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1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(1): 1-5, 2020 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917782

RESUMO

In May 2018, a study of birth defects in infants born to women with diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Botswana reported an eightfold increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) among births with periconceptional exposure to antiretroviral therapy (ART) that included the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) compared with other ART regimens (1). The World Health Organization* (WHO) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services† (HHS) promptly issued interim guidance limiting the initiation of DTG during early pregnancy and in women of childbearing age with HIV who desire pregnancy or are sexually active and not using effective contraception. On the basis of additional data, WHO now recommends DTG as a preferred treatment option for all populations, including women of childbearing age and pregnant women. Similarly, the U.S. recommendations currently state that DTG is a preferred antiretroviral drug throughout pregnancy (with provider-patient counseling) and as an alternative antiretroviral drug in women who are trying to conceive.§ Since 1981 and 1994, CDC has supported separate surveillance programs for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (2) and birth defects (3) in state health departments. These two surveillance programs can inform public health programs and policy, linkage to care, and research activities. Because birth defects surveillance programs do not collect HIV status, and HIV surveillance programs do not routinely collect data on occurrence of birth defects, the related data have not been used by CDC to characterize birth defects in births to women with HIV. Data from these two programs were linked to estimate overall prevalence of NTDs and prevalence of NTDs in HIV-exposed pregnancies during 2013-2017 for 15 participating jurisdictions. Prevalence of NTDs in pregnancies among women with diagnosed HIV infection was 7.0 per 10,000 live births, similar to that among the general population in these 15 jurisdictions, and the U.S. estimate based on data from 24 states. Successful linking of data from birth defects and HIV/AIDS surveillance programs for pregnancies among women with diagnosed HIV infection suggests that similar data linkages might be used to characterize possible associations between maternal diseases or maternal use of medications, such as integrase strand transfer inhibitors used to manage HIV, and pregnancy outcomes. Although no difference in NTD prevalence in HIV-exposed pregnancies was found, data on the use of integrase strand transfer inhibitors in pregnancy are needed to understand the safety and risks of these drugs during pregnancy.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Defeitos do Tubo Neural/epidemiologia , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Adulto , Antirretrovirais/efeitos adversos , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(3): 67-71, 2020 Jan 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31971935

RESUMO

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital brain and eye abnormalities and is associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities (1-3). In areas of the United States that experienced local Zika virus transmission, the prevalence of birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection during pregnancy increased in the second half of 2016 compared with the first half (4). To update the previous report, CDC analyzed population-based surveillance data from 22 states and territories to estimate the prevalence of birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection, regardless of laboratory evidence of or exposure to Zika virus, among pregnancies completed during January 1, 2016-June 30, 2017. Jurisdictions were categorized as those 1) with widespread local transmission of Zika virus; 2) with limited local transmission of Zika virus; and 3) without local transmission of Zika virus. Among 2,004,630 live births, 3,359 infants and fetuses with birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection during pregnancy were identified (1.7 per 1,000 live births, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6-1.7). In areas with widespread local Zika virus transmission, the prevalence of birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection during pregnancy was significantly higher during the quarters comprising July 2016-March 2017 (July-September 2016 = 3.0; October-December 2016 = 4.0; and January-March 2017 = 5.6 per 1,000 live births) compared with the reference period (January-March 2016) (1.3 per 1,000). These findings suggest a fourfold increase (prevalence ratio [PR] = 4.1, 95% CI = 2.1-8.4) in birth defects potentially related to Zika virus in widespread local transmission areas during January-March 2017 compared with that during January-March 2016, with the highest prevalence (7.0 per 1,000 live births) in February 2017. Population-based birth defects surveillance is critical for identifying infants and fetuses with birth defects potentially related to Zika virus regardless of whether Zika virus testing was conducted, especially given the high prevalence of asymptomatic disease. These data can be used to inform follow-up care and services as well as strengthen surveillance.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/virologia , Vigilância da População , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/virologia , Infecção por Zika virus/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Gravidez , Prevalência , Porto Rico/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Ilhas Virgens Americanas/epidemiologia
3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(7): 177-180, 2019 Feb 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30789880

RESUMO

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a drug withdrawal syndrome that can occur following prenatal exposure to opioids (1). NAS surveillance in the United States is based largely on diagnosis codes in hospital discharge data, without validation of these codes or case confirmation. During 2004-2014, reported NAS incidence increased from 1.5 to 8.0 per 1,000 U.S. hospital births (2), based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes identified in hospital discharge data, without case confirmation. However, little is known about how well these codes identify NAS or how the October 1, 2015, transition from ICD-9-CM to the tenth revision of ICD-CM (ICD-10-CM) codes affected estimated NAS incidence. This report describes a pilot project in Illinois, New Mexico, and Vermont to use birth defects surveillance infrastructure to obtain state-level, population-based estimates of NAS incidence among births in 2015 (all three states) and 2016 (Illinois) using hospital discharge records and other sources (varied by state) with case confirmation, and to evaluate the validity of NAS diagnosis codes used by each state. Wide variation in NAS incidence was observed across the three states. In 2015, NAS incidence for Illinois, New Mexico, and Vermont was 3.0, 7.5, and 30.8 per 1,000 births, respectively. Among evaluated diagnosis codes, those with the highest positive predictive values (PPVs) for identifying confirmed cases of NAS, based on a uniform case definition, were drug withdrawal syndrome in a newborn (ICD-9-CM code 779.5; state range = 58.6%-80.2%) and drug withdrawal, infant of dependent mother (ICD-10-CM code P96.1; state range = 58.5%-80.2%). The methods used to assess NAS incidence in this pilot project might help inform other states' NAS surveillance efforts.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Síndrome de Abstinência Neonatal/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População/métodos , Humanos , Illinois/epidemiologia , Recém-Nascido , New Mexico/epidemiologia , Vermont/epidemiologia
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(2): 31-36, 2019 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653484

