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1.
Gastroenterology ; 2021 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33524400

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), remains poorly defined beyond germline(g) alterations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. METHODS: We interrogated whole genome sequencing (WGS) data on 391 patients including 49 carriers of pathogenic variants (PVs) in gBRCA and PALB2. HRD classifiers were applied to the dataset and included: 1) the genomic instability score (GIS) used by Myriad's MyChoice HRD assay; 2) substitution base signature 3 (SBS3); 3) HRDetect; and, 4) Structural Variant (SV) burden. Clinical outcomes and responses to chemotherapy were correlated with HRD status. RESULTS: Biallelic tumour inactivation of gBRCA or PALB2 was evident in 43/49 germline carriers identifying HRD-PDAC. HRDetect (score ≥0.7) predicted gBRCA1/PALB2 deficiency with highest sensitivity (98%) and specificity (100%). HRD genomic tumour classifiers suggested that 7-10% of PDAC that do not harbor gBRCA/PALB2 have features of HRD. Of the somatic HRDetecthi cases, 69% were attributed to alterations in BRCA1/2, PALB2, RAD51C/D and XRCC2, and a tandem duplicator phenotype. TP53 loss was more common in BRCA1- compared to BRCA2-associated HRD-PDAC. HRD status was not prognostic in resected PDAC. However in advanced disease the GIS (p=0.02), SBS3 (p=0.03) and HRDetect score (p=0.005) were predictive of platinum response and superior survival. PVs in gATM (n=6) or gCHEK2 (n=2) did not result in HRD-PDAC by any of the classifiers. In four patients, BRCA2 reversion mutations associated with platinum resistance. CONCLUSIONS: Germline and parallel somatic profiling of PDAC outperforms germline testing alone in identifying HRD-PDAC. An additional 7-10% of patients without gBRCA/PALB2 mutations may benefit from DNA damage response agents.

2.
Cancer Res ; 2021 Feb 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33574088

RESUMO

Germline variation and smoking are independently associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We conducted genome-wide smoking interaction analysis of PDAC using genotype data from four previous genome-wide association studies in individuals of European ancestry (7,937 cases and 11,774 controls). Examination of expression quantitative trait loci data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project followed by colocalization analysis was conducted to determine if there was support for common SNP(s) underlying the observed associations. Statistical tests were two sided and P-values < 5 x 10-8 were considered statistically significant. Genome-wide significant evidence of qualitative interaction was identified on chr2q21.3 in intron 5 of the transmembrane protein 163 (TMEM163) and upstream of the cyclin T2 (CCNT2). The most significant SNP using the Empirical Bayes method, in this region which included 45 significantly associated SNPs, was rs1818613 (per allele OR in never smokers 0.87, 95% CI 0.82-0.93; former smokers 1.00, 95 CI 0.91-1.07; current smokers 1.25, 95%CI 1.12-1.40, interaction P-value=3.08x10-9). Examination of the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project data demonstrated an expression quantitative trait locus in this region for TMEM163 and CCNT2 in several tissue types. Colocalization analysis supported a shared SNP, rs842357, in high LD with rs1818613 (r2=0. 94) driving both the observed interaction and the expression quantitative trait loci signals. Future studies are needed to confirm and understand the differential biologic mechanisms by smoking status that contribute to our PDAC findings.

3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 1378, 2021 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33446870

RESUMO

As an analytic pipeline for quantitative imaging feature extraction and analysis, radiomics has grown rapidly in the past decade. On the other hand, recent advances in deep learning and transfer learning have shown significant potential in the quantitative medical imaging field, raising the research question of whether deep transfer learning features have predictive information in addition to radiomics features. In this study, using CT images from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients recruited in two independent hospitals, we discovered most transfer learning features have weak linear relationships with radiomics features, suggesting a potential complementary relationship between these two feature sets. We also tested the prognostic performance for overall survival using four feature fusion and reduction methods for combining radiomics and transfer learning features and compared the results with our proposed risk score-based feature fusion method. It was shown that the risk score-based feature fusion method significantly improves the prognosis performance for predicting overall survival in PDAC patients compared to other traditional feature reduction methods used in previous radiomics studies (40% increase in area under ROC curve (AUC) yielding AUC of 0.84).

