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1.
Science ; 367(6478)2020 02 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31919129

RESUMO

Gamma delta (γδ) T cells are essential to protective immunity. In humans, most γδ T cells express Vγ9Vδ2+ T cell receptors (TCRs) that respond to phosphoantigens (pAgs) produced by cellular pathogens and overexpressed by cancers. However, the molecular targets recognized by these γδTCRs are unknown. Here, we identify butyrophilin 2A1 (BTN2A1) as a key ligand that binds to the Vγ9+ TCR γ chain. BTN2A1 associates with another butyrophilin, BTN3A1, and these act together to initiate responses to pAg. Furthermore, binding of a second ligand, possibly BTN3A1, to a separate TCR domain incorporating Vδ2 is also required. This distinctive mode of Ag-dependent T cell activation advances our understanding of diseases involving pAg recognition and creates opportunities for the development of γδ T cell-based immunotherapies.

2.
J Immunol ; 204(5): 1119-1133, 2020 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31988181

RESUMO

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are important for immune responses against microbial infections. Although known to undergo marked numerical changes with age in humans, our understanding of how MAIT cells are altered during different phases across the human life span is largely unknown. Although also abundant in the tissues, our study focuses on MAIT cell analyses in blood. Across the human life span, we show that naive-like MAIT cells in umbilical cord blood switch to a central/effector memory-like profile that is sustained into older age. Whereas low-grade levels of plasma cytokine/chemokine were apparent in older donors (>65 y old), surprisingly, they did not correlate with the ex vivo MAIT hyperinflammatory cytokine profile observed in older adults. Removal of MAIT cells from older individuals and an aged environment resulted in the reversal of the baseline effector molecule profile comparable with MAIT cells from younger adults. An upregulated basal inflammatory profile accounted for reduced Escherichia coli-specific responses in aged MAIT cells compared with their young adult counterparts when fold change in expression levels of GzmB, CD107a, IFN-γ, and TNF was examined. However, the magnitude of antimicrobial MR1-dependent activation remained as potent and polyfunctional as with younger adults. Paired TCRαß analyses of MAIT cells revealed large clonal expansions in older adults and tissues that rivalled, remarkably, the TCRαß repertoire diversity of virus-specific CD8+ T cells. These data suggest that MAIT cells in older individuals, although associated with large clonal TCRαß expansions and increased baseline inflammatory potential, demonstrate plasticity and provide potent antimicrobial immunity.

3.
Science ; 366(6472): 1522-1527, 2019 12 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31857486

RESUMO

T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and MHC class I-like molecules. We describe a diverse population of human γδ T cells isolated from peripheral blood and tissues that exhibit autoreactivity to the monomorphic MHC-related protein 1 (MR1). The crystal structure of a γδTCR-MR1-antigen complex starkly contrasts with all other TCR-MHC and TCR-MHC-I-like complex structures. Namely, the γδTCR binds underneath the MR1 antigen-binding cleft, where contacts are dominated by the MR1 α3 domain. A similar pattern of reactivity was observed for diverse MR1-restricted γδTCRs from multiple individuals. Accordingly, we simultaneously report MR1 as a ligand for human γδ T cells and redefine the parameters for TCR recognition.

4.
Curr Protoc Immunol ; 127(1): e89, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31763782

RESUMO

This unit describes the utility of various mouse models of infection and immunization for studying mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cell immunity: MAIT cells can be isolated from the lungs (or from other tissues/organs) and then identified and characterized by flow cytometry using MR1 tetramers in combination with a range of antibodies. The response kinetics, cytokine profiles, and functional differentiation of lung MAIT cells are studied following infection with the bacterial pathogen Legionella longbeachae or Salmonella enterica Typhimurium or immunization with synthetic MAIT cell antigen plus Toll-like receptor agonist. MAIT cells enriched or expanded during the process can be used for further studies. A step-by-step protocol is provided for MAIT cell sorting and adoptive transfer. Mice can then be challenged and MAIT cells tracked and further examined. © 2019 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

