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2.
Diabetologia ; 2021 Jan 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33495845

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Our aim was to investigate the relationship between average blood glucose levels and incident CHD in individuals without diabetes mellitus. METHODS: To investigate average blood glucose levels, we studied HbA1c as predicted by 40 variants previously shown to be associated with both type 2 diabetes and HbA1c. Linear and non-linear Mendelian randomisation analyses were performed to investigate associations with incident CHD risk in 324,830 European ancestry individuals from the UK Biobank without diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: Every one mmol/mol increase in genetically proxied HbA1c was associated with an 11% higher CHD risk (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05, 1.18). The dose-response curve increased at all levels of HbA1c, and there was no evidence favouring a non-linear relationship over a linear one. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: In individuals without diabetes mellitus, lowering average blood glucose levels may reduce CHD risk in a dose-dependent way.

3.
Hypertension ; 77(2): 376-382, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33390040

RESUMO

Observational studies have shown an association between hypertension and atrial fibrillation (AF). Aggressive blood pressure management in patients with known AF reduces overall arrhythmia burden, but it remains unclear whether hypertension is causative for AF. To address this question, this study explored the relationship between genetic predictors of blood pressure and risk of AF. We secondarily explored the relationship between genetically proxied use of antihypertensive drugs and risk of AF. Two-sample Mendelian randomization was performed using an inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis with weighted median Mendelian randomization and Egger intercept tests performed as sensitivity analyses. Summary statistics for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure were obtained from the International Consortium of Blood Pressure and the UK Biobank discovery analysis and AF from the 2018 Atrial Fibrillation Genetics Consortium multiethnic genome-wide association studies. Increases in genetically proxied systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, or pulse pressure by 10 mm Hg were associated with increased odds of AF (systolic blood pressure: odds ratio [OR], 1.17 [95% CI, 1.11-1.22]; P=1×10-11; diastolic blood pressure: OR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.16-1.35]; P=3×10-8; pulse pressure: OR, 1.1 [95% CI, 1.0-1.2]; P=0.05). Decreases in systolic blood pressure by 10 mm Hg estimated by genetic proxies of antihypertensive medications showed calcium channel blockers (OR, 0.66 [95% CI, 0.57-0.76]; P=8×10-9) and ß-blockers (OR, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.46-0.81]; P=6×10-4) decreased the risk of AF. Blood pressure-increasing genetic variants were associated with increased risk of AF, consistent with a causal relationship between blood pressure and AF. These data support the concept that blood pressure reduction with calcium channel blockade or ß-blockade could reduce the risk of AF.

4.
Br J Clin Pharmacol ; 2021 Jan 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33393675

RESUMO

Inhibition of interleukin 6 (IL-6) signalling has been proposed as a potential cardioprotective strategy for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the direct effects of IL-6 inhibition on renal function are not known. A Mendelian randomization (MR) study was performed to investigate the association of genetically proxied inhibition of IL-6 signalling with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), CKD and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Inverse-variance weighted MR was used as the main analysis, with sensitivity analyses performed using simple median, weighted median and MR-Egger methods. There was no evidence for an association of genetically proxied inhibition of IL-6 signalling (scaled per standard deviation unit decrease in C-reactive protein) with log eGFR (0.001, 95% confidence interval -0.004-0.007), BUN (0.009, 95% confidence interval -0.003-0.021) and CKD (odds ratio 0.948, 95% confidence interval 0.822-1.094). These findings do not raise concerns for IL-6 signalling having large adverse effects on renal function.

5.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0236904, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33465101

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Observational studies have reported either null or weak protective associations for coffee consumption and risk of breast cancer. METHODS: We conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis to evaluate the relationship between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk using 33 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coffee consumption from a genome-wide association (GWA) study on 212,119 female UK Biobank participants of White British ancestry. Risk estimates for breast cancer were retrieved from publicly available GWA summary statistics from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) on 122,977 cases (of which 69,501 were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, 21,468 ER-negative) and 105,974 controls of European ancestry. Random-effects inverse variance weighted (IVW) MR analyses were performed along with several sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of potential MR assumption violations. RESULTS: One cup per day increase in genetically predicted coffee consumption in women was not associated with risk of total (IVW random-effects; odds ratio (OR): 0.91, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.80-1.02, P: 0.12, P for instrument heterogeneity: 7.17e-13), ER-positive (OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.79-1.02, P: 0.09) and ER-negative breast cancer (OR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.75-1.03, P: 0.12). Null associations were also found in the sensitivity analyses using MR-Egger (total breast cancer; OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.80-1.25), weighted median (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.05) and weighted mode (OR: 1.00, CI: 0.93-1.07). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this large MR study do not support an association of genetically predicted coffee consumption on breast cancer risk, but we cannot rule out existence of a weak association.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33418132

