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1.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; : 1049909120923595, 2020 May 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32383388

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prior to national spread, the Department of Veterans Affairs implemented a pilot of the life-sustaining treatment decisions initiative (LSTDI) to promote proactive goals of care conversations (GoCC) with seriously ill patients, including policy and practice standards, an electronic documentation template and order set, and implementation support. AIM: To describe a 2-year pilot of the LSTDI at 4 demonstration sites. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: A total of 6664 patients who had at least one GoCC. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics characterized patient demographics, goals of care, LST decisions, and risk of hospitalization or mortality among patients with at least one GoCC. Participants were on average 71.4 years old, 93.2% male, 87.1% white, and 64.7% urban; 27.3% died by the end of the pilot period. Fifteen percent lacked decision-making capacity (DMC). Nonmutually exclusive goals included to be cured (7.6%), to prolong life (34%), to improve/maintain quality of life (61.5%), to be comfortable (53%), to obtain support for family/caregiver (8.4%), to achieve life goals (2.1%), and other (10.5%). Many GoCCs resulted in a do not resuscitate (DNR) order (58.8%). Patients without DMC were more likely to have comfort-oriented goals (77.3% vs 48.8%) and a DNR (84% vs 52.6%). Chart abstraction supported content validity of GoCC documentation. CONCLUSION: The pilot demonstrated that standardizing practices for eliciting and documenting GoCCs resulted in customized documentation of goals of care and LST decisions of a large number of seriously ill patients and established the feasibility of spreading standardized practices throughout a large integrated health care system.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31996609

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Veterans Health Administration piloted a nationwide Lean Enterprise Transformation program to optimize delivery of services to patients for high value care. PURPOSE: Barriers and facilitators to Lean implementation were evaluated. METHODS: Guided by the Lean Enterprise Transformation evaluation model, 268 interviews were conducted, with stakeholders across 10 Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques. RESULTS: Supporting the utility of the model, facilitators and barriers to Lean implementation were found in each of the Lean Enterprise Transformation evaluation model domains: (a) impetus to transform, (b) leadership commitment to quality, (c) improvement initiatives, (d) alignment across the organization, (e) integration across internal boundaries, (f) communication, (g) capability development, (h) informed decision making, (i) patient engagement, and (j) organization culture. In addition, three emergent themes were identified: staff engagement, sufficient staffing, and use of Lean experts (senseis). CONCLUSIONS: Effective implementation required staff engagement, strategic planning, proper scoping and pacing, deliberate coaching, and accountability structures. Visible, stable leadership drove Lean when leaders articulated a clear impetus to change, aligned goals within the facility, and supported middle management. Reliable data and metrics provided support for and evidence of successful change. Strategic early planning with continual reassessment translated into focused and sustained Lean implementation. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Prominent best practices identified include (a) reward participants by broadcasting Lean successes; (b) provide time and resources for participation in Lean activities; (c) avoid overscoping projects; (d) select metrics that closely align with improvement processes; and (e) invest in coaches, informal champions, process improvement staff, and senior leadership to promote staff engagement and minimize turnover.

3.
JAMA Surg ; 2020 Jan 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31895424

RESUMO

Importance: Palliative care has the potential to improve care for patients and families undergoing high-risk surgery. Objective: To characterize the use of perioperative palliative care and its association with family-reported end-of-life experiences of patients who died within 90 days of a high-risk surgical operation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This secondary analysis of administrative data from a retrospective cross-sectional patient cohort was conducted in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. Patients who underwent any of 227 high-risk operations between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015, were included. Exposures: Palliative-care consultation within 30 days before or 90 days after surgery. Main Outcomes and Measures: The outcomes were family-reported ratings of overall care, communication, and support in the patient's last month of life. The VA surveyed all families of inpatient decedents using the Bereaved Family Survey, a valid and reliable tool that measures patient and family-centered end-of-life outcomes. Results: A total of 95 204 patients underwent high-risk operations in 129 inpatient VA Medical Centers. Most patients were 65 years or older (69 278 [72.8%]), and the most common procedures were cardiothoracic (31 157 [32.7%]) or vascular (23 517 [24.7%]). The 90-day mortality rate was 6.0% (5740 patients) and varied by surgical subspecialty (ranging from 278 of 7226 [3.8%] in urologic surgery to 875 of 6223 patients [14.1%] in neurosurgery). A multivariate mixed model revealed that families of decedents who received palliative care were 47% more likely to rate overall care in the last month of life as excellent than those who did not (odds ratio [OR], 1.47 [95% CI, 1.14-1.88]; P = .007), after adjusting for patient's characteristics, surgical subspecialty of the high-risk operation, and survey nonresponse. Similarly, families of decedents who received palliative care were more likely to rate end-of-life communication (OR, 1.43 [95% CI, 1.09-1.87]; P = .004) and support (OR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.01-1.71]; P = .05) components of medical care as excellent. Of the entire cohort, 3374 patients (3.75%) had a palliative care consultation, and 770 patients (0.8%) received it before surgery. Of all decedents, 1632 (29.9%) had a palliative care consultation, with 319 (5.6%) receiving it before surgery. Conclusions and Relevance: Receipt of a palliative consultation was associated with better ratings of overall end-of-life care, communication, and support, as reported by families of patients who died within 90 days of high-risk surgery. Yet only one-third of decedents was exposed to palliative care. Expanding integration of perioperative palliative care may benefit patients undergoing high-risk operations and their families.