5.
Curr Protoc Immunol ; 127(1): e90, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31763790

RESUMO

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a subset of unconventional T cells restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecule MHC-related protein 1 (MR1). MAIT cells are found throughout the body, especially in human blood and liver. Unlike conventional T cells, which are stimulated by peptide antigens presented by MHC molecules, MAIT cells recognize metabolite antigens derived from an intermediate in the microbial biosynthesis of riboflavin. MAIT cells mediate protective immunity to infections by riboflavin-producing microbes via the production of cytokines and cytotoxicity. The discovery of stimulating MAIT cell antigens allowed for the development of an analytical tool, the MR1 tetramer, that binds specifically to the MAIT T cell receptor (TCR) and is becoming the gold standard for identification of MAIT cells by flow cytometry. This article describes protocols to characterize the phenotype of human MAIT cells in blood and tissues by flow cytometry using fluorescently labeled human MR1 tetramers alongside antibodies specific for MAIT cell markers. © 2019 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. The main protocols include: Basic Protocol 1: Determining the frequency and steady-state surface phenotype of human MAIT cells Basic Protocol 2: Determining the activation phenotype of human MAIT cells in blood Basic Protocol 3: Characterizing MAIT cell TCRs using TCR-positive reporter cell lines Alternate protocols are provided for determining the absolute number, transcription factor phenotype, and TCR usage of human MAIT cells; and determining activation phenotype by staining for intracellular markers, measuring secreted cytokines, and measuring fluorescent dye dilution due to proliferation. Additional methods are provided for determining the capacity of MAIT cells to produce cytokine independently of antigen using plate-bound or bead-immobilized CD3/CD28 stimulation; and determining the MR1-Ag dependence of MAIT cell activation using MR1-blocking antibody or competitive inhibition. For TCR-positive reporter cell lines, methods are also provided for evaluating the MAIT TCR-mediated MR1-Ag response, determining the capacity of the reporter lines to produce cytokine independently of antigen, determining the MR1-Ag dependence of the reporter lines, and evaluating the MR1-Ag response of the reporter lines using IL-2 secretion. Support Protocols describe the preparation of PBMCs from human blood, the preparation of single-cell suspensions from tissue, the isolation of MAIT cells by FACS and MACS, cloning MAIT TCRα and ß chain genes and MR1 genes for transduction, generating stably and transiently transfected cells lines, generating a stable MR1 knockout antigen-presenting cell line, and generating monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

6.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 5242, 2019 11 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31748533

RESUMO

Type I and type II natural killer T (NKT) cells are restricted to the lipid antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. While we have an understanding of the antigen reactivity and function of type I NKT cells, our knowledge of type II NKT cells in health and disease remains unclear. Here we describe a population of type II NKT cells that recognise and respond to the microbial antigen, α-glucuronosyl-diacylglycerol (α-GlcADAG) presented by CD1d, but not the prototypical type I NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide. Surprisingly, the crystal structure of a type II NKT TCR-CD1d-α-GlcADAG complex reveals a CD1d F'-pocket-docking mode that contrasts sharply with the previously determined A'-roof positioning of a sulfatide-reactive type II NKT TCR. Our data also suggest that diverse type II NKT TCRs directed against distinct microbial or mammalian lipid antigens adopt multiple recognition strategies on CD1d, thereby maximising the potential for type II NKT cells to detect different lipid antigens.

8.
Nat Immunol ; 20(9): 1110-1128, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31406380

RESUMO

In recent years, a population of unconventional T cells called 'mucosal-associated invariant T cells' (MAIT cells) has captured the attention of immunologists and clinicians due to their abundance in humans, their involvement in a broad range of infectious and non-infectious diseases and their unusual specificity for microbial riboflavin-derivative antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like protein MR1. MAIT cells use a limited T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire with public antigen specificities that are conserved across species. They can be activated by TCR-dependent and TCR-independent mechanisms and exhibit rapid, innate-like effector responses. Here we review evidence showing that MAIT cells are a key component of the immune system and discuss their basic biology, development, role in disease and immunotherapeutic potential.


Assuntos
Apresentação do Antígeno/imunologia , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Classe I/imunologia , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/imunologia , Células T Invariáveis Associadas à Mucosa/imunologia , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T/imunologia , Animais , Antígenos/imunologia , Suscetibilidade a Doenças/imunologia , Humanos , Ativação Linfocitária/imunologia , Camundongos , Neoplasias/imunologia
9.
Immunol Cell Biol ; 97(8): 689-699, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31323167

RESUMO

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are unconventional T cells that recognize antigens derived from riboflavin biosynthesis. In addition to anti-microbial functions, human MAIT cells are associated with cancers, autoimmunity, allergies and inflammatory disorders, although their role is poorly understood. Activated MAIT cells are well known for their rapid release of Th1 and Th17 cytokines, but we have discovered that chronic stimulation can also lead to potent interleukin (IL)-13 expression. We used RNA-seq and qRT-PCR to demonstrate high expression of the IL-13 gene in chronically stimulated MAIT cells, and directly identify IL-13 using intracellular flow cytometry and multiplex bead analysis of MAIT cell cultures. This unexpected finding has important implications for IL-13-dependent diseases, such as colorectal cancer (CRC), that occur in mucosal areas where MAIT cells are abundant. We identify MAIT cells near CRC tumors and show that these areas and precancerous polyps express high levels of the IL-13 receptor, which promotes tumor progression and metastasis. Our data suggest that MAIT cells have a more complicated role in CRC than currently realized and that they represent a promising new target for immunotherapies where IL-13 can be a critical factor.