5.
Gynecol Oncol ; 2021 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33478752

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Findings on impact of mismatch repair deficiency (MMRd) on patient outcomes in endometrial cancer (EC) have been inconsistent to date. The objective of this study was to compare the oncologic outcomes and recurrence patterns between MMRd and MMR-intact (MMRi) endometrioid EC (EEC). METHODS: Between 2015 and 2018, we prospectively recruited 492 EEC cases from three cancer centers in Ontario, Canada. Tumors were reflexively assessed for MMR protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Clinicopathological, survival and recurrence patterns were compared between MMRd and MMRi cases. RESULTS: Of 492 EEC, 348 were MMRi (71%) and 144 were MMRd (29%) with median follow-up of 16.8 months (0-69.6). MMRd tumors tended to be grade 2 or 3 (56% vs. 29%, p < 0.001), with propensity for lymphovascular space invasion (28% vs. 18%, p = 0.024), lymph node involvement (7% vs. 5%, p < 0.001) and received more adjuvant treatment (46% vs. 33%, p = 0.027). This group also had significantly lower 3-year recurrence-free survival (78% vs. 90%, p = 0.014) although there was no difference in OS (p = 0.603). MMRd cases were more likely to recur in retroperitoneal lymph nodes (p = 0.045). Upon subgroup analysis, MLH1 methylated tumors had the worst prognostic features and survival outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: MLH1 methylated EECs exhibit more aggressive features compared to other MMRd and MMRi EECs. This may indicate an inherent difference in tumor biology, suggesting the importance of individualized management based on EC molecular phenotype.

6.
F1000Res ; 9: 732, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33274048

RESUMO

Background: To account for cancer heterogeneity, we previously introduced the concept of "personalized" tumor markers, which are biomarkers that are informative in subsets of patients or even a single patient. Recent developments in various multiplex protein technologies create excitement for the discovery of markers of tumor burden in individual patients, but the reliability of the technologies remains to be tested for this purpose. Here, we sought to explore the potential of a novel proteomics platform, which utilizes a multiplexed antibody microarray, to detect changes in serum protein concentration that may correlate to tumor burden in pancreatic cancer. Methods: We applied the Quantibody® Human Kiloplex Array to simultaneously measure 1,000 proteins in sera obtained pre- and post-surgically from five pancreatic cancer patients. We expected that proteins which decreased post-surgery may correlate to tumor burden. Sera from two healthy individuals, split into two aliquots each, were used as controls. To validate the multiplexed results, we used single-target ELISA assays to measure the proteins with the largest serum concentration changes after surgery in sera collected pre- and post-surgically from the previous five patients and 10 additional patients. Results: The multiplexed array revealed nine proteins with more than two-fold post-surgical decrease in at least two of five patients. However, validation using single ELISAs showed that only two proteins tested displayed more than two-fold post-surgical decrease in one of the five original patients. In the independent cohort, six of the proteins tested showed at least a two-fold decrease post-surgery in at least one patient. Conclusions: Our study found that the Quantibody® Human Kiloplex Array results could not be reliably replicated with individual ELISA assays and most hits would likely represent false positives if applied to biomarker discovery. These findings suggest that data from novel, high-throughput proteomic platforms need stringent validation to avoid false discoveries.

7.
J Mol Diagn ; 2020 Nov 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33259954

RESUMO

Clinical testing for mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency often entails serial testing of tumour and constitutional DNA using multiple assays. To minimize cost and specimen requirements of MMR testing, we developed an integrated targeted sequencing protocol (termed MultiMMR) that tests for promoter methylation, mutations, copy number alterations, copy neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, and microsatellite instability from a single aliquot of DNA. We performed hybrid capture of DNA sequencing libraries constructed with methylated adapters on 142 samples (60 tumours and 82 constitutional samples) from 82 patients with MMR-associated colorectal, endometrial, and brain cancers as well as a synthetic DNA mix with 11 known mutations. We then split the captured material to enable parallel bisulfite and conventional sequence analysis. The panel targeted microsatellite regions and 13 genes associated with MMR, hypermutation, and hereditary colorectal cancer. MultiMMR recapitulated clinical testing results in 23/24 cases, was able to explain MMR loss in an additional 29/48 patients with incomplete/inconclusive testing, and identified all 11 MMR variants within the synthetic DNA mix. Promoter methylation and microsatellite instability analysis showed 95% and 97% concordance with clinical testing, respectively. We demonstrated feasibility for amalgamation of the current stepwise and complex clinical testing workflow into an integrated test for both hereditary and somatic causes of MMR deficiency.

8.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 396, 2020 12 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33327948

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Higher adiposity increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this relationship varies by anatomical sub-site or by sex is unclear. Further, the metabolic alterations mediating the effects of adiposity on CRC are not fully understood. METHODS: We examined sex- and site-specific associations of adiposity with CRC risk and whether adiposity-associated metabolites explain the associations of adiposity with CRC. Genetic variants from genome-wide association studies of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, unadjusted for BMI; N = 806,810), and 123 metabolites from targeted nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics (N = 24,925), were used as instruments. Sex-combined and sex-specific Mendelian randomization (MR) was conducted for BMI and WHR with CRC risk (58,221 cases and 67,694 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium, Colorectal Cancer Transdisciplinary Study, and Colon Cancer Family Registry). Sex-combined MR was conducted for BMI and WHR with metabolites, for metabolites with CRC, and for BMI and WHR with CRC adjusted for metabolite classes in multivariable models. RESULTS: In sex-specific MR analyses, higher BMI (per 4.2 kg/m2) was associated with 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08, 1.38) times higher CRC odds among men (inverse-variance-weighted (IVW) model); among women, higher BMI (per 5.2 kg/m2) was associated with 1.09 (95% CI = 0.97, 1.22) times higher CRC odds. WHR (per 0.07 higher) was more strongly associated with CRC risk among women (IVW OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.43) than men (IVW OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.81, 1.36). BMI or WHR was associated with 104/123 metabolites at false discovery rate-corrected P ≤ 0.05; several metabolites were associated with CRC, but not in directions that were consistent with the mediation of positive adiposity-CRC relations. In multivariable MR analyses, associations of BMI and WHR with CRC were not attenuated following adjustment for representative metabolite classes, e.g., the univariable IVW OR for BMI with CRC was 1.12 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.26), and this became 1.11 (95% CI = 0.99, 1.26) when adjusting for cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein particles. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that higher BMI more greatly raises CRC risk among men, whereas higher WHR more greatly raises CRC risk among women. Adiposity was associated with numerous metabolic alterations, but none of these explained associations between adiposity and CRC. More detailed metabolomic measures are likely needed to clarify the mechanistic pathways.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33318029

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence for aspirin's chemopreventative properties on colorectal cancer (CRC) is substantial, but its mechanism of action is not well-understood. We combined a proteomic approach with Mendelian randomization (MR) to identify possible new aspirin targets that decrease CRC risk. METHODS: Human colorectal adenoma cells (RG/C2) were treated with aspirin (24 hours) and a stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based proteomics approach identified altered protein expression. Protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs) from INTERVAL (N = 3,301) and expression QTLs (eQTLs) from the eQTLGen Consortium (N = 31,684) were used as genetic proxies for protein and mRNA expression levels. Two-sample MR of mRNA/protein expression on CRC risk was performed using eQTL/pQTL data combined with CRC genetic summary data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR), Colorectal Transdisciplinary (CORECT), Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (GECCO) consortia and UK Biobank (55,168 cases and 65,160 controls). RESULTS: Altered expression was detected for 125/5886 proteins. Of these, aspirin decreased MCM6, RRM2, and ARFIP2 expression, and MR analysis showed that a standard deviation increase in mRNA/protein expression was associated with increased CRC risk (OR: 1.08, 95% CI, 1.03-1.13; OR: 3.33, 95% CI, 2.46-4.50; and OR: 1.15, 95% CI, 1.02-1.29, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: MCM6 and RRM2 are involved in DNA repair whereby reduced expression may lead to increased DNA aberrations and ultimately cancer cell death, whereas ARFIP2 is involved in actin cytoskeletal regulation, indicating a possible role in aspirin's reduction of metastasis. IMPACT: Our approach has shown how laboratory experiments and population-based approaches can combine to identify aspirin-targeted proteins possibly affecting CRC risk.

