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1.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 2020 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32108117

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment options for trochlear pain arising from trochleitis or primary trochlear headache include oral anti-inflammatory medications and/or local injection of corticosteroids and local anesthetic. Trochleaectomy is an additional option to consider for monocular patients with intractable trochlear pain. METHODS: We report 3 patients undergoing trochleaectomy for refractory trochlear pain syndromes. RESULTS: Trochleaectomy resulted in resolution of their periocular discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Trochleaectomy is an effective procedure to treat trochlear pain syndrome in functionally monocular patients.

2.
J Pediatr ; 216: 242-245, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31843118
3.
Lancet Neurol ; 18(12): 1081-1090, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31701891

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chronic cluster headache is the most disabling form of cluster headache. The mainstay of treatment is attack prevention, but the available management options have little efficacy and are associated with substantial side-effects. In this study, we aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for treatment of chronic cluster headache. METHODS: We did a randomised, sham-controlled, parallel group, double-blind, safety and efficacy study at 21 headache centres in the USA. We recruited patients aged 22 years or older with chronic cluster headache, who reported a minimum of four cluster headache attacks per week that were unsuccessfully controlled by preventive treatments. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) via an online adaptive randomisation procedure to either stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion or a sham control that delivered a cutaneous electrical stimulation. Patients and the clinical evaluator and surgeon were masked to group assignment. The primary efficacy endpoint, which was analysed with weighted generalised estimated equation logistic regression models, was the difference between groups in the proportion of stimulation-treated ipsilateral cluster attacks for which relief from pain was achieved 15 min after the start of stimulation without the use of acute drugs before that timepoint. Efficacy analyses were done in all patients who were implanted with a device and provided data for at least one treated attack during the 4-week experimental phase. Safety was assessed in all patients undergoing an implantation procedure up to the end of the open-label phase of the study, which followed the experimental phase. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02168764. FINDINGS: Between July 9, 2014, and Feb 14, 2017, 93 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned, 45 to the sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation group and 48 to the control group. 36 patients in the sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation group and 40 in the control group had at least one attack during the experimental phase and were included in efficacy analyses. The proportion of attacks for which pain relief was experienced at 15 min was 62·46% (95% CI 49·15-74·12) in the sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation group versus 38·87% (28·60-50·25) in the control group (odds ratio 2·62 [95% CI 1·28-5·34]; p=0·008). Nine serious adverse events were reported by the end of the open-label phase. Three of these serious adverse events were related to the implantation procedure (aspiration during intubation, nausea and vomiting, and venous injury or compromise). A fourth serious adverse event was an infection that was attributed to both the stimulation device and the implantation procedure. The other five serious adverse events were unrelated. There were no unanticipated serious adverse events. INTERPRETATION: Sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation seems efficacious and is well tolerated, and potentially offers an alternative approach to the treatment of chronic cluster headache. Further research is need to clarify its place in clinical practice. FUNDING: Autonomic Technologies.

4.
Expert Rev Neurother ; 19(9): 881-893, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31478394

RESUMO

Introduction: Diagnosis and appropriate management of patients with the pseudotumor cerebri syndrome are imperative to prevent or minimize permanent visual loss and headache-related disability. Areas covered: Steps in management, including making the correct diagnosis, techniques to assess the patient's visual status, medical treatment of intracranial hypertension and the associated headaches, weight management strategies, surgical treatments and stenting are reviewed incorporating the most recent medical evidence. Expert opinion: As the pathogenesis of the pseudotumor cerebri syndrome is still unknown, many of the currently employed management strategies incorporate a 'plumbing approach' to decrease cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Trial (IIHTT) taught us that the disorder markedly affects visual and overall quality of life, and that reducing pressure alone is not enough to make patients well, even those considered to have 'mild' vision loss. Other than the IIHTT, the evidence supporting the use of various treatments is meager. The course of the disorder can be unpredictable, and the clinician(s) managing these patients are often uncertain about which treatments to employ. Moreover, the desired modalities and specialists are not universally available in all locations. An individualized and detailed approach to the various manifestations and nuances of the disorder is essential.