10.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 2243, 2019 05 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31113973

RESUMO

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express an invariant TRAV1/TRAJ33 TCR-α chain and are restricted to the MHC-I-like molecule, MR1. Whether MAIT cell development depends on this invariant TCR-α chain is unclear. Here we generate Traj33-deficient mice and show that they are highly depleted of MAIT cells; however, a residual population remains and can respond to exogenous antigen in vitro or pulmonary Legionella challenge in vivo. These residual cells include some that express Trav1+ TCRs with conservative Traj-gene substitutions, and others that express Trav1- TCRs with a broad range of Traj genes. We further report that human TRAV1-2- MR1-restricted T cells contain both MAIT-like and non-MAIT-like cells, as judged by their TCR repertoire, antigen reactivity and phenotypic features. These include a MAIT-like population that expresses a public, canonical TRAV36+ TRBV28+ TCR. Our findings highlight the TCR diversity and the resulting potential impact on antigen recognition by MR1-restricted T cells.


Assuntos
Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Classe I/metabolismo , Legionelose/imunologia , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/metabolismo , Células T Invariáveis Associadas à Mucosa/imunologia , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T alfa-beta/metabolismo , Animais , Apresentação do Antígeno/imunologia , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Células HEK293 , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Classe I/imunologia , Humanos , Legionella/imunologia , Legionelose/microbiologia , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/imunologia , Células T Invariáveis Associadas à Mucosa/metabolismo , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T alfa-beta/genética , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T alfa-beta/imunologia
12.
J Exp Med ; 216(7): 1682-1699, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31142588

RESUMO

Interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ T (Tc17) cells have emerged as key players in host-microbiota interactions, infection, and cancer. The factors that drive their development, in contrast to interferon (IFN)-γ-producing effector CD8+ T cells, are not clear. Here we demonstrate that the transcription factor TCF-1 (Tcf7) regulates CD8+ T cell fate decisions in double-positive (DP) thymocytes through the sequential suppression of MAF and RORγt, in parallel with TCF-1-driven modulation of chromatin state. Ablation of TCF-1 resulted in enhanced Tc17 cell development and exposed a gene set signature to drive tissue repair and lipid metabolism, which was distinct from other CD8+ T cell subsets. IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells isolated from healthy humans were also distinct from CD8+IL-17- T cells and enriched in pathways driven by MAF and RORγt Overall, our study reveals how TCF-1 exerts central control of T cell differentiation in the thymus by normally repressing Tc17 differentiation and promoting an effector fate outcome.

13.
Eur J Immunol ; 49(5): 737-746, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30854633

RESUMO

Lyme disease is a common multisystem disease caused by infection with a tick-transmitted spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi and related Borrelia species. The monoglycosylated diacylglycerol known as B. burgdorferi glycolipid II (BbGL-II) is a major target of antibodies in sera from infected individuals. Here, we show that CD1b presents BbGL-II to human T cells and that the TCR mediates the recognition. However, we did not detect increased frequency of CD1b-BbGL-II binding T cells in the peripheral blood of Lyme disease patients compared to controls. Unexpectedly, mapping the T cell specificity for BbGL-II-like molecules using tetramers and activation assays revealed a concomitant response to CD1b-expressing APCs in absence of BbGL-II. Further, among all major classes of self-lipid tested, BbGL-II responsive TCRs show strong cross-reactivity to diacylglycerol, a self-lipid antigen with structural similarities to BbGL-II. Extending prior work on MHC and CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d proteins, this study provides evidence for cross-reactive CD1b-restricted T cell responses to bacterial and self-antigens, and identifies chemically defined targets for future discovery of self and foreign antigen cross-reactive T cells.

