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1.
Addict Behav ; 124: 107097, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34536632

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Vaporised nicotine products (VNPs) may be useful smoking cessation aids for people in alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment, a population with high tobacco-related morbidity and mortality rates. This qualitative study aimed to examine the barriers and facilitators of using VNPs as part of a clinical trial to reduce or quit smoking among people in AOD treatment. METHODS: Thirteen people in AOD treatment who were participating in a trial of VNPs for smoking cessation (QuitENDs) completed a brief semi-structured interview examining experiences of using VNPs to reduce or quit smoking. Transcribed data was analysed using the iterative categorisation framework. RESULTS: Many participants expressed the benefit of having a smoking cessation aid that addressed nicotine cravings and the behavioural hand-to-mouth action to help them reduce or quit smoking. Although many participants reported that VNPs were easy to use, some found maintaining the device to be challenging. Some participants described Australian regulations limiting use of VNPs as reducing their desire to use the device as a cessation aid. Many participants attempting to reduce or quit tobacco and cannabis simultaneously stated that VNPs alone were insufficient to help them reduce or quit tobacco. CONCLUSIONS: VNPs hold significant promise as smoking cessation aids among people in AOD treatment because of their unique ability to satisfy both nicotine cravings and behavioural habits. However, multiple barriers, such as accessibility, maintenance, and the challenges of reducing other substance use simultaneously also need to be addressed for optimal engagement in clinical trials with VNPs to quit smoking.


Assuntos
Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Austrália , Humanos , Nicotina/uso terapêutico , Dispositivos para o Abandono do Uso de Tabaco
2.
Subst Use Misuse ; : 1-10, 2021 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34796786

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Co-administering cannabis with tobacco (i.e. co-administration of the substances mixed together) is a common practice among cannabis users, but the consequences of this practice are not well understood. This study examines the relationship between co-administering cannabis with tobacco and the long-term frequency of cannabis use in a young adult population group with high rates of cannabis and tobacco use. METHODS: The data are from an Australian prospective population-based study of young adults who recurrently used amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS). The mean age of participants was 20.8 years at baseline, sample size (n = 277), and 47% were female. We examined the frequency and quantity of cannabis consumption over 4 ½ years. Negative binomial regression analysis was conducted to examine the frequency of cannabis use at 12-month follow-up and at 4 ½ years, with co-administering practices as the predictor. RESULTS: At every time interval, participants who always co-administered their cannabis with tobacco used cannabis on more days in the last month than those who only sometimes co-administered, rarely co-administered, or never co-administered these substances (p < 0.001). Sometimes co-administering cannabis with tobacco at baseline predicted more frequent cannabis use at 12-month follow-up (adjusted IRR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.05, 4.78), independently of the baseline frequency of cannabis use. However, levels of co-administering cannabis with tobacco at 12-month follow-up (rarely, sometimes, and always) did not predict high levels of cannabis use at 4 ½ years follow-up after adjusting for cannabis use at 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Among people who use ATS and cannabis, frequent cannabis use may be a marker of the practice of co-administering cannabis with tobacco, and can be used to target tobacco cessation interventions in these populations.

3.
Lancet Reg Health West Pac ; 14: 100210, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34671751

RESUMO

Background: The prevalence of smoking in Central Queensland (CQ), Australia was higher than the state and national averages. A regional smoking cessation initiative ("10,000 Lives") was launched to promote available interventions (e.g., Quitline). We investigated the impact of "10,000 Lives" on referral to and use of Quitline services. Methods: We conducted an interrupted time series analysis using a segmented Poisson regression model to measure the impact of "10,000 Lives" on monthly referrals to, and use of Quitline services (counselling sessions and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) dispatched by Quitline), in CQ compared to other areas in the state (control population). The control population included all regional areas in Queensland with a comparable smoking prevalence to CQ and similar access to Quitline's Intensive Quit Support Program. We calculated the changes in level and trend of outcomes in CQ relative to the change in the control area during the post-launch period of "10,000 Lives". The models were checked for autocorrelation and seasonality and adjusted accordingly. Findings: After the introduction of "10,000 Lives", the mean monthly rate per 1,000 smoking population increased in the intervention area for each outcome; e.g., from 3.3 to 10.8 for referrals to Quitline, from 1.6 to 4.4 for initial counselling session completed. These results were validated by the controlled interrupted time series analysis which showed relative increases for each of these outcomes (238•5% for monthly rate of referral to Quitline per 1,000 smoking population and 248•6% for monthly rate of initial counselling sessions completed per 1,000 smoking population). Interpretation: Our study demonstrates a locally coordinated health promotion initiative can promote and boost the referral to, and use of Quitline smoking cessation services. Funding: The research is funded by a collaborative research grant between School of Public Health at University of Queensland and Central Queensland Public Health Unit which is awarded by the Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service (CQHHS93907). The lead author (AK) is supported by a University of Queensland Research Training Scholarship and a Research Higher Degree Top-up Scholarship.