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obesity, type 2 diabetes, and lifestyle factors (cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and coffee consumption) have been associated with the risk of developing gallstone disease in observational studies, but whether these associations are causal is undetermined. We conducted a Mendelian randomization study to assess these associations. METHODS: Genetic instruments associated with the exposures at the genome-wide significance (p < 5×10-8) level were selected from corresponding genome-wide associations studies (n=224 459 to 1 232 091 individuals). Summary-level data for gallstone disease were obtained from the UK Biobank (10 520 cases and 350 674 non-cases) and FinnGen consortium (11 675 cases and 121 348 non-cases). Univariable and multivariable Mendelian randomization analyses were conducted. Results from UK Biobank and FinnGen were combined using fixed-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: The odds ratios were 1.63 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.49, 1.79) for one standard deviation (SD) increase in body mass index, 1.81 (95% CI, 1.60, 2.05) for one SD increase in waist circumference, 1.13 (95% CI, 1.09, 1.17) for one unit increase in the log-odds ratio of type 2 diabetes and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.16, 1.34) for one SD increase in prevalence of smoking initiation. The associations for body mass index and type 2 diabetes persisted after mutual adjustment. Genetically predicted coffee consumption was inversely associated with gallstone disease after adjustment for body mass index and smoking (odds ratio per 50% increase 0.44, 95% CI, 0.21, 0.91). There was no association with alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports independent causal roles of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and smoking in gallstone disease.

7.
Hypertension ; 77(2): 383-392, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33356394

RESUMO

Serum urate has been implicated in hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but it is not known whether it is exerting a causal effect. To investigate this, we performed Mendelian randomization analysis using data from UK Biobank, Million Veterans Program and genome-wide association study consortia, and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. The main Mendelian randomization analyses showed that every 1-SD increase in genetically predicted serum urate was associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.10-1.30]; P=4×10-5), peripheral artery disease (1.12 [95% CI, 1.03-1.21]; P=9×10-3), and stroke (1.11 [95% CI, 1.05-1.18]; P=2×10-4). In Mendelian randomization mediation analyses, elevated blood pressure was estimated to mediate approximately one-third of the effect of urate on cardiovascular disease risk. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials showed a favorable effect of urate-lowering treatment on systolic blood pressure (mean difference, -2.55 mm Hg [95% CI, -4.06 to -1.05]; P=1×10-3) and major adverse cardiovascular events in those with previous cardiovascular disease (odds ratio, 0.40 [95% CI, 0.22-0.73]; P=3×10-3) but no significant effect on major adverse cardiovascular events in all individuals (odds ratio, 0.67 [95% CI, 0.44-1.03]; P=0.07). In summary, these Mendelian randomization and clinical trial data support an effect of higher serum urate on increasing blood pressure, which may mediate a consequent effect on cardiovascular disease risk. High-quality trials are necessary to provide definitive evidence on the specific clinical contexts where urate lowering may be of cardiovascular benefit.

8.
BMJ ; 371: m4763, 2020 Dec 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33303483
10.
Blood ; 136(26): 3062-3069, 2020 Dec 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33367543

RESUMO

Fibrinogen is a key component of the coagulation cascade, and variation in its circulating levels may contribute to thrombotic diseases, such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) and ischemic stroke. Gamma prime (γ') fibrinogen is an isoform of fibrinogen that has anticoagulant properties. We applied 2-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) to estimate the causal effect of total circulating fibrinogen and its isoform, γ' fibrinogen, on risk of VTE and ischemic stroke subtypes using summary statistics from genome-wide association studies. Genetic instruments for γ' fibrinogen and total fibrinogen were selected, and the inverse-variance weighted MR approach was used to estimate causal effects in the main analysis, complemented by sensitivity analyses that are more robust to the inclusion of pleiotropic variants, including MR-Egger, weighted median MR, and weighted mode MR. The main inverse-variance weighted MR estimates based on a combination of 16 genetic instruments for γ' fibrinogen and 75 genetic instruments for total fibrinogen indicated a protective effect of higher γ' fibrinogen and higher total fibrinogen on VTE risk. There was also a protective effect of higher γ' fibrinogen levels on cardioembolic and large artery stroke risk. Effect estimates were consistent across sensitivity analyses. Our results provide evidence to support effects of genetically determined γ' fibrinogen on VTE and ischemic stroke risk. Further research is needed to explore mechanisms underlying these effects and their clinical applications.

