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1.
World Neurosurg ; 137: e257-e262, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32004742

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is used in many surgical specialties to prevent postoperative dehiscence and surgical site infections (SSIs). However, little is known about the role of incisional NPWT in spine fusion surgery. Therefore, we sought to report a single surgeon's experience using incisional NPWT and describe its effects on dehiscence and SSIs after instrumented spine surgery. METHODS: We compared rates of hospital readmission and return to the operating room for dehiscence and SSIs in a consecutive series of patients who underwent spinal fusion surgery with or without NPWT from 2015 to 2018. RESULTS: A total of 393 patients without and 76 patients with NPWT were included for analysis. Half way through the data collection period, all patients who underwent anterior lumbar fusion received NPWT. Three of 15 (20.0%) of non-NPWT patients who underwent anterior lumbar fusion had dehiscence or SSI compared with zero of 23 (0.0%) of NPWT patients (P = 0.01). NPWT for posterior surgeries was used on a case-by-case basis using risk factors that contribute to SSIs and dehiscence. NPWT patients had higher rates of spinal neoplasia (0.5% vs. 11.3%, P < 0.0001), osteomyelitis/diskitis (1.3% vs. 7.5%, P = 0.02), durotomy (14.9% vs. 28.6%, P = 0.007), revision surgery (32.2% vs. 59.6%, P = 0.0001), and longer fusion constructs (7 vs. 11 levels, P < 0.0001) but had similar rates of dehiscence and SSIs as non-NPWT patients (5.6% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: NPWT decreases dehiscence and SSIs in patients undergoing lumbar fusion through an anterior approach. When preferentially used in patients at high risk for postoperative wound complications, NPWT prevents increased rates of dehiscence and SSI.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32056015

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individual evidence suggests that multiple modalities can be used to treat entrapment pathology by Morton's neuroma, including injection, neurolysis, and neurectomy. However, their impacts on patient pain and satisfaction have yet to be fully defined or elucidated. Correspondingly, our aim was to pool systematically identified metadata and substantiate the impact of these different modalities in treating Morton's neuroma with respect to these outcomes. METHODS: Searches of 7 electronic databases from inception to October 2019 were conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Articles were screened against pre-specified criteria. The incidences of outcomes were extracted and pooled by random-effects meta-analysis of proportions. RESULTS: A total of 35 articles satisfied all criteria, reporting a total of 2998 patients with Morton's neuroma managed by one of the three modalities. Incidence of complete pain relief after injection (43%; 95% CI, 23-64%) was significantly lower than neurolysis (68%; 95% CI, 51-84%) and neurectomy (74%; 95% CI, 66-82%) (P = 0.02). Incidence of complete satisfaction after injection (35%; 95% CI, 21-50%) was significantly lower than neurolysis (63%; 95% CI, 50-74%) and neurectomy (57%; 95% CI, 47-67%) (P < 0.01). The need to proceed to further surgery was significantly greater following injection (15%; 95% CI, 9-23%) versus neurolysis (2%; 95% CI, 0-4%) or neurectomy (5%; 95% CI, 3-7%) (P < 0.01). Incidence of procedural complications did not differ between modalities (P = 0.30). CONCLUSIONS: Although all interventions demonstrated favorable procedural complication incidences, surgical interventions by either neurolysis or neurectomy appear to trend towards greater incidences of complete pain relief and complete patient satisfaction outcomes compared to injection treatment. The optimal decision-making algorithm for treatment for Morton's neuroma should incorporate these findings to better form and meet the expectations of patients.

3.
J Neurooncol ; 144(3): 433-443, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31342317

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have reported the loss of trimethylation at lysine (K) 27 on histone 3 (H3K27me3) in high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). However, the diagnostic potential of this finding in MPNSTs remains yet to be fully substantiated. Correspondingly, our aim was to pool systematically-identified metadata in the literature and substantiate the incidence of H3K27me3 loss in this setting. METHODS: Searches of 7 electronic databases from inception to May 2019 were conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Articles were screened against pre-specified criteria. The incidence of loss was then pooled by random-effects meta-analysis of proportions. RESULTS: Nine pertinent studies described a total of 823 high-grade MPNST samples. When pooled, incidence (sensitivity) of complete H3K27me3 loss was estimated to be 53% (95% CI 42-64%). For MPNST subtypes, estimated incidences of complete loss in NF1 subtype was 52% (95% CI 41-62), in sporadic subtype was 53% (95% CI 36-70%), in the epithelioid subtype was 0% (95% CI 0-7%), and radiation-associated subtype was 98% (95% CI 86-100%). Finally, incidence of incomplete loss (specificity) in 1231 MPNST-mimic samples was estimated to be 96% (95% CI 90-99%). Certainty of these outcomes ranged from very low to high. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of complete H3K27me3 loss is substantial in high-grade MPNSTs and is low in MPNST-mimics. Greater cohort study and biological investigation will validate the certainty of these findings as well as elucidate their true molecular and clinical significances.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores Tumorais/genética , Metilação de DNA , Histonas/genética , Neurofibrossarcoma/diagnóstico , Neurofibrossarcoma/genética , Humanos , Lisina , Prognóstico
4.
J Neurosurg ; : 1-12, 2019 Jan 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30611138

