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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31617910

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Elevated plasma concentrations of liver enzymes are routinely used as markers of liver injury in adults and children. Currently, the age- and sex-specific effects of adiposity on pediatric liver enzyme concentrations are unclear. METHODS: We included participants from two cohorts of Danish children and adolescents: 1,858 from a population-based cohort, and 2,155 with overweight or obesity, aged between six and 18 years. Age- and sex-specific percentile curves were calculated for fasting plasma concentrations of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in both cohorts. Hepatic fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 458 participants. RESULTS: Concentrations of ALT, AST, LDH, and ALP decreased with age in both girls and boys, while GGT and bilirubin were comparable across age groups in girls and increased slightly with age in boys. Children and adolescents with overweight or obesity exhibited higher concentrations of ALT in all age groups. Concentrations of ALT, and to a lesser degree GGT, increased with age in boys with overweight or obesity. Optimal ALT cut-points for diagnosing hepatic steatosis (liver fat content > 5%) was 24.5 U/L for girls (sensitivity: 55.6%, specificity: 84.0%), and 34.5 U/L for boys (sensitivity: 83.7%, specificity: 68.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric normal values of liver enzymes vary with both age and sex. Overweight and obesity is associated with elevated biochemical markers of liver damage. These findings emphasize the need for prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

2.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 110(5): 1079-1087, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31504107

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mendelian randomization studies in adults suggest that abdominal adiposity is causally associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease in adults, but its causal effect on cardiometabolic risk in children remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study the causal relation of abdominal adiposity with cardiometabolic risk factors in children by applying Mendelian randomization. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using variants previously associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI) and examined its associations with cardiometabolic factors by linear regression and Mendelian randomization in a meta-analysis of 6 cohorts, including 9895 European children and adolescents aged 3-17 y. RESULTS: WHRadjBMI GRS was associated with higher WHRadjBMI (ß = 0.021 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.016, 0.026 SD/allele; P = 3 × 10-15) and with unfavorable concentrations of blood lipids (higher LDL cholesterol: ß = 0.006 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.001, 0.011 SD/allele; P = 0.025; lower HDL cholesterol: ß = -0.007 SD/allele; 95% CI: -0.012, -0.002 SD/allele; P = 0.009; higher triglycerides: ß = 0.007 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.012 SD/allele; P = 0.006). No differences were detected between prepubertal and pubertal/postpubertal children. The WHRadjBMI GRS had a stronger association with fasting insulin in children and adolescents with overweight/obesity (ß = 0.016 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.001, 0.032 SD/allele; P = 0.037) than in those with normal weight (ß = -0.002 SD/allele; 95% CI: -0.010, 0.006 SD/allele; P = 0.605) (P for difference = 0.034). In a 2-stage least-squares regression analysis, each genetically instrumented 1-SD increase in WHRadjBMI increased circulating triglycerides by 0.17 mmol/L (0.35 SD, P = 0.040), suggesting that the relation between abdominal adiposity and circulating triglycerides may be causal. CONCLUSIONS: Abdominal adiposity may have a causal, unfavorable effect on plasma triglycerides and potentially other cardiometabolic risk factors starting in childhood. The results highlight the importance of early weight management through healthy dietary habits and physically active lifestyle among children with a tendency for abdominal adiposity.

3.
Hum Mol Genet ; 28(19): 3327-3338, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31504550

RESUMO

Although hundreds of genome-wide association studies-implicated loci have been reported for adult obesity-related traits, less is known about the genetics specific for early-onset obesity and with only a few studies conducted in non-European populations to date. Searching for additional genetic variants associated with childhood obesity, we performed a trans-ancestral meta-analysis of 30 studies consisting of up to 13 005 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI) achieved 2-18 years old) and 15 599 controls (consistently <50th percentile of BMI) of European, African, North/South American and East Asian ancestry. Suggestive loci were taken forward for replication in a sample of 1888 cases and 4689 controls from seven cohorts of European and North/South American ancestry. In addition to observing 18 previously implicated BMI or obesity loci, for both early and late onset, we uncovered one completely novel locus in this trans-ancestral analysis (nearest gene, METTL15). The variant was nominally associated with only the European subgroup analysis but had a consistent direction of effect in other ethnicities. We then utilized trans-ancestral Bayesian analysis to narrow down the location of the probable causal variant at each genome-wide significant signal. Of all the fine-mapped loci, we were able to narrow down the causative variant at four known loci to fewer than 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (FAIM2, GNPDA2, MC4R and SEC16B loci). In conclusion, an ethnically diverse setting has enabled us to both identify an additional pediatric obesity locus and further fine-map existing loci.