14.
Nat Immunol ; 20(3): 373, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30728493

RESUMO

In the version of this article initially published, three authors (Hui-Fern Kuoy, Adam P. Uldrich and Dale. I. Godfrey) and their affiliations, acknowledgments and contributions were not included. The correct information is as follows:Ayano C. Kohlgruber1,2, Shani T. Gal-Oz3, Nelson M. LaMarche1,2, Moto Shimazaki1, Danielle Duquette4, Hui-Fern Koay5,6, Hung N. Nguyen1, Amir I. Mina4, Tyler Paras1, Ali Tavakkoli7, Ulrich von Andrian2,8, Adam P. Uldrich5,6, Dale I. Godfrey5,6, Alexander S. Banks4, Tal Shay3, Michael B. Brenner1,10* and Lydia Lynch1,4,9,10*1Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. 2Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 3Department of Life Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheba, Israel. 4Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. 5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. 6ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. 7Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. 8Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 9School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. 10These authors jointly supervised this work: Michael B. Brenner, Lydia Lynch. *e-mail: mbrenner@research.bwh.harvard.edu; llynch@bwh.harvard.eduAcknowledgementsWe thank A.T. Chicoine, flow cytometry core manager at the Human Immunology Center at BWH, for flow cytometry sorting. We thank D. Sant'Angelo (Rutgers Cancer Institute) for providing Zbtb16-/- mice and R. O'Brien (National Jewish Health) for providing Vg4/6-/- mice. Supported by NIH grant R01 AI11304603 (to M.B.B.), ERC Starting Grant 679173 (to L.L.), the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (1013667), an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT140100278 for A.P.U.) and a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1117766 for D.I.G.).Author contributionsA.C.K., L.L., and M.B.B. conceived and designed the experiments, and wrote the manuscript. A.C.K., N.M.L., L.L., H.N.N., M.S., T.P., and D.D. performed the experiments. S.T.G.-O. and T.S. performed the RNA-seq analysis. A.S.B. and A.I.M. provided advice and performed the CLAMS experiments. A.T. provided human bariatric patient samples. Parabiosis experiments were performed in the laboratory of U.v.A. H.-F.K., A.P.U. and D.I.G provided critical insight into the TCR chain usage of PLZF+ γδ T cells. M.B.B., N.M.L., and L.L. critically reviewed the manuscript.The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF version of the article.Correction to: Nature Immunology doi:10.1038/s41590-018-0094-2 (2018), published online 18 April 2018.

15.
Immunol Cell Biol ; 97(5): 498-511, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30803026

RESUMO

Special AT-rich binding protein-1 (SATB1) is a global chromatin organizer capable of activating or repressing gene transcription in mice and humans. The role of SATB1 is pivotal for T-cell development, with SATB1-knockout mice being neonatally lethal, although the exact mechanism is unknown. Moreover, SATB1 is dysregulated in T-cell lymphoma and proposed to suppress transcription of the Pdcd1 gene, encoding the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1). Thus, SATB1 expression in T-cell subsets across different tissue compartments in humans is of potential importance for targeting PD-1. Here, we comprehensively analyzed SATB1 expression across different human tissues and immune compartments by flow cytometry and correlated this with PD-1 expression. We investigated SATB1 protein levels in pediatric and adult donors and assessed expression dynamics of this chromatin organizer across different immune cell subsets in human organs, as well as in antigen-specific T cells directed against acute and chronic viral infections. Our data demonstrate that SATB1 expression in humans is the highest in T-cell progenitors in the thymus, and then becomes downregulated in mature T cells in the periphery. Importantly, SATB1 expression in peripheral mature T cells is not static and follows fine-tuned expression dynamics, which appear to be tissue- and antigen-dependent. Furthermore, SATB1 expression negatively correlates with PD-1 expression in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Our study has implications for understanding the role of SATB1 in human health and disease and suggests an approach for modulating PD-1 in T cells, highly relevant to human malignancies or chronic viral infections.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento , Regulação da Expressão Gênica/imunologia , Proteínas de Ligação à Região de Interação com a Matriz , Adulto , Idoso , Envelhecimento/imunologia , Envelhecimento/metabolismo , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/citologia , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/imunologia , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Proteínas de Ligação à Região de Interação com a Matriz/biossíntese , Proteínas de Ligação à Região de Interação com a Matriz/imunologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Especificidade de Órgãos/fisiologia , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/imunologia , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/metabolismo , Timócitos/citologia , Timócitos/imunologia
17.
Org Biomol Chem ; 17(5): 1225-1237, 2019 01 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30656346

RESUMO

Activated NKT cells can stimulate antigen-presenting cells leading to enhanced peptide antigen-specific immunity. However, administration of potent NKT cell agonists like α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) can be associated with release of high levels of cytokines, and in some situations, hepatotoxicity. Here we show that it is possible to provoke sufficient NKT cell activity to stimulate strong antigen-specific T cell responses without these unwanted effects. This was achieved by chemically conjugating antigenic peptides to α-galactosylphytosphingosine (α-GalPhs), an NKT cell agonist with very weak activity based on structural characterisation and biological assays. Conjugation improved delivery to antigen-presenting cells in vivo, while use of a cathepsin-sensitive linker to release the α-GalPhs and peptide within the same cell promoted strong T cell activation and therapeutic anti-tumour responses in mice. The conjugates activated human NKT cells and enhanced human T cell responses to a viral peptide in vitro. Accordingly, we have demonstrated a means to safely exploit the immunostimulatory properties of NKT cells to enhance T cell activation for virus- and tumour-specific immunity.