RESUMO

Prevalence of gastroschisis, a serious birth defect of the abdominal wall resulting in some of the abdominal contents extending outside the body at birth, has been increasing worldwide (1,2). Gastroschisis requires surgical repair after birth and is associated with digestive and feeding complications during infancy, which can affect development. Recent data from 14 U.S. states indicated an increasing prevalence of gastroschisis from 1995 to 2012 (1). Young maternal age has been strongly associated with gastroschisis, but research suggests that risk factors such as smoking, genitourinary infections, and prescription opioid use also might be associated (3-5). Data from 20 population-based state surveillance programs were pooled and analyzed to assess age-specific gastroschisis prevalence during two 5-year periods, 2006-2010 and 2011-2015, and an ecologic approach was used to compare annual gastroschisis prevalence by annual opioid prescription rate categories. Gastroschisis prevalence increased only slightly (10%) from 2006-2010 to 2011-2015 (prevalence ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.1), with the highest prevalence among mothers aged <20 years. During 2006-2015, the prevalence of gastroschisis was 1.6 times higher in counties with high opioid prescription rates (5.1 per 10,000 live births; CI = 4.9-5.3) and 1.4 times higher where opioid prescription rates were medium (4.6 per 10,000 live births; CI = 4.4-4.8) compared with areas with low prescription rates (3.2 per 10,000 live births; CI = 3.1-3.4). Public health research is needed to understand factors contributing to the association between young maternal age and gastroschisis and assess the effect of prescription opioid use during pregnancy on this pregnancy outcome.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Fenômenos Ecológicos e Ambientais , Gastrosquise/epidemiologia , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Gastrosquise/etnologia , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Mães/estatística & dados numéricos , Gravidez , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
5.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(3): 91-96, 2018 Jan 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29370151

RESUMO

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects, including microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1). Population-based birth defects surveillance systems are critical to monitor all infants and fetuses with birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection, regardless of known exposure or laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy. CDC analyzed data from 15 U.S. jurisdictions conducting population-based surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.* Jurisdictions were stratified into the following three groups: those with 1) documented local transmission of Zika virus during 2016; 2) one or more cases of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents; and 3) less than one case of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents. A total of 2,962 infants and fetuses (3.0 per 1,000 live births; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.9-3.2) (2) met the case definition.† In areas with local transmission there was a non-statistically significant increase in total birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection from 2.8 cases per 1,000 live births in the first half of 2016 to 3.0 cases in the second half (p = 0.10). However, when neural tube defects and other early brain malformations (NTDs)§ were excluded, the prevalence of birth defects strongly linked to congenital Zika virus infection increased significantly, from 2.0 cases per 1,000 live births in the first half of 2016 to 2.4 cases in the second half, an increase of 29 more cases than expected (p = 0.009). These findings underscore the importance of surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection and the need for continued monitoring in areas at risk for Zika.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/virologia , Vigilância da População , Infecção por Zika virus/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/virologia , Prevalência , Porto Rico/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Birth Defects Res ; 109(18): 1442-1450, 2017 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28905502