4.
Am J Kidney Dis ; 75(5): 744-752, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31679746

RESUMO

RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE: Elicitation and documentation of patient preferences is at the core of shared decision making and is particularly important among patients with high anticipated mortality. The extent to which older patients with incident kidney failure undertake such discussions with their providers is unknown and its characterization was the focus of this study. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of veterans 67 years and older with incident kidney failure receiving care from the US Veterans Health Administration between 2005 and 2010. EXPOSURES: Demographic and facility characteristics, as well as predicted 6-month mortality risk after dialysis initiation and documentation of resuscitation preferences. OUTCOMES: Documented discussions of dialysis treatment and supportive care. ANALYTICAL APPROACH: We reviewed medical records over the 2 years before incident kidney failure and up to 1 year afterward to ascertain the frequency and timing of documented discussions about dialysis treatment, supportive care, and resuscitation. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with these documented discussions. RESULTS: The cohort of 821 veterans had a mean age of 80.9±7.2 years, and 37.2% had a predicted 6-month mortality risk>20% with dialysis. Documented discussions addressing dialysis treatment and resuscitation were present in 55.6% and 77.1% of patients, respectively. Those addressing supportive care were present in 32.4%. The frequency of documentation varied by mortality risk and whether the patient ultimately started dialysis. In adjusted analyses, the frequency and pattern of documentation were more strongly associated with geographic location and receipt of outpatient nephrology care than with patient demographic or clinical characteristics. LIMITATIONS: Documentation may not fully reflect the quality and content of discussions, and generalizability to nonveteran patients is limited. CONCLUSIONS: Among older veterans with incident kidney failure, discussions of dialysis treatment are decoupled from other aspects of advance care planning and are suboptimally documented, even among patients at high risk for mortality.

5.
Implement Sci ; 14(1): 11, 2019 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30709368

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: It is challenging to conduct and quickly disseminate findings from in-depth qualitative analyses, which can impede timely implementation of interventions because of its time-consuming methods. To better understand tradeoffs between the need for actionable results and scientific rigor, we present our method for conducting a framework-guided rapid analysis (RA) and a comparison of these findings to an in-depth analysis of interview transcripts. METHODS: Set within the context of an evaluation of a successful academic detailing (AD) program for opioid prescribing in the Veterans Health Administration, we developed interview guides informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) and interviewed 10 academic detailers (clinical pharmacists) and 20 primary care providers to elicit detail about successful features of the program. For the RA, verbatim transcripts were summarized using a structured template (based on CFIR); summaries were subsequently consolidated into matrices by participant type to identify aspects of the program that worked well and ways to facilitate implementation elsewhere. For comparison purposes, we later conducted an in-depth analysis of the transcripts. We described our RA approach and qualitatively compared the RA and deductive in-depth analysis with respect to consistency of themes and resource intensity. RESULTS: Integrating the CFIR throughout the RA and in-depth analysis was helpful for providing structure and consistency across both analyses. Findings from the two analyses were consistent. The most frequently coded constructs from the in-depth analysis aligned well with themes from the RA, and the latter methods were sufficient and appropriate for addressing the primary evaluation goals. Our approach to RA was less resource-intensive than the in-depth analysis, allowing for timely dissemination of findings to our operations partner that could be integrated into ongoing implementation. CONCLUSIONS: In-depth analyses can be resource-intensive. If consistent with project needs (e.g., to quickly produce information to inform ongoing implementation or to comply with a policy mandate), it is reasonable to consider using RA, especially when faced with resource constraints. Our RA provided valid findings in a short timeframe, enabling identification of actionable suggestions for our operations partner.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Padrões de Prática Médica/normas , Saúde dos Veteranos/normas , Coleta de Dados , Prescrições de Medicamentos/normas , Humanos , Ciência da Implementação , Disseminação de Informação , Entrevistas como Assunto/normas , Avaliação de Processos em Cuidados de Saúde , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estados Unidos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
6.
Pain Med ; 19(suppl_1): S46-S53, 2018 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30203010

