb) as well as whole blood cell counts and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured. Disease activity was inferred by physician's global assessment (PGA) and the pediatric vasculitis activity score (PVAS). Results: Serum concentrations of standard markers of inflammation (ESR, CRP, Hb, absolute blood neutrophil count), and S100A12 track with clinically assessed disease activity. These measures-particularly neutrophil counts and sera concentrations of S100A12-had the most significant correlation with clinical scores of disease activity in those children with vasculitis that is associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) against proteinase 3. Conclusions: S100A12 and neutrophil counts should be considered in the assessment of disease activity in children with CPV particularly the most common forms of the disease that involve proteinase 3 ANCA. Key messages: - In children with chronic primary systemic vasculitis (CPV), classical measures of inflammation are not formally considered in scoring of disease activity. - Inflammatory markers-specifically S100A12 and neutrophil count-track preferentially with the most common forms of childhood CPV which affect small to medium sized vessels and involve anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) against proteinase-3.

20.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 20(1): 276, 2018 12 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30545399

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the 25(OH) vitamin D (25(OH)D) status of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and determine whether the 25(OH)D level is associated with disease activity and the course of JIA. METHODS: Patients ≤ 16 years of age with recently diagnosed JIA (< 12 months) were enrolled in the inception cohort of patients with newly diagnosed JIA (ICON), an ongoing prospective observational, controlled multicenter study started in 2010. Clinical and laboratory parameters were ascertained quarterly during the first year and half-yearly thereafter. Of the 954 enrolled patients, 360 patients with two blood samples taken during the first 2 years after inclusion and with follow up of 3 years were selected. The serum 25(OH)D levels were determined and compared with those of subjects from the general population after matching for age, sex, migration status and the month of blood-drawing. RESULTS: Nearly half of the patients had a deficient 25(OH)D level (< 20 ng/ml) in the first serum sample and a quarter had a deficient level in both samples. Disease activity and the risk of developing JIA-associated uveitis were inversely correlated with the 25(OH)D level (ß = - 0.20, 95% CI - 0.37; 0.03, hazard ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.91; 0.99, respectively). CONCLUSION: In this study, 25(OH)D deficiency was common and associated with higher disease activity and risk of developing JIA-associated uveitis. Further studies are needed to substantiate these results and determine whether correcting 25(OH)D deficiency is beneficial in JIA.


Assuntos
Artrite Juvenil/sangue , Uveíte/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/sangue , Vitamina D/sangue , Adolescente , Artrite Juvenil/diagnóstico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Valores de Referência , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Uveíte/diagnóstico , Deficiência de Vitamina D/diagnóstico
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