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1.
Surg Endosc ; 36(1): 621-630, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33543349

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Treatment of pancreaticobiliary pathology following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) poses significant technical challenges. Laparoscopic-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (LA-ERCP) can overcome those anatomical hurdles, allowing access to the papilla. Our aims were to analyze our 12-year institutional outcomes and determine the learning curve for LA-ERCP. METHODS: A retrospective review of cases between 2007 and 2019 at a high-volume pancreatobiliary unit was performed. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of specific outcomes. To identify the learning curve, CUSUM analyses and innovative methods for standardizing the surgeon's timelines were performed. RESULTS: 131 patients underwent LA-ERCP (median age 60, 81% females) by 17 surgeons and 10 gastroenterologists. Cannulation of the papilla was achieved in all cases. Indications were choledocholithiasis (78%), Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction/Papillary stenosis (18%), management of bile leak (2%) and stenting/biopsy of malignant strictures (2%). Median total, surgical and ERCP times were 180, 128 and 48 min, respectively, and 47% underwent concomitant cholecystectomy. Surgical site infection developed in 9.2% and post-ERCP pancreatitis in 3.8%. Logistic regression revealed multiple abdominal operations and magnitude of BMI decrease (between RYGB and LA-ERCP) to be predictive of conversion to open approach. CUSUM analysis of operative time demonstrated a learning curve at case 27 for the surgical team and case 9 for the gastroenterology team. On binary cut analysis, 3-5 cases per surgeon were needed to optimize operative metrics. CONCLUSION: LA-ERCP is associated with high success rates and low adverse events. We identify outcome benchmarks and a learning curve for new adopters of this increasingly performed procedure.


Assuntos
Coledocolitíase , Derivação Gástrica , Laparoscopia , Colangiopancreatografia Retrógrada Endoscópica/métodos , Coledocolitíase/cirurgia , Feminino , Derivação Gástrica/efeitos adversos , Derivação Gástrica/métodos , Humanos , Laparoscopia/métodos , Curva de Aprendizado , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos
4.
Pancreatology ; 21(8): 1411-1418, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34602367

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is associated with debilitating refractory pain. Distinct subtypes of CP pain have been previously characterized based on severity (none, mild-moderate, severe) and temporal (none, intermittent, constant) nature of pain, but no mechanism-based tools are available to guide pain management. This exploratory study was designed to determine if potential pain biomarkers could be detected in patient serum and whether they associate with specific pain patterns. METHODS: Cytokines, chemokines, and peptides associated with nociception and pain were measured in legacy serum samples from CP patients (N = 99) enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Studies. The unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to cluster CP patients based on their biomarker profile. Classification and regression tree was used to assess whether these biomarkers can predict pain outcomes. RESULTS: The hierarchical cluster analysis revealed a subset of patients with predominantly constant, mild-moderate pain exhibited elevated interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) whereas patients with higher interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) were more likely to have severe pain. Interestingly, analyses of each individual biomarker revealed that patients with constant pain had reduced circulating TNFα and fractalkine. Patients with severe pain exhibited a significant reduction in TNFα as well as trends towards lower levels of IL-6 and substance P. DISCUSSION: The observations from this study indicate that unique pain experiences within the chronic pancreatitis population can be associated with distinct biochemical signatures. These data indicate that further hypothesis-driven analyses combining biochemical measurements and detailed pain phenotyping could be used to develop precision approaches for pain management in patients with chronic pancreatitis.