11.
BMJ ; 371: m4288, 2020 11 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33315587
14.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2020 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33130851

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic variants can be used to prioritize risk factors as potential therapeutic targets via Mendelian randomization (MR). An agnostic statistical framework using Bayesian model averaging (MR-BMA) can disentangle the causal role of correlated risk factors with shared genetic predictors. Here, our objective is to identify lipoprotein measures as mediators between lipid-associated genetic variants and coronary artery disease (CAD) for the purpose of detecting therapeutic targets for CAD. METHODS: As risk factors we consider 30 lipoprotein measures and metabolites derived from a high-throughput metabolomics study including 24 925 participants. We fit multivariable MR models of genetic associations with CAD estimated in 453 595 participants (including 113 937 cases) regressed on genetic associations with the risk factors. MR-BMA assigns to each combination of risk factors a model score quantifying how well the genetic associations with CAD are explained. Risk factors are ranked by their marginal score and selected using false-discovery rate (FDR) criteria. We perform supplementary and sensitivity analyses varying the dataset for genetic associations with CAD. RESULTS: In the main analysis, the top combination of risk factors ranked by the model score contains apolipoprotein B (ApoB) only. ApoB is also the highest ranked risk factor with respect to the marginal score (FDR <0.005). Additionally, ApoB is selected in all sensitivity analyses. No other measure of cholesterol or triglyceride is consistently selected otherwise. CONCLUSIONS: Our agnostic genetic investigation prioritizes ApoB across all datasets considered, suggesting that ApoB, representing the total number of hepatic-derived lipoprotein particles, is the primary lipid determinant of CAD.

17.
PLoS Med ; 17(10): e1003288, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33031386

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Observational studies have identified height as a strong risk factor for atrial fibrillation, but this finding may be limited by residual confounding. We aimed to examine genetic variation in height within the Mendelian randomization (MR) framework to determine whether height has a causal effect on risk of atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In summary-level analyses, MR was performed using summary statistics from genome-wide association studies of height (GIANT/UK Biobank; 693,529 individuals) and atrial fibrillation (AFGen; 65,446 cases and 522,744 controls), finding that each 1-SD increase in genetically predicted height increased the odds of atrial fibrillation (odds ratio [OR] 1.34; 95% CI 1.29 to 1.40; p = 5 × 10-42). This result remained consistent in sensitivity analyses with MR methods that make different assumptions about the presence of pleiotropy, and when accounting for the effects of traditional cardiovascular risk factors on atrial fibrillation. Individual-level phenome-wide association studies of height and a height genetic risk score were performed among 6,567 European-ancestry participants of the Penn Medicine Biobank (median age at enrollment 63 years, interquartile range 55-72; 38% female; recruitment 2008-2015), confirming prior observational associations between height and atrial fibrillation. Individual-level MR confirmed that each 1-SD increase in height increased the odds of atrial fibrillation, including adjustment for clinical and echocardiographic confounders (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.50 to 2.40; p = 0.007). The main limitations of this study include potential bias from pleiotropic effects of genetic variants, and lack of generalizability of individual-level findings to non-European populations. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we observed evidence that height is likely a positive causal risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Further study is needed to determine whether risk prediction tools including height or anthropometric risk factors can be used to improve screening and primary prevention of atrial fibrillation, and whether biological pathways involved in height may offer new targets for treatment of atrial fibrillation.

20.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32978716

RESUMO

C-reactive protein (CRP) has been studied extensively for association with a large number of non-infectious diseases and outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the breadth and validity of associations between CRP and non-infectious, chronic health outcomes and biomarkers. We conducted an umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses and a systematic review of Mendelian randomization (MR) studies. PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched from inception up to March 2019. Meta-analyses of observational studies and MR studies examining associations between CRP and health outcomes were identified, excluding studies on the diagnostic value of CRP for infections. We found 113 meta-analytic comparisons of observational studies and 196 MR analyses, covering a wide range of outcomes. The overwhelming majority of the meta-analyses of observational studies reported a nominally statistically significant result (95/113, 84.1%); however, the majority of the meta-analyses displayed substantial heterogeneity (47.8%), small study effects (39.8%) or excess significance (41.6%). Only two outcomes, cardiovascular mortality and venous thromboembolism, showed convincing evidence of association with CRP levels. When examining the MR literature, we found MR studies for 53/113 outcomes examined in the observational study meta-analyses but substantial support for a causal association with CRP was not observed for any phenotype. Despite the striking amount of research on CRP, convincing evidence for associations and causal effects is remarkably limited.

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