RESUMO

OBJECTIVEThe authors sought to investigate the incidence and predictors of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) after craniotomy for tumor resection, which are not well established, and the efficacy of and risks associated with VTE chemoprophylaxis, which remains controversial.METHODSThe authors investigated the incidence of VTEs in a consecutive series of patients presenting to the authors' institution for resection of an intracranial lesion between 2012 and 2017. Information on patient and tumor characteristics was collected and independent predictors of VTEs were determined using stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Review of the literature was performed by searching MEDLINE using the keywords "venous thromboembolism," "deep venous thrombosis," "pulmonary embolism," "craniotomy," and "brain neoplasms."RESULTSThere were 1622 patients included for analysis. A small majority of patients were female (52.6%) and the mean age of the cohort was 52.9 years (SD 15.8 years). A majority of intracranial lesions were intraaxial (59.3%). The incidence of VTEs was 3.0% and the rates of deep venous thromboses and pulmonary emboli were 2.3% and 0.9%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, increasing patient age (unit OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.018), history of VTE (OR 7.26, 95% CI 3.24-16.27; p < 0.001), presence of motor deficit (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.43-4.88; p = 0.002), postoperative intracranial hemorrhage (OR 4.35, 95% CI 1.51-12.55; p < 0.001), and prolonged intubation or reintubation (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.28-8.32; p < 0.001) were independently associated with increased odds of a VTE. There were 192 patients who received VTE chemoprophylaxis (11.8%); the mean postoperative day of chemoprophylaxis initiation was 4.6 (SD 3.8). The incidence of VTEs was higher in patients receiving chemoprophylaxis than in patients not receiving chemoprophylaxis (8.3% vs 2.2%; p < 0.001). There were 30 instances of clinically significant postoperative hemorrhage (1.9%), with only 1 hemorrhage occurring after initiation of VTE chemoprophylaxis (0.1%).CONCLUSIONSThe study results show the incidence and predictors of VTEs after craniotomy for tumor resection in this patient population. The incidence of VTE within this cohort appears low and comparable to that observed in other institutional series, despite the lack of routine prophylactic anticoagulation in the postoperative setting.

5.
J Neurosurg Spine ; 29(6): 725-728, 2018 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30239270

RESUMO

OBJECTIVEIn this study, the authors sought to compare tumors with intradural extension to those remaining in the epidural or paraspinal space with the hypothesis that intradural extension may be a mechanism for seeding of the CSF with malignant cells, thereby resulting in higher rates of CNS metastases and shorter overall survival.METHODSThe authors searched the medical record for cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) identified from 1994 to 2017. The charts of the identified patients were then reviewed for tumor location to identify patients with paraspinal malignancy. All patients included in the study had tumor specimens that were reviewed in the surgical pathology department. Paraspinal tumors with intradural extension were identified in the lumbar, sacral, and spinal accessory nerves, and attempts were made to match this cohort to another cohort of patients who had paraspinal tumors of the cranial nerves and lumbar and sacral spinal regions without intradural extension. Further information was collected on all patients with and without intradural extension, including date of diagnosis by pathology specimen review; nerve or nerves of tumor origin; presence, location, and diagnostic date of any CNS metastases; and either the date of death or date of last follow-up.RESULTSThe authors identified 6 of 179 (3.4%) patients who had intradural tumor extension and compared these patients with 12 patients who harbored paraspinal tumors that did not have intradural extension. All tumors were diagnosed as high-grade MPNSTs according to the surgical pathology findings. Four of 6 (66.7%) patients with intradural extension had documented CNS metastases. The presence of CNS metastases was significantly higher in the intradural group than in the paraspinal group (intradural, 66.7% vs paraspinal, 0%; p < 0.01). Time from diagnosis until death was 11.2 months in the intradural group and approximately 72 months in the paraspinal, extradural cohort.CONCLUSIONSIn patients with intradural extension of paraspinal MPNSTs, significantly higher rates of CNS metastases are seen with a reduced interval of time from diagnosis to metastatic lesion detection. Intradural tumor extension is also a poor prognostic factor for survival, with these patients showing a reduced mean time from diagnosis to death.