Assuntos
Interleucina-6 , Pancreatite Crônica , Biomarcadores/sangue , Humanos , Dor , Pancreatite Crônica/complicações , Fator de Necrose Tumoral alfa
5.
Pancreatology ; 2021 May 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34116939

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Smoking prevalence in patients with chronic pancreatitis [CP] is high. We aimed to understand lifetime history of smoking and cohort trends in CP patients to inform effective strategies for smoking cessation. METHOD: Data on 317 CP patients from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 [NAPS2] Continuation and Validation Study and the NAPS2 Ancillary Study were analyzed. Smoking history was assessed for each phase of life from the onset of smoking to study enrollment. Data on second-hand smoke and drinking history were also collected. We compared demographic factors, drinking history, pain level and pancreas morphology by smoking status at age 25 (non-smoking, <1 pack per day [PPD], ≥1 PPD). We compared smoking prevalence by birth cohorts: 1930-1949, 1950-1969, 1970-1989. RESULT: Fifty-one percent of CP patients reported smoking at the time of enrollment. Those who smoked ≥1 PPD at age 25 smoked a cumulative total of 30.3 pack-years of cigarettes over a lifetime. Smoking at age 25 was associated with greater lifetime drinking and greater exposure to second-hand smoke at home and at workplace. Pancreatic atrophy and pseudocysts were more common among smokers. Pancreatic pain was more severe among smokers, and 12-13% of smokers reported smoking to alleviate pain. Male CP patients born in 1950-1969 reported the highest peak prevalence of smoking, and female CP patients born in 1970-1989 reported highest peak prevalence of smoking. CONCLUSION: CP patients exhibit intense and sustained smoking behavior once established in the 20s. Regardless, cohort analyses demonstrate that the behaviors could potentially be altered by policy changes.

6.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(2): 349-357, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32240833

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) is the second most common subtype of CP. In 1994, researchers reported the bimodal age at onset of ICP symptoms: early onset ICP (EO-ICP; median age, 19.2 y) and late-onset ICP (LO-ICP; median age, 56.2 y). Ages of onset and clinical features of ICP differed from those of alcohol-related CP (ACP). However, variants in PRSS1 had not yet been associated with ICP. We reexamined ages of onset of ICP in a large, North American cohort of patients, and investigated the effects of genetic factors and alcohol use in patients with EO-ICP, LO-ICP, and ACP. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of patients with CP of European ancestry enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Study 2, a prospective study of 1195 patients with CP from 26 centers in the United States from August 2000 through December 2014. We compared age at onset of symptoms for 130 patients with CP who were lifetime abstainers from alcohol (61 patients with early onset and 69 patients with late onset), 308 light to moderate alcohol drinkers with CP, and 225 patients with ACP and heavy to very heavy alcohol use. DNA from available patients was analyzed for variants associated with CP in SPINK1, CFTR, and CTRC. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare continuous variables across groups and based on genetic variants. RESULTS: Median ages at onset of symptoms were 20 years for patients with EO-ICP and no alcohol use, 58 years for patients with LO-ICP and no alcohol use, 47 years for light to moderate alcohol drinkers with CP, and 44 years for patients with ACP. A higher proportion of patients with EO-ICP had constant pain (65%) than patients with LO-ICP (31%) (P = .04). A higher proportion of patients with ACP had pseudocysts (43%) than patients with EO-ICP (11%) (P = .001). A higher proportion of patients with EO-ICP had pathogenic variants in SPINK1, CFTR, or CTRC (49%) than patients with LO-ICP (23%), light to moderate alcohol drinking with CP (26%), or ACP (23%) (P = .001). Among patients with variants in SPINK1, those with EO-ICP had onset of symptoms at a median age of 12 years, and light to moderate alcohol drinkers with CP had an age at onset of 24 years. Among patients with variants in CFTR, light to moderate alcohol drinkers had an age at onset of symptoms of 41 years, but this variant did not affect age at onset of EO-ICP or ACP. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed previously reported ages at onset of symptoms for EO-ICP and LO-ICP in a North American cohort. We found differences in clinical features among patients with EO-ICP, LO-ICP, and ACP. Almost half of patients with EO-ICP have genetic variants associated with CP, compared with approximately one quarter of patients with LO-CP or ACP. Genetic variants affect ages at onset of symptoms in some groups.


