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1.
Arch Bronconeumol ; 2020 Oct 08.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33041107

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Although mean physical activity in COPD patients declines by 400-500steps/day annually, it is unknown whether the natural progression is the same for all patients. We aimed to identify distinct physical activity progression patterns using a hypothesis-free approach and to assess their determinants. METHODS: We pooled data from two cohorts (usual care arm of Urban Training [NCT01897298] and PROactive initial validation [NCT01388218] studies) measuring physical activity at baseline and 12 months (Dynaport MoveMonitor). We identified clusters (patterns) of physical activity progression (based on levels and changes of steps/day) using k-means, and compared baseline sociodemographic, interpersonal, environmental, clinical and psychological characteristics across patterns. RESULTS: In 291 COPD patients (mean±SD 68±8 years, 81% male, FEV1 59±19%pred) we identified three distinct physical activity progression patterns: Inactive (n=173 [59%], baseline: 4621±1757 steps/day, 12-month change (Δ): -487±1201 steps/day), ActiveImprovers (n=49 [17%], baseline: 7727±3275 steps/day, Δ:+3378±2203 steps/day) and ActiveDecliners (n=69 [24%], baseline: 11 267±3009 steps/day, Δ: -2217±2085 steps/day). After adjustment in a mixed multinomial logistic regression model using Active Decliners as reference pattern, a lower 6-min walking distance (RRR [95% CI] 0.94 [0.90-0.98] per 10m, P=.001) and a higher mMRC dyspnea score (1.71 [1.12-2.60] per 1 point, P=.012) were independently related with being Inactive. No baseline variable was independently associated with being an Active Improver. CONCLUSIONS: The natural progression in physical activity over time in COPD patients is heterogeneous. While Inactive patients relate to worse scores for clinical COPD characteristics, Active Improvers and Decliners cannot be predicted at baseline.

2.
Eur Respir J ; 2020 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32855223

RESUMO

Previous studies have related early postnatal growth with later lung function but their interpretation is limited by the methods used to assess child's growth. We aimed to assess the association of early childhood growth, measured by body mass index (BMI) trajectories up to 4 years, with lung function at 7 years.We included 1257 children from the Spanish Infancia y Medio Ambiente population-based birth cohort. Early childhood growth was classified in five categories based on BMI trajectories up to 4 years previously identified using latent class growth analysis. These trajectories differed in birth size ("lower", "average", "higher") and in BMI gain velocity ("slower", "accelerated"). We related these trajectories with lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75)) at 7 years, using multivariable mixed regression.Compared to children with average birth size and slower BMI gain (reference), children with higher birth size and accelerated BMI gain had higher percent predicted FVC (3.3% [95% CI: 1.0; 5.6]) and lower percent predicted FEV1/FVC (-1.5% [-2.9; -0.1]) at 7 years. Similar associations were observed for children with lower birth size and accelerated BMI gain. Children with lower birth size and slower BMI gain had lower percent predicted FVC at 7 years. No association was found for FEF25-75Independently of birth size, children with accelerated BMI gain in early childhood had higher lung function at 7 years but showed airflow limitation. Children with lower birth size and slower BMI gain in early childhood had lower lung function at 7 years.

3.
Respir Med ; 171: 106105, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32858497

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is partial evidence that COPD is expressed differently in women than in men, namely on symptoms, pulmonary function, exacerbations, comorbidities or prognosis. There is a need to improve the characterization of COPD in females. METHODS: We obtained and pooled data of 17 139 patients from 22 COPD cohorts and analysed the clinical differences by sex, establishing the relationship between these characteristics in women and the prognosis and severity of the disease. Comparisons were established with standard statistics and survival analysis, including crude and multivariate Cox-regression analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 5355 (31.2%) women were compared with men with COPD. Women were younger, had lower pack-years, greater FEV1%, lower BMI and a greater number of exacerbations (all p < 0.05). On symptoms, women reported more dyspnea, equal cough but less expectoration (p < 0.001). There were no differences in the BODE index score in women (2.4) versus men (2.4) (p = 0.5), but the distribution of all BODE components was highly variable by sex within different thresholds of BODE. On prognosis, 5-year survival was higher in COPD females (86.9%) than in males (76.3%), p < 0.001, in all patients and within each of the specific comorbidities that we assessed. The crude and adjusted RR and 95% C.I. for death in males was 1.82 (1.69-1.96) and 1.73 (1.50-2.00), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: COPD in women has some characteristic traits expressed differently than compared to men, mainly with more dyspnea and COPD exacerbations and less phlegm, among others, although long-term survival appears better in female COPD patients.

