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1.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 17(10): 2019-2027, 2021 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34606439

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine the relationship between internet use, sleep, and internalizing disorder symptoms in adolescents with an evening circadian preference. METHODS: One hundred seventy-two adolescents aged 10-18 years with an evening circadian preference completed a week of sleep diaries and questionnaires about internet use and internalizing disorder symptoms. RESULTS: Adolescents reported internet use for 3.81 hours on weekdays and 5.44 hours on weekends, with > 90% having access to both a computer with internet and a personal cell phone. A majority of adolescents used the internet from 4-8 pm (71%) and from 9-11 pm (62%). Common online activities included listening to music (77%), watching videos (64%), communicating with others (64%), and doing homework (58%). Late-night internet use (9-11 pm) was associated with more internalizing disorder symptoms. Middle-of-the-night internet use (midnight-5 am) was associated with a later bedtime, shorter total sleep time, and more internalizing disorder symptoms. Adolescents used the internet to fulfill social needs, to avoid or combat boredom, or for maladaptive activities. Using the internet for social interaction or avoidance/boredom was associated with higher internalizing disorder symptoms. Using the internet for maladaptive reasons was associated with more late-night and middle-of-the-night use. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent internet use late at night and in the middle of the night is common. Internet use may be motivated by desires for social connection, by boredom/avoidance, or for maladaptive behaviors. Because middle-of-the-night internet use was associated with higher internalizing disorder symptoms and worse sleep, it presents as a potential target for intervention. CITATION: Asarnow LD, Gasperetti CE, Gumport NB, Harvey AG. Internet use and its impact on internalizing disorder symptoms and sleep in adolescents with an evening circadian preference. J Clin Sleep Med. 2021;17(10):2019-2027.

2.
Behav Res Ther ; 145: 103948, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34428642

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Comorbidity and subdiagnostic symptoms are understudied for sleep and circadian problems. We evaluated 1) impairment associated with (a) number of sleep and circadian problems and (b) diagnostic threshold (full diagnosis vs. subdiagnostic symptoms), and 2) Transdiagnostic Sleep and Circadian Intervention (TranS-C) outcomes for participants with specific sleep and circadian problems. METHOD: Community participants (N = 121) with serious mental illness and sleep and circadian problem(s) were randomized to receive TranS-C plus usual care (TranS-C + UC) or usual care plus delayed TranS-C (UC-DT). Overall impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and sleep and circadian dysfunction were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Higher numbers of sleep and circadian problems, versus one problem, were associated with worse overall impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and sleep and circadian dysfunction (ps < 0.05, ω2 = 0.06-0.15). Diagnostic threshold was not associated with baseline functioning (ps > 0.05). TranS-C + UC versus UC-DT was associated with psychosocial and sleep and circadian improvements for specific sleep and circadian problems (insomnia, hypersomnia, parasomnias, periodic limb movement/restless leg syndrome, circadian rhythm disorders), though improvements varied by problem. TranS-C + UC outcomes were not moderated by number of sleep and circadian problems (ps > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Higher numbers of sleep and circadian problems, not diagnostic threshold, were associated with greater impairment. Transdiagnostic utility of TranS-C + UC was supported.

3.
J Consult Clin Psychol ; 89(6): 537-550, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34264701

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine if the Transdiagnostic Intervention for Sleep and Circadian Dysfunction (TranS-C) improves functional impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and sleep and circadian functioning. METHOD: Adults diagnosed with serious mental illness (SMI) and sleep and circadian dysfunction (N = 121) were randomly allocated to TranS-C plus usual care (TranS-C + UC; n = 61; 8 individual weekly sessions) or 6 months of Usual Care followed by Delayed Treatment with TranS-C (UC-DT; n = 60). Schizophrenia (45%) and anxiety disorders (47%) were common. Blind assessments were conducted pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6 months later (6FU). The latter two were the post-randomization points of interest. The location was Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services (ACBHCS), a Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) in California. RESULTS: For the primary outcomes, relative to UC-DT, TranS-C + UC was associated with reduction in functional impairment (b = -3.18, p = 0.025, d = -0.58), general psychiatric symptoms (b = -5.88, p = 0.001, d = -0.64), sleep disturbance (b = -5.55, p < .0001, d = -0.96), and sleep-related impairment (b = -9.14, p < .0001, d = -0.81) from pre-treatment to post-treatment. These effects were maintained to 6-month follow-up (6FU; d = -0.42 to -0.82), except functional impairment (d = -0.37). For the secondary outcomes, relative to UC-DT, TranS-C + UC was associated with improvement in sleep efficiency and on the Sleep Health Composite score from pre-treatment to 6FU. TranS-C + UC was also associated with reduced total wake time and wake time variability from pre-treatment to post-treatment, as well as reduced hallucinations and delusions, bedtime variability, and actigraphy measured waking activity count variability from pre-treatment to 6FU. CONCLUSIONS: A novel transdiagnostic treatment, delivered within a CMHC setting, improves selected measures of functioning, symptoms of comorbid disorders, and sleep and circadian outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Centros Comunitários de Saúde Mental , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Psicoterapia/métodos , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/terapia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/terapia , Adulto , Ansiedade/terapia , Transtornos de Ansiedade/terapia , California , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Transtornos Mentais/complicações , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Esquizofrenia/terapia , Sono , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/complicações , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/complicações , Resultado do Tratamento
4.
J Youth Adolesc ; 2021 May 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33948831

RESUMO

There are mixed findings when examining if technology use is harmful for adolescent sleep and health. This study builds on these mixed findings by examining the association between technology use with sleep and health in a high-risk group of adolescents. Adolescents with an evening circadian preference (N = 176; 58% female, mean age = 14.77, age range = 10-18) completed measures over one week. Sleep was measured via actigraphy. Technology use and health were measured using ecological momentary assessment. Technology use was associated with an increase in sleep onset latency; with better emotional, social, cognitive, and physical health; and with worse behavioral health. This study offers support for technology use having some benefits and expands research on technology use to adolescents with an evening circadian preference.

5.
Sleep Med ; 79: 166-174, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33262011

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study is to examine the relationship between light and sleep, in adolescents with an evening circadian preference. METHODS: For a period of seven days, ninety-nine adolescents wore a wrist actigraph to assess light exposure and objective sleep and completed a sleep diary to assess subjective sleep. RESULTS: Lower average light intensity across the preceding 24 h was associated with a later sleep onset (p < 0.01) and a later next-day sleep offset (p < 0.05). A later time of last exposure to more than 10 lux was associated with a later sleep onset (p < 0.001) and a shorter objective total sleep time (p < 0.001), as well as a later bedtime (p < 0.001) and a shorter subjective total sleep time (p < 0.001). Furthermore, exploratory analyses found that lower average early morning light exposure (between 4 and 9 AM) was associated with later sleep onset (p < 0.05), a later next-day sleep offset (p < 0.05), and a later next-day waketime (p < 0.01), lower average afternoon light exposure (between 2 and 7 PM) was associated with a later next-day sleep offset (p < 0.05), and lower average evening light exposure (between 7 PM and 12 AM) was associated with longer subjective total sleep time (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of light exposure, particularly the timing of light exposure, for establishing healthy patterns of sleep among adolescents with a propensity for a delayed bedtime and waketime. These findings provide additional evidence for targeting light exposure when designing interventions to improve adolescent sleep.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Sono , Adolescente , Humanos , Polissonografia
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