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1.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 65: 101643, 2020 Feb 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32058310

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The first large-scale genome-wide association study of gallbladder cancer (GBC) recently identified and validated three susceptibility variants in the ABCB1 and ABCB4 genes for individuals of Indian descent. We investigated whether these variants were also associated with GBC risk in Chileans, who show the highest incidence of GBC worldwide, and in Europeans with a low GBC incidence. METHODS: This population-based study analysed genotype data from retrospective Chilean case-control (255 cases, 2042 controls) and prospective European cohort (108 cases, 181 controls) samples consistently with the original publication. RESULTS: Our results confirmed the reported associations for Chileans with similar risk effects. Particularly strong associations (per-allele odds ratios close to 2) were observed for Chileans with high Native American (=Mapuche) ancestry. No associations were noticed for Europeans, but the statistical power was low. CONCLUSION: Taking full advantage of genetic and ethnic differences in GBC risk may improve the efficiency of current prevention programs.

2.
Elife ; 82019 11 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31763980

RESUMO

The human face represents a combined set of highly heritable phenotypes, but knowledge on its genetic architecture remains limited, despite the relevance for various fields. A series of genome-wide association studies on 78 facial shape phenotypes quantified from 3-dimensional facial images of 10,115 Europeans identified 24 genetic loci reaching study-wide suggestive association (p < 5 × 10-8), among which 17 were previously unreported. A follow-up multi-ethnic study in additional 7917 individuals confirmed 10 loci including six unreported ones (padjusted < 2.1 × 10-3). A global map of derived polygenic face scores assembled facial features in major continental groups consistent with anthropological knowledge. Analyses of epigenomic datasets from cranial neural crest cells revealed abundant cis-regulatory activities at the face-associated genetic loci. Luciferase reporter assays in neural crest progenitor cells highlighted enhancer activities of several face-associated DNA variants. These results substantially advance our understanding of the genetic basis underlying human facial variation and provide candidates for future in-vivo functional studies.

3.
Am J Hum Biol ; : e23323, 2019 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31506993

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The diagnosis and treatment of obesity are usually based on traditional anthropometric variables including weight, height, and several body perimeters. Here we present a three-dimensional (3D) image-based computational approach aimed to capture the distribution of abdominal adipose tissue as an aspect of shape rather than a relationship among classical anthropometric measures. METHODS: A morphometric approach based on landmarks and semilandmarks placed upon the 3D torso surface was performed in order to quantify abdominal adiposity shape variation and its relation to classical indices. Specifically, we analyzed sets of body cross-sectional circumferences, collectively defining each, along with anthropometric data taken on 112 volunteers. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on 250 circumferences located along the abdominal region of each volunteer. An analysis of covariance model was used to compare shape variables (PCs) against anthropometric data (weight, height, and waist and hip circumferences). RESULTS: The observed shape patterns were mainly related to nutritional status, followed by sexual dimorphism. PC1 (12.5%) and PC2 (7.5%) represented 20% of the total variation. In PCAs calculated independently by sex, linear regression analyses provide statistically significant associations between PC1 and the three classical indexes: body mass index, waist-to-height ratio, and waist-hip ratio. CONCLUSION: Shape indicators predict well the behavior of classical markers, but also evaluate 3D and geometric features with more accuracy as related to the body shape under study. This approach also facilitates diagnosis and follow-up of therapies by using accessible 3D technology.

4.
Am J Hum Biol ; 31(5): e23278, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31237064

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This article aims to assess the contribution of genomic ancestry and socioeconomic status to obesity in a sample of admixed Latin Americans. METHODS: The study comprised 6776 adult volunteers from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru. Each volunteer completed a questionnaire about socioeconomic variables. Anthropometric variables such as weight, height, waist, and hip circumference were measured to calculate body indices: body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). Genetic data were extracted from blood samples, and ancestry was estimated using chip genotypes. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between the indices and ancestry, educational level, and economic well-being. The body indices were dichotomized to obesity indices by using appropriate thresholds. Odds ratios were calculated for each obesity index. RESULTS: The sample showed high percentages of obesity by all measurements. However, indices did not overlap consistently when classifying obesity. WHtR resulted in the highest prevalence of obesity. Overall, women with low education level and men with high economic wellness were more likely to be obese. American ancestry was statistically associated with obesity indices, although to a lesser extent than socioeconomic variables. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of obesity was heavily dependent on the index and the population. Genomic ancestry has a significant influence on the anthropometric measurements, especially on central adiposity. As a whole, we detected a large interpopulation variation that suggests that better approaches to overweight and obesity phenotypes are needed in order to obtain more precise reference values.

5.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 358, 2019 01 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30664655

RESUMO

We report a genome-wide association scan in >6,000 Latin Americans for pigmentation of skin and eyes. We found eighteen signals of association at twelve genomic regions. These include one novel locus for skin pigmentation (in 10q26) and three novel loci for eye pigmentation (in 1q32, 20q13 and 22q12). We demonstrate the presence of multiple independent signals of association in the 11q14 and 15q13 regions (comprising the GRM5/TYR and HERC2/OCA2 genes, respectively) and several epistatic interactions among independently associated alleles. Strongest association with skin pigmentation at 19p13 was observed for an Y182H missense variant (common only in East Asians and Native Americans) in MFSD12, a gene recently associated with skin pigmentation in Africans. We show that the frequency of the derived allