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1.
Haematologica ; 2019 Oct 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31582554

RESUMO

Venous thromboembolism is a frequent complication in patients with cancer. Homozygous carriers of the fibrinogen gamma gene (FGG) rs2066865 have a moderately increased risk of venous thromboembolism, but the effect of the FGG variant in cancer is unknown. We aimed to investigate the effect of the FGG variant and active cancer on the risk of venous thromboembolism. Cases with incident venous thromboembolism (n= 640) and a randomly selected age-weighted sub-cohort (n=3734) were derived from a population-based cohort (the Tromso study). Cox-regression was used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for VTE according to categories of cancer and FGG. In those without cancer, homozygosity at the FGG variant was associated with a 70% (HR 1.7 95% CI 1.2-2.3) increased risk of venous thromboembolism compared to non-carriers. Cancer patients homozygous for the FGG variant had a 2-fold (HR 2.0 95% CI 1.1-3.6) higher risk of venous thromboembolism than cancer patients without the variant. Moreover, the 6-month cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism among cancer patients was 6.4% (95% CI, 3.5%-11.6%) in homozygous carriers of FGG and 3.1% (95% CI, 2.3%-4.7%) in those without risk alleles. A synergistic effect was observed between rs2066865 and active cancer on the risk of VTE (Synergy index: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.02-3.21, Attributable proportion: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.11-0.74). In conclusion, homozygosity at the FGG variant and active cancer yielded synergistic effect on the risk of venous thromboembolism.

2.
Blood ; 2019 Aug 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31420334

RESUMO

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality. To advance our understanding of the biology contributing to VTE, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of VTE and a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) based on imputed gene expression from whole blood and liver. We meta-analyzed GWAS data from 18 studies for 30,234 VTE cases and 172,122 controls and assessed the association between 12,923,718 genetic variants and VTE. We generated variant prediction scores of gene expression from whole blood and liver tissue and assessed them for association with VTE. Mendelian randomization analyses were conducted for traits genetically associated with novel VTE loci. We identified 34 independent genetic signals for VTE risk from GWAS meta-analysis of which 14 are newly reported associations. This included 11 newly associated genetic loci (C1orf198, PLEK, OSMR-AS1, NUGGC/SCARA5, GRK5, MPHOSPH9, ARID4A, PLCG2, SMG6, EIF5A, and STX10) of which 6 replicated, and 3 new, independent signals in 3 known genes. Further, TWAS identified 5 additional genetic loci with imputed gene expression levels differing between cases and controls in whole blood (SH2B3, SPSB1, RP11-747H7.3, RP4-737E23.2) and in liver (ERAP1). At some GWAS loci, we found suggestive evidence that the VTE association signal for both novel and previously known regions co-localized with eQTL signals. Mendelian randomization analyses suggested that blood traits may contribute to the underlying risk of VTE. To conclude, we identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for VTE; for some loci, the association signals are likely mediated through gene expression of nearby genes.

3.
J Thromb Haemost ; 17(8): 1363-1371, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31124268

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Family history of myocardial infarction (FHMI) is known to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of prothrombotic genotypes on the association between FHMI and VTE in a case-cohort recruited from a general population. METHODS: Cases with a first VTE (n = 1493) and a subcohort (n = 13 072) were sampled from the Tromsø study (1994-2012) and the Nord-Trøndelag health (HUNT) study (1995-2008). The DNA samples were genotyped for rs8176719 (ABO), rs6025 (F5), rs1799963 (F2), rs2066865 (FGG), and rs2036914 (F11). Participants with missing information on risk alleles (n = 175), FHMI (n = 2769), and BMI (n = 52) were excluded. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for VTE. To explore the role of prothrombotic genotypes for the association between FHMI and VTE, we (a) included the genotypes in the multivariable-adjusted models and (b) assessed the joint effects between FHMI and genotypes on VTE risk. RESULTS: The FHMI was associated with a 1.3-fold increased risk of VTE (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.16-1.50) and 1.5-fold increased risk of unprovoked VTE (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.22-1.78). The risk of VTE by FHMI did not alter after adjustment for the five genotypes. The combination of FHMI and the different prothrombotic genotypes did not result in an excess VTE risk (i.e. no biological interaction). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the risk of VTE by FHMI is not explained by rs8176719 (ABO), rs6025 (F5), rs1799963 (F2), rs2066865 (FGG), and rs2036914 (F11). The combination of FHMI with prothrombotic genotypes had an additive effect on VTE risk.

4.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 1847, 2019 04 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31015462

RESUMO

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing health burden currently affecting 10-15% of adults worldwide. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as a marker of kidney function is commonly used to diagnose CKD. We analyze eGFR data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study and Michigan Genomics Initiative and perform a GWAS meta-analysis with public summary statistics, more than doubling the sample size of previous meta-analyses. We identify 147 loci (53 novel) associated with eGFR, including genes involved in transcriptional regulation, kidney development, cellular signaling, metabolism, and solute transport. Additionally, sex-stratified analysis identifies one locus with more significant effects in women than men. Using genetic risk scores constructed from these eGFR meta-analysis results, we show that associated variants are generally predictive of CKD with only modest improvements in detection compared with other known clinical risk factors. Collectively, these results yield additional insight into the genetic factors underlying kidney function and progression to CKD.


Assuntos
Loci Gênicos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Taxa de Filtração Glomerular/genética , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/genética , Feminino , Carga Global da Doença , Humanos , Rim/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Prognóstico , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/diagnóstico , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/epidemiologia , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/fisiopatologia , Medição de Risco/métodos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais
5.
Nat Genet ; 50(9): 1335-1341, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30104761

RESUMO

In genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for thousands of phenotypes in large biobanks, most binary traits have substantially fewer cases than controls. Both of the widely used approaches, the linear mixed model and the recently proposed logistic mixed model, perform poorly; they produce large type I error rates when used to analyze unbalanced case-control phenotypes. Here we propose a scalable and accurate generalized mixed model association test that uses the saddlepoint approximation to calibrate the distribution of score test statistics. This method, SAIGE (Scalable and Accurate Implementation of GEneralized mixed model), provides accurate P values even when case-control ratios are extremely unbalanced. SAIGE uses state-of-art optimization strategies to reduce computational costs; hence, it is applicable to GWAS for thousands of phenotypes by large biobanks. Through the analysis of UK Biobank data of 408,961 samples from white British participants with European ancestry for > 1,400 binary phenotypes, we show that SAIGE can efficiently analyze large sample data, controlling for unbalanced case-control ratios and sample relatedness.

6.
Nat Genet ; 50(9): 1234-1239, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30061737

RESUMO

To identify genetic variation underlying atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia, we performed a genome-wide association study of >1,000,000 people, including 60,620 atrial fibrillation cases and 970,216 controls. We identified 142 independent risk variants at 111 loci and prioritized 151 functional candidate genes likely to be involved in atrial fibrillation. Many of the identified risk variants fall near genes where more deleterious mutations have been reported to cause serious heart defects in humans (GATA4, MYH6, NKX2-5, PITX2, TBX5)1, or near genes important for striated muscle function and integrity (for example, CFL2, MYH7, PKP2, RBM20, SGCG, SSPN). Pathway and functional enrichment analyses also suggested that many of the putative atrial fibrillation genes act via cardiac structural remodeling, potentially in the form of an 'atrial cardiomyopathy'2, either during fetal heart development or as a response to stress in the adult heart.

7.
Int J Epidemiol ; 47(4): 1098-1105, 2018 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29509885

RESUMO

Background: Observational studies have shown that tobacco and alcohol use co-occur, but it is not clear whether this relationship is causal. Methods: Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and UK Biobank, we used observational methods to test the hypothesis that smoking heaviness increases alcohol consumption. Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses were then used to test the causal relationship between smoking heaviness and alcohol consumption using 55 967 smokers from four European studies [ALSPAC, The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS) and UK Biobank]. MR analyses used rs1051730/rs16969968 as a genetic proxy for smoking heaviness. Results: Observational results provided evidence of an association between cigarettes per day and weekly alcohol consumption (increase in units of alcohol per additional cigarette smoked per day = 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05 to 0.15, P ≤ 0.001 in ALSPAC; and 0.48, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.52, P ≤ 0.001 in UK Biobank). However, there was little evidence for an association between rs1051730/rs16969968 and units of alcohol consumed per week across ALSPAC, HUNT, CGPS and UK Biobank (standard deviation increase in units of alcohol per additional copy of the risk allele = -0.004, 95% CI -0.023 to 0.016, P=0.708, I2 = 51.9%). We had 99% and 88% power to detect a change of 0.03 and 0.02 standard deviation units of alcohol per additional copy of the risk allele, respectively. Conclusions: Previously reported associations between smoking and alcohol are unlikely to be causal, and may be the result of confounding and/or reverse causation. This has implications for public health research and intervention research.

8.
Am J Hum Genet ; 102(1): 103-115, 2018 01 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29290336

RESUMO

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure, and premature death. The pathogenesis of AF remains poorly understood, which contributes to the current lack of highly effective treatments. To understand the genetic variation and biology underlying AF, we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6,337 AF individuals and 61,607 AF-free individuals from Norway, including replication in an additional 30,679 AF individuals and 278,895 AF-free individuals. Through genotyping and dense imputation mapping from whole-genome sequencing, we tested almost nine million genetic variants across the genome and identified seven risk loci, including two novel loci. One novel locus (lead single-nucleotide variant [SNV] rs12614435; p = 6.76 × 10-18) comprised intronic and several highly correlated missense variants situated in the I-, A-, and M-bands of titin, which is the largest protein in humans and responsible for the passive elasticity of heart and skeletal muscle. The other novel locus (lead SNV rs56202902; p = 1.54 × 10-11) covered a large, gene-dense chromosome 1 region that has previously been linked to cardiac conduction. Pathway and functional enrichment analyses suggested that many AF-associated genetic variants act through a mechanism of impaired muscle cell differentiation and tissue formation during fetal heart development.

9.
Int J Epidemiol ; 46(6): 1958-1967, 2017 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29025033

RESUMO

Background: There is evidence for a positive relationship between cigarette and coffee consumption in smokers. Cigarette smoke increases metabolism of caffeine, so this may represent a causal effect of smoking on caffeine intake. Methods: We performed Mendelian randomization analyses in the UK Biobank (N = 114 029), the Norwegian HUNT study (N = 56 664) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS) (N = 78 650). We used the rs16969968 genetic variant as a proxy for smoking heaviness in all studies and rs4410790 and rs2472297 as proxies for coffee consumption in UK Biobank and CGPS. Analyses were conducted using linear regression and meta-analysed across studies. Results: Each additional cigarette per day consumed by current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.10 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.17). There was weak evidence for an increase in tea consumption per additional cigarette smoked per day (0.04 cups per day, 95% CI: -0.002, 0.07). There was strong evidence that each additional copy of the minor allele of rs16969968 (which increases daily cigarette consumption) in current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.16 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.20), but only weak evidence for an association with tea consumption (0.04 cups per day, 95% CI: -0.01, 0.09). There was no clear evidence that rs16969968 was associated with coffee or tea consumption in never or former smokers or that the coffee-related variants were associated with cigarette consumption. Conclusions: Higher cigarette consumption causally increases coffee intake. This is consistent with faster metabolism of caffeine by smokers, but could also reflect a behavioural effect of smoking on coffee drinking.


Assuntos
Cafeína/administração & dosagem , Fumar Cigarros/epidemiologia , Fumar Cigarros/genética , Café , Comportamento de Ingestão de Líquido , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Alelos , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Metanálise como Assunto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
10.
Nat Genet ; 49(12): 1752-1757, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29083406

RESUMO

Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals, partly because of a shared genetic origin. To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease phenotype that considers the presence of any one of these three diseases. We identified 136 independent risk variants (P < 3 × 10-8), including 73 not previously reported, which implicate 132 nearby genes in allergic disease pathophysiology. Disease-specific effects were detected for only six variants, confirming that most represent shared risk factors. Tissue-specific heritability and biological process enrichment analyses suggest that shared risk variants influence lymphocyte-mediated immunity. Six target genes provide an opportunity for drug repositioning, while for 36 genes CpG methylation was found to influence transcription independently of genetic effects. Asthma, hay fever and eczema partly coexist because they share many genetic risk variants that dysregulate the expression of immune-related genes.


Assuntos
Asma/genética , Eczema/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Hipersensibilidade/genética , Rinite Alérgica Sazonal/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
11.
Sci Rep ; 7(1): 2224, 2017 05 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28533558

RESUMO

Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0·68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0·61, 0·76; P < 0·001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0·74, 95% CI: 0·64, 0·86; P < 0·001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1·00, 95% CI: 0·91, 1·09; P = 0·967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0·958, 95% CI: 0·920, 0·998; P = 0·041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0·92, 95% CI: 0·84, 1·02; P = 0·117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1·06, 95% CI: 1·01, 1·11; P = 0·020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.

12.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet ; 8(6): 832-41, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26538566

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data on 141 317 participants (62 666 never, 40 669 former, 37 982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were included in observational and Mendelian randomization meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the Mendelian randomization analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy for smoking heaviness in current smokers. In observational analyses, current as compared with never smoking was associated with lower systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure and lower hypertension risk, but with higher resting heart rate. In observational analyses among current smokers, 1 cigarette/day higher level of smoking heaviness was associated with higher (0.21 bpm; 95% confidence interval 0.19; 0.24) resting heart rate and slightly higher diastolic blood pressure (0.05 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval 0.02; 0.08) and systolic blood pressure (0.08 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval 0.03; 0.13). However, in Mendelian randomization analyses among current smokers, although each smoking increasing allele of rs16969968/rs1051730 was associated with higher resting heart rate (0.36 bpm/allele; 95% confidence interval 0.18; 0.54), there was no strong association with diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, or hypertension. This would suggest a 7 bpm higher heart rate in those who smoke 20 cigarettes/day. CONCLUSIONS: This Mendelian randomization meta-analysis supports a causal association of smoking heaviness with higher level of resting heart rate, but not with blood pressure. These findings suggest that part of the cardiovascular risk of smoking may operate through increasing resting heart rate.


Assuntos
Alelos , Pressão Sanguínea/genética , Frequência Cardíaca/genética , Hipertensão , Fumar , Feminino , Humanos , Hipertensão/etiologia , Hipertensão/genética , Hipertensão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Fumar/genética , Fumar/fisiopatologia
13.
Carcinogenesis ; 36(11): 1314-26, 2015 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26363033

RESUMO

Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have likely uncovered all common variants at the GWAS significance level. Additional variants within the suggestive range (0.0001> P > 5×10(-8)) are, however, still of interest for identifying causal associations. This analysis aimed to apply novel variant prioritization approaches to identify additional lung cancer variants that may not reach the GWAS level. Effects were combined across studies with a total of 33456 controls and 6756 adenocarcinoma (AC; 13 studies), 5061 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 12 studies) and 2216 small cell lung cancer cases (9 studies). Based on prior information such as variant physical properties and functional significance, we applied stratified false discovery rates, hierarchical modeling and Bayesian false discovery probabilities for variant prioritization. We conducted a fine mapping analysis as validation of our methods by examining top-ranking novel variants in six independent populations with a total of 3128 cases and 2966 controls. Three novel loci in the suggestive range were identified based on our Bayesian framework analyses: KCNIP4 at 4p15.2 (rs6448050, P = 4.6×10(-7)) and MTMR2 at 11q21 (rs10501831, P = 3.1×10(-6)) with SCC, as well as GAREM at 18q12.1 (rs11662168, P = 3.4×10(-7)) with AC. Use of our prioritization methods validated two of the top three loci associated with SCC (P = 1.05×10(-4) for KCNIP4, represented by rs9799795) and AC (P = 2.16×10(-4) for GAREM, represented by rs3786309) in the independent fine mapping populations. This study highlights the utility of using prior functional data for sequence variants in prioritization analyses to search for robust signals in the suggestive range.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/genética , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/genética , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Adenocarcinoma/patologia , Teorema de Bayes , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/patologia
14.
PLoS Genet ; 10(12): e1004799, 2014 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25474695

RESUMO

We previously used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster associated with heaviness of smoking within smokers to confirm the causal effect of smoking in reducing body mass index (BMI) in a Mendelian randomisation analysis. While seeking to extend these findings in a larger sample we found that this SNP is associated with 0.74% lower body mass index (BMI) per minor allele in current smokers (95% CI -0.97 to -0.51, P = 2.00 × 10(-10)), but also unexpectedly found that it was associated with 0.35% higher BMI in never smokers (95% CI +0.18 to +0.52, P = 6.38 × 10(-5)). An interaction test confirmed that these estimates differed from each other (P = 4.95 × 10(-13)). This difference in effects suggests the variant influences BMI both via pathways unrelated to smoking, and via the weight-reducing effects of smoking. It would therefore be essentially undetectable in an unstratified genome-wide association study of BMI, given the opposite association with BMI in never and current smokers. This demonstrates that novel associations may be obscured by hidden population sub-structure. Stratification on well-characterized environmental factors known to impact on health outcomes may therefore reveal novel genetic associations.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Receptores Nicotínicos/genética , Fumar/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Família Multigênica , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Fumar/epidemiologia , Perda de Peso/genética , Adulto Jovem
15.
Int J Epidemiol ; 43(5): 1458-70, 2014 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24867305

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking has been associated with cardiovascular risk factors including adverse serum lipid levels, central obesity and higher resting heart rate, but lower blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). We used a Mendelian randomization approach to study whether these associations may be causal. If smoking affects cardiovascular risk factors then rs1051730 T alleles, predictors of increased smoking quantity, should be associated with cardiovascular risk factors among smokers, but not among never smokers. METHODS: Among 56,625 participants of a population-based study, we estimated associations of rs1051730 T alleles with cardiovascular risk factors and examined whether the associations differed by smoking status. RESULTS: Rs1051730 T alleles were associated with lower BMI and waist and hip circumferences and higher resting heart rate and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and the associations were strongest among current smokers (P interaction 5×10(-9) to 0.01). Rs1051730 T alleles were associated with lower systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure and higher HDL cholesterol concentrations, but these associations did not robustly differ by smoking status. There were no convincing associations of rs1051730 T alleles with waist-hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure and non-fasting serum concentrations of non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose and C-reactive protein. CONCLUSIONS: This Mendelian randomization analysis provides evidence that smoking may cause lower BMI and waist and hip circumferences and higher resting heart rate and eGFR. The findings further suggest that smoking is not a major determinant of waist-hip ratio or adverse blood pressure, serum lipid or glucose levels.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Fumar/epidemiologia , Alelos , Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Causalidade , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença/epidemiologia , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Variação Genética , Humanos , Lipídeos/sangue , Masculino , Noruega/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/genética , Triglicerídeos/sangue , Relação Cintura-Quadril
16.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 21(11): 1293-9, 2013 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23443019

RESUMO

Genetic studies have shown an association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 15q25 and smoking-related traits and diseases, such as quantity of smoking, lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A discussion has centred on the variants and their effects being directly disease related or indirect via nicotine addiction. To address these discrepancies, we genotyped the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs16969968 in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster at chromosome 15q25, in 56 307 individuals from a large homogenous population-based cohort, the North Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) in Norway. The variant was examined in relation to four different outcomes: lung cancer, loss of lung function equivalent to that of COPD, smoking behaviour and the use of smokeless tobacco (snus). Novel associations were found between rs16969968 and the motivational factor for starting to use snus, and the quantity of snus used. Our results also confirm and extend previous findings for associations between rs16969968 and lung cancer, loss of lung function equivalent to that of COPD, and smoking quantity. Our data suggest a role for rs16969968 in nicotine addiction, and the novel association with snus strengthens this observation.


Assuntos
Cromossomos Humanos Par 15/genética , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Tabagismo/genética , Alelos , Feminino , Humanos , Pulmão/patologia , Pulmão/fisiopatologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/complicações , Neoplasias Pulmonares/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Razão de Chances , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/complicações , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Fumar/genética , Tabagismo/complicações , Tabagismo/fisiopatologia , Tabaco sem Fumaça
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