Assuntos
Metástase Neoplásica/patologia , Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/cirurgia , Neurofibrossarcoma/cirurgia , Neoplasias da Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Região Lombossacral/patologia , Região Lombossacral/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/diagnóstico , Sistema Nervoso/patologia , Neurofibrossarcoma/diagnóstico , Neurofibrossarcoma/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Coluna Vertebral/mortalidade
6.
World Neurosurg ; 117: 178-181, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29909207

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: It is important to differentiate low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from benign nerve sheath tumors as MPNSTs may require a more aggressive treatment strategy during and after initial resection. Loss of expression of the trimethyl histone H3 at the Lys27 position (H3K27-me3) has recently been described in MPNSTs and may help distinguish this tumor from pathologic mimics. METHODS: A 43-year-old woman presented with symptoms of radiculopathy and a history of pelvic radiation for cervical cancer 7 years prior. Imaging and surgical pathology were initially consistent with an L5 schwannoma including spindle morphology without mitoses and retained S100 expression. After an aggressive recurrence 11 months later, pathology was consistent with high-grade MPNST including heightened mitotic activity and loss of S100 expression. RESULTS: After the identification of MPNST, H3K27M me3 immunostaining was applied to both the initial and recurrent pathologic specimens. The initial specimen demonstrated patchy loss of H3K27M me3 expression, more consistent with low-grade MPNST than schwannoma. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the role of H3K27M me3 immunostaining to help differentiate MPNSTs that may mimic more benign nerve sheath tumors, especially in patients who have a history of radiation to the region in question.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/patologia , Neurilemoma/diagnóstico por imagem , Adulto , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Evolução Fatal , Feminino , Histonas/metabolismo , Humanos , Vértebras Lombares , Gradação de Tumores , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/diagnóstico por imagem , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/metabolismo , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/cirurgia , Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Bainha Neural/cirurgia
7.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 42(3): E177-E185, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27285899

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: Compare minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and open surgery (OS) spinal fusion outcomes for the treatment of spondylolisthesis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: OS spinal fusion is an interventional option for patients with spinal disease who have failed conservative therapy. During the past decade, MIS approaches have increasingly been used, with potential benefits of reduced surgical trauma, postoperative pain, and length of hospital stay. However, current literature consists of single-center, low-quality studies with no review of approaches specific to spondylolisthesis only. METHODS: This first systematic review of the literature regarding MIS and OS spinal fusion for spondylolisthesis treatment was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for article identification, screening, eligibility, and inclusion. Electronic literature search of Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Scopus databases yielded 2489 articles. These articles were screened against established criteria for inclusion into this study. RESULTS: A total of five retrospective and five prospective articles with a total of 602 patients were found. Reported spondylolisthesis grades were I and II only. Overall, MIS was associated with less intraoperative blood loss (mean difference [MD], -331.04 mL; 95% confidence interval [CI], -490.48 to -171.59; P < 0.0001) and shorter length of hospital stay (MD, -1.74 days; 95% CI, -3.04 to -0.45; P = 0.008). There was no significant difference overall between MIS and OS in terms of functional or pain outcomes. Subgroup analysis of prospective studies revealed MIS had greater operative time (MD, 19.00 minutes; 95% CI, 0.90 to 37.10; P = 0.04) and lower final functional scores (weighted MD, -1.84; 95% CI, -3.61 to -0.07; P = 0.04) compared with OS. CONCLUSION: Current data suggests spinal fusion by MIS is a safe and effective approach to treat grade I and grade II spondylolisthesis. Moreover, although prospective trials associate MIS with better functional outcomes, longer-term and randomized trials are warranted to validate any association found in this study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.


Assuntos
Custos e Análise de Custo , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos , Fusão Vertebral , Estenose Espinal/cirurgia , Espondilolistese/cirurgia , Humanos , Fusão Vertebral/métodos , Resultado do Tratamento
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