Assuntos
Células Apresentadoras de Antígenos/imunologia , Vacinas Anticâncer/administração & dosagem , Células T Matadoras Naturais/efeitos dos fármacos , Células T Matadoras Naturais/imunologia , Neoplasias Experimentais/imunologia , Peptídeos/administração & dosagem , Adjuvantes Imunológicos , Animais , Antígenos CD1d/química , Vacinas Anticâncer/imunologia , Doença Hepática Induzida por Substâncias e Drogas/prevenção & controle , Epitopos/química , Glicolipídeos/química , Ativação Linfocitária , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Neoplasias Experimentais/tratamento farmacológico , Peptídeos/química , Peptídeos/imunologia
18.
J Immunol ; 201(10): 2862-2871, 2018 11 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30397170

RESUMO

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are characterized by a semi-invariant TCR that recognizes vitamin B metabolite Ags presented by the MHC-related molecule MR1. Their Ag restriction determines a unique developmental lineage, imbuing a tissue-homing, preprimed phenotype with antimicrobial function. A growing body of literature indicates that MR1-restricted T cells are more diverse than the MAIT term implies. Namely, it is increasingly clear that TCR α- and TCR ß-chain diversity within the MR1-restricted repertoire provides a potential mechanism of Ag discrimination, and context-dependent functional variation suggests a role for MR1-restricted T cells in diverse physiological settings. In this paper, we summarize MR1-restricted T cell biology, with an emphasis on TCR diversity, Ag discrimination, and functional heterogeneity.


Assuntos
Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Classe I/imunologia , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/imunologia , Células T Invariáveis Associadas à Mucosa/imunologia , Subpopulações de Linfócitos T/imunologia , Animais , Humanos , Células T Invariáveis Associadas à Mucosa/citologia , Subpopulações de Linfócitos T/citologia
19.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 4706, 2018 11 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30413689

RESUMO

Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are evolutionarily-conserved, innate-like lymphocytes which are abundant in human lungs and can contribute to protection against pulmonary bacterial infection. MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections, yet it remains unknown whether MAIT cells play a significant protective or even detrimental role during viral infections in vivo. Using murine experimental challenge with two strains of influenza A virus, we show that MAIT cells accumulate and are activated early in infection, with upregulation of CD25, CD69 and Granzyme B, peaking at 5 days post-infection. Activation is modulated via cytokines independently of MR1. MAIT cell-deficient MR1-/- mice show enhanced weight loss and mortality to severe (H1N1) influenza. This is ameliorated by prior adoptive transfer of pulmonary MAIT cells in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient RAG2-/-γC-/- mice. Thus, MAIT cells contribute to protection during respiratory viral infections, and constitute a potential target for therapeutic manipulation.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana/patologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Células T Invariáveis Associadas à Mucosa/virologia , Infecções por Orthomyxoviridae/patologia , Infecções por Orthomyxoviridae/virologia , Transferência Adotiva , Animais , Citocinas/metabolismo , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Classe I/metabolismo , Humanos , Pulmão/patologia , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/metabolismo
20.
Cell Rep ; 25(1): 68-79.e4, 2018 10 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30282039

RESUMO

Liver tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells migrate throughout the sinusoids and are capable of protecting against malaria sporozoite challenge. To gain an understanding of liver Trm cell development, we examined various conditions for their formation. Although liver Trm cells were found in naive mice, their presence was dictated by antigen specificity and required IL-15. Liver Trm cells also formed after adoptive transfer of in vitro-activated but not naive CD8+ T cells, indicating that activation was essential but that antigen presentation within the liver was not obligatory. These Trm cells patrolled the liver sinusoids with a half-life of 36 days and occupied a large niche that could be added to sequentially without effect on subsequent Trm cell cohorts. Together, our findings indicate that liver Trm cells form as a normal consequence of CD8+ T cell activation during essentially any infection but that inflammatory and antigenic signals preferentially tailor their development.


Assuntos
Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/imunologia , Memória Imunológica/imunologia , Fígado/imunologia , Transferência Adotiva , Animais , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/citologia , Epitopos , Hepatite/imunologia , Interleucina-15/imunologia , Fígado/citologia , Ativação Linfocitária , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
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