5.
Neurology ; 93(18): e1715-e1719, 2019 10 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31554650

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To report on the benefits of noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) on acute vestibular migraine (VM) treatment. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of patients with VM treated with nVNS in a single tertiary referral center between November 2017 and January 2019. Eighteen patients (16 women) were identified (mean age 45.7 [±14.8] years); 14 were treated for a VM attack and 4 for bothersome interictal dizziness consistent with persistent perceptual postural dizziness (PPPD). Patients graded the severity of vestibular symptoms and headache using an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS; 0 = no symptoms, 10 = worst ever symptoms) before and 15 minutes after nVNS. RESULTS: In those with acute VM, vertigo improved in 13/14 (complete resolution in 2, at least 50% improvement in 5). The mean vertigo intensity before nVNS was 5.2 (±1.6; median 6), and 3.1 (±2.2; median 3) following stimulation; mean reduction in vertigo intensity was 46.9% (±31.5; median 45%). Five experienced headache with the VM attack; all reported improvement following nVNS. Mean headache severity was 6 (±1.4; median 6) prior to treatment and 2.4 (±1.5; median 3) following nVNS; mean reduction in headache intensity was 63.3% (±21.7; median 50). All 4 treated with nVNS for interictal PPPD reported no benefit. CONCLUSION: Our study provides preliminary evidence that nVNS may provide rapid relief of vertigo and headache in acute VM, and supports further randomized, sham-controlled studies into nVNS in VM. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with acute VM, nVNS rapidly relieves vertigo and headache.


Assuntos
Cefaleia/terapia , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/terapia , Estimulação Elétrica Nervosa Transcutânea/métodos , Estimulação do Nervo Vago/métodos , Vertigem/terapia , Doença Aguda , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Cefaleia/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/fisiopatologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Vertigem/fisiopatologia , Doenças Vestibulares/fisiopatologia , Doenças Vestibulares/terapia , Adulto Jovem
6.
Cephalalgia ; 39(12): 1577-1585, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31450969

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether synchronous video-based telemedicine visits with specialists are feasible and to evaluate clinical effectiveness, patient perceptions, and other benefits of telemedicine visits for follow-up migraine care in a tertiary headache center. DESIGN: A one-year, randomized clinical trial. RESULTS: Fifty patients were screened and 45 entered the study (43 women, two men). Out of 96 scheduled visits, 89 were successfully conducted using telemedicine. Eighteen patients (out of 22) in the telemedicine cohort and 12 patients (out of 23) in the in-office cohort completed the study. In this small study, clinical outcomes, namely improvement in MIDAS, number of headache days, and average severity at 12 months for participants in the telemedicine group, were not different from those in the in-office group. Convenience was rated higher and visit times were shorter in the telemedicine group. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of patients with severe migraine-related disability, telemedicine was a feasible mode of treatment and an effective alternative to in-office visits for follow-up migraine care. Physician productivity could be higher with telemedicine, and patients may get better access because of its convenience. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study is listed on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01706003).

