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1.
J Orthop Res ; 2021 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34783068

RESUMO

Tendons and ligaments are jointed to bones via an enthesis that is essential to the proper function of the muscular and skeletal structures. The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of mechanical stress on the enthesis. We used ex vivo models in organ cultures of rat Achilles tendons with calcaneus including the enthesis. The organ was attached to a mechanical stretching apparatus that can conduct cyclic tensile strain. We made the models of 1-mm elongation (0.5 Hz, 3% elongation), 2-mm elongation (0.5 Hz, 5% elongation), and no stress. Histological evaluation by Safranin O staining and Toluidin Blue and Picro Sirius red staining was conducted. Expression of sex-determining region Y-box 9 (Sox9), scleraxis (Scx), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp13) were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick end-labeling and live/dead staining and was conducted for evaluation of the apoptosis and cell viability. The structure of the enthesis was most maintained in the model of 1-mm elongation. The electronic microscope showed that the enthesis of the no stress model had ill-defined borders between fibrocartilage and mineralized fibrocartilage, and that calcification of mineralized fibrocartilage occurred in the model of 2-mm elongation. Sox9 and Scx was upregulated by 1-mm elongation, whereas Runx2 and Mmp13 were upregulated by 2-mm elongation. Apoptosis was inhibited by low stress. The results of this study suggested that 1-mm elongation can maintain the structure of the enthesis, while 2-mm elongation promotes degenerative changes.

2.
J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) ; 29(3): 23094990211049569, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34775855

RESUMO

Purpose: Medial meniscus (MM) posterior root (PR) tear leads to severe MM posterior extrusion (PE), resulting in rapid knee cartilage degeneration. MMPR repairs are recommended to reduce MMPE, especially during knee flexion. However, the difference in MMPE between different repair techniques remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate preoperative and postoperative MMPE following several pullout repair techniques. We hypothesized that a technique using two simple stitches (TSS) would be more useful than FasT-Fix-dependent modified Mason-Allen suture (F-MMA) to prevent the progression of MMPE in knee extension. Methods: This retrospective study included 35 patients who underwent MMPR repair. To compare MMPE, patients were divided into two groups according to the use of F-MMA while grasping the posterior capsule and TSS without grasping it. Open magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 10° and 90° knee flexion preoperatively, and at 3 and 12 months postoperatively, and the MMPE of both groups was evaluated. Results: A significant difference was observed between preoperative and 3-month postoperative MMPE at 90° knee flexion in both groups (p < .01). A significant difference was observed in 3- and 12-month postoperative MMPE at 10° knee flexion between both groups (p = .04/.02), whereas no significant difference in the preoperative MMPE at 10° knee flexion was observed between them (p = .45). Conclusions: Both repairs were found to be useful to reduce MMPE in knee flexion. Further, F-MMA repair increased MMPE in knee extension, unlike TSS repair. These findings suggest that TSS might have more advantages for load distribution when standing or walking.

3.
Knee Surg Relat Res ; 33(1): 38, 2021 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34627395

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Diagnosing partial tears of the medial meniscus (MM) posterior root is difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic values involved in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of MM posterior root tears (MMPRTs) and find other MRI-based findings in patients with partial MMPRTs. METHODS: Eighteen patients who had arthroscopically confirmed partial MMPRTs were included. As a control, 18 patients who underwent partial meniscectomy for other types of MM tears were evaluated. Isolated partial MMPRTs were classified into the following three types: type A, accurate partial stable tear (cleavage < 1/2 of root width); type B, bridged unstable root tear (cleavage ≥ 1/2 of root width); type C, complex horn tear expanded to the root. Conventional MRI-based findings of MMPRTs were evaluated between two groups (n = 23). Posterior root irregularity, bone marrow spot, and ocarina-like appearance showing several condensed circles in triangular meniscal horn (ocarina sign) were also evaluated. RESULTS: Posterior root irregularity and bone marrow spot were frequently observed in the partial MMPRTs (47.8%), compared with the other MM tears (P = 0.007 and 0.023, respectively). The ocarina sign was detected in 69.6% of patients with partial MMPRTs. A significant difference between two groups was observed in a positive ratio of ocarina sign (P < 0.001). Types A, B, and C of the partial tear/damage were observed in three, eight, and seven patients, respectively. The ocarina sign was the most common MRI finding in each type of partial MMPRT. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that a characteristic MRI finding, "ocarina sign," was frequently observed in patients with partial tear/damage of the MM posterior root. The ocarina sign was the most common MRI finding in several types of partial MMPRTs. Our results suggest that the ocarina sign may be useful to diagnose unnoticed partial MMPRTs. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV, retrospective comparative study.

4.
J Orthop Sci ; 2021 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34535382

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Different methods are available to assess the healing status of repaired root for medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRT) using second-look arthroscopy. However, few studies are comparing them or validating their usefulness. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the semi-quantitative arthroscopic score might correlate more with 1-year clinical outcomes in patients with MMPRT than the qualitative evaluation. METHODS: Data of 61 patients who underwent MMPRT pullout repair and second-look arthroscopy were retrospectively evaluated. The semi-quantitative arthroscopic scoring system was divided into three evaluation criteria: scores from 0 to 10 points include the width of the bridging tissue, stability of the repaired root, and synovial coverage. The qualitative evaluation was classified into 4 status; complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing according to the stability and mobility of the repaired root. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify predictors of 1-year postoperative clinical outcomes, including Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome, Lysholm, or International Knee Documentation Committee scores. Spearman's correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between second-look arthroscopic score/qualitative evaluation and 1-year postoperative clinical outcomes. In addition, the optimal cutoff point of semi-quantitative arthroscopic score was determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare clinical outcomes between patients with semi-quantitative arthroscopic scores ≥8 and scores <8. RESULTS: All clinical scores significantly improved at 1 year postoperatively. A good correlation was observed between the semi-quantitative score and clinical scores, but none between qualitative evaluation and clinical scores. The optimal cutoff point of semi-quantitative second-look arthroscopic score was 8 points. Significantly, better clinical outcomes were observed in patients with semi-quantitative scores ≥8 points. CONCLUSIONS: All 1-year postoperative clinical scores were significantly improved. The semi-quantitative arthroscopic scores correlate more with 1-year clinical outcomes in patients with MMPRT than the qualitative evaluation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV case series study.

5.
Hip Int ; : 11207000211044675, 2021 Sep 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34538120

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The acetabular labrum plays an important role in joint lubrication, and damage to this structure leads to osteoarthritis. This study aimed to histologically classify the degree of degeneration of the acetabular labrum and to investigate the changes in gene expression induced by mechanical stretching. METHODS: We obtained acetabular labrum cells from patients with hip osteoarthritis during total hip arthroplasty (n = 25). The labrum was stained with safranin O, and images were histologically evaluated using a new parameter, the red/blue (R/B) value. The samples were divided into the degenerated group (D group: n = 18) and the healthy group (H group: n = 7) in accordance with the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade. The cultured acetabular labral cells were subjected to loaded uniaxial cyclic tensile strain (CTS). After CTS, changes in gene expression were examined in both groups. RESULTS: Spearman's correlation analysis revealed that the R/B value was significantly correlated with the KL grade and the Krenn score. The expression levels of genes related to cartilage metabolism, osteogenesis and angiogenesis significantly increased after CTS in the H group, while gene expression in the D group showed weaker changes after CTS than that in the H group compared to the nonstretched control group. CONCLUSIONS: The degree of labral degeneration could be classified histologically using the R/B value and the KL grade. Mechanical stretching caused changes in gene expression that support the pathological features of labral degeneration.

6.
Acta Med Okayama ; 75(4): 423-430, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34511608

RESUMO

The treatment of medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) has evolved to include a variety of repair strategies. This study investigated the location of the articular cartilage degeneration during second-look arthroscopy after transtibial pullout repair with a modified Mason-Allen suture using FasT-Fix (F-MMA) in 22 patients with MMPRTs. Second-look arthroscopy was performed approximately 1 year postoperatively to eval-uate the healing status of the medial meniscus (MM). Articular cartilage degeneration was assessed using the International Cartilage Repair Society grade at primary surgery and again at second-look arthroscopy. Articular surfaces of the medial/lateral femoral condyles, the medial/lateral tibial plateaus, the patella and the trochlea were divided into several subcompartments (MF 1-9, LF 1-9, MT 1-5, LT 1-5, P 1-9, T 1-3). Clinical evaluations used the Japanese Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome, Lysholm, and International Knee Documentation Committee scores. Second-look arthroscopic findings showed complete healing of the MM posterior root in all patients. Significant differences between pullout repair and second-look arthroscopy were observed for MF 2 and 4, LF 7, and P 7. All clinical outcomes were improved. Our results indicate that this technique improves clinical outcomes postoperatively and may prevent the progression of cartilage degenera-tion on the loading surface of the medial knee compartment.

7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34458101

RESUMO

Background: Cartilage degradation progresses rapidly following medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT). Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has been performed for medial compartmental osteoarthritis following MMPRT. We evaluated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of UKA for medial compartmental osteoarthritis after an untreated MMPRT. Methods: Twenty-one patients who underwent UKA for isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis following MMPRT were retrospectively investigated. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and knee range of motion. The posterior tibial slope and tibial component inclination were evaluated using plain radiographs. Results: The mean follow-up periods were 25.5 ± 13.8 months. Clinical outcomes improved significantly postoperatively. The mean postoperative knee extension angle was -1.1° ± 2.1°, and the knee flexion angle was 134.3° ± 4.9°. The posterior tibial slope angle decreased from 9.0° ± 2.0° preoperatively to 5.4° ± 1.8° postoperatively, and postoperative tibial component inclination at the final follow-up was 2.9° ± 1.1° varus. No aseptic loosening or deep infections were observed. Conclusion: UKA significantly improved clinical outcomes and could be a viable surgical option for treating isolated medial compartmental osteoarthritis accompanied by untreated MMPRT.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34223925

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tibial rotation on the postoperative healing status of the medial meniscus (MM) following pullout repair of the MM posterior root tear (MMPRT). METHODS: Ninety-one patients (68 women and 23 men; mean age 63.3 ± 8.8 years) who had undergone transtibial pullout repair of MMPRT were enrolled in the study. The tibial external rotation angle (ERA) in each patient was measured postoperatively using computed tomography in the extended knee position. The meniscal healing status following transtibial pullout repair was assessed by second-look arthroscopy (mean postoperative period 12 months) using a previously published scoring system (range 0-10). The association between the ERA and the meniscal healing score was investigated using univariate linear regression models. The ERA cut-off for improved meniscal healing score (≥ 7) was determined using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: The ERA and the meniscal healing score were significantly associated, confirming that increased ERAs were correlated with worse meniscal healing status (R = - 0.28; P < 0.001). The optimum ERA cut-off value was 0.5°, with a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 63%. The mean meniscal healing scores were 7.3 and 6.2 among patients with ERAs < 0.5° and those with ERAs ≥ 0.5°, respectively (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that the ERA was significantly correlated with the postoperative meniscal healing status. Postoperative tibial rotation could be one of the factors affecting postoperative outcomes of pullout repair of MMPRT. Controlling the tibial rotation may possibly improve meniscal healing. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34137941

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Transtibial pullout repairs using two simple stitches (TSS) and a combination of TSS with posteromedial pullout repair (TSS + PMP) using an all-inside meniscal repair device have been reported previously for the treatment of medial meniscus (MM) posterior root tears. This study aimed to investigate the postoperative clinical outcomes of these techniques including MM extrusion (MME). METHODS: Fifty-two patients who underwent transtibial pullout repair were investigated and divided into TSS (n = 27) and TSS + PMP (n = 25) groups. The clinical outcomes were assessed using the Lysholm knee score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score 1 year postoperatively and compared between two groups. MME was measured using magnetic resonance imaging at 1 year postoperatively and compared between two groups. RESULTS: A significant improvement in each clinical score was observed in both groups, and no significant difference was seen in clinical outcomes. Moreover, no significant difference in postoperative MME was observed in both groups (TSS and TSS + PMP: 3.5 mm and 3.8 mm, respectively). Though no significant progression of MME was observed in TSS group, a significant progression of it was observed in TSS + PMP group postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that both techniques improved clinical outcomes in the short-term postoperative period. However, MME was progressed significantly in TSS + PMP group 1 year postoperatively, which indicated that PMP might not be a useful additional procedure for reducing the postoperative MME.

10.
Acta Med Okayama ; 75(2): 147-152, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33953421

RESUMO

Medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) have recently attracted considerable interest in orthopedics. To date, no in vivo human study has investigated suture translation changes in repaired MMPRTs with different degrees of knee flexion. This study examined suture translation at various degrees of knee flexion in 30 patients undergoing medial meniscus posterior root repair using the modified Mason-Allen suture technique between August 2016 and September 2017. Intraoperatively, sutures were provisionally fixed to an isometric positioner at the tibial site of the desired meniscal attachment, and the suture translation was measured at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The results showed significant increases in mean suture translation at the knee flexion positions from 0° to 30°, 30° to 60°, and 60° to 90° (p<0.01 for all). Our findings indicate that surgeons should carefully assess the degree of knee flexion at the moment when the meniscus is refixed by surgical sutures.

11.
Acta Med Okayama ; 75(2): 225-230, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33953430

RESUMO

A 65-year-old man presented with a left medial meniscus (MM) posterior root tear (PRT). Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed 12 months after transtibial pullout repair of the MMPRT. Repaired MM posterior root tissue was subjected to histological analysis. Immunostaining and picrosirius red staining showed sufficient deposition of type I collagen, and hematoxylin-eosin staining using a polarized microscope showed well-aligned fiber orientation in the repaired tissue. The repaired posterior root (post-transtibial pullout repair) showed mature and well-aligned ligament-like tissue. Preserving the MM posterior root remnant to mimic the original posterior root tissue might be useful when performing pullout repair.

12.
J Orthop Sci ; 2021 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34039522

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During transtibial pullout repair of medial meniscus (MM) posterior root tears (MMPRTs), accurate tibial tunnel creation within the anatomic MM posterior root attachment seems critical. This study aimed to evaluate the tibial tunnel position created by a newly-developed Precision guide during pullout repair of MMPRTs. METHODS: In 40 patients who underwent transtibial pullout repairs, the tibial tunnel was created using the Unicorn Meniscal Root (UMR) (n = 20) or Precision guide (n = 20). Three-dimensional computed tomography images of the tibial surface were evaluated postoperatively, using Tsukada's measurement method. The expected anatomic center of the MM posterior root attachment was defined as the center of three tangential lines corresponding to anatomic bony landmarks. The expected anatomic center (AC) and the tibial tunnel center (TC) were evaluated using the percentage-based posterolateral location on the tibial surface. The difference in the mediolateral and anteroposterior percentage distance between the AC and TC was calculated, as was the absolute distance between the AC and TC. RESULTS: The mean AC was located 77.4% posterior and 40.1% lateral. The mean TC was similar in the UMR and Precision guide groups. There was no significant difference in the mediolateral percentage distance (UMR 3.9% vs. Precision 3.6%, p = 0.405), but a significant difference was observed in the anteroposterior percentage distance (UMR 3.5% vs. Precision 2.6%, p = 0.031). The mean absolute distance between the AC and TC was 3.9 mm and 3.5 mm (UMR and Precision guide groups, respectively) (p = 0.364). CONCLUSIONS: The new Precision guide can create tibial tunnel in an optimal and stable position during pullout repair of MMPRTs.

13.
Connect Tissue Res ; : 1-10, 2021 May 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33974473

RESUMO

Purpose/Aim of the study: Previous studies have noted distinctions between medial meniscus posterior root and horn cells. However, the characteristics of root remnant cells have not been explored in detail. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression levels, proliferation, and resistance to mechanical stress of remnant and horn cells.Materials and Methods: Medial meniscus tissue samples were obtained from patients who underwent total or uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty. Cellular morphology, sry-type HMG box 9, type II collagen, and chondromodulin-I gene expression levels were analyzed. Collagen synthesis was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Proliferation analysis after 4 h-cyclic tensile strain was performed.Results: Horn cells displayed triangular morphology, whereas root remnant cells appeared fibroblast-like. sry-type HMG box 9 mRNA expression levels were similar in both cells, but type II collagen and chondromodulin-I mRNA expressions were observed only in horn cells. The ratio of type II collagen-positive cells in horn cells was about 10-fold higher than that in root remnant cells, whereas the ratio of sry-type HMG box 9-positive cells was similar. A significant increase in proliferation was observed in root remnant cells compared to that in horn cells. Further, under cyclic tensile strain, the survival rate was higher in root remnant cells than in horn cells.Conclusions: Medial meniscus root remnant cells showed higher proliferation and resistant properties to cyclic tensile strain than horn cells and showed no chondromodulin-I expression. Preserving the medial meniscus posterior root remnant during pullout repair surgery might maintain mechanical stress-resistant tissue and support healing.

14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33846879

RESUMO

BACKGROUNDS: Medial meniscus (MM) posterior root tear (PRT) results in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee, and pullout repair is recommended to prevent subsequent osteoarthritis. Diagnosing MMPRT is sometimes difficult, especially in the case of an incomplete tear. A posterior shiny-corner lesion (PSCL) is reported to be useful for diagnosis, although the association between MMPRT and PSCL is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the properties of PSCL, such as the location, volume, and duration from injury to the time of MRI (duration). We hypothesized that PSCL is observed in the early phase after the MMPRT onset. METHODS: T2-weighted fat-suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained from 55 patients with MMPRT preoperatively. The prevalence of the PSCL; giraffe neck, cleft, and ghost signs; severe MM extrusion (> 3 mm); and the PSCL volume were evaluated. The PSCL lesion elliptical volume (mm3) was calculated by measuring the anteroposterior, transverse, and craniocaudal dimensions. RESULTS: PSCL was observed in 34 (62%) cases. The mean volume of the PSCL was 102.0 mm3. A significantly shorter duration was observed in the PSCL-positive group (5.6 weeks) than that in the PSCL-negative group (40.9 weeks, P < 0.01), although no significant correlation was observed between the PSCL volume and duration. The sensitivity for the MMPRT was 90.5% when the cut-off duration value was 3 weeks and 81.8% when the cut-off value was 8 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: MRI examination may detect PSCL if it is performed early following MMPRT onset. Detecting PSCL may be useful in diagnosing MMPRT with high sensitivity.

15.
Hip Int ; : 11207000211004917, 2021 Apr 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33829902

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Residual acetabular dysplasia of the hip after open reduction can complicate the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) due to the potential need for corrective surgery. This retrospective study aimed to determine the predictive factors for acetabular development using postoperative radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: We retrospectively investigated 74 hips of patients with DDH who underwent open reduction after reaching walking age and were followed up radiologically until skeletal maturity. We evaluated the cartilaginous acetabulum and labrum using a new method that measures the cartilaginous and labral landmarks on coronal and axial MR T2*-weighted images in patients aged 5 years. The mean age at the time of surgery was 22 months and that at the final survey was 20 years. Severin classification was determined at the final follow-up. Groups with good (53 hips) and poor (21 hips) outcomes were compared using the postoperative radiographic and MRI parameters recorded at 5 years of age. Factors predicting acetabular development were identified using univariate and multiple logistic analyses. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the bony-acetabular index (AI) and centre-edge (CE) angle between the good and poor outcome groups. However, the poor outcome group had significantly larger cartilaginous- and labral-AIs but significantly smaller cartilaginous- and labral-CE angles than the good outcome group (both p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that labral-AI and labral-CE angle were predictors of acetabular development after open reduction for DDH, and their optimal cut-offs were 4° (77% sensitivity, 76% specificity) and 37° (68% sensitivity, 85% specificity), respectively. DISCUSSION: Normal cartilaginous acetabulum development occurs in childhood, and evaluation using only radiographs is difficult. However, labral-AI ⩾4° and labral-CE angle <37° on MRI at 5 years of age offer useful indications for corrective surgery in patients with DDH.

16.
JBJS Case Connect ; 11(2)2021 04 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33826555

RESUMO

CASE: A 49-year-old woman injured her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) as a high-school student. Double-bundle ACL reconstruction (DBACLR) using hamstring tendon grafts was performed because of recurrent instability. Eleven years after DBACLR, total knee arthroplasty was performed because of osteoarthritis progression. Histologic analysis was completed to observe the osteointegration of the tendon in the obtained proximal tibia. The tibial tunnel showed Sharpey-like fibers anteriorly, connecting the tendon graft and lamellar bone, whereas the intraarticular exit revealed well-aligned chondrocytes posteriorly, indicating chondral metaplasia of the tendon graft. CONCLUSION: Tendon-bone healing can regenerate both fibrous insertion and chondral metaplasia in DBACLR.

17.
Acta Med Okayama ; 75(1): 71-77, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33649616

RESUMO

Intra-operative acetabular fracture is a total hip arthroplasty complication that can occur during cementless cup insertion, especially in osteoporotic patients. We conducted this biomechanical study to investigate the impact resistance of the acetabulum with simulated bones of different density by drop-weight impact testing. Low- and high-density polyurethane foam blocks were used as osteoporotic and healthy bone models, respectively. Polyurethane blocks were used as the acetabular cancellous bone. Composite sheets were used as the acetabu-lum's medial cortex. The testing revealed that the osteoporotic bone model's impact resistance was significantly lower than that the healthy bone model'. In the healthy bone model, even thin acetabular cancellous bone with ≥ 1 mm acetabulum medial cortex was less likely to fracture. In the osteoporotic bone model, fracture was pos-sible without ≥ 1 mm medial cortex of the acetabulum and thick acetabular cancellous bone. Although impac-tion resistance differs due to bone quality, the impaction resistance in this osteoporotic bone model was equiv-alent to that healthy bone model's when a thick medial wall was present. To avoid intra-operative acetabulum fracture, surgeons should consider both the bone quality and the thicknesses of the medial cortex and acetabu-lar cancellous bone.


Assuntos
Acetábulo/patologia , Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Fraturas Ósseas/prevenção & controle , Complicações Intraoperatórias/prevenção & controle , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Prótese de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Modelos Anatômicos
18.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 29(12): 4205-4212, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33704516

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The volume of medial meniscus (MM) extrusion at 10° and 90° knee flexions using three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and assessed relevant clinical outcomes at 1-year follow-up were evaluated. METHODS: Twenty-four patients who underwent MM posterior root repair were retrospectively reviewed. At 10° and 90° knee flexions, the meniscal extrusion distance and volume were measured using 3D meniscus models constructed by SYNAPSE VINCENT®. The correlation between Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee scores, Tegner activity, and pain visual analog scales and changes in MM extrusion were assessed. RESULTS: No significant differences in the MM medial extrusion were observed between 10° and 90° knee flexions postoperatively. MM posterior extrusion (MMPE) decreased significantly at 10° and 90° knee flexions postoperatively. At 90° knee flexion, the meniscus volume at the intra-tibial surface increased at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. The MM extrusion volume increased slightly at 10° knee flexion; however, the volume decreased significantly at 90° knee flexion postoperatively. The change in MMPE significantly correlated with clinical scores. All 12-month clinical scores were significantly improved compared to preoperative scores. CONCLUSIONS: The progression of meniscus posterior extrusion and reduction of its volume at 90° knee flexion can be suppressed by MM posterior root repair. Postoperative clinical scores correlated with reductions of the posterior extrusion. Regarding clinical relevance, the dynamic stability of the meniscus can be maintained by MM posterior root repair, which is an effective therapeutic method for improving its clinical status. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV.


Assuntos
Traumatismos do Joelho , Lesões do Menisco Tibial , Humanos , Articulação do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Articulação do Joelho/cirurgia , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Meniscos Tibiais/cirurgia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Lesões do Menisco Tibial/cirurgia
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33680859

RESUMO

Background: Medial meniscus (MM) tears are associated with both acute and chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency and can lead to degenerative changes in the knee. ACL reconstruction (ACLR) combined with the meniscal repair was reported to result in decreased anterior knee joint laxity with evidence of improved patient-reported outcomes in the long term. However, a subtle tear of the MM posterior segment, also known as a ramp lesion, is difficult to detect on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and is frequently missed in ACL-deficient knees. However, there are few studies about the associations between bone geometry and ramp lesion of the MM. This study aimed to compare sagittal medial tibial slope (MTS), medial tibial plateau depth (MTPD), and coronal tibial slope (CTS) between ACL-injured knees with and without ramp lesion of the MM. We hypothesised that patients with ramp lesion of the MM and a concomitant ACL injury have a steeper MTS and shallower MTPD than those without ramp lesion of the MM. Methods: Twenty-seven patients who underwent ACLR (group A), and 15 patients with combined MM repair (group AM) were included in the study. Anterior tibial translation (ATT) was measured under general anaesthesia just before surgery using a knee arthrometer. MRI was performed in the 10°-knee-flexed position. The MTS and MTPD were measured on sagittal view, and the CTS was measured on coronal view. These parameters were compared between the groups. Differences in MRI measurements or patient demographics between the groups were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: No significant difference was observed in demographic data and post-operative side-to-side difference in ATT between both groups. Pre-operative ATT was significantly higher in group AM than in group A (P < 0.05), whereas post-operative ATT was similar in both groups. Further, Pre-operative ATT was significantly higher in patients with MTS ≥5.0° than in those with MTS <5.0° (P < 0.05). In groups A and AM, the MTS were 3.6° ± 1.8° and 6.2° ± 2.9°, the MTPD were 2.0 ± 0.5 mm and 2.1 ± 0.6 mm, and the CTS were 2.5° ± 1.8° and 2.4° ± 1.6°, respectively. Patients in group AM had a significantly steeper MTS compared to those in group A (P < 0.01), whereas MTPD and CTS were nearly the same in both groups. When the MTS cut-off value was set at 5.0°, the sensitivity and specificity for ACL injury with concomitant ramp lesion of the MM were 0.73 and 0.76, respectively. Conclusion: A steep posterior slope of the medial tibial plateau is a risk factor for ramp lesion of the MM associated with an ACL injury. Especially in patients with MTS ≥5.0°, an occult MM ramp lesion should be strongly suspected, and surgeons should prepare for MM repair in combination with ACLR.

20.
Knee ; 29: 593-594, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33518431
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