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We evaluated selected birth defects over a 9-year period to assess prevalence trends by selected maternal and infant factors. METHODS: Data were pooled from 11 population-based birth defects surveillance programs in the United States for children born between 1999 and 2007. Overall prevalence, as well as 3-year interval prevalence, was calculated for 26 specific birth defects, stratified by maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, and infant sex. Average annual percent change (AAPC) was calculated for each birth defect. Poisson regression was used to determine change in AAPC, and joinpoint regression to identify breakpoints and changes in slope for prevalence of each defect over time. RESULTS: Between 1999 and 2001 and 2005 and 2007, four birth defects increased by 10% or more: coarctation of the aorta (17%), gastroschisis (83%), omphalocele (11%), and Down syndrome (10%). Among mothers <20 years of age, the gastroschisis AAPC increased 10.1% overall and, cross-classified by maternal race/ethnicity, the AAPC for mothers <20 years increased 9.2%, 25.7%, and 7.7% among non-Hispanic white (NHW), non-Hispanic black (NHB), and Hispanic mothers, respectively. A small increase in Down syndrome (AAPC 4.4%) was found for NHB mothers ≥35 years. CONCLUSION: No significant trends in prevalence were identified for most birth defects. Gastroschisis prevalence increased significantly among NHW and NHB mothers <20 years of age, with the greatest increases in NHB mothers. Prevalence of Down syndrome among NHB mothers ≥35 years also increased slightly. Stratified results may suggest avenues of research in birth defect etiology and in evaluating prevention efforts. Birth Defects Research 109:1442-1450, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/prevenção & controle , Coartação Aórtica/epidemiologia , Coartação Aórtica/prevenção & controle , Síndrome de Down/epidemiologia , Síndrome de Down/prevenção & controle , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Gastrosquise/epidemiologia , Gastrosquise/prevenção & controle , Hérnia Umbilical/epidemiologia , Hérnia Umbilical/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Masculino , Idade Materna , Mães , Vigilância da População/métodos , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Estados Unidos
7.
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol ; 106(11): 972-982, 2016 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27891783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Congenital microcephaly has been linked to maternal Zika virus infection. However, ascertaining infants diagnosed with microcephaly can be challenging. METHODS: Thirty birth defects surveillance programs provided data on infants diagnosed with microcephaly born 2009 to 2013. The pooled prevalence of microcephaly per 10,000 live births was estimated overall and by maternal/infant characteristics. Variation in prevalence was examined across case finding methods. Nine programs provided data on head circumference and conditions potentially contributing to microcephaly. RESULTS: The pooled prevalence of microcephaly was 8.7 per 10,000 live births. Median prevalence (per 10,000 live births) was similar among programs using active (6.7) and passive (6.6) methods; the interdecile range of prevalence estimates was wider among programs using passive methods for all race/ethnicity categories except Hispanic. Prevalence (per 10,000 live births) was lowest among non-Hispanic Whites (6.5) and highest among non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics (11.2 and 11.9, respectively); estimates followed a U-shaped distribution by maternal age with the highest prevalence among mothers <20 years (11.5) and ≥40 years (13.2). For gestational age and birth weight, the highest prevalence was among infants <32 weeks gestation and infants <1500 gm. Case definitions varied; 41.8% of cases had an HC ≥ the 10th percentile for sex and gestational age. CONCLUSION: Differences in methods, population distribution of maternal/infant characteristics, and case definitions for microcephaly can contribute to the wide range of observed prevalence estimates across individual birth defects surveillance programs. Addressing these factors in the setting of Zika virus infection can improve the quality of prevalence estimates. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:972-982, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Microcefalia/epidemiologia , Infecção por Zika virus/epidemiologia , Zika virus , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
8.
Am J Public Health ; 104(9): e14-23, 2014 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25033129

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship between race/ethnicity and 27 major birth defects. METHODS: We pooled data from 12 population-based birth defects surveillance systems in the United States that included 13.5 million live births (1 of 3 of US births) from 1999 to 2007. Using Poisson regression, we calculated prevalence estimates for each birth defect and 13 racial/ethnic groupings, along with crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs). Non-Hispanic Whites served as the referent group. RESULTS: American Indians/Alaska Natives had a significantly higher and 50% or greater prevalence for 7 conditions (aPR = 3.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.89, 5.44 for anotia or microtia); aPRs of 1.5 to 2.1 for cleft lip, trisomy 18, and encephalocele, and lower, upper, and any limb deficiency). Cubans and Asians, especially Chinese and Asian Indians, had either significantly lower or similar prevalences of these defects compared with non-Hispanic Whites, with the exception of anotia or microtia among Chinese (aPR = 2.08; 95% CI = 1.30, 3.33) and Filipinos (aPR = 1.90; 95% CI = 1.10, 3.30) and tetralogy of Fallot among Vietnamese (aPR = 1.60; 95% CI = 1.11, 2.32). CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest population-based study to our knowledge to systematically examine the prevalence of a range of major birth defects across many racial/ethnic groups, including Asian and Hispanic subgroups. The relatively high prevalence of birth defects in American Indians/Alaska Natives warrants further attention.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/etnologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Declaração de Nascimento , Humanos , Vigilância da População , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
9.
Arch Environ Occup Health ; 66(2): 87-94, 2011.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24484365

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to examine childhood cancer incidence in proximity to nuclear power plants in Illinois. Cancer cases diagnosed among Illinois children 0 to 14 years old from 1986 through 2005 were included in the study. Standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated for the geographic zones defined by the proximity to nuclear power plants. The results show that children living within 10 miles of any nuclear power plant did not have significant increase in incidence for leukemia (period 1986-1995: SIR = 0.85 [95% confidence interval, CI: 0.54-1.26]; period 1996-2005: 1.23 [0.91-1.64]), lymphomas [period 1986-1995: 1.38 [0.77-2.27]; period 1996-2005: 0.77 [0.37-1.42]), or other cancer sites. Neither did the children living 10 to 20 miles or 20 to 30 miles from any nuclear power plants. This study did not find any significant childhood cancer excess among children living near nuclear plants and did not observe any dose-response patterns.


Assuntos
Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias Induzidas por Radiação/epidemiologia , Centrais Nucleares , Características de Residência , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Illinois/epidemiologia , Incidência , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Modelos Lineares , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco
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