10.
Am Surg ; : 3134820954834, 2020 Dec 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33345573

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Selected patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) and synchronous extrahepatic disease (EHD) are considered for surgery. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the change in surgical management and long-term survival (disease-free survival [DFS] and overall survival [OS]) for patients with CRLM and EHD who undergo positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) vs no PET-CT. METHODS: Patients with CRLM were enrolled in a trial evaluating the effect of PET-CT (vs no PET-CT) on surgical management, DFS, and OS. This is a sub-study of the trial, including only patients with synchronous EHD. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate risks for recurrence and death. Survival were described by Kaplan-Meier method and compared with log-rank test. RESULTS: Of 25 patients with EHD (PET-CT arm: 14/270 (5%) and no PET-CT arm: 11/134 (8%)), PET-CT changed surgical management in 14%, all of which avoided liver resection due to more extensive disease. Complete metastasectomy was achieved in 36% (5/14) and 72% (8/11), respectively. Respectively, PET-CT vs no PET-CT had statistically similar median DFS, 5.6 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.6-18) vs 7.6 months (95% CI 2.9-15) and median OS, 42 months (95% CI 25-48) vs 29 months (95% CI 17-41). EHD was associated with worse DFS (hazard ratio HR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.41-2.52) and OS (HR = 2.47, 95% CI 1.6-3.83). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative PET-CT for the management of resectable CRLM did not improve long-term outcomes among patients who had synchronous EHD; however, it changed surgical management in a relatively significant proportion of patients.

11.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; : 846537120968782, 2020 Nov 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33151087

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Radiomic features in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) often lack validation in independent test sets or are limited to early or late stage disease. Given the lethal nature of PDAC it is possible that there are similarities in radiomic features of both early and advanced disease reflective of aggressive biology. PURPOSE: To assess the performance of prognostic radiomic features previously published in patients with resectable PDAC in a test set of patients with unresectable PDAC undergoing chemotherapy. METHODS: The pre-treatment CT of 108 patients enrolled in a prospective chemotherapy trial were used as a test cohort for 2 previously published prognostic radiomic features in resectable PDAC (Sum Entropy and Cluster Tendency with square-root filter[Sqrt]). We assessed the performance of these 2 radiomic features for the prediction of overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP) using Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: Sqrt Cluster Tendency was significantly associated with outcome with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.27(for primary pancreatic tumor plus local nodes), (Confidence Interval(CI):1.01 -1.6, P-value = 0.039) for OS and a HR of 1.25(CI:1.00 -1.55, P-value = 0.047) for TTP. Sum entropy was not associated with outcomes. Sqrt Cluster Tendency remained significant in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: The CT radiomic feature Sqrt Cluster Tendency, previously demonstrated to be prognostic in resectable PDAC, remained a significant prognostic factor for OS and TTP in a test set of unresectable PDAC patients. This radiomic feature warrants further investigation to understand its biologic correlates and CT applicability in PDAC patients.

12.
Clin Cancer Res ; 2020 Oct 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33051307

RESUMO

PURPOSE: RNA-sequencing-based subtyping of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has been reported by multiple research groups, each using different methodologies and patient cohorts. "Classical" and "basal-like" PDAC subtypes are associated with survival differences, with basal-like tumors associated with worse prognosis. We amalgamated various PDAC subtyping tools to evaluate the potential of such tools to be reliable in clinical practice. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Sequencing data for 574 PDAC tumors was obtained from prospective trials and retrospective public databases. Six published PDAC subtyping strategies (Moffitt regression tools, clustering-based Moffitt, Collisson, Bailey, and Karasinska subtypes) were used on each sample, and results were tested for subtype call consistency and association with survival. RESULTS: Basal-like and classical subtype calls were concordant in 88% of patient samples, and survival outcomes were significantly different (P < 0.05) between prognostic subtypes. Twelve percent of tumors had subtype-discordant calls across the different methods, showing intermediate survival in univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Transcriptional profiles compatible with that of a hybrid subtype signature were observed for subtype-discordant tumors, in which classical and basal-like genes were concomitantly expressed. Subtype-discordant tumors showed intermediate molecular characteristics, including subtyping gene expression (P < 0.0001) and mutant KRAS allelic imbalance (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Nearly 1 in 6 patients with PDAC have tumors that fail to reliably fall into the classical or basal-like PDAC subtype categories, based on two regression tools aimed toward clinical practice. Rather, these patient tumors show intermediate prognostic and molecular traits. We propose close consideration of the non-binary nature of PDAC subtypes for future incorporation of subtyping into clinical practice.

13.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 30(12): 1951-1958, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33082239

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: For synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancers, most centers rely on mismatch repair testing of the endometrial cancer to identify Lynch syndrome, and neglect the ovarian tumor site completely. We examined the mismatch repair immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability results from the endometrium and ovary to assess discordance between the tumor sites and between tests. METHODS: 30 women with newly diagnosed synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancer were prospectively recruited from three cancer centers in Ontario, Canada. Both tumor sites were assessed for mismatch repair deficiency by immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability test; discordance in results between tumor sites and discordance between test results at each site was examined. Cases with discordant results had tumors sequenced with a targeted panel in order to reconcile the findings. All women underwent mismatch repair gene germline testing. RESULTS: Of 30 patients, 11 (37%) were mismatch repair deficient or microsatellite instable at either tumor site, with 5 (17%) testing positive for Lynch syndrome. Mismatch repair immunohistochemistry expression was discordant between endometrial and ovarian tumor sites in 2 of 27 patients (7%) while microsatellite instability results were discordant in 2 of 25 patients (8%). Relying on immunohistochemistry or microsatellite instability alone on the endometrial tumor would have missed one and three cases of Lynch syndrome, respectively. One patient with Lynch syndrome with a PMS2 pathogenic variant was not detected by either immunohistochemistry or microsatellite instability testing. The rate of discordance between immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability test was 3.8% in the ovary and 12% in the endometrium. CONCLUSIONS: There was discordance in immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability results between tumor sites and between tests within each site. Endometrial tumor testing with mismatch repair immunohistochemistry performed well, but missed one case of Lynch syndrome. Given the high incidence of Lynch syndrome (17%), consideration may be given to germline testing in all patients with synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancers.

14.
Gastroenterology ; 2020 Oct 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33058866

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Susceptibility genes and the underlying mechanisms for the majority of risk loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for colorectal cancer (CRC) risk remain largely unknown. We conducted a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) to identify putative susceptibility genes. METHODS: Gene-expression prediction models were built using transcriptome and genetic data from the 284 normal transverse colon tissues of European descendants from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx), and model performance was evaluated using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (n = 355). We applied the gene-expression prediction models and GWAS data to evaluate associations of genetically predicted gene-expression with CRC risk in 58,131 CRC cases and 67,347 controls of European ancestry. Dual-luciferase reporter assays and knockdown experiments in CRC cells and tumor xenografts were conducted. RESULTS: We identified 25 genes associated with CRC risk at a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P < 9.1 × 10-6, including genes in 4 novel loci, PYGL (14q22.1), RPL28 (19q13.42), CAPN12 (19q13.2), MYH7B (20q11.22), and MAP1L3CA (20q11.22). In 9 known GWAS-identified loci, we uncovered 9 genes that have not been reported previously, whereas 4 genes remained statistically significant after adjusting for the lead risk variant of the locus. Through colocalization analysis in GWAS loci, we additionally identified 12 putative susceptibility genes that were supported by TWAS analysis at P < .01. We showed that risk allele of the lead risk variant rs1741640 affected the promoter activity of CABLES2. Knockdown experiments confirmed that CABLES2 plays a vital role in colorectal carcinogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study reveals new putative susceptibility genes and provides new insight into the biological mechanisms underlying CRC development.

15.
BMC Cancer ; 20(1): 856, 2020 Sep 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894098

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Germline copy number variants (CNVs) increase risk for many diseases, yet detection of CNVs and quantifying their contribution to disease risk in large-scale studies is challenging due to biological and technical sources of heterogeneity that vary across the genome within and between samples. METHODS: We developed an approach called CNPBayes to identify latent batch effects in genome-wide association studies involving copy number, to provide probabilistic estimates of integer copy number across the estimated batches, and to fully integrate the copy number uncertainty in the association model for disease. RESULTS: Applying a hidden Markov model (HMM) to identify CNVs in a large multi-site Pancreatic Cancer Case Control study (PanC4) of 7598 participants, we found CNV inference was highly sensitive to technical noise that varied appreciably among participants. Applying CNPBayes to this dataset, we found that the major sources of technical variation were linked to sample processing by the centralized laboratory and not the individual study sites. Modeling the latent batch effects at each CNV region hierarchically, we developed probabilistic estimates of copy number that were directly incorporated in a Bayesian regression model for pancreatic cancer risk. Candidate associations aided by this approach include deletions of 8q24 near regulatory elements of the tumor oncogene MYC and of Tumor Suppressor Candidate 3 (TUSC3). CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory effects may not account for the major sources of technical variation in genome-wide association studies. This study provides a robust Bayesian inferential framework for identifying latent batch effects, estimating copy number, and evaluating the role of copy number in heritable diseases.

16.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(12): 2735-2739, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967863

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether circulating polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels are associated with pancreatic cancer risk is uncertain. Mendelian randomization (MR) represents a study design using genetic instruments to better characterize the relationship between exposure and outcome. METHODS: We utilized data from genome-wide association studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, involving approximately 9,269 cases and 12,530 controls of European descent, to evaluate associations between pancreatic cancer risk and genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels. Conventional MR analyses were performed using individual-level and summary-level data. RESULTS: Using genetic instruments, we did not find evidence of associations between genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels and pancreatic cancer risk [estimates per one SD increase in each PUFA-specific weighted genetic score using summary statistics: linoleic acid odds ratio (OR) = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98-1.02; arachidonic acid OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.99-1.01; and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.87-1.02]. The OR estimates remained virtually unchanged after adjustment for covariates, using individual-level data or summary statistics, or stratification by age and sex. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that variations of genetically determined plasma n-6 PUFA levels are not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These results suggest that modifying n-6 PUFA levels through food sources or supplementation may not influence risk of pancreatic cancer.

17.
Clin Cancer Res ; 2020 Sep 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32958704

RESUMO

PURPOSE: With the rising incidence of early-onset pancreatic cancer (EOPC), molecular characteristics that distinguish early-onset pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tumors from those arising at a later age are not well understood. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We performed bioinformatic analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data generated from 269 advanced (metastatic or locally advanced) and 277 resectable PDAC tumor samples. Patient samples were stratified into EOPC (age of onset ≤55 years; n = 117), intermediate (age of onset 55-70 years; n = 264), and average (age of onset ≥70 years; n = 165) groups. Frequency of somatic mutations affecting genes commonly implicated in PDAC, as well as gene expression patterns, were compared between EOPC and all other groups. RESULTS: EOPC tumors showed significantly lower frequency of somatic single-nucleotide variant (SNV)/insertions/deletions (indel) in CDKN2A (P = 0.0017), and were more likely to achieve biallelic mutation of CDKN2A through homozygous copy loss as opposed to heterozygous copy loss coupled with a loss-of-function SNV/indel mutation, the latter of which was more common for tumors with later ages of onset (P = 1.5e-4). Transcription factor forkhead box protein C2 (FOXC2) was significantly upregulated in EOPC tumors (P = 0.032). Genes significantly correlated with FOXC2 in PDAC samples were enriched for gene sets related to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and included VIM (P = 1.8e-8), CDH11 (P = 6.5e-5), and CDH2 (P = 2.4e-2). CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive analysis of sequencing data generated from a large cohort of PDAC patient samples highlights a distinctive pattern of biallelic CDKN2A mutation in EOPC tumors. Increased expression of FOXC2 in EOPC, with the correlation between FOXC2 and EMT pathways, represents novel molecular characteristics of EOPC.

18.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 4(5): pkaa042, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32923935

RESUMO

Background: Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) is associated with a decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. As CRC is a heterogeneous disease, we evaluated whether the association of HT and CRC differs across etiologically relevant, molecularly defined tumor subtypes and tumor location. Methods: We pooled data on tumor subtypes (microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylator phenotype status, BRAF and KRAS mutations, pathway: adenoma-carcinoma, alternate, serrated), tumor location (proximal colon, distal colon, rectum), and HT use among 8220 postmenopausal women (3898 CRC cases and 4322 controls) from 8 observational studies. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of ever vs never HT use with each tumor subtype compared with controls. Models were adjusted for study, age, body mass index, smoking status, and CRC family history. All statistical tests were 2-sided. Results: Among postmenopausal women, ever HT use was associated with a 38% reduction in overall CRC risk (OR =0.62, 95% CI = 0.56 to 0.69). This association was similar according to microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype and BRAF or KRAS status. However, the association was attenuated for tumors arising through the serrated pathway (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.01) compared with the adenoma-carcinoma pathway (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.55 to 0.73; P het =.04) and alternate pathway (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.51 to 0.72). Additionally, proximal colon tumors had a weaker association (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.80) compared with rectal (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.46 to 0.63) and distal colon (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.66; P het =.01) tumors. Conclusions: We observed a strong inverse association between HT use and overall CRC risk, which may predominantly reflect a benefit of HT use for tumors arising through the adenoma-carcinoma and alternate pathways as well as distal colon and rectal tumors.

19.
Gut ; 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32933947

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical, pathological and genomic characteristics of pancreatic cancer with DNA mismatch repair deficiency (MMRD) and proficiency (MMRP). DESIGN: We identified patients with MMRD and MMRP pancreatic cancer in a clinical cohort (N=1213, 519 with genetic testing, 53 with immunohistochemistry (IHC)) and a genomic cohort (N=288 with whole-genome sequencing (WGS)). RESULTS: 12 out of 1213 (1.0%) in the clinical cohort were MMRD by IHC or WGS. Of the 14 patients with Lynch syndrome, 3 (21.4%) had an MMRP pancreatic cancer by IHC, and 4 (28.6%) were excluded because tissue was unavailable for testing. MMRD cancers had longer overall survival after surgery (weighted HR after coarsened exact matching 0.11, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.78, p=0.001). One patient with an unresectable MMRD cancer has an ongoing partial response 3 years after starting treatment with PD-L1/CTLA-4 inhibition. This tumour showed none of the classical histopathological features of MMRD. 9 out of 288 (3.1%) tumours with WGS were MMRD. Despite markedly higher tumour mutational burden and neoantigen loads, MMRD cancers were significantly less likely to have mutations in usual pancreatic cancer driver genes like KRAS and SMAD4, but more likely to have mutations in genes that drive cancers with microsatellite instability like ACV2RA and JAK1. MMRD tumours were significantly more likely to have a basal-like transcriptional programme and elevated transcriptional markers of immunogenicity. CONCLUSIONS: MMRD pancreatic cancers have distinct clinical, pathological and genomic profiles. Patients with MMRD pancreatic cancer should be considered for basket trials targeting enhanced immunogenicity or the unique genomic drivers in these malignancies.

20.
N Engl J Med ; 383(11): 1028-1039, 2020 09 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32905675

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combination therapy with eflornithine and sulindac, as compared with either drug alone, in delaying disease progression in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis are unknown. METHODS: We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the combination of eflornithine and sulindac, as compared with either drug alone, in adults with familial adenomatous polyposis. The patients were stratified on the basis of anatomical site with the highest polyp burden and surgical status; the strata were precolectomy (shortest projected time to disease progression), rectal or ileal pouch polyposis after colectomy (longest projected time), and duodenal polyposis (intermediate projected time). The patients were then randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 750 mg of eflornithine, 150 mg of sulindac, or both once daily for up to 48 months. The primary end point, assessed in a time-to-event analysis, was disease progression, defined as a composite of major surgery, endoscopic excision of advanced adenomas, diagnosis of high-grade dysplasia in the rectum or pouch, or progression of duodenal disease. RESULTS: A total of 171 patients underwent randomization. Disease progression occurred in 18 of 56 patients (32%) in the eflornithine-sulindac group, 22 of 58 (38%) in the sulindac group, and 23 of 57 (40%) in the eflornithine group, with a hazard ratio of 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 1.32) for eflornithine-sulindac as compared with sulindac (P = 0.29) and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.36 to 1.24) for eflornithine-sulindac as compared with eflornithine. Among 37 precolectomy patients, the corresponding values in the treatment groups were 2 of 12 patients (17%), 6 of 13 (46%), and 5 of 12 (42%) (hazard ratios, 0.30 [95% CI, 0.07 to 1.32] and 0.20 [95% CI, 0.03 to 1.32]); among 34 patients with rectal or ileal pouch polyposis, the values were 4 of 11 patients (36%), 2 of 11 (18%), and 5 of 12 (42%) (hazard ratios, 2.03 [95% CI, 0.43 to 9.62] and 0.84 [95% CI, 0.24 to 2.90]); and among 100 patients with duodenal polyposis, the values were 12 of 33 patients (36%), 14 of 34 (41%), and 13 of 33 (39%) (hazard ratios, 0.73 [95% CI, 0.34 to 1.52] and 0.76 [95% CI, 0.35 to 1.64]). Adverse and serious adverse events were similar across the treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: In this trial involving patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, the incidence of disease progression was not significantly lower with the combination of eflornithine and sulindac than with either drug alone. (Funded by Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01483144; EudraCT number, 2012-000427-41.).


Assuntos
Polipose Adenomatosa do Colo/tratamento farmacológico , Progressão da Doença , Eflornitina/uso terapêutico , Sulindaco/uso terapêutico , Adulto , Quimioterapia Combinada , Eflornitina/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Análise de Intenção de Tratamento , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Sulindaco/efeitos adversos , Resultado do Tratamento
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