RESUMO

Objective: Academic detailing (AD) is a promising intervention to address the growing morbidity and mortality associated with opioids. While AD has been shown to be effective in improving provider prescribing practices across a range of conditions, it is unclear how best to implement AD. The present study was designed to identify key lessons for implementation based on a model AD program in the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Design: Qualitative process evaluation using semistructured interviews. Setting: Seven VA health care systems in the Sierra Pacific region. Subjects: Current and former academic detailers (N = 10) and VA providers with varying exposure to AD (high, low, or no; N = 20). Methods: Semistructured interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. We used a team-based, mixed inductive and deductive approach guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Results: Key lessons identified by academic detailers and providers coalesced around key themes: 1) one-on-one sessions customized to the provider's patient population are most useful; 2) leadership plays a critical role in supporting providers' participation in AD programs; 3) tracking academic detailer and provider performance is important for improving performance for both groups; 4) academic detailers play a key role in motivating provider behavior change and thus training in Motivational Interviewing is highly valuable; and 5) academic detailers noted that networking is important for sharing implementation strategies and resources. Conclusions: Identifying and incorporating these key lessons into the implementation of complex interventions like AD are critical to facilitating uptake of evidence-based interventions addressing the opioid epidemic.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/normas , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Pessoal de Saúde/normas , Hospitais de Veteranos/normas , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Veteranos , Dor Crônica/tratamento farmacológico , Dor Crônica/epidemiologia , Humanos , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Distribuição Aleatória
7.
JAMA Intern Med ; 178(5): 657-664, 2018 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29630695

RESUMO

Importance: The benefits of maintenance dialysis for older adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are uncertain. Whether the setting of pre-ESRD nephrology care influences initiation of dialysis and mortality is not known. Objective: To compare initiation of dialysis and mortality among older veterans with incident kidney failure who received pre-ESRD nephrology care in fee-for-service Medicare vs the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of patients from the US Medicare and VA health care systems evaluated 11 215 veterans aged 67 years or older with incident kidney failure between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Data analysis was performed March 15, 2016, through September 20, 2017. Exposures: Pre-ESRD nephrology care in Medicare vs VA health care systems. Main Outcome and Measures: Dialysis treatment and death within 2 years. Results: Of the 11 215 patients included in the study, 11 085 (98.8%) were men; mean (SD) age was 79.1 (6.9) years. Within 2 years of incident kidney failure, 7071 (63.0%) of the patients started dialysis and 5280 (47.1%) died. Patients who received pre-ESRD nephrology care in Medicare were more likely to undergo dialysis compared with patients who received pre-ESRD nephrology care in VA (82% vs 53%; adjusted risk difference, 28 percentage points; 95% CI, 26-30 percentage points). Differences in dialysis initiation between Medicare and VA were more pronounced among patients aged 80 years or older and patients with dementia or metastatic cancer, and less pronounced among patients with paralysis (P < .05 for interaction). Two-year mortality was higher for patients who received pre-ESRD care in Medicare compared with VA (53% vs 44%; adjusted risk difference, 5 percentage points; 95% CI, 3-7 percentage points). The findings were similar in a propensity-matched analysis. Conclusions and Relevance: Veterans who receive pre-ESRD nephrology care in Medicare receive dialysis more often yet are also more likely to die within 2 years compared with those in VA. The VA's integrated health care system and financing appear to favor lower-intensity treatment for kidney failure in older patients without a concomitant increase in mortality.


Assuntos
Falência Renal Crônica/mortalidade , Falência Renal Crônica/terapia , Medicare/estatística & dados numéricos , Diálise Renal/estatística & dados numéricos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/estatística & dados numéricos , Veteranos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Análise de Sobrevida , Estados Unidos
8.
Am J Nephrol ; 45(1): 14-21, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27842302

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Preemptive placement of permanent dialysis access is recommended in order to reduce the morbidity associated with central venous catheters. We assessed the effect of a dialysis access coordinator on preemptive access placement in veterans who are at high risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: Pre-post evaluation of a dialysis access coordinator in the nephrology clinics of the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto. The access coordinator streamlined access referrals, prioritized surgical waiting lists and addressed patient barriers. We compared the frequency of preemptive access referral, surgery, and use for dialysis during the intervention period, July 1, 2013 to May 31, 2016, to a pre-intervention period, January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013, among all patients with a predicted 1-year risk for ESRD ≥20%. RESULTS: There were 156 patients in the historical cohort and 131 in the intervention cohort. The mean age was 69.9 ± 11.6 years and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 14.5 ± 5.7 ml/min/1.73 m2. The intervention was associated with an 11.8% increase in access referral (p value = 0.03), and a 9.4% increase in completed access surgery (p value = 0.05). Increases in permanent access at the start of dialysis (15.2%), and functional permanent access at the start of dialysis (12.4%) did not reach statistical significance. Among patients who received access surgery, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of unused access. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of an access coordinator was associated with a modest increase in preemptive access placement among patients who are at high risk for ESRD without increasing the prevalence of unused access.


Assuntos
Anastomose Cirúrgica , Falência Renal Crônica/terapia , Melhoria de Qualidade , Diálise Renal/métodos , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/terapia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/organização & administração , Veteranos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Artérias/cirurgia , Cateterismo , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Diálise Peritoneal/métodos , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios , Veias/cirurgia
9.
Implement Sci ; 11: 24, 2016 Feb 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26911135

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a team-based, comprehensive model of primary care. When effectively implemented, PCMH is associated with higher patient satisfaction, lower staff burnout, and lower hospitalization for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. However, less is known about what factors contribute to (or hinder) PCMH implementation. We explored the associations of specific facilitators and barriers reported by primary care employees with a previously validated, clinic-level measure of PCMH implementation, the Patient Aligned Care Team Implementation Progress Index (Pi(2)). METHODS: We used a 2012 survey of primary care employees in the Veterans Health Administration to perform cross-sectional, respondent-level multinomial regressions. The dependent variable was the Pi(2) categorized as high implementation (top decile, 54 clinics, 235 respondents), medium implementation (middle eight deciles, 547 clinics, 4537 respondents), and low implementation (lowest decile, 42 clinics, 297 respondents) among primary care clinics. The independent variables were ordinal survey items rating 19 barriers to patient-centered care and 10 facilitators of PCMH implementation. For facilitators, we explored clinic Pi(2) score decile both as a function of respondent-reported availability of facilitators and of rating of facilitator helpfulness. RESULTS: The availability of five facilitators was associated with higher odds of a respondent's clinic's Pi(2) scores being in the highest versus lowest decile: teamlet huddles (OR = 3.91), measurement tools (OR = 3.47), regular team meetings (OR = 2.88), information systems (OR = 2.42), and disease registries (OR = 2.01). The helpfulness of four facilitators was associated with higher odds of a respondent's clinic's Pi(2) scores being in the highest versus lowest decile. Six barriers were associated with significantly higher odds of a respondent's clinic's Pi(2) scores being in the lowest versus highest decile, with the strongest associations for the difficulty recruiting and retaining providers (OR = 2.37) and non-provider clinicians (OR = 2.17). Results for medium versus low Pi(2) score clinics were similar, with fewer, smaller significant associations, all in the expected direction. CONCLUSIONS: A number of specific barriers and facilitators were associated with PCMH implementation, notably recruitment and retention of clinicians, team huddles, and local education. These findings can guide future research, and may help healthcare policy makers and leaders decide where to focus attention and limited resources.


Assuntos
Difusão de Inovações , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Pessoal Administrativo/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
10.
Qual Manag Health Care ; 24(3): 147-61, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26115063

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Disease severity, complexity, and patient burden highlight cancer care as a target for quality improvement (QI) interventions. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented a series of disease-specific online cancer care QI toolkits. OBJECTIVES: To describe characteristics of the toolkits, target users, and VHA cancer care facilities that influenced toolkit access and use and assess whether such resources were beneficial for users. METHODS: Deductive content analysis of detailed notes from 94 telephone interviews with individuals from 48 VHA facilities. We evaluated toolkit access and use across cancer types, participation in learning collaboratives, and affiliation with VHA cancer care facilities. RESULTS: The presence of champions was identified as a strong facilitator of toolkit use, and learning collaboratives were important for spreading information about toolkit availability. Identified barriers included lack of personnel and financial resources and complicated approval processes to support tool use. CONCLUSIONS: Online cancer care toolkits are well received across cancer specialties and provider types. Clinicians, administrators, and QI staff may benefit from the availability of toolkits as they become more reliant on rapid access to strategies that support comprehensive delivery of evidence-based care. Toolkits should be considered as a complement to other QI approaches.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/normas , Internet , Neoplasias , Melhoria de Qualidade/organização & administração , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Neoplasias/terapia , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estados Unidos
11.
Implement Sci ; 10: 52, 2015 Apr 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25924611

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Like other transformative healthcare initiatives, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation requires substantial investments of time and resources. Even though PCMH and PCMH-like models are being implemented by multiple provider practices and health systems, little is known about what facilitates their implementation. The purpose of this study was to assess which PCMH-implementation resources are most widely used, by whom, and which resources primary care personnel find most helpful. METHODS: This study is an analysis of data from a cross-sectional survey of primary care personnel in the Veterans Health Administration in 2012, in which respondents were asked to rate whether they were aware of and accessed PCMH-implementation resources, and to rate their helpfulness. Logistic regression was used to produce odds ratios for the outcomes (1) resource use and (2) resource helpfulness. Respondents were nested within clinics, nested, in turn, within 135 parent hospitals. RESULTS: Teamlet huddles were the most widely accessed (80.4% accessed) and most helpful (90.4% rated helpful) resource; quality-improvement methods to conduct small tests of change were the least frequently accessed (42.4% accessed) resource though two-thirds (66.7%) of users reported as helpful. Supervisors were significantly more likely (ORs, 1.46 to 1.86) to use resources than non-supervisors but were less likely to rate the majority (8 out of 10) of resources as "somewhat/very helpful" than non-supervisors (ORs, 0.72 to 0.84). Longer-tenured employees tended to rate resources as more helpful. CONCLUSIONS: These findings are the first in the PCMH literature that we are aware of that systematically assesses primary care staff's access to and the helpfulness of PCMH implementation resources. Supervisors generally reported greater access to resources, relative to non-supervisors, but rated resources as less helpful, suggesting that information about them may not have been optimally disseminated. Knowing what resources primary care staff use and find helpful can inform administrators' and policymakers' investments in PCMH-implementation resources. The implications of our model extend beyond just PCMH implementation but also to considerations when providing implementation resources for other complex quality-improvement initiatives.


Assuntos
Assistência Centrada no Paciente/organização & administração , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Recursos em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Organizacionais , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Atenção Primária à Saúde/métodos , Atenção Primária à Saúde/organização & administração , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/organização & administração , Adulto Jovem
12.
J Oncol Pract ; 11(3): e421-7, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25852141

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Peer-to-peer collaboration within integrated health systems requires a mechanism for sharing quality improvement lessons. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) developed online compendia of tools linked to specific cancer quality indicators. We evaluated awareness and use of the toolkits, variation across facilities, impact of social marketing, and factors influencing toolkit use. METHODS: A diffusion of innovations conceptual framework guided the collection of user activity data from the Toolkit Series SharePoint site and an online survey of potential Lung Cancer Care Toolkit users. RESULTS: The VA Toolkit Series site had 5,088 unique visitors in its first 22 months; 5% of users accounted for 40% of page views. Social marketing communications were correlated with site usage. Of survey respondents (n = 355), 54% had visited the site, of whom 24% downloaded at least one tool. Respondents' awareness of the lung cancer quality performance of their facility, and facility participation in quality improvement collaboratives, were positively associated with Toolkit Series site use. Facility-level lung cancer tool implementation varied widely across tool types. CONCLUSION: The VA Toolkit Series achieved widespread use and a high degree of user engagement, although use varied widely across facilities. The most active users were aware of and active in cancer care quality improvement. Toolkit use seemed to be reinforced by other quality improvement activities. A combination of user-driven tool creation and centralized toolkit development seemed to be effective for leveraging health information technology to spread disease-specific quality improvement tools within an integrated health care system.


Assuntos
Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde/normas , Implementação de Plano de Saúde/normas , Internet , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Oncologia/normas , Melhoria de Qualidade/normas , Indicadores de Qualidade em Assistência à Saúde/normas , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Atitude Frente aos Computadores , Conscientização , Difusão de Inovações , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/diagnóstico , Marketing de Serviços de Saúde , Padrões de Prática Médica/normas , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Marketing Social , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
13.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 31(4): 428-34, 2014 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23921287

RESUMO

The Affordable Care Act requires US hospices to report quality data to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2013 with data eventually being made public. There may be some benefit to participating in a voluntary public-reporting program prior to public disclosure by CMS; therefore, we developed and conducted an electronic survey exploring California hospices' perceptions of public reporting. The majority (78.1%) of respondents reported current use of the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care tool and a willingness to consider voluntary participation in a public-reporting program outside of what is being implemented by CMS (58.6%). Tax status of responding hospices was not predictive of a willingness to participate in a statewide public-reporting program of hospice quality in our study.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida/normas , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , California/epidemiologia , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
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