7.
Pediatr Neurol ; 99: 31-39, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31303369

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Revised diagnostic criteria for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome require three of four neuroimaging findings in the absence of papilledema. We examined the sensitivity and specificity of three or more of four of these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in children. METHODS: As part of clinical care, patients in whom there was suspicion for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome underwent neurological and fundoscopic examinations, lumbar puncture, MRI, or magnetic resonance venogram. For this retrospective study, we used this information to classify 119 subjects into definite (n = 66) or probable pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (n = 12), elevated opening pressure without papilledema (n = 23), or controls who had normal opening pressure without papilledema (n = 24). A neuroradiologist, unaware of the clinical findings or original MRI report, reviewed MRIs for pituitary gland flattening, flattening of the posterior sclera, optic nerve sheath distention, and transverse venous sinus stenosis. RESULTS: The presence of three or more MRI findings has a sensitivity of 62% (95% confidence interval: 47% to 75%) and a specificity of 95% (95% confidence interval: 77% to 100%), compared with controls. Two of three (transverse venous sinus stenosis, pituitary gland flattening, flattening of the posterior sclera) had a similar sensitivity and specificity. Transverse venous sinus stenosis alone had a slightly higher sensitivity (74%, 95% confidence interval: 60% to 85%) and specificity (100%, 95% confidence interval: 80% to 100%). CONCLUSIONS: In children, three of four of the proposed neuroimaging criteria and transverse venous sinus stenosis alone have a moderate sensitivity and robust specificity for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome. MRIs should be reviewed for these criteria, and their presence should raise suspicion for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in children, particularly if the presence of papilledema is uncertain.

8.
Headache ; 59(7): 1052-1062, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31152441

RESUMO

TRIAL DESIGN: SAMURAI and SPARTAN were double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 studies conducted in the United States, as well as the United Kingdom and Germany (SPARTAN only). Individuals with migraine were randomized to receive oral lasmiditan 50 mg (SPARTAN only), 100 mg, 200 mg, or placebo within 4 hours of onset of a migraine attack. The aim of this analysis was to characterize dizziness reported with lasmiditan treatment. METHODS: Data from SAMURAI and SPARTAN were pooled for the current post hoc analyses. Onset time and duration of dizziness were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses based on presence/absence of dizziness were performed for the endpoints of interference with daily activity, patient global impression of change (PGIC), pain at 2 hours, and most bothersome symptom (MBS) at 2 hours based on adverse events occurring within 2 hours of taking study drug. RESULTS: Dizziness incidence was as follows: Placebo (N = 1262), 2.9% (0.1% severe); lasmiditan 50 mg (N = 654), 8.6% (0.3% severe); lasmiditan 100 mg (N = 1265), 14.9% (0.7% severe); and lasmiditan 200 mg (N = 1258), 16.8% (1.4% severe). Among participants who received lasmiditan as their first dose, risk factors for dizziness were higher lasmiditan dosage, being non-Hispanic/Latino, mild or moderate severity of migraine attack, and lower body mass index. The median time to onset of dizziness was generally 30-40 minutes, and the median duration was 1.5-2 hours. The presence of dizziness did not appear to have a negative influence on lasmiditan's effect on daily activity, PGIC, freedom from pain, or MBS. Overall, 21 participants experienced vertigo: Lasmiditan 50 mg, n = 2 (0.3%); 100 mg, n = 11 (0.9%); 200 mg, n = 7 (0.6%); and placebo, n = 1 (<0.1%). CONCLUSION: The incidence of dizziness with lasmiditan increased with dose. Dizziness was generally mild or moderate in severity and of quick onset and short duration. The presence of dizziness did not influence drug efficacy.

10.
Cephalalgia ; 39(8): 967-977, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31246132

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Two randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trials (ACT1, ACT2) evaluated non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) as acute treatment for cluster headache. We analyzed pooled ACT1/ACT2 data to increase statistical power and gain insight into the differential efficacy of nVNS in episodic and chronic cluster headache. METHODS: Data extracted from ACT1 and ACT2 were pooled using a fixed-effects model. Main outcome measures were the primary endpoints of each study. This was the proportion of participants whose first treated attack improved from moderate (2), severe (3), or very severe (4) pain intensity to mild (1) or nil (0) for ACT1 and the proportion of treated attacks whose pain intensity improved from 2-4 to 0 for ACT2. RESULTS: The pooled population included 225 participants (episodic: n = 112; chronic: n = 113) from ACT1 (n = 133) and ACT2 (n = 92) in the nVNS (n = 108) and sham (n = 117) groups. Interaction was shown between treatment group and cluster headache subtype (p < 0.05). nVNS was superior to sham in episodic but not chronic cluster headache (both endpoints p < 0.01). Only four patients discontinued the studies due to adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: nVNS is a well-tolerated and effective acute treatment for episodic cluster headache. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The studies were registered at clinicaltrials.gov (ACT1: NCT01792817; ACT2: NCT01958125).