4.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237769, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32817718

RESUMO

Concerns exist that the positive association of physical activity with better lung function, which has been suggested in previous longitudinal studies in smokers, is due to reverse causation. To investigate this, we applied structural equation modeling (SEM), an exploratory approach, and marginal structural modeling (MSM), an approach from the causal inference framework that corrects for reverse causation and time-dependent confounding and estimates causal effects, on data from participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS, a multicentre European cohort study initiated in 1991-1993 with ECRHS I, and with two follow-ups: ECRHS II in 1999-2003, and ECRHS III in 2010-2014). 753 subjects who reported current smoking at ECRHS II, with repeated data on lung function at ECRHS I, II and III, physical activity at ECRHS II and III, and potential confounders at ECRHS I and II, were included in the analyses. SEM showed positive associations between physical activity and lung function in both directions. MSM suggested a protective causal effect of physical activity on lung function (overall difference in mean ß (95% CI), comparing active versus non-active individuals: 58 mL (21-95) for forced expiratory volume in one second and 83 mL (36-130) for forced vital capacity). Our results suggest bi-directional causation and support a true protective effect of physical activity on lung function in smokers, after accounting for reverse causation and time-dependent confounding.


Assuntos
Asma/terapia , Exercício Físico , Pulmão/fisiologia , Infecções Respiratórias/terapia , Adolescente , Adulto , Asma/etiologia , Asma/fisiopatologia , Peso Corporal/fisiologia , Dieta , Feminino , Volume Expiratório Forçado/fisiologia , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Testes de Função Respiratória , Fumantes , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Capacidade Vital/fisiologia , Adulto Jovem
5.
Sleep Breath ; 2020 Jul 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32632893

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To study changes in lung function among individuals with a risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and if asthma affected this relationship. METHODS: We used data from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II and III, a multicentre general population study. Participants answered questionnaires and performed spirometry at baseline and 10-year follow-up (n = 4,329 attended both visits). Subjects with high risk for OSA were identified from the multivariable apnoea prediction (MAP) index, calculated from BMI, age, gender, and OSA symptoms at follow-up. Asthma was defined as having doctor's diagnosed asthma at follow-up. Primary outcomes were changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from baseline to follow-up. RESULTS: Among 5108 participants at follow-up, 991 (19%) had a high risk of OSA based on the MAP index. Participants with high OSA risk more often had wheeze, cough, chest tightness, and breathlessness at follow-up than those with low OSA risk. Lung function declined more rapidly in subjects with high OSA risk (low vs high OSA risk [mean ± SD]: FEV1 = - 41.3 ± 24.3 ml/year vs - 50.8 ± 30.1 ml/year; FVC = - 30.5 ± 31.2 ml/year vs - 45.2 ± 36.3 ml/year). Lung function decline was primarily associated with higher BMI and OSA symptoms. OSA symptoms had a stronger association with lung function decline among asthmatics, compared to non-asthmatics. CONCLUSION: In the general population, a high probability of obstructive sleep apnoea was related to faster lung function decline in the previous decade. This was driven by a higher BMI and more OSA symptoms among these subjects. The association between OSA symptoms and lung function decline was stronger among asthmatics.

6.
BMJ Open ; 10(7): e038704, 2020 07 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32690539

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Advances in wearable sensor technology now enable frequent, objective monitoring of real-world walking. Walking-related digital mobility outcomes (DMOs), such as real-world walking speed, have the potential to be more sensitive to mobility changes than traditional clinical assessments. However, it is not yet clear which DMOs are most suitable for formal validation. In this review, we will explore the evidence on discriminant ability, construct validity, prognostic value and responsiveness of walking-related DMOs in four disease areas: Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and proximal femoral fracture. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Arksey and O'Malley's methodological framework for scoping reviews will guide study conduct. We will search seven databases (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, EMBASE, IEEE Digital Library and Cochrane Library) and grey literature for studies which (1) measure differences in DMOs between healthy and pathological walking, (2) assess relationships between DMOs and traditional clinical measures, (3) assess the prognostic value of DMOs and (4) use DMOs as endpoints in interventional clinical trials. Two reviewers will screen each abstract and full-text manuscript according to predefined eligibility criteria. We will then chart extracted data, map the literature, perform a narrative synthesis and identify gaps. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: As this review is limited to publicly available materials, it does not require ethical approval. This work is part of Mobilise-D, an Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking which aims to deliver, validate and obtain regulatory approval for DMOs. Results will be shared with the scientific community and general public in cooperation with the Mobilise-D communication team. REGISTRATION: Study materials and updates will be made available through the Center for Open Science's OSFRegistry (https://osf.io/k7395).

7.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235632, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32628720

RESUMO

Emerging evidence suggests that parents' preconception exposures may influence offspring health. We aimed to investigate maternal and paternal smoking onset in specific time windows in relation to offspring body mass index (BMI) and fat mass index (FMI). We investigated fathers (n = 2111) and mothers (n = 2569) aged 39-65 years, of the population based RHINE and ECRHS studies, and their offspring aged 18-49 years (n = 6487, mean age 29.6 years) who participated in the RHINESSA study. BMI was calculated from self-reported height and weight, and FMI was estimated from bioelectrical impedance measures in a subsample. Associations with parental smoking were analysed with generalized linear regression adjusting for parental education and clustering by study centre and family. Interactions between offspring sex were analysed, as was mediation by parental pack years, parental BMI, offspring smoking and offspring birthweight. Fathers' smoking onset before conception of the offspring (onset ≥15 years) was associated with higher BMI in the offspring when adult (ß 0.551, 95%CI: 0.174-0.929, p = 0.004). Mothers' preconception and postnatal smoking onset was associated with higher offspring BMI (onset <15 years: ß1.161, 95%CI 0.378-1.944; onset ≥15 years: ß0.720, 95%CI 0.293-1.147; onset after offspring birth: ß2.257, 95%CI 1.220-3.294). However, mediation analysis indicated that these effects were fully mediated by parents' postnatal pack years, and partially mediated by parents' BMI and offspring smoking. Regarding FMI, sons of smoking fathers also had higher fat mass (onset <15 years ß1.604, 95%CI 0.269-2.939; onset ≥15 years ß2.590, 95%CI 0.544-4.636; and onset after birth ß2.736, 95%CI 0.621-4.851). There was no association between maternal smoking and offspring fat mass. We found that parents' smoking before conception was associated with higher BMI in offspring when they reached adulthood, but that these effects were mediated through parents' pack years, suggesting that cumulative smoking exposure during offspring's childhood may elicit long lasting effects on offspring BMI.


Assuntos
Tecido Adiposo/metabolismo , Crianças Adultas , Índice de Massa Corporal , Fertilização , Pais , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/metabolismo , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez
8.
Am J Epidemiol ; 2020 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32510134

RESUMO

A restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Whether practicing regular physical activity protects against this pattern has never been studied. We estimated the association between regular physical activity and the incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and physical activity were assessed between 2000-2002 in the ECRHS (n=2,757, 39-67 years) and SAPALDIA (n=2,610, 36-82 years) population-based European cohorts, and again approximately 10-years later (2010-2013). Subjects with restrictive or obstructive spirometry pattern at baseline were excluded. We assessed the association of being active at baseline (defined as being physically active ≥2-3 times/wk for ≥1 h) with restrictive spirometry pattern at follow-up (defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ≥Lower Limit of Normal and FVC<80% predicted) using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for relevant confounders. After 10 years of follow-up, 3.3% of participants had developed restrictive spirometry pattern. Being physically active was associated with a lower risk of developing this phenotype (RR=0.76, 95% CI=0.59-0.98). This association was stronger among those overweight and obese, compared to those with normal weight (Pinteraction=0.06). In two large European studies, adults practicing regular physical activity were at lower risk of developing restrictive spirometry pattern after 10 years.

9.
BMC Pulm Med ; 20(1): 171, 2020 Jun 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546146

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Low lung function has been associated with increased body mass index (BMI). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the effect of BMI on lung function is mediated by DNA methylation. METHODS: We used individual data from 285,495 participants in four population-based cohorts: the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966, the Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung Disease in Adults, and the UK Biobank. We carried out Mendelian randomisation (MR) analyses in two steps using a two-sample approach with SNPs as instrumental variables (IVs) in each step. In step 1 MR, we estimated the causal effect of BMI on peripheral blood DNA methylation (measured at genome-wide level) using 95 BMI-associated SNPs as IVs. In step 2 MR, we estimated the causal effect of DNA methylation on FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC using two SNPs acting as methQTLs occurring close (in cis) to CpGs identified in the first step. These analyses were conducted after exclusion of weak IVs (F statistic < 10) and MR estimates were derived using the Wald ratio, with standard error from the delta method. Individuals whose data were used in step 1 were not included in step 2. RESULTS: In step 1, we found that BMI might have a small causal effect on DNA methylation levels (less than 1% change in methylation per 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI) at two CpGs (cg09046979 and cg12580248). In step 2, we found no evidence of a causal effect of DNA methylation at cg09046979 on lung function. We could not estimate the causal effect of DNA methylation at cg12580248 on lung function as we could not find publicly available data on the association of this CpG with SNPs. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first paper to report the use of a two-step MR approach to assess the role of DNA methylation in mediating the effect of a non-genetic factor on lung function. Our findings do not support a mediating effect of DNA methylation in the association of lung function with BMI.

10.
Environ Int ; 140: 105749, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32380303

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Residing in greener areas is increasingly linked to beneficial health outcomes, but little is known about its effect on respiratory health. OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between residential greenness and nearby green spaces with lung function up to 24 years in the UK Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. METHODS: Lung function was measured by spirometry at eight, 15 and 24 years of age. Greenness levels within circular buffers (100-1000 m) around the birth, eight-, 15- and 24-year home addresses were calculated using the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and averaged (lifetime greenness). The presence and proportion of green spaces (urban green spaces, forests and agricultural land) within a 300 m buffer was determined. First, associations between repeated greenness and green space variables and repeated lung function parameters were assessed using generalized estimation equations (N = 7094, 47.9% male). Second, associations between lifetime average greenness and lifetime average proportion of green spaces with lung function at 24-years were assessed using linear regression models (N = 1763, 39.6% male). All models were adjusted for individual and environmental covariates. RESULTS: Using repeated greenspace and lung function data at eight, 15 and 24 years, greenness in a 100 m buffer was associated with higher FEV1 and FVC (11.4 ml [2.6, 20.3] and 12.2 ml [1.8, 22.7], respectively, per interquartile range increase), as was the presence of urban green spaces in a 300 m buffer (20.3 ml [-0.1, 40.7] and 23.1 ml [-0.3, 46.5] for FEV1 and FVC, respectively). These associations were independent of air pollution, urbanicity and socio-economic status. Lifetime average greenness within a 100 m buffer and proportion of agricultural land within a 300 m buffer were associated with better lung function at 24 years but adjusting for asthma attenuated these associations. DISCUSSION: This study provides suggestive evidence that children whose homes are in more vegetated places or are in close proximity of green spaces have better lung function up to 24 years of age.

11.
BMJ Open ; 10(4): e032511, 2020 04 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32350008

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To compare the prevalence of different insomnia subtypes among middle-aged adults from Europe and Australia and to explore the cross-sectional relationship between insomnia subtypes, respiratory symptoms and lung function. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based, multicentre cohort study. SETTING: 23 centres in 10 European countries and Australia. METHODS: We included 5800 participants in the third follow-up of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) who answered three questions on insomnia symptoms: difficulties falling asleep (initial insomnia), waking up often during the night (middle insomnia) and waking up early in the morning and not being able to fall back asleep (late insomnia). They also answered questions on smoking, general health and chronic diseases and had the following lung function measurements: forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and the FEV1/FVC ratio. Changes in lung function since ECRHS I about 20 years earlier were also analysed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of insomnia subtypes and relationship to respiratory symptoms and function. RESULTS: Overall, middle insomnia (31.2%) was the most common subtype followed by late insomnia (14.2%) and initial insomnia (11.2%). The highest reported prevalence of middle insomnia was found in Iceland (37.2%) and the lowest in Australia (22.7%), while the prevalence of initial and late insomnia was highest in Spain (16.0% and 19.7%, respectively) and lowest in Denmark (4.6% and 9.2%, respectively). All subtypes of insomnia were associated with significantly higher reported prevalence of respiratory symptoms. Only isolated initial insomnia was associated with lower FEV1, whereas no association was found between insomnia and low FEV1/FVC ratio or decline in lung function. CONCLUSION: There is considerable geographical variation in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms. Middle insomnia is most common especially in Iceland. Initial and late insomnia are most common in Spain. All insomnia subtypes are associated with respiratory symptoms, and initial insomnia is also associated with lower FEV1.

12.
Allergy ; 2020 Apr 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32277847

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Allergic diseases often occur in combination (multimorbidity). Human blood transcriptome studies have not addressed multimorbidity. Large-scale gene expression data were combined to retrieve biomarkers and signaling pathways to disentangle allergic multimorbidity phenotypes. METHODS: Integrated transcriptomic analysis was conducted in 1233 participants with a discovery phase using gene expression data (Human Transcriptome Array 2.0) from whole blood of 786 children from three European birth cohorts (MeDALL), and a replication phase using RNA Sequencing data from an independent cohort (EVA-PR, n = 447). Allergic diseases (asthma, atopic dermatitis, rhinitis) were considered as single disease or multimorbidity (at least two diseases), and compared with no disease. RESULTS: Fifty genes were differentially expressed in allergic diseases. Thirty-two were not previously described in allergy. Eight genes were consistently overexpressed in all types of multimorbidity for asthma, dermatitis, and rhinitis (CLC, EMR4P, IL5RA, FRRS1, HRH4, SLC29A1, SIGLEC8, IL1RL1). All genes were replicated the in EVA-PR cohort. RT-qPCR validated the overexpression of selected genes. In MeDALL, 27 genes were differentially expressed in rhinitis alone, but none was significant for asthma or dermatitis alone. The multimorbidity signature was enriched in eosinophil-associated immune response and signal transduction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis identified IL5/JAK/STAT and IL33/ST2/IRAK/TRAF as key signaling pathways in multimorbid diseases. Synergistic effect of multimorbidity on gene expression levels was found. CONCLUSION: A signature of eight genes identifies multimorbidity for asthma, rhinitis, and dermatitis. Our results have clinical and mechanistic implications, and suggest that multimorbidity should be considered differently than allergic diseases occurring alone.

14.
Thorax ; 75(4): 313-320, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32098862

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported an association between weight increase and excess lung function decline in young adults followed for short periods. We aimed to estimate lung function trajectories during adulthood from 20-year weight change profiles using data from the population-based European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). METHODS: We included 3673 participants recruited at age 20-44 years with repeated measurements of weight and lung function (forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)) in three study waves (1991-93, 1999-2003, 2010-14) until they were 39-67 years of age. We classified subjects into weight change profiles according to baseline body mass index (BMI) categories and weight change over 20 years. We estimated trajectories of lung function over time as a function of weight change profiles using population-averaged generalised estimating equations. RESULTS: In individuals with normal BMI, overweight and obesity at baseline, moderate (0.25-1 kg/year) and high weight gain (>1 kg/year) during follow-up were associated with accelerated FVC and FEV1 declines. Compared with participants with baseline normal BMI and stable weight (±0.25 kg/year), obese individuals with high weight gain during follow-up had -1011 mL (95% CI -1.259 to -763) lower estimated FVC at 65 years despite similar estimated FVC levels at 25 years. Obese individuals at baseline who lost weight (<-0.25 kg/year) exhibited an attenuation of FVC and FEV1 declines. We found no association between weight change profiles and FEV1/FVC decline. CONCLUSION: Moderate and high weight gain over 20 years was associated with accelerated lung function decline, while weight loss was related to its attenuation. Control of weight gain is important for maintaining good lung function in adult life.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Peso Corporal/fisiologia , Estilo de Vida , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Testes de Função Respiratória/métodos , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , União Europeia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Volume Expiratório Forçado/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade/diagnóstico , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Estudos Prospectivos , Medição de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Capacidade Vital/fisiologia , Ganho de Peso/fisiologia , Perda de Peso/fisiologia , Adulto Jovem
15.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 17(4): 429-437, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31967855

RESUMO

Rationale: Poor lung function, a significant predictor of mortality, has been observed in postmenopausal women compared with those still menstruating. Menopausal age is a risk factor for several adverse health outcomes, but little evidence exists on the impact of menopausal age on lung function impairments, especially regarding post-bronchodilator lung function measures.Objectives: To investigate the association between age at menopause and pre- and post-bronchodilator lung function outcomes.Methods: During the sixth-decade follow-up of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study cohort (mean age, 53 yr), information was collected on most recent menstrual period and menopausal status. Lung function was measured at age 7 years and again at 53 years. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine the association between age at menopause and pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry, controlling for early and adult life confounders.Results: Women reporting an early age at natural menopause (<45 yr) had lower post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (-168 ml; 95% confidence interval, -273 to -63) and lower forced vital capacity (-186 ml; 95% confidence interval, -302 to -70) than postmenopausal women who experienced menopause at a later age (≥45 yr). No association was observed with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio. Adjustment for early-life confounders strengthened these associations.Conclusions: This study provides new evidence that early menopause is associated with reduced lung function that is suggestive of restriction, but not obstruction, even after adjustment for early-life confounders. Given the important link between poor lung function and mortality, clinicians should be aware of the risk of diminished lung function in postmenopausal women who experience menopause at an early age.

16.
Environ Int ; 136: 105474, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31962272

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Uncertainly continues to exist regarding the role of air pollution on pediatric asthma and allergic conditions, especially as air pollution levels have started to decrease in recent decades. OBJECTIVE: We examined associations of long-term air pollution levels at the home address with pediatric eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma prevalences in five birth cohorts (BIB, EDEN, GASPII, RHEA and INMA) from seven areas in five European countries. METHODS: Current eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma were assessed in children aged four (N = 6527) and eight years (N = 2489). A multi-morbidity outcome (≥2 conditions versus none) was also defined. Individual outdoor levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen oxides, mass of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 µm (PM10), 10-2.5 µm (PMcoarse) and <2.5 µm (PM2.5), and PM2.5 absorbance were assigned to the birth, four- and eight-year home addresses using highly defined spatial air pollution exposure models. Cohort-specific cross-sectional associations were assessed using logistic regression models adjusted for demographic and environmental covariates and combined in a random effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of pediatric eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma at four years was 15.4%, 5.9% and 12.4%. We found no increase in the prevalence of these outcomes at four or eight years with increasing air pollution exposure. For example, the meta-analysis adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma at four years were 0.94 (0.81, 1.09), 0.90 (0.75, 1.09), and 0.91 (0.74, 1.11), respectively, per 10 µg/m3 increase in NO2 at the birth address, and 1.00 (0.81, 1.23), 0.70 (0.49, 1.00) and 0.88 (0.54, 1.45), respectively, per 5 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 at the birth address. DISCUSSION: In this large meta-analysis of five birth cohorts, we found no indication of adverse effects of long-term air pollution exposure on the prevalence of current pediatric eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis or asthma.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos , Poluição do Ar , Asma , Conjuntivite , Eczema , Rinite , Poluentes Atmosféricos/toxicidade , Criança , Conjuntivite/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Eczema/epidemiologia , Exposição Ambiental , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Humanos , Material Particulado , Rinite/epidemiologia
17.
Allergy ; 75(7): 1672-1688, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31995656

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In allergic rhinitis, a relevant outcome providing information on the effectiveness of interventions is needed. In MASK-air (Mobile Airways Sentinel Network), a visual analogue scale (VAS) for work is used as a relevant outcome. This study aimed to assess the performance of the work VAS work by comparing VAS work with other VAS measurements and symptom-medication scores obtained concurrently. METHODS: All consecutive MASK-air users in 23 countries from 1 June 2016 to 31 October 2018 were included (14 189 users; 205 904 days). Geolocalized users self-assessed daily symptom control using the touchscreen functionality on their smart phone to click on VAS scores (ranging from 0 to 100) for overall symptoms (global), nose, eyes, asthma and work. Two symptom-medication scores were used: the modified EAACI CSMS score and the MASK control score for rhinitis. To assess data quality, the intra-individual response variability (IRV) index was calculated. RESULTS: A strong correlation was observed between VAS work and other VAS. The highest levels for correlation with VAS work and variance explained in VAS work were found with VAS global, followed by VAS nose, eye and asthma. In comparison with VAS global, the mCSMS and MASK control score showed a lower correlation with VAS work. Results are unlikely to be explained by a low quality of data arising from repeated VAS measures. CONCLUSIONS: VAS work correlates with other outcomes (VAS global, nose, eye and asthma) but less well with a symptom-medication score. VAS work should be considered as a potentially useful AR outcome in intervention studies.

18.
Respirology ; 25(3): 289-297, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31297952

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Early menarche is increasing in prevalence worldwide, prompting clinical and public health interest on its links with pulmonary function. We aimed to investigate the relationship between early menarche and lung function in middle age. METHODS: The population-based Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (born 1961; n = 8583), was initiated in 1968. The 5th Decade follow-up data (mean age: 45 years) included age at menarche and complex lung function testing. The 6th Decade follow-up (age: 53 years) repeated spirometry and gas transfer factor. Multiple linear regression and mediation analyses were performed to determine the association between age at menarche and adult lung function and investigate biological pathways, including the proportion mediated by adult-attained height. RESULTS: Girls reporting an early menarche (<12 years) were measured to be taller with greater lung function at age 7 years compared with those reporting menarche ≥12 years. By 45 years of age, they were shorter and had lower post-bronchodilator (BD) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (adjusted mean difference: -133 mL; 95% CI: -233, -33), forced vital capacity (-183 mL; 95% CI: -300, -65) and functional residual capacity (-168 mL; 95% CI: -315, -21). Magnitudes of spirometric deficits were similar at age 53 years. Forty percent of these total effects were mediated through adult-attained height. CONCLUSION: Early menarche was associated with reduced adult lung function. This is the first study to investigate post-BD outcomes and quantify the partial role of adult height in this association.

19.
Int J Epidemiol ; 49(1): 131-141, 2020 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31270549

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although physical activity has many known health benefits, its association with lung function in childhood/adolescence remains unclear. We examined the association of physical-activity trajectories between 11 and 15 years with lung function at 15 years in 2266 adolescents. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 14 305 singleton births alive at 1 year was recruited in the UK population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort. Physical activity (counts/minute and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) was assessed for 7 days using an accelerometer at 11, 13 and 15 years. We identified sex-specific physical-activity trajectories applying K-means for longitudinal data in children with at least two accelerometer measurements (n = 3584). We then estimated the sex-specific associations of these trajectories with post-bronchodilation lung-function parameters using multivariable linear-regression models (n = 2266, 45% boys). RESULTS: Fewer than 7% of participants met the WHO physical-activity recommendations (i.e. daily average of at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity). Boys were substantially more active than girls. In both sexes, we identified three distinct physical-activity trajectories ('low': 39.8% boys, 45.8% girls; 'moderate': 42.9% boys, 41.4% girls; and 'high' physical activity: 17.3% boys, 12.8% girls). Girls in the moderate and high physical-activity trajectories had 0.11 L [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04-0.19] and 0.15 L (95% CI: 0.03-0.26) higher forced vital capacity than their less-active peers. No association was observed in boys. CONCLUSIONS: Higher childhood physical activity relates to higher lung-function levels in adolescent girls. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying this association should be pursued.

20.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 17(3): 302-312, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800292

RESUMO

Rationale: Interactions between early life and adult insults on lung function decline are not well understood, with most studies investigating prebronchodilator (pre-BD) FEV1 decline.Objectives: To investigate relationships between adult risk factors and pre- and post-BD lung function decline and their potential effect modification by early life and genetic factors.Methods: Multiple regression was used to examine associations between adult exposures (asthma, smoking, occupational exposures, traffic pollution, and obesity) and decline in both pre- and post-BD spirometry (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) between ages 45 and 53 years in the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (n = 857). Effect modification of these relationships by childhood respiratory risk factors, including low childhood lung function and GST (glutathione S-transferase) gene polymorphisms, was investigated.Results: Baseline asthma, smoking, occupational exposure to vapors/gases/dusts/fumes, and living close to traffic were associated with accelerated decline in both pre- and post-BD FEV1. These factors were also associated with FEV1/FVC decline. Occupational exposure to aromatic solvents was associated with pre-BD but not post-BD FEV1 decline. Maternal smoking accentuated the effect of personal smoking on pre- and post-BD FEV1 decline. Lower childhood lung function and having the GSTM1 null allele accentuated the effect of occupational exposure to vapors/gases/dusts/fumes and personal smoking on post-BD FEV1 decline. Incident obesity was associated with accelerated decline in FEV1 and more pronounced in FVC.Conclusions: This study provides new evidence for accentuation of individual susceptibility to adult risk factors by low childhood lung function, GSTM1 genotype, and maternal smoking.

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