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1.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 2021 Nov 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34751672

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) have been reported with great variability and without standardization. In hospitalized patients, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GI symptoms, factors associated with their occurrence, and variation at 1 month. METHODS: The GI-COVID-19 is a prospective, multicenter, controlled study. Patients with and without COVID-19 diagnosis were recruited at hospital admission and asked for GI symptoms at admission and after 1 month, using the validated Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale questionnaire. RESULTS: The study included 2036 hospitalized patients. A total of 871 patients (575 COVID+ and 296 COVID-) were included for the primary analysis. GI symptoms occurred more frequently in patients with COVID-19 (59.7%; 343/575 patients) than in the control group (43.2%; 128/296 patients) (P < 0.001). Patients with COVID-19 complained of higher presence or intensity of nausea, diarrhea, loose stools, and urgency as compared with controls. At a 1-month follow-up, a reduction in the presence or intensity of GI symptoms was found in COVID-19 patients with GI symptoms at hospital admission. Nausea remained increased over controls. Factors significantly associated with nausea persistence in COVID-19 were female sex, high body mass index, the presence of dyspnea, and increased C-reactive protein levels. DISCUSSION: The prevalence of GI symptoms in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is higher than previously reported. Systemic and respiratory symptoms are often associated with GI complaints. Nausea may persist after the resolution of COVID-19 infection.

2.
Gut Liver ; 2021 Nov 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34789582

RESUMO

Following acute gastroenteritis (AGE) due to bacteria, viruses, or protozoa, a subset of patients develop new onset Rome criteria positive irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), called postinfection IBS (PI-IBS). The pooled prevalence of PI-IBS following AGE was 11.5%. PI-IBS is the best natural model that suggests that a subset of patients with IBS may have an organic basis. Several factors are associated with a greater risk of development of PI-IBS following AGE including female sex, younger age, smoking, severity of AGE, abdominal pain, bleeding per rectum, treatment with antibiotics, anxiety, depression, somatization, neuroticism, recent adverse life events, hypochondriasis, extroversion, negative illness beliefs, history of stress, sleep disturbance, and family history of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), currently called disorder of gut-brain interaction. Most patients with PI-IBS present with either diarrhea-predominant IBS or the mixed subtype of IBS, and overlap with other FGIDs, such as functional dyspepsia is common. The drugs used to treat non-constipation IBS may also be useful in PI-IBS treatment. Since randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of drugs to treat PI-IBS are rare, more studies are needed on this issue.

3.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 722700, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34737974

RESUMO

Background and Aims: The over-prescription of antibiotics is thought to represent a major threat to public health worldwide and is more frequently observed in some low- and middle-income countries. In the Asia-Pacific region, economic development, health care organization and population demographics are very heterogenous. The objective of this survey was to investigate antibiotic use and probiotic co-prescription among adult patients in this area. Methods: An online survey of physicians from seven countries of the Asia-Pacific region (Australia, Japan, Indonesia, India, China, Singapore and South Korea) was performed in 2018. The questionnaire explored current practices of physicians concerning antibiotics and probiotics and factors related to prescribing decisions. Results: A total of 387 general practitioners and 350 gastroenterologists completed the questionnaire. Physicians in Australia, Japan and South-Korea were low prescribers of antibiotics (11% to 19% of visits resulted in an antibiotic prescription), while physicians in Indonesia, India, China and Singapore were high prescribers (41% to 61%). A large majority (85%) of physicians agreed that antibiotics disrupted intestinal microbiota. The rates of co-prescription of probiotics varied from 16% in Japan to 39% in Singapore (overall, 27%). Conditions considered by physicians to be prevented by probiotics were mostly antibiotic-associated diarrhea (62%) and Clostridium difficile colitis (43%). Conclusions: Rates of probiotic co-prescription remain low in many countries although the negative effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiota and the benefits of co-prescribing probiotics are generally known.


Assuntos
Médicos , Probióticos , Adulto , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Ásia/epidemiologia , Humanos , Percepção , Padrões de Prática Médica , Probióticos/uso terapêutico , Inquéritos e Questionários
5.
J Neurogastroenterol Motil ; 27(4): 453-481, 2021 Oct 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34642267

RESUMO

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which gastric contents regurgitate into the esophagus or beyond, resulting in either troublesome symptoms or complications. GERD is heterogeneous in terms of varied manifestations, test findings, and treatment responsiveness. GERD diagnosis can be established with symptomatology, pathology, or physiology. Recently the Lyon consensus defined the "proven GERD" with concrete evidence for reflux, including advanced grade erosive esophagitis (Los Angeles classification grades C and or D esophagitis), long-segment Barrett's mucosa or peptic strictures on endoscopy or distal esophageal acid exposure time > 6% on 24-hour ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring. However, some Asian researchers have different opinions on whether the same standards should be applied to the Asian population. The prevalence of GERD is increasing in Asia. The present evidence-based guidelines were developed using a systematic review and meta-analysis approach. In GERD with typical symptoms, a proton pump inhibitor test can be recommended as a sensitive, cost-effective, and practical test for GERD diagnosis. Based on a meta-analysis of 19 estimated acid-exposure time values in Asians, the reference range upper limit for esophageal acid exposure time was 3.2% (95% confidence interval, 2.7-3.9%) in the Asian countries. Esophageal manometry and novel impedance measurements, including mucosal impedance and a post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave, are promising in discrimination of GERD among different reflux phenotypes, thus increasing its diagnostic yield. We also propose a long-term strategy of evidence-based GERD treatment with proton pump inhibitors and other drugs.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34672022

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Because acute infectious gastroenteritis may cause post-infection irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 affects gastrointestinal (GI) tract, coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) may cause post-infection-functional GI disorders (FGIDs). We prospectively studied the frequency and spectrum of post-infection-FGIDs among COVID-19 and historical healthy controls and the risk factors for its development. METHODS: Two hundred eighty patients with COVID-19 and 264 historical healthy controls were followed up at 1 and 3 months using translated validated Rome Questionnaires for the development of chronic bowel dysfunction (CBD), dyspeptic symptoms, and their overlap and at 6-month for IBS, uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD) and their overlap. Psychological comorbidity was studied using Rome III Psychosocial Alarm Questionnaire. RESULTS: At 1 and 3 months, 16 (5.7%), 16 (5.7%), 11 (3.9%), and 24 (8.6%), 6 (2.1%), 9 (3.2%) of COVID-19 patients developed CBD, dyspeptic symptoms, and their overlap, respectively; among healthy controls, none developed dyspeptic symptoms and one developed CBD at 3 months (P < 0.05). At 6 months, 15 (5.3%), 6 (2.1%), and 5 (1.8%) of the 280 COVID-19 patients developed IBS, UD, and IBS-UD overlap, respectively, and one healthy control developed IBS at 6 months (P < 0.05 for all except IBS-UD overlap). The risk factors for post-COVID-19 FGIDs at 6 months included symptoms (particularly GI), anosmia, ageusia, and presence of CBD, dyspeptic symptoms, or their overlap at 1 and 3 months and the psychological comorbidity. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study showing COVID-19 led to post-COVID-19 FGIDs. Post-COVID-19 FGIDs may pose a significant economic, social, and healthcare burden to the world.

8.
Pathogens ; 10(9)2021 Aug 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34578132

RESUMO

Chronic inflammation and long-term tissue injury are related to many malignancies, including gastric cancer (GC). Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), classified as a class I carcinogen, induces chronic superficial gastritis followed by gastric carcinogenesis. Despite a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, only about 1-3% of people infected with this bacterium develop GC worldwide. Furthermore, the development of chronic gastritis in some, but not all, H. pylori-infected subjects remains unexplained. These conflicting findings indicate that clinical outcomes of aggressive inflammation (atrophic gastritis) to gastric carcinogenesis are influenced by several other factors (in addition to H. pylori infection), such as gut microbiota, co-existence of intestinal helminths, dietary habits, and host genetic factors. This review has five goals: (1) to assess our current understanding of the process of H. pylori-triggered inflammation and gastric precursor lesions; (2) to present a hypothesis on risk modulation by the gut microbiota and infestation with intestinal helminths; (3) to identify the dietary behavior of the people at risk of GC; (4) to check the inflammation-related genetic polymorphisms and role of exosomes together with other factors as initiators of precancerous lesions and gastric carcinoma; and (5) finally, to conclude and suggest a new direction for future research.

9.
JGH Open ; 5(9): 976-987, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34584964

RESUMO

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), currently known as disorders of gut-brain interaction, are emerging microbiota-gut-brain abnormalities that are prevalent worldwide. The pathogenesis of FGIDs is heterogeneous and is intertwined with gut microbiota and its derived molecule-modulated mechanisms, including gut dysmotility, visceral hypersensitivity, gut immune abnormalities, abnormal secretion, and impaired barrier function. There has been phenomenal progress in understanding the role of gut microbiota in FGIDs by underpinning the species alternations between healthy and pathological conditions such as FGIDs. However, the precise gut microbiota-directed cellular and molecular pathogeneses of FGIDs are yet enigmatic. Determining the mechanistic link between the gut microbiota and gastrointestinal (GI) diseases has been difficult due to (i) the lack of robust animal models imitating the various aspects of human FGID pathophysiology; (ii) the absence of longitudinal human and/or animal studies to unveil the interaction of the gut microbiota with FGID-relevant pathogenesis; (iii) uncertainty about connections between human and animal studies; and (iv) insufficient data supporting a holistic view of disease-specific pathophysiological changes in FGID patients. These unidentified gaps open possibilities to explore pathological mechanisms directed through gut microbiota dysbiosis in FGIDs. The current treatment options for dysbiotic gut microbiota are limited; dietary interventions, antibiotics, probiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation are the front-line clinical options. Here, we review the contribution of gut microbiota and its derived molecules in gut homeostasis and explore the possible pathophysiological mechanisms involved in FGIDs leading to potential therapeutics options.

10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34390471

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Though small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is known in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the data on it are scanty and have limitations. METHODS: Data on IBD patients undergoing glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the frequency and risk factors of SIBO in IBD compared to 66 healthy controls. RESULTS: Patients with IBD (n=86; 45 ulcerative colitis [UC] and 41 Crohn's disease [CD]) more often had SIBO on GHBT than the healthy subjects (16/86 [18.6%] vs. 1/66 [1.5%]; p=0.002). SIBO was commoner among patients with CD than UC (14/41 [34.1%] vs. 2/45 [4.4%]; p=0.001). The frequency of SIBO among UC patients was comparable to healthy subjects (2/45 [4.4%] vs. 1/66 [1.5%]; p=not significant [NS]). Patients with CD than those with UC had higher values of maximum breath hydrogen and a greater area under the curve for breath hydrogen. Other factors associated with SIBO included female gender (11/16 [68.8%] with vs. 21/70 [30%] without SIBO; p=0.003), and having undergone surgery (8/16 [50%] vs. 6/70 [8.6%]; p=0.0002). SIBO patients had lower levels of total serum protein and albumin than those without SIBO (6.2 ± 1.5 g/dL vs. 7.0 ± 0.9 g/dL, respectively; p=0.009 and 3.5 ± 0.9 g/dL vs. 4.0 ± 0.6 g/dL, respectively; p=0.02). CD, female gender, and surgery for IBD tended to be the independent factors associated with SIBO among IBD patients on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with IBD, particularly CD, female, and those having undergone surgery, have a higher risk of SIBO than the healthy controls.

11.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 32(4): 336-348, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34231480

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data on specific gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders, such as gastroparesis (GP), chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), and colonic inertia (CI), as well as awareness among doctors about these disorders are scanty in Asia. METHOD: Prospectively maintained records of 60 patients were retrospectively analyzed, and knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of 66 Indian physicians were surveyed electronically. RESULTS: A total of 60 (age 37.7 ± 18.4 years, 25 female) patients were included in the study (13 [21.7%] GP, 25 [41.7%] CIPO, 14 [23.3%] CI, and 8 [13.3%] overlap of GP and either CIPO [5] or CI [3]), of whom 40 had primary disorders and 20 had secondary disorders due to diabetes mellitus (n = 6), systemic sclerosis (n = 4), paraneoplastic (n = 2), infection (n = 3), Parkinson's disease (n = 1), hypothyroidism (n = 1), hyperparathyroidism (n = 1), celiac disease (n = 1), and amyloidosis (n = 1). Primary disorders were more often misdiagnosed as functional GI disorders, causing diagnostic delays and complications, than secondary disorders. More patients in the primary disorder group underwent surgery compared with those in the secondary group (25/40, 62.5% vs 1/20, 5%). A few rare infectious causes of GI motility disorders due to Strongyloides stercoralis, herpesvirus, and unidentified viruses were found. Of four patients treated with pyridostigmine with (n = 3) or without prucalopride (n = 1), three responded. Awareness about GI motility disorders, particularly the primary disorders, among 66 doctors participating in the KAP survey was inadequate. CONCLUSION: Awareness regarding specific GI motility disorders among physicians is lacking, which leads to delay in diagnosis and results in more complications in patients, such as surgery, particularly in those with primary disorders.

12.
Indian J Gastroenterol ; 40(4): 420-444, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34219211

RESUMO

The Indian Society of Gastroenterology (ISG) felt the need to organize a consensus on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and to update the current management of H. pylori infection; hence, ISG constituted the ISG's Task Force on Helicobacter pylori. The Task Force on H. pylori undertook an exercise to produce consensus statements on H. pylori infection. Twenty-five experts from different parts of India, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, surgeons, epidemiologists, pediatricians, and microbiologists participated in the meeting. The participants were allocated to one of following sections for the meeting: Epidemiology of H. pylori infection in India and H. pylori associated conditions; diagnosis; treatment and retreatment; H. pylori and gastric cancer, and H. pylori prevention/public health. Each group reviewed all published literature on H. pylori infection with special reference to the Indian scenario and prepared appropriate statements on different aspects for voting and consensus development. This consensus, which was produced through a modified Delphi process including two rounds of face-to-face meetings, reflects our current understanding and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of H. pylori infection. These consensus should serve as a reference for not only guiding treatment of H. pylori infection but also to guide future research on the subject.

13.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0252835, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34097719

RESUMO

IMPORTANCE: Knowledge and attitude influence compliance and individuals' practices. The risk and protective factors associated with high compliance to these preventive measures are critical to enhancing pandemic preparedness. OBJECTIVE: This survey aims to assess differences in mental health, knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of preventive measures for COVID-19 amongst healthcare professionals (HCP) and non-healthcare professionals. DESIGN: Multi-national cross-sectional study was carried out using electronic surveys between May-June 2020. SETTING: Multi-national survey was distributed across 36 countries through social media, word-of-mouth, and electronic mail. PARTICIPANTS: Participants ≥21 years working in healthcare and non-healthcare related professions. MAIN OUTCOME: Risk factors determining the difference in KAP towards personal hygiene and social distancing measures during COVID-19 amongst HCP and non-HCP. RESULTS: HCP were significantly more knowledgeable on personal hygiene (AdjOR 1.45, 95% CI -1.14 to 1.83) and social distancing (AdjOR 1.31, 95% CI -1.06 to 1.61) compared to non-HCP. They were more likely to have a positive attitude towards personal hygiene and 1.5 times more willing to participate in the contact tracing app. There was high compliance towards personal hygiene and social distancing measures amongst HCP. HCP with high compliance were 1.8 times more likely to flourish and more likely to have a high sense of emotional (AdjOR 1.94, 95% CI (1.44 to 2.61), social (AdjOR 2.07, 95% CI -1.55 to 2.78), and psychological (AdjOR 2.13, 95% CI (1.59-2.85) well-being. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: While healthcare professionals were more knowledgeable, had more positive attitudes, their higher sense of total well-being was seen to be more critical to enhance compliance. Therefore, focusing on the well-being of the general population would help to enhance their compliance towards the preventive measures for COVID-19.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Cooperação do Paciente , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Saúde Global , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34052391

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, and functional constipation are among the prevalent gastrointestinal (GI) disorders classified as disorders of gut-brain interaction (DGBI), which can adversely affect the lives of sufferers. This study aimed to assess the degree and consequences of overlapping DGBI in a large population-based global scale. METHODS: Internet survey data from 54,127 adults (49.1% women) in 26 countries were analyzed by 4 GI anatomic regions (esophageal, gastroduodenal, bowel, and anorectal). The number of DGBI-affected GI regions was assessed, including associations with sex, age, disease severity, quality of life, psychosocial variables, and health care utilization. RESULTS: A total of 40.3% of surveyed individuals met Rome IV criteria for a DGBI. The percentages with 1-4 DGBI-affected GI regions were 68.3%, 22.3%, 7.1%, and 2.3%, respectively. The IBS symptom severity score increased significantly from 1 (207.6) to 4 (291.6) regions, as did non-GI symptom reporting (somatization), anxiety and depression, concerns and embarrassment about bowel function, doctor visits, medications, and abdominal surgeries (all P < .0001). Quality of life decreased with increasing number of DGBI regions (P < .0001). In a logistic mixed model, non-GI symptoms (odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.10), being very vs not concerned (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 2.27-2.90), being very vs not embarrassed about bowel function (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.08-1.33), and mean number of doctor visits (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.115-1.32) were most strongly associated with number of DGBI regions. CONCLUSIONS: DGBI in multiple anatomic GI regions is associated with increased psychological comorbidity, health care utilization, and IBS severity. Physician awareness of overlap could improve quality of care, prevent unnecessary interventions, and yield more positive health outcomes.

16.
JGH Open ; 2021 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33821221

RESUMO

Background and Aim: Although telemedicine is an option for the care of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients during the Coronavirus Disease (COVID)-19 pandemic, its feasibility and acceptability data are scant. Data on the frequency of COVID-19 among patients with IBD, quality of life (QOL), access to health care, psychological stress, and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic are scant. Methods: Video/audio consultation for IBD patients was undertaken after a web-based appointment, and data on acceptability, IBD control, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), and World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-Bref) were obtained electronically. IBD patients were assessed for COVID-19 symptoms or contact history and tested using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on naso- oro-pharyngeal swabs, and data were compared with 16,317 non-IBD controls. Results: Teleconsultation was feasible and acceptable. IBD patients had COVID-19 as frequently as non-IBD controls despite immunosuppressive therapy, possibly due to their awareness and preventive practices. Although the physical, psychological, and social QOL scores during the COVID-19 pandemic were comparable to the prepandemic period, the environmental scores were worse. Psychological tension and interference with work due to pain were lower during the pandemic, which might be influenced by the control of the disease. Conclusions: Teleconsultation is a feasible and acceptable alternative for IBD patients. They had COVID-19 as frequently as non-IBD controls despite a high frequency of immunosuppressive treatment, possibly due to their awareness of the disease and preventive practices. The QOL scores (except the environmental domains) and psychological issues were quite comparable or even better during the COVID-19 pandemic than earlier.

17.
Clin Transl Gastroenterol ; 12(4): e00334, 2021 04 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33878048

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Functional dyspepsia (FD), although commoner than organic dyspepsia (OD) in-hospital studies, community data, particularly from rural areas, are lacking. We performed a rural community study in Bangladesh with the primary aims to evaluate (i) the prevalence of uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD), FD, and OD and (ii) the risk factors for UD. METHODS: This house-to-house survey was performed using a translated-validated enhanced Asian Rome III questionnaire and endoscopy with Helicobacter pylori tests, including genotyping. RESULTS: Of 3,351/3,559 responders ([94.15%], age 40.41 ± 16.05 years, female 1924 [57.4%]), 547 (16.3%) had UD (female 346 [18%] vs male 201 [14%]; P = 0.002); 201 (6%), 88 (2.6%), and 258 (7.7%) had postprandial distress (PDS), epigastric pain syndromes (EPS) and PDS-EPS overlap, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age >50 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.34 [1.07-1.68]), female sex (AOR 1.42 [1.17-1.74]), being married (AOR 1.57 [1.21-2.07]), lower family income (AOR 1.79 [1.43-2.26]), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (AOR 7.05 [2.11-23.55]), previous acute gastroenteritis (AOR 5.42 [1.83-16]), and psychological distress (AOR 5.02 [2.87-8.76]) were risk factors for UD. Of 346/547 (63.25%) undergoing endoscopy, 232 (67.05%) and 114 (32.95%) had FD and OD (peptic ulcers [PU] 99 [28.61%] and erosive esophagitis 13 [3.76%]). About 53% of FD subjects had EPS-PDS overlap, 32% had PDS, and only 15% had EPS. H. pylori was detected in 266/342 (78%) dyspeptics (FD 173/230 [75.2%], vs OD 92/114 [82.1%], P = 0.169). DISCUSSION: Sixteen percent, 11% and 5% of rural Bangladeshi Asian adults had UD, FD, and PU, respectively. One-third of UD subjects had OD, mostly PU.JOURNAL/cltg/04.03/01720094-202104000-00016/inline-graphic1/v/2021-04-15T161418Z/r/image-tiff.


Assuntos
Dispepsia/epidemiologia , Dispepsia/microbiologia , Infecções por Helicobacter/epidemiologia , Helicobacter pylori , Úlcera Péptica/epidemiologia , Úlcera Péptica/microbiologia , Adulto , Bangladesh/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Dispepsia/tratamento farmacológico , Dispepsia/psicologia , Endoscopia Gastrointestinal , Feminino , Infecções por Helicobacter/psicologia , Helicobacter pylori/patogenicidade , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Satisfação do Paciente , Úlcera Péptica/psicologia , Úlcera Péptica/terapia , Estudos Prospectivos , Qualidade de Vida , Fatores de Risco , População Rural , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Virulência
19.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 36(8): 2187-2197, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33615534

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gastrointestinal manifestations of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may mimic irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and social distancing measures may affect IBS patients negatively. We aimed to study the impact of COVID-19 on respondents with self-reported IBS. METHODS: We conducted an anonymized survey from May to June 2020 in 33 countries. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices on personal hygiene and social distancing as well as psychological impact of COVID-19 were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to determine differences in well-being and compliance to social distancing measures between respondents with and without self-reported IBS. Factors associated with improvement or worsening of IBS symptoms were evaluated. RESULTS: Out of 2704 respondents, 2024 (74.9%) did not have IBS, 305 (11.3%) had self-reported IBS, and 374 (13.8%) did not know what IBS was. Self-reported IBS respondents reported significantly worse emotional, social, and psychological well-being compared with non-IBS respondents and were less compliant to social distancing measures (28.2% vs 35.3%, P = 0.029); 61.6% reported no change, 26.6% reported improvement, and 11.8% reported worsening IBS symptoms. Higher proportion of respondents with no change in IBS symptoms were willing to practice social distancing indefinitely versus those who deteriorated (74.9% vs 51.4%, P = 0.016). In multivariate analysis, willingness to continue social distancing for another 2-3 weeks (vs longer period) was significantly associated with higher odds of worsening IBS. CONCLUSION: Our study showed that self-reported IBS respondents had worse well-being and compliance to social distancing measures than non-IBS respondents. Future research will focus on occupational stress and dietary changes during COVID-19 that may influence IBS.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Cooperação do Paciente , SARS-CoV-2 , Autorrelato , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Singapura/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Indian J Gastroenterol ; 40(2): 209-219, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33409947

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Indian population-based studies on the prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are scanty, and a meta-analysis and a meta-regression of prevalence and risk factors based on the existing data have not yet been reported. METHODS: A systematic review of all the available publications from India reporting data regarding prevalence and risk factors of GERD was performed. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 statistics. The meta-analysis was undertaken to measure the average proportion reported in the existing studies, and meta-regression models were used to explore the risk factors for it. RESULTS: The nine studies included 20,614 subjects; the prevalence of GERD ranged from 5% to 28.5%. The summary effect size (weighted average proportion) estimated by meta-analytic model was 0.1415 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.099 to 0.197). The results for the test of heterogeneity that included tau2 (0.37, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.80), I2 (98.9%, 95% CI 98.01 to 99.77), and the Q-statistic (707.670; p < 0.0001) suggested high heterogeneity in the effect sizes. The pooled proportion of GERD (random-effects model) was 15.573 (95% CI 11.046 to 20.714). In the meta-regression model, sample size (p = 0.005) explained about 50% of the heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: The pooled prevalence of GERD in the Indian population is 15.6 (95% CI 11.046 to 20.714). The risk factors were age, body mass index (BMI), non-vegetarian diet, tea/coffee intake, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. However, there was significant heterogeneity in the studies.

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