4.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 43(10): 2007-2016, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31332278

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most obese children show cardiometabolic impairments, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Yet some obese children retain a normal cardiometabolic profile. The mechanisms underlying this variability remain largely unknown. We examined whether genetic loci associated with increased insulin sensitivity and relatively higher fat storage on the hip than on the waist in adults are associated with a normal cardiometabolic profile despite higher adiposity in children. METHODS: We constructed a genetic score using variants previously linked to increased insulin sensitivity and/or decreased waist-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and examined the associations of this genetic score with adiposity and cardiometabolic impairments in a meta-analysis of six cohorts, including 7391 European children aged 3-18 years. RESULTS: The genetic score was significantly associated with increased degree of obesity (higher BMI-SDS beta = 0.009 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.003; higher body fat mass beta = 0.009, SE = 0.004, P = 0.031), yet improved body fat distribution (lower WHRadjBMI beta = -0.014 SD/allele, SE = 0.006, P = 0.016), and favorable concentrations of blood lipids (higher HDL cholesterol: beta = 0.010 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.002; lower triglycerides: beta = -0.011 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.001) adjusted for age, sex, and puberty. No differences were detected between prepubertal and pubertal/postpubertal children. The genetic score predicted a normal cardiometabolic profile, defined by the presence of normal glucose and lipid concentrations, among obese children (OR = 1.07 CI 95% 1.01-1.13, P = 0.012, n = 536). CONCLUSIONS: Genetic predisposition to higher body fat yet lower cardiometabolic risk exerts its influence before puberty.

5.
Pediatr Diabetes ; 20(5): 538-548, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31074070

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Alterations in glucose metabolism that lead to the development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease may begin already in childhood. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to generate pediatric age and sex-specific reference values for fasting concentrations of glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, C-peptide, and homeostasis model assessment: insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in Danish/North-European white children and adolescents from a population-based cohort and to compare values from children and adolescents with overweight/obesity with this reference. METHODS: The population- and obesity clinic-based cohorts consisted of 2451 and 1935 children and adolescents between 6 and 18 years of age. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were obtained and percentile curves were calculated. RESULTS: In the population-based cohort, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR values increased before the expected onset of puberty (P < .05). Thereafter, all variables decreased in girls (P < .05) and HbA1c decreased in boys (P < .05). Concentrations of all measured markers of glucose metabolism were higher in the obesity clinic-based cohort than the population-based cohort (both sexes P < .001). Specifically, insulin and HOMA-IR continued to increase to 18 years in the clinic-based cohort, particularly among boys. CONCLUSIONS: Fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR change during childhood, making pediatric reference values essential for timely identification of derangements in glucose metabolism. Children and adolescents with obesity exhibit increased concentrations of these biomarkers.

6.
Clin Chim Acta ; 493: 123-128, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30849308

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Leptin and adiponectin are two key adipocyte secreted hormones and both are involved in several essential physiological mechanisms. Due to their central role in energy homeostasis their ratio, the leptin/adiponectin ratio, is believed to be a marker of metabolic derangement. Pediatric reference values are needed for the risk stratification of individual-measured ratios. METHODS: Blood samples were drawn from healthy, Danish schoolchildren following an overnight fast. A ratio was calculated from serum leptin and adiponectin quantifications done using commercially available ELISA Kits. RESULTS: Nine hundred eighty-three participants (583 girls) aged 6-18 years were included. Smoothed percentile curves and age-group specific percentiles were calculated. A correlation with age was demonstrated, with a gradual increase with age in girls and a negative parabolic relation, with a peak in age group 10-14, in boys. The leptin/adiponectin ratio was positively correlated to the body mass index standard deviation score for both girls and boys (p < .001). CONCLUSION: The leptin/adiponectin ratio is correlated to age and differs between the sexes in healthy children and adolescents.