Assuntos
Pancreatite Crônica , Adulto , Idade de Início , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/complicações , Pancreatite Crônica/epidemiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/genética , Estudos Prospectivos , Tripsina , Inibidor da Tripsina Pancreática de Kazal , Adulto Jovem
7.
J Gastroenterol ; 55(10): 1000-1009, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32681239

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pain is the most debilitating symptom of recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) and often requires chronic opioids or total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation to manage. Pain is a complex experience that can be exacerbated by depression and vice versa. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that depression-associated genes are associated with a constant-severe pain experience in RAP/CP patients. STUDY: A retrospective study was done using North American Pancreatitis Study II (NAPS2) genotyped RAP and CP patients with completed case report forms (n = 1,357). Subjects were divided based on pattern of pain and pain severity as constant-severe pain (n = 787) versus not constant-severe pain (n = 570) to conduct a nested genome-wide association study. The association between reported antidepressant medication use and depression gene loci was tested. RESULTS: Constant-severe pain was reported in 58% (n = 787) of pancreatitis patients. No differences in sex or alcohol consumption were found based on pain severity. Antidepressant use was reported in 28% (n = 223), and they had lower SF-12 mental quality of life (MCS, p < 2.2 × 10- 16). Fifteen loci associated with constant-severe pain (p < 0.00001) were found to be in or near depression-associated genes including ROBO2, CTNND2, SGCZ, CNTN5 and BAIAP2. Three of these genes respond to antidepressant use (SGCZ, ROBO2, and CTNND2). CONCLUSION: Depression is a major co-factor in the pain experience. This genetic predisposition to depression may have utility in counseling patients and in instituting early antidepressant therapy for pain management of pancreatitis patients. Prospective randomized trials are warranted. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: Clinicaltriasl.gov.# NCT01545167.


Assuntos
Antidepressivos/administração & dosagem , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/epidemiologia , Dor/etiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/complicações , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/tratamento farmacológico , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Feminino , Loci Gênicos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dor/genética , Dor/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Estudos Retrospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
8.
Alcohol Alcohol ; 54(6): 615-624, 2019 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31603464

RESUMO

AIMS: Cumulative consumption of alcohol and variations of alcohol intake by age are unknown in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients in North America. This study summarizes the lifetime drinking history (LDH) by physician attribution of alcohol etiology, smoking status and sex in persons with CP. METHODS: We analyzed data on 193 CP participants who completed the LDH questionnaire in the North American Pancreatitis Continuation and Validation Study (NAPS2-CV). We collected data on frequency of drinking and drinks per drinking day for each drinking phase of their lives. We examined differences in total number of alcoholic drinks and weight of ethanol consumed by physician's assessment of CP etiology, sex and smoking status. We also compared intensity of drinking in 20, 30 and 40s by timing of CP diagnosis. RESULTS: Persons diagnosed with alcoholic CP consumed median of 34,488 drinks (interquartile range 18,240-75,024) prior to diagnosis of CP, which occurred earlier than in persons with CP of other etiology (47 vs. 52 years). Cumulative drinking was greater in male vs. female patients. Male CP patients with a diagnosis of CP before the age of 45 drank more intensely in their 20s as compared to those with later onset of disease. Current smoking was prevalent (67%) among those diagnosed with alcoholic CP. Twenty-eight percent of patients without physician attribution of alcohol etiology reported drinking heavily in the past. CONCLUSIONS: Lifetime cumulative consumption of alcohol and prevalence of current smoking are high in persons diagnosed with alcoholic pancreatitis. Intense drinking in early years is associated with earlier manifestation of the disease.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Alcoolismo/complicações , Alcoolismo/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pancreatite , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores Sexuais , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Inquéritos e Questionários
9.
Clin Transl Gastroenterol ; 10(7): e00057, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31232720

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Whether pancreatogenic diabetes associated with CP-DM represents a discrete pathophysiologic entity from type 2 DM (T2DM) remains uncertain. Addressing this question is needed for development of specific measures to manage CP-DM. We approached this question from a unique standpoint, hypothesizing that if CP-DM and T2DM are separate disorders, they should be genetically distinct. To test this hypothesis, we sought to determine whether a genetic risk score (GRS) based on validated single nucleotide polymorphisms for T2DM could distinguish between groups with CP-DM and T2DM. METHODS: We used 60 T2DM single nucleotide polymorphisms to construct a weighted GRS in 1,613 subjects from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 and 2,685 subjects from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, all of European origin. RESULTS: The mean GRS was identical between 321 subjects with CP-DM and 423 subjects with T2DM (66.53 vs 66.42, P = 0.95), and the GRS of both diabetic groups was significantly higher than that of nondiabetic controls (n = 3,554, P < 0.0001). Exploratory analyses attempting to enrich the CP-DM group for pancreatogenic diabetes, such as eliminating diabetes diagnosed before CP, requiring pancreas-specific comorbidities, or removing those with a family history of diabetes, did not improve the ability of the GRS to distinguish between CP-DM and T2DM. DISCUSSION: Recognizing that we lacked a gold standard to define CP-DM, our study suggests that CP-DM may be a subtype of T2DM, a notion that should be tested in future, large prospective studies.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Pancreatite Crônica/complicações , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Comorbidade , Estudos Transversais , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pancreatite Crônica/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco
10.
Pancreatology ; 19(4): 500-506, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30910452

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We have previously reported that physicians under-recognize smoking as a chronic pancreatitis (CP) risk factor. We hypothesized that availability of empiric data will influence physician recognition of this relationship. METHODS: We analyzed data from 508 CP patients prospectively enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Study-2 Continuation and Validation (NAPS2-CV) or NAPS2-Ancillary (AS) studies (2008-2014) from 26 US centers who self-reported ever-smoking. Information on smoking status, physician-defined etiology and identification of smoking as a CP risk factor was obtained from structured patient and physician questionnaires. We compared how often physician identified smoking as a CP risk factor in NAPS2-CV/NAPS2-AS studies with NAPS2-original study (2000-2006). RESULTS: Enrolling physician identified smoking as a risk factor in significantly (all p < 0.001) greater proportion of patients in NAPS2-CV/AS studies when compared with NAPS2-original study among ever (80.7 vs. 45.3%), current (91.3 vs. 53%), past (60.3 vs. 30.2%) smokers, in those who smoked ≤1 pack/day (79.3 vs. 39.5%) or ≥1 packs/day (83 vs. 49.8%). In multivariable analyses, the enrolling physician was 3.32-8.49 times more likely to cite smoking as a CP risk factor in the NAPS2-CV/NAPS2-AS studies based on smoking status and amount after controlling for age, sex, race and alcohol etiology. The effect was independent of enrolling site in a sub-analysis limited to sites participating in both phases of enrollment. CONCLUSIONS: Availability of empiric data likely enhanced physician recognition of the association between smoking and CP. Wide-spread dissemination of this information could potentially curtail smoking rates in subjects with and those at risk of CP.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pancreatite Crônica/etiologia , Médicos , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pancreatite Crônica/tratamento farmacológico , Fatores de Risco , Autorrelato , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr ; 68(4): 566-573, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30897605

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to investigate the natural history of chronic pancreatitis (CP); patients in the North American Pancreatitis Study2 (NAPS2, adults) and INternational Study group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE (INSPPIRE, pediatric) were compared. METHODS: Demographics, risk factors, disease duration, management and outcomes of 224 children and 1063 adults were compared using appropriate statistical tests for categorical and continuous variables. RESULTS: Alcohol was a risk in 53% of adults and 1% of children (P < 0.0001); tobacco in 50% of adults and 7% of children (P < 0.0001). Obstructive factors were more common in children (29% vs 19% in adults, P = 0.001). Genetic risk factors were found more often in children. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was similar (children 26% vs adult 33%, P = 0.107). Diabetes was more common in adults than children (36% vs 4% respectively, P < 0.0001). Median emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and missed days of work/school were similar across the cohorts. As a secondary analysis, NAPS2 subjects with childhood onset (NAPS2-CO) were compared with INSPPIRE subjects. These 2 cohorts were more similar than the total INSPPIRE and NAPS2 cohorts, including for genetic risk factors. The only risk factor significantly more common in the NAPS2-CO cohort compared with the INSPPIRE cohort was alcohol (9% NAPS2-CO vs 1% INSPPIRE cohorts, P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Despite disparity in age of onset, children and adults with CP exhibit similarity in demographics, CP treatment, and pain. Differences between groups in radiographic findings and diabetes prevalence may be related to differences in risk factors associated with disease and length of time of CP.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Pancreatite Crônica/epidemiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/etiologia , Fumar Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Demografia , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/genética , Pancreatite Crônica/fisiopatologia , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
Endosc Int Open ; 7(2): E151-E154, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30705946

RESUMO

Background and study aims Eosinophilic pancreatitis (EP) is a rare etiology of chronic pancreatitis, and few cases have been reported. It is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the pancreas and elevated IgE levels. EP is difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer based on clinical symptoms and auxiliary exams. We present a case of EP and debate the routine performance of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for resectable pancreatic mass.

13.
Nutr Clin Pract ; 34(3): 387-399, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30101991

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients frequently experience malabsorption and maldigestion, leading to micronutrient and macronutrient deficiencies. Comorbid diabetes and lifestyle habits, such as alcohol consumption, may impact nutrition status. METHODS: We compared micronutrient antioxidant, bone metabolism, serum protein, and inflammatory marker levels in 301 CP patients and 266 controls with no known pancreatic disease. We analyzed serum prealbumin and retinol binding protein; vitamins A, D, E, and B12; osteocalcin; tumor necrosis factor-α; and C-reactive protein (CRP). We also evaluated biomarkers among subsets of patients, examining factors including time since diagnosis, body mass index, alcohol as primary etiology, diabetes mellitus, vitamin supplementation, and pancreatic enzyme replacement. RESULTS: After correcting for multiple comparisons, CP patients had significantly lower levels than controls of the following: vitamin A (40.9 vs 45.4 µg/dL) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol [8.7 vs 10.3 mg/L] and γ-tocopherol [1.8 vs 2.2 mg/L]), as well as osteocalcin (7.9 vs 10 ng/mL) and serum prealbumin (23 vs 27 mg/dL). Both patients and controls who took vitamin supplements had higher serum levels of vitamins than those not taking supplements. Compared with controls, in controlled analyses, CP patients had significantly lower levels of vitamins A, D, and E (both α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol). CP patients also had significantly lower levels of osteocalcin, serum prealbumin, and retinol binding protein, and higher CRP. CONCLUSIONS: CP patients demonstrated lower levels of selected nutrition and bone metabolism biomarkers than controls. Diabetes and alcohol did not impact biomarkers. Vitamin supplements and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy improved nutrition biomarkers in CP patients.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores/sangue , Inflamação/sangue , Estado Nutricional/fisiologia , Pancreatite Crônica/sangue , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Diabetes Mellitus , Suplementos Nutricionais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteocalcina/sangue , Pré-Albumina/análise , Proteínas de Ligação ao Retinol/análise , Vitaminas/sangue
14.
Gastrointest Endosc ; 89(4): 671-679.e1, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30529441

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Endoscopy has evolved to become first-line therapy for the treatment of post-bariatric leaks; however, many sessions are often required with variable success rates. Due to these limitations, the use of the cardiac septal defect occluder (CSDO) has recently been reported in this population. METHODS: The study population was a multicenter retrospective series of patients with post-bariatric surgical leaks who underwent treatment with CSDO placement. Data on the type of surgery, previous treatment details, fistula dimensions, success rate, and adverse events were collected. Leaks were grouped according to the International Sleeve Gastrectomy Expert Panel Consensus. Outcomes included technical and clinical success and safety of the CSDO. Regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors of response. RESULTS: Forty-three patients with leaks were included (31 sleeve gastrectomy and 12 Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). They were divided into acute (n = 3), early (n = 5), late (n = 23), and chronic (n = 12). Forty patients had failed previous endoscopic treatment and 3 patients had CSDO as the primary treatment. Median follow-up was 34 weeks. Technical success was achieved in all patients and clinical success in 39 patients (90.7%). All chronic, late, and early leaks were successfully closed, except one undrained late leak. The 5 patients with early leaks had an initial satisfactory response, but within 30 days, drainage recurred. The CSDOs were removed and replaced with larger-diameter devices leading to permanent defect closure. Acute leaks were not successfully closed in all 3 patients. Regression analysis showed that chronicity and previous treatment were associated with fistula closure; success rates for late/chronic leaks versus acute/early leaks were 97.1% and 62.5%, respectively (P = .0023). CONCLUSION: This observational study found that the CSDO had a high efficacy rate in patients with non-acute leaks, with no adverse events. All early, late, and chronic leaks were successfully closed, except for one undrained late leak. However, early leaks required a second placement of a larger CSDO in all cases. These results suggest that the CSDO should be considered for non-acute fistula and that traditional closure methods are likely preferred in the acute and early settings.


Assuntos
Fístula Anastomótica/cirurgia , Fístula Brônquica/cirurgia , Fístula Cutânea/cirurgia , Fístula Gástrica/cirurgia , Dispositivo para Oclusão Septal , Doença Aguda , Adulto , Fístula Anastomótica/etiologia , Fístula Brônquica/etiologia , Doença Crônica , Fístula Cutânea/etiologia , Endoscopia Gastrointestinal/métodos , Feminino , Gastrectomia/efeitos adversos , Derivação Gástrica/efeitos adversos , Fístula Gástrica/etiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reoperação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Dispositivo para Oclusão Septal/efeitos adversos , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Transpl Int ; 32(3): 280-290, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30353611

RESUMO

We investigated six indices based on a single fasting blood sample for evaluation of the beta-cell function after total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TP-IAT). The Secretory Unit of Islet Transplant Objects (SUITO), transplant estimated function (TEF), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-2B%), C-peptide/glucose ratio (CP/G), C-peptide/glucose creatinine ratio (CP/GCr) and BETA-2 score were compared against a 90-min serum glucose level, weighted mean C-peptide in mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT), beta score and the Igls score adjusted for islet function in the setting of IAT. We analyzed values from 32 MMTTs in 15 patients after TP-IAT with a follow-up of up to 3 years. Four (27%) individuals had discontinued insulin completely prior to day 75, while 6 out of 12 patients (50%) did not require insulin support at 1-year follow-up with HbA1c 6.0% (5.5-6.8). BETA-2 was the most consistent among indices strongly correlating with all reference measures of beta-cell function (r = 0.62-0.68). In addition, it identified insulin independence (cut-off = 16.2) and optimal/good versus marginal islet function in the Igls score well, with AUROC of 0.85 and 0.96, respectively. Based on a single fasting blood sample, BETA-2 score has the most reliable discriminant value for the assessment of graft function in patients undergoing TP-IAT.


Assuntos
Jejum/sangue , Células Secretoras de Insulina/fisiologia , Transplante das Ilhotas Pancreáticas , Pancreatectomia , Adolescente , Adulto , Glicemia/análise , Peptídeo C/sangue , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Transplante Autólogo , Adulto Jovem
16.
Pancreas ; 47(10): 1256-1261, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30286013

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Animated Pancreas Patient (APP) educational modules (APP website and YouTube) on pancreas education, awareness, and health outcomes. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of APP metrics data from September 2013 to October 2017. We evaluated audience reach (number of visit sessions, unique visitors, page views) and calculated top views by media type (animation, expert video, patient video, and slide show) and top retention videos from the modules. We also assessed the educational impact through learner feedback survey. RESULTS: The APP had 1,475,252 views (547,693 unique visitors, 63.1% in United States) during the study period. Most popular topic viewed among the animations was "Role and Anatomy of the Pancreas" (n = 361,116), and most common expert video viewed was "Chronic Pancreatitis: What Foods and Beverages Should I Avoid?" (n = 31,667). Participants who completed the online feedback survey reported knowledge gains and commitments to change. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreas education in visual formats of learning provided by APP demonstrated wide reach and has substantial potential to inform and impact behaviors of patients and caregivers. Continued efforts should be made to provide patient resources that address health literacy and patient education and respond to patient needs for better quality of life and improved health outcomes in pancreatic diseases.


Assuntos
Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde/métodos , Pancreatopatias/diagnóstico , Pancreatopatias/terapia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Gravação em Vídeo/métodos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 113(6): 906-912, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29867178

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The impact of recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) on quality of life (QOL) is unknown. We hypothesized that RAP would reduce QOL even in the absence of chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: Data were pooled from three prospective, cross-sectional studies conducted across 27 U.S. centers (the North American Pancreatitis Studies); these included subjects with chronic pancreatitis (n = 1086), RAP alone (n = 508), and non-disease controls (n = 1025). QOL was measured using the Short Form 12 (SF-12), generating a Physical Component Summary (PCS) and the Mental Component Summary score (MCS). Multivariable regression models were developed to measure the effect of RAP on QOL, the predictors of lower QOL in those with RAP, and the differential effect QOL predictors between CP and RAP. RESULTS: Compared to controls (51.0 ± 9.4), subjects with RAP (41.1 ± 11.4) and CP (37.2 ± 11.8) had lower PCS (p < 0.01). Subjects with CP had lower PCS compared to those with RAP (p < 0.01). Similarly, MCS was lower among RAP (44.6 ± 11.5) and CP (42.8 ± 12.2) subjects compared to controls (51.7 ± 9.1, p < 0.01). Subjects with CP had lower MCS compared to those with RAP (p < 0.01). After controlling for independent predictors of PCS, RAP was associated with lower PCS (estimate -8.46, p < 0.01) and MCS (estimate -6.45, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The effect of endocrine insufficiency on PCS was differentially greater among RAP subjects (-1.28 for CP vs. -4.9 for RAP, p = 0.0184). CONCLUSIONS: Even in the absence of CP, subjects with RAP have lower physical and mental QOL. This underscores the importance of identifying interventions to attenuate RAP before the development of overt CP.


Assuntos
Pancreatite/complicações , Qualidade de Vida , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pancreatite/patologia , Pancreatite/psicologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Recidiva , Fatores de Risco
18.
Pancreatology ; 18(5): 528-535, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29859674

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple pathogenic genetic variants are associated with pancreatitis in patients of European (EA) and Asian ancestries, but studies on patients of African ancestry (AA) are lacking. We evaluated the prevalence of known genetic variations in African-American subjects in the US. METHODS: We studied prospectively enrolled controls (n = 238) and patients with chronic (CP) (n = 232) or recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) (n = 45) in the NAPS2 studies from 2000-2014 of self-identified AA. Demographic and phenotypic information was obtained from structured questionnaires. Ancestry and admixture were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA). Genotyping was performed for pathogenic genetic variants in PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR and CTRC. Prevalence of disease-associated variants in NAPS2 subjects of AA and EA was compared. RESULTS: When compared with CP subjects of EA (n = 862), prevalence of established pathogenic genetic variants was infrequent in AA patients with CP, overall (29 vs. 8.19%, OR 4.60, 95% CI 2.74-7.74, p < 0.001), and after stratification by alcohol etiology (p < 0.001). On PCA, AA cases were more heterogeneous but distinct from EA subjects; no difference was observed between AA subjects with and without CP-associated variants. Of 19 A A patients with CP who had pathogenic genetic variants, 2 had variants in PRSS1 (R122H, R122C), 4 in SPINK1 (all N34S heterozygotes), 12 in CFTR (2 CFTRsev, 9 CFTRBD, 1 compound heterozygote with CFTRsev and CFTRBD), and 1 in CTRC (R254W). CONCLUSION: Pathogenic genetic variants reported in EA patients are significantly less common in AA patients. Further studies are needed to determine the complex risk factors for AA subjects with pancreatitis.

19.
Cancer Discov ; 8(1): 37-48, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28978556

RESUMO

Gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA) is a lethal disease where targeted therapies, even when guided by genomic biomarkers, have had limited efficacy. A potential reason for the failure of such therapies is that genomic profiling results could commonly differ between the primary and metastatic tumors. To evaluate genomic heterogeneity, we sequenced paired primary GEA and synchronous metastatic lesions across multiple cohorts, finding extensive differences in genomic alterations, including discrepancies in potentially clinically relevant alterations. Multiregion sequencing showed significant discrepancy within the primary tumor (PT) and between the PT and disseminated disease, with oncogene amplification profiles commonly discordant. In addition, a pilot analysis of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing demonstrated the feasibility of detecting genomic amplifications not detected in PT sampling. Lastly, we profiled paired primary tumors, metastatic tumors, and cfDNA from patients enrolled in the personalized antibodies for GEA (PANGEA) trial of targeted therapies in GEA and found that genomic biomarkers were recurrently discrepant between the PT and untreated metastases. Divergent primary and metastatic tissue profiling led to treatment reassignment in 32% (9/28) of patients. In discordant primary and metastatic lesions, we found 87.5% concordance for targetable alterations in metastatic tissue and cfDNA, suggesting the potential for cfDNA profiling to enhance selection of therapy.Significance: We demonstrate frequent baseline heterogeneity in targetable genomic alterations in GEA, indicating that current tissue sampling practices for biomarker testing do not effectively guide precision medicine in this disease and that routine profiling of metastatic lesions and/or cfDNA should be systematically evaluated. Cancer Discov; 8(1); 37-48. ©2017 AACR.See related commentary by Sundar and Tan, p. 14See related article by Janjigian et al., p. 49This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Esofágicas/genética , Genômica/métodos , Medicina de Precisão , Neoplasias Gástricas/genética , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma/métodos , Adenocarcinoma , Estudos de Coortes , Neoplasias Esofágicas/patologia , Humanos , Neoplasias Gástricas/patologia
20.
Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther ; 15(11): 879-887, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28847199

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) is a rare, inherited lipid disorder characterized by high levels of plasma triglycerides and chylomicrons, which may cause life-threatening acute pancreatitis. Currently no FDA-approved treatment exists. Management is low-fat diet (<20g fat/day), which is difficult to maintain. With the restricted diet, triglycerides may remain elevated. We conducted discussions with patients and caregivers to better understand the burden of FCS from their perspectives. METHODS: A panel of FCS patients and caregivers was assembled to discuss and assess the clinical and psychosocial burden of FCS. RESULTS: Ten adults with FCS (median age 48 yr) and their spouses/caregivers were asked specific questions about their experiences living with FCS. Patients with FCS stated their symptoms were abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, and fatigue. Patients reported a median of 34 episodes of acute pancreatitis over their lifetimes; half of these led to hospitalizations, each with an average stay of 6.5 days. The psychosocial burden of FCS was primarily associated with the restricted diet, anxiety and stress of FCS. CONCLUSIONS: Living with FCS imposes a significant clinical and psychosocial burden on patients and caregivers, who reported reduced quality of life, limited employment opportunities, socialization and increased burden on family.


Assuntos
Quilomícrons/sangue , Hiperlipoproteinemia Tipo I/fisiopatologia , Qualidade de Vida , Triglicerídeos/sangue , Doença Aguda , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
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