11.
Neurology ; 92(20): e2309-e2320, 2019 05 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30996056

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of erenumab, a human anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor monoclonal antibody, in patients with chronic migraine and medication overuse. METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 667 adults with chronic migraine were randomized (3:2:2) to placebo or erenumab (70 or 140 mg), stratified by region and medication overuse status. Data from patients with baseline medication overuse at baseline were used to assess changes in monthly migraine days, acute migraine-specific medication treatment days, and proportion of patients achieving ≥50% reduction from baseline in monthly migraine days. RESULTS: Of 667 patients randomized, 41% (n = 274) met medication overuse criteria. In the medication overuse subgroup, erenumab 70 or 140 mg groups had greater reductions than the placebo group at month 3 in monthly migraine days (mean [95% confidence interval] -6.6 [-8.0 to -5.3] and -6.6 [-8.0 to -5.3] vs -3.5 [-4.6 to -2.4]) and acute migraine-specific medication treatment days (-5.4 [-6.5 to -4.4] and -4.9 [-6.0 to -3.8] vs -2.1 [-3.0 to -1.2]). In the placebo and 70 and 140 mg groups, ≥50% reductions in monthly migraine days were achieved by 18%, 36% (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 2.67 [1.36-5.22]) and 35% (odds ratio 2.51 [1.28-4.94]). These clinical responses paralleled improvements in patient-reported outcomes with a consistent benefit of erenumab across multiple measures of impact, disability, and health-related quality of life. The observed treatment effects were similar in the non-medication overuse subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: Erenumab reduced migraine frequency and acute migraine-specific medication treatment days in patients with chronic migraine and medication overuse, improving disability and quality of life. CLINICALTRIALSGOV IDENTIFIER: NCT02066415. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class II evidence that erenumab reduces monthly migraine days at 3 months in patients with chronic migraine and medication overuse.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/uso terapêutico , Antagonistas do Receptor do Peptídeo Relacionado ao Gene de Calcitonina/uso terapêutico , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/tratamento farmacológico , Uso Excessivo de Medicamentos Prescritos , Adulto , Analgésicos/uso terapêutico , Doença Crônica , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Triptaminas/uso terapêutico
12.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 39(3): 299-307, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30829949

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Revised diagnostic criteria for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were proposed in part to reduce misdiagnosis of intracranial hypertension without papilledema (WOP) by using 3 or 4 MRI features of intracranial hypertension when a sixth nerve palsy is absent. This study was undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI criteria and to validate their utility for diagnosing IIH in patients with chronic headaches and elevated opening pressure (CH + EOP), but WOP. METHODS: Brain MRIs from 80 patients with IIH with papilledema (WP), 33 patients with CH + EOP, and 70 control patients with infrequent episodic migraine were assessed in a masked fashion for MRI features of intracranial hypertension. RESULTS: Reduced pituitary gland height was moderately sensitive for IIH WP (80%) but had low specificity (64%). Increased optic nerve sheath diameter was less sensitive (51%) and only moderately specific (83%). Flattening of the posterior globe was highly specific (97%) but had low sensitivity (57%). Transverse venous sinus stenosis was moderately sensitive for IIH WP (78%) but of undetermined specificity. A combination of any 3 of 4 MRI features was nearly 100% specific, while maintaining a sensitivity of 64%. Of patients with CH + EOP, 30% had 3 or more MRI features, suggesting IIH WOP in those patients. CONCLUSION: A combination of any 3 of 4 MRI features is highly specific for intracranial hypertension and suggests IIH WOP when present in patients with chronic headache and no papilledema.

13.
Headache ; 59(5): 727-740, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30737783

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the ictal symptoms, interictal symptoms, psychiatric comorbidities, and interictal neuro-otologic examination findings in vestibular migraine (VM). METHODS: Retrospective chart review of 491 patients seen from August 2014 until March 2018 at a tertiary neurology referral center for vestibular disorders to identify patients fulfilling the 2012 VM criteria. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-one patients (105 women) were identified. Mean age of VM onset was 44.3 (±13.7) years. Preceding the onset of vestibular symptoms, most had migraine (57.3%) and motion sickness (61.1%). It was common to have a family history of migraine (50.8%) and episodic vestibular symptoms (28.1%). Common ictal symptoms were triggered (visually induced and head-motion) and spontaneous vertigo, accompanied by photophobia and phonophobia (118/131 [90.1%] patients), nausea (105/131 [80.2%] patients), aural symptoms (79/131 [60.3%] patients), and headache (65/131 [49.6%] patients). Interictally, many experienced visually induced (116/131 [88.6%] patients), head-motion (86/131 [65.6%] patients), and persistent (67/131 [51.1%] patients) dizziness. Psychiatric comorbidities include anxiety (92/131 [70.2%] patients), depression (53/131 [40.5%] patients), insomnia (38/131 [29.0%] patients), phobic disorders (15/131 [11.5%] patients), and psychogenic disorders (11/131 [8.4%] patients). Common triggers were stress (52/131 [39.7%] patients), bright lights (35/131 [26.7%] patients), weather changes (34/131 [26.0%] patients), and sleep deprivation (34/131 [26.0%] patients). Interictal neuro-otologic examination was abnormal in 56/131 (42.7%), usually hyperventilation-induced, head-shaking-induced, vibration-induced, and positional nystagmus. The most common balance-test finding was impaired sharpened Romberg's test (22/130 [16.9%] patients). CONCLUSIONS: In this single center study, we found that VM typically affects women in their 40s, with a personal and family history of migraine. Typical ictal symptoms were triggered and spontaneous vertigo, associated with photophobia and phonophobia, nausea, aural symptoms, and headache. Interictal vestibular symptoms, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and non-specific interictal neuro-otologic findings were common.

14.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 39(1): 1-2, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30762715
15.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 39(1): 82-93, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30762716

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Headache is the most common symptom of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and may not resolve with intracranial pressure-lowering treatments. Many patients with IIH have a pre-existing history of migraine. Approximately two-thirds of patients with IIH continue to experience headaches after the other manifestations of the disorder resolve. There are no evidence-based guidelines for treating IIH-related headaches. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: This review proposes mechanisms by which IIH produces both acute and ongoing headache. The article analyzes the literature regarding medical and procedural therapies for IIH, apropos to their effectiveness for treating headaches. It then proposes strategies to use in clinical practice, incorporating treatments used for the primary headache disorders of migraine and tension-type headache, the most common phenotypes of IIH-associated headache. CONCLUSIONS: Treatments used to manage primary headache disorders may be effective in the management of IIH-associated headache, although none have been specifically studied in this condition. RESULTS: Recommendations provided consider a holistic approach to the problem based on existing guidelines and clinical experience.

16.
Neurol Clin Pract ; 8(5): 389-396, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30564492

RESUMO

Background: Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare sensory perception disorder, most often caused by migraine in adults. We aimed to characterize the clinical characteristics of AIWS in a cohort of vestibular migraine (VM) patients. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with VM seen between August 2014 and January 2018. Results: Seventeen patients were identified (10 women) with a median age at onset of 45 years (range 15-61 years), and median age at presentation of 49 years (range 17-63 years). Eighty-two percent reported 1 AIWS symptom, 12% reported 3 symptoms, and 6% described 2 symptoms. The most common symptom was visual distortions (47%), followed by extrapersonal misperceptions (41%) and somesthetic distortions (29%). Most AIWS occurred during VM episodes (77%). Eleven patients were seen in follow-up; 10 described complete or partial resolution of both AIWS and VM with migraine preventive therapy, while 1 experienced complete resolution of VM but continued to have AIWS. Neuro-otologic abnormalities improved in 2 patients. Conclusions: This study characterizes the clinical features of AIWS in patients with VM. We observed several rare and highly unusual AIWS misperceptions (frosted-glass vision, underwater vision, dolly zoom effect, sensation of the brain coming out of the head, closed-eye visual hallucinations, and headlight glare-induced marco/microsomatognosia), and resolution or improvement in AIWS and VM with migraine preventive treatment.

18.
Neurology ; 91(24): e2211-e2221, 2018 12 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30446596

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of galcanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to calcitonin gene-related peptide, in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine. METHODS: A phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of LY2951742 in patients with chronic migraine (Evaluation of Galcanezumab in the Prevention of Chronic Migraine [REGAIN]) was a phase 3 study with a 3-month double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment phase and a 9-month open-label extension. Eligible patients 18 to 65 years of age with chronic migraine were randomized 2:1:1 to monthly subcutaneous injections of placebo (n = 558), galcanezumab 120 mg (with a 240-mg loading dose, n = 278), or galcanezumab 240 mg (n = 277). The primary endpoint was the overall mean change from baseline in the number of monthly migraine headache days (MHDs) during the 3-month double-blind treatment phase. RESULTS: Mean number of monthly MHDs at baseline was 19.4 for the total sample. Both galcanezumab dose groups demonstrated greater overall mean reduction in the number of monthly MHDs compared to placebo (placebo -2.7, galcanezumab 120 mg -4.8, galcanezumab 240 mg -4.6) (p < 0.001 for each dose compared to placebo). There were no clinically meaningful differences between galcanezumab doses and placebo on any safety or tolerability outcome except for a higher incidence of treatment-emergent injection-site reaction (p < 0.01), injection-site erythema (p < 0.001), injection-site pruritus (p < 0.01), and sinusitis (p < 0.05) in the galcanezumab 240-mg group relative to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Both doses of galcanezumab were superior to placebo in reducing the number of monthly MHDs. Galcanezumab appears efficacious, safe, and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine. CLINICALTRIALSGOV IDENTIFIER: NCT02614261. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This interventional study provides Class I evidence that galcanezumab is superior to placebo in the reduction of the number of monthly MHDs.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais/uso terapêutico , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/uso terapêutico , Doença Crônica/prevenção & controle , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Resultado do Tratamento
19.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 22(12): 85, 2018 10 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30343336

RESUMO

The original version of this article contains an error in the title. The title should be: Migraine Aura Without Headache. The title is corrected in this correction article.

20.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 22(11): 77, 2018 09 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30225597

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review evaluates and explains our current understanding of a rare subtype of migraine, typical aura without headache, also known as migraine aura without headache or acephalgic migraine. RECENT FINDINGS: Typical aura without headache is a known entity within the spectrum of migraine. Its pathophysiology is suggested to be similar to classic migraines, with cortical spreading depression leading to aura formation but without an associated headache. No clinical trials have been performed to evaluate treatment options, but case reports suggest that most patients will respond to the traditional treatments for migraine with aura. Bilateral greater occipital nerve blocks may be helpful in aborting migraine with prolonged aura. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has shown efficacy in aborting attacks of migraine with aura but has not been specifically tested in isolated aura. Typical aura without headache occurs exclusively in 4% patients with migraine, and may take place at some point in 38% of patients with migraine with aura. Typical aura without headache commonly presents with visual aura without headache, brainstem aura without headache, and can also develop later in life, known as late-onset migraine accompaniment.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/epidemiologia , Epilepsia/terapia , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/epidemiologia , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/terapia , Enxaqueca com Aura/epidemiologia , Enxaqueca com Aura/terapia , Humanos , Transtornos de Enxaqueca/complicações , Enxaqueca com Aura/complicações
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