Assuntos
Adiponectina/normas , Leptina/normas , Adiponectina/sangue , Adolescente , Índice de Massa Corporal , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Leptina/sangue , Masculino , Valores de Referência
7.
Scand J Clin Lab Invest ; 79(1-2): 129-135, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30861348

RESUMO

Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones influence the functions of many organ systems, as well as child development and growth. Several studies have reported an association between ethnicity and thyroid hormones. This study aims to explore pediatric serum concentrations of TSH, free triiodothyronine (fT3), and free thyroxine (fT4) and their relation to age and sex and subsequently to present pediatric reference intervals from healthy Danish/North-European white children. A population-based cohort in Denmark of 2411 (1435 girls) healthy school children and adolescents aged 6.0-18.9 years were included. Fasting concentrations of serum TSH, fT3, and fT4 were determined from venous blood samples using immunologic chemiluminescent assays. Age- and sex-dependent percentiles were generated using the GAMLSS function. Median values of fT3 and fT4, but not TSH, were lower in the older age group compared with the youngest age group for both sexes (all p < .05). A significant difference for fT3 was found between the sexes for all age groups (all p < .001). fT4 was negatively correlated with body mass index standard deviation scores in boys. In conclusion, serum concentrations of thyroid hormones vary during childhood and adolescence and differ with age and sex.


Assuntos
Jejum/sangue , Tireotropina/sangue , Tiroxina/sangue , Tri-Iodotironina/sangue , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Índice de Massa Corporal , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Europa (Continente) , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Voluntários Saudáveis , Humanos , Imunoensaio , Luminescência , Masculino , Valores de Referência , Fatores Sexuais , Adulto Jovem
8.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 26(12): 1915-1922, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30460774

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the effect of a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, previously shown to associate with childhood BMI, on the baseline cardiometabolic traits and the response to a lifestyle intervention in Danish children and adolescents. METHODS: Children and adolescents with overweight or obesity (n = 920) and a population-based control sample (n = 698) were recruited. Anthropometric and biochemical measures were obtained at baseline and in a subgroup of children and adolescents with overweight or obesity again after 6 to 24 months of lifestyle intervention (n = 754). The effects of the GRS were examined by multiple linear regressions using additive genetic models. RESULTS: At baseline, the GRS associated with BMI standard deviation score (SDS) both in children and adolescents with overweight or obesity (ß = 0.033 [SE = 0.01]; P = 0.001) and in the population-based sample (ß = 0.065 [SE = 0.02]; P = 0.001). No associations were observed for cardiometabolic traits. The GRS did not influence changes in BMI SDS or cardiometabolic traits following lifestyle intervention. CONCLUSIONS: A GRS for childhood BMI was associated with BMI SDS but not with other cardiometabolic traits in Danish children and adolescents. The GRS did not influence treatment response following lifestyle intervention.

9.
Pediatr Endocrinol Diabetes Metab ; 23(3): 122-129, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29253032

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The accumulation of components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a disturbed glucose metabolism in obese children. AIM OF STUDY: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between MetS and estimates of insulin sensitivity and ß-cell function obtained from oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived indices in lean and obese children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 2-hour OGTT was administered in 83 children aged 7-17 years. 47 children were obese and recruited from a childhood obesity clinic and 36 were lean age- and sex-matched controls. Surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity and ß-cell function were assessed by the OGTT-derived indices: the Matsuda index, the insulinogenic index, and the oral disposition index. The severity of MetS was assessed by measures of waist circumference, blood pressure, and fasting levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose. RESULTS: The 83 children were allocated to one of three groups according to the number of components of MetS: the median body mass index standard deviation score was 0.2 (range -0.6-2.9) in the low MetS risk group (n=36), 2.8 (0.1-4.1) in the high MetS risk group (n=25), and 2.9 (2.1-4.4) in the MetS group (n=22). An increasing number of MetS components were associated with a lower insulin sensitivity and an altered ß-cell function according to the Matsuda index (p<0.0001), the insulinogenic index (p<0.0001), and the oral disposition index (p=0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Children burdened by the accumulation of components of MetS exhibited a disturbed glucose metabolism as expressed by lowered peripheral insulin sensitivity and ß-cell function.


Assuntos
Resistência à Insulina , Células Secretoras de Insulina/fisiologia , Síndrome Metabólica/fisiopatologia , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Teste de Tolerância a Glucose , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade/fisiopatologia
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