6.
JAMA Pediatr ; 2021 Oct 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34694342

RESUMO

Importance: Vaping products were initially designed to deliver nicotine as a tobacco cigarette substitute (eg, electronic cigarettes) but are now frequently used to deliver psychoactive substances, such as cannabis and its derivatives. Large, nationally representative surveys, such as Monitoring the Future, found that approximately 1 in 3 grade-12 students vaped cannabis in 2018 alone. Objective: To summarize the findings of epidemiological studies that reported the global prevalence of cannabis vaping in adolescents by survey year and school grades. Data Sources: PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched systematically on August 19, 2020, for studies published globally between January 1, 2003, and August 19, 2020. Study Selection: Publications that reported the prevalence of cannabis vaping in adolescents in the general population were included. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Study characteristics and prevalence estimates were extracted from each article. Random-effects meta-analysis based on the DerSimonian and Laird method and meta-regression were performed on lifetime, 12-month, and 30-day prevalence estimates. Meta-regression was also conducted using survey year and school grades as moderators. Main Outcomes and Measures: Prevalence of cannabis vaping. Results: Seventeen studies met the eligibility criteria (n = 198 845 adolescents). Although no restrictions were imposed on study location, all 17 studies were from the US and Canada. Across all school grades, the pooled prevalence increased for lifetime use (6.1% in 2013-2016 to 13.6% in 2019-2020), use in the past 12 months (7.2% in 2017-2018 to 13.2% in 2019-2020), and use in the past 30 days (1.6% in 2013-2016 to 8.4% in 2019-2020). Heterogeneity across studies was large. The limited evidence from studies using similar survey and study designs suggested that adolescents' preference for cannabis products other than dried herbs, which usually contain higher Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol levels, may have shifted over time. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings of this study suggest that the prevalence of cannabis vaping has increased among adolescents in the US and Canada and that more effective preventive and response measures are required. Trial Registration: PROSPERO Identifier: CRD42020219644.

7.
Water Res ; 206: 117733, 2021 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34653796

RESUMO

Understanding smoking patterns in the population is essential for formulating public health and tobacco control policies. Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) is a valuable complementary approach to conventional survey methods to measure tobacco use, providing non-invasive information in an objective and cost-effective manner. This study estimates tobacco use in an urban population at daily resolution and in a university town at weekly resolution in China. Wastewater samples were collected daily in an urban catchment (n = 279) and every week from a university town located within 13 km of the urban catchment (n = 43) in 2017-2018. The tobacco-related biomarkers, cotinine and hydroxycotinine, and nicotine were analyzed via direct injection liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Per capita daily tobacco use was back-estimated based on cotinine in wastewater. Over the year of sampling, we observed an increasing trend in tobacco use in the urban catchment that corroborated with sales statistics in 2017-2018. Tobacco use in the urban area was estimated to be 1.16 cigarettes/person aged 15+/day, while it was estimated to be 0.60 cigarettes/person aged 15+/day in the university town. The level of tobacco use in the university town remained stable over the year in contrast to the urban area. The difference of tobacco use in the two catchments may be attributed to their demographic differences. Furthermore, the Tobacco-Free Campus Policy would be a possible reason for the lower level of tobacco use in the university town.


Assuntos
Universidades , Águas Residuárias , China/epidemiologia , Cromatografia Líquida , Humanos , Espectrometria de Massas em Tandem , Uso de Tabaco , Águas Residuárias/análise
8.
Health Educ Behav ; : 10901981211034738, 2021 Sep 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34496656

RESUMO

There are high rates of tobacco smoking among people who experience mental illness (MI). While videos are an effective method of disseminating health-related information, there is limited research investigating the effectiveness of video-delivered education promoting smoking cessation among people living with MI. This formative study aimed to investigate the effectiveness and acceptability of targeted video resources providing smoking cessation information and advice to smokers with MI. This study used a mixed-method design; 29 Australian smokers living with MI completed a preinterview survey including 12 questions assessing knowledge about smoking cessation, watched six videos developed by the research team providing information about smoking cessation, took part in semistructured interviews about the videos' quality, content, and format, and then completed a postinterview survey identical to the preinterview survey to assess changes in smoking cessation-related knowledge. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to calculate changes in cessation-related knowledge, and thematic analysis was used to identify common themes in qualitative data. We found a statistically significant increase in participants' smoking cessation-related knowledge scores after watching the videos. Participants indicated an overall high level of acceptability of the videos' quality, content, and format, and findings from the semistructured interviews reflected these favorable views. This study's findings provide a new understanding of the effectiveness and acceptability of customized video-based education to promote smoking cessation among people living with MI, and can be used to inform the content and focus of video resources aimed at increasing knowledge about smoking cessation for people experiencing MI.

9.
Nicotine Tob Res ; 2021 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34498088

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: New Zealand's equity-focused endgame goal (Smokefree 2025) aims to reduce smoking prevalence to minimal levels (ie, <5%) in all population groups by 2025. Inadequate progress has stimulated discussion of innovative measures to reduce prevalence; because few studies have explored how marginalized groups perceive these measures, we addressed this knowledge gap. AIMS AND METHODS: In November and December 2020, we conducted 20 in-depth interviews with people who smoked daily, were aged between 21 and 53, earned less than the median income (NZD33 900), and had marginal or inadequate income sufficiency. We explored participants' smoking history and used an elicitation exercise to probe their views on smokefree policies, including potential endgame measures. We used qualitative descriptive analysis and reflexive thematic analysis to interpret the data. RESULTS: Participants favored increasing personal support to quit and reducing nicotine levels in cigarettes, but generally opposed tobacco excise tax increases and paying people to quit. While many privileged their right to "choose," some recognized that stronger policies could restore the loss of agency addiction caused. Participants felt smoking's powerful addictiveness remained poorly understood, and called for smoking to be recognized and treated as an addiction. CONCLUSIONS: Several participants supported intensifying existing measures or introducing new measures. However, their use of tobacco industry rhetoric to frame smoking as a choice they had made could inadvertently reinforce the stigma they experienced. Reframing cigarettes as an addictive product engineered by a deceptive industry, may make it easier for participants to access the expanded support and compassion they sought. IMPLICATIONS: Policy measures, such as reducing the nicotine level in cigarettes, could support endgame goals; however, greater public understanding of addiction is needed to reduce stigma, support self-efficacy, and foster smoking cessation. Industry denormalization campaigns could challenge views of smoking as a personal choice, decrease self-blame among people who smoke, and present endgame goals as likely to enhance agency.

10.
Addict Behav ; 123: 107073, 2021 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34364109

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: An increase in electronic cigarette (EC) use among US youth has raised concerns that their use may increase conventional cigarette smoking. METHODS: Repeated cross-sectional data from two large nationally representative samples of US youth were drawn from the National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) and Monitoring the Future (MTF). Students from grade 6-12 of the NYTS (N = 98,454-132,003) and students from grade 12 of the MTF (N = 17,870-30,981) were included in the analyses. Trends in smoking behavior, intention to smoke in the future and perceived smoking harms among youth who do and do not use ECs were estimated from 2014 to 2020 using weighted multinomial logistic regression and predicted marginal probabilities. RESULTS: The prevalence for regular smoking decreased among youth who regularly use ECs. For example, among regular EC users, smoking prevalence decreased from 27.8% to 6.7% (-21%; 99.67% CI:[-32.3%, -9.9%]) in the NYTS between 2014 and 2020 and from 31.8% to 10.6% (-21.2%, 99.67% CI:[-35.0%, -7.3%]) in the MTF between 2014 and 2018. Intent to smoke in the future and perceiving smoking as harmless decreased or remained unchanged during the same period. For example, among regular EC users, there was no significant change in intention to smoke next year in the NYTS between 2014 and 2018; intention to smoke in the next 5 years decreased significantly from 30.7% to 11.2% (-19.5%, 99.67% CI:[-37.7%, -1.3%]) in the MTF. CONCLUSIONS: In two national samples of US youth, smoking prevalence declined by a sizeable relative percentage. Intent to smoke in the future and harm perceptions of smoking declined or remained unchanged while EC use increased. Results provide little evidence that EC use has increased conventional cigarette smoking among youth.


Assuntos
Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina , Vaping , Adolescente , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Intenção , Fumaça , Fumar/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Tabaco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
Nicotine Tob Res ; 2021 Aug 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34460922

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Mobile smoking cessation (mCessation) apps have the potential to complement and enhance existing interventions, but many are of low quality. Exploring app reviews can provide a broader understanding of user experiences and engagement, to enhance the quality, acceptability and effectiveness of future developments. METHODS: Publicly available user reviews and ratings of smoking cessation apps were mined from Google Play TM and the App Store ® via a targeted two-stage search strategy. English language smoking cessation apps with at least 20 consumer reviews between 2011 and 2020 were included. User reviews were thematically analysed using Braun & Clarke's framework. Apps were independently scored using the Mobile Apps Rating Scale (MARS) and compared to average user star ratings. RESULTS: Forty-eight versions of 42 apps, encompassing 1,414 associated reviews, met eligibility criteria. Inductive coding of reviews produced 1,084 coding references including reviews coded across multiple nodes. Themes generated included: (1) supportive characteristics/tools; (2) useability; (3) influence on smoking behaviour; (4) benefits of quitting; and (5) role as a supplementary tool for quitting. The mean MARS score of 36 free and accessible apps was 3.10 (SD 0.71) with mean scores ranging from 2.00 to 4.47. An inverse relationship between MARS scores and average user star ratings was observed . CONCLUSIONS: App personalisation, relationality, functionality and credibility were important to users, and should be considered as key design components for future apps. Differences between user star ratings and MARS scores may illustrate competing priorities of consumers and researchers, and the importance of a co-design development method. IMPLICATIONS: This is the first study to use unsolicited user reviews from a large population to understand the general mCessation user experience in relation to making a quit attempt. Our findings highlight specific features favoured and disliked by users, including their influence on engagement, and supports previous findings that mCessation applications need to be highly tailorable, functional, credible and supportive. We recommend a consumer-driven, co-design approach for future mCessation app developments to optimise user acceptability and engagement.

12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34411375

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In June 2020, the Australian Government announced that personal importation of nicotine vaping products (NVP) would be prohibited, pending a 12-month classification and regulation review by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. This brief report examines the themes of responses on Twitter to this announcement. METHODS: Simple random sampling was used to retrieve tweets containing keywords from 19 to 26 June 2020. Tweets were manually coded and descriptive statistics calculated for themes and policy position. RESULTS: The vast majority of the 1,168 tweets were anti-policy. Themes included: criticism towards government (59.8%), activism against NVP restriction (38%), potential adverse consequences (30.8%) and support for NVP restriction (1.4%). Tweets that identified potential adverse consequences of NVP restriction cited: smoking relapse for individuals currently using NVPs (75.6%); the impact of policy enforcement (8.6%); illicit market (8.3%); panic buying (3.6%); difficulty obtaining prescriptions (2.8%); and impacts on NVP businesses (2.8%). CONCLUSION: Tweets predominately objected to the policy announcement. Approximately three-quarters of tweets that cited potential adverse consequences of the policy mentioned smoking relapse as their primary concern. Implications for public health: User-generated content on Twitter was primarily used to lobby against the proposed policy, which was subsequently amended.

13.
J Psychoactive Drugs ; : 1-10, 2021 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34254884

RESUMO

Tobacco smoking remains highly prevalent in high-risk groups, including young adults who use cannabis and a variety of other drugs. We examine whether co-administering cannabis with tobacco is associated with heavier and more persistent tobacco smoking compared to separate use of these substances among young adults who use drugs recreationally. Data are from a prospective population-based study of young adults residing in Queensland, Australia, who recurrently used ecstasy or methamphetamine. The mean age was 20.8 years at baseline, and 47% were female. An ordinal regression model was developed (n = 277) with levels of tobacco smoking at 4½ years as the outcome. At baseline, just under half the sample (44.6%) had not co-administered cannabis with tobacco in the last month, 9.5% rarely co-administered, 7.7% sometimes co-administered, and 38.2% always co-administered. Always co-administering cannabis with tobacco was associated with more frequent and persistent tobacco smoking at 4½ years (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.98, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.02, 3.83), independently of factors including baseline frequency of cannabis and tobacco use. Young adults who use cannabis should be advised not to co-administrate cannabis with tobacco, and comprise an important target group for tobacco smoking cessation interventions.

14.
Int J Drug Policy ; 97: 103349, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34252787

RESUMO

AIMS AND BACKGROUND: People living with HIV (PLHIV) have a higher rate of smoking and experience a greater burden of tobacco-related disease than the general population. This study aimed to understand the role smoking plays in the lives of PLHIV, participants' views of traditionally available nicotine products (e.g., nicotine replacement therapy or NRT) and novel nicotine products (e.g., nicotine vaping products or NVPs) as both short-term quit aids and long-term substitutes for cigarettes. METHODS: Semi-structured focus groups were conducted with PLHIV who smoked. Focus groups were transcribed and analysed using a combination of deductive and inductive thematic analysis. A brief questionnaire of nicotine product use and interest was also completed and the quantitative data presented using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Fifty-four participants took part in 11 focus groups. Participants' views of smoking, quitting and nicotine products were diverse. Commitment to smoking and interest in quitting were categorised into three groups across a smoking-quitting continuum: committed to smoking, ambivalent about smoking and reluctantly smoking. NRT was criticised for a range of side effects and primarily considered as a short-term cessation aid. NVPs generated debate. NVPs that closely resembled cigarettes were viewed as the most acceptable product and were considered to be more suitable than NRT for long-term use. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the unique needs, goals and views of PLHIV related to smoking, quitting smoking and using nicotine products could inform development of novel and tailored smoking interventions for PLHIV. NVPs should be further examined as potential long-term substitutes for PLHIV who are ambivalent about smoking. However, traditional smoking cessation assistance (approved cessation aids and counselling) is likely to be most appropriate for PLHIV who are reluctantly smoking.

15.
JAMA ; 326(1): 56-64, 2021 07 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34228066

RESUMO

Importance: Cytisine is more effective than placebo and nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation. However, cytisine has not been tested against the most effective smoking cessation medication, varenicline, which is associated with adverse events known to lead to discontinuation of therapy. Objective: To examine whether standard cytisine treatment (25 days) was at least as effective as standard varenicline treatment (84 days) for smoking cessation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This noninferiority, open-label randomized clinical trial with allocation concealment and blinded outcome assessment was undertaken in Australia from November 2017 through May 2019; follow-up was completed in January 2020. A total of 1452 Australian adult daily smokers willing to make a quit attempt were included. Data collection was conducted primarily by computer-assisted telephone interview, but there was an in-person visit to validate the primary outcome. Interventions: Treatments were provided in accordance with the manufacturers' recommended dosage: cytisine (n = 725), 1.5-mg capsules taken 6 times daily initially then gradually reduced over the 25-day course; varenicline (n = 727), 0.5-mg tablets titrated to 1 mg twice daily for 84 days (12 weeks). All participants were offered referral to standard telephone behavioral support. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was 6-month continuous abstinence verified using a carbon monoxide breath test at 7-month follow-up. The noninferiority margin was set at 5% and the 1-sided significance threshold was set at .025. Results: Among 1452 participants who were randomized (mean [SD] age, 42.9 [12.7] years; 742 [51.1%] women), 1108 (76.3%) completed the trial. Verified 6-month continuous abstinence rates were 11.7% for the cytisine group and 13.3% for the varenicline group (risk difference, -1.62% [1-sided 97.5% CI, -5.02% to ∞]; P = .03 for noninferiority). Self-reported adverse events occurred less frequently in the cytisine group (997 events among 482 participants) compared with the varenicline group (1206 events among 510 participants) and the incident rate ratio was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.81 to 0.95; P = .002). Conclusions and Relevance: Among daily smokers willing to quit, cytisine treatment for 25 days, compared with varenicline treatment for 84 days, failed to demonstrate noninferiority regarding smoking cessation. Trial Registration: anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12616001654448.


Assuntos
Alcaloides/uso terapêutico , Agentes de Cessação do Hábito de Fumar/uso terapêutico , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/métodos , Vareniclina/uso terapêutico , Adulto , Alcaloides/efeitos adversos , Azocinas/efeitos adversos , Azocinas/uso terapêutico , Sonhos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Náusea/induzido quimicamente , Quinolizinas/efeitos adversos , Quinolizinas/uso terapêutico , Agentes de Cessação do Hábito de Fumar/efeitos adversos , Resultado do Tratamento , Vareniclina/efeitos adversos
16.
Tob Control ; 2021 Jul 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34312317

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The rising popularity of TikTok among adolescents may influence their awareness and perceptions of e-cigarette use via user-generated content. This study aimed to examine how e-cigarette/vaping-related videos are portrayed on TikTok. METHODS: The nine most viewed hashtag based keywords were used to identify popular e-cigarette/vaping-related videos on TikTok (n=1000) from its inception (earliest upload date: January 2019) to November 2020. Five researchers independently coded the number of views, likes, user category and theme. RESULTS: A final sample of 808 e-cigarette/vaping-related videos that met study criteria were included. Collectively, these videos were viewed over 1.5 billion times, with a median view count of 1 000 000 (range 112 900-78 600 000) and a median 'likes' count of 143 000 (range 10 000-1 000 000). A majority of the videos portrayed e-cigarette use positively (63%; collectively viewed over 1.1 billion times). Neutral depictions of e-cigarette use were viewed a total of 290 million times (24%) and negative depictions of e-cigarettes were viewed a total of 193 million times (13%). The video themes included (not mutually exclusively): 'comedy and joke' (52%; total of 618 million views), 'lifestyle and acceptability' (35%; 459 million), 'marketing' (29%; 392 million), 'vaping tricks' (20%; 487 million), 'nicotine and addiction' (20%; 194 million), 'creativity' (16%; 322 million) and 'warning' (11%; 131 million). CONCLUSION: Our findings illustrated that positively framed e-cigarette and vaping-related postings available without age restrictions on TikTok-a rising video-sharing platform that is popular among adolescents-have been viewed many times. Effective age restrictions are needed to reduce adolescents' potential exposure to videos that portray vaping positively.

20.
Drug Alcohol Rev ; 40(7): 1308-1314, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33829571

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: High rates of tobacco smoking among people who are homeless or living in temporary accommodation exacerbate poor health outcomes and financial disadvantage. There is limited research on this population's perceptions of smoking cessation benefits or support strategies. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 68 male smokers living in a temporary accommodation hostel in Brisbane, Australia. The survey measured smoking and quit attempt history, perceptions of cessation aids and benefits of cessation, and awareness of the Intensive Quit Support program-a free Queensland government-funded program comprising 12 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy supplemented with weekly calls from Quitline. RESULTS: Participants (56% aged ≤40 years) spent a high proportion of their income on smoking (median $80/week). Although the most commonly reported perceived benefit of smoking cessation was improved health, more participants were interested in a campaign promoting the financial savings of quitting rather than the health benefits. Twice as many participants reported the high cost of smoking-provoked thoughts of quitting than graphic health warning labels on cigarette packs (70.6% vs. 30.9%). Participants reported a high level of interest in e-cigarettes as a cessation aid. There was a low level of awareness but moderate level of interest in the Intensive Quit Support program. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation campaigns promoting the financial savings of cessation may be more salient than health-focused campaigns among relatively young men who smoke and experience homelessness. There is a clear need for innovative, targeted strategies promoting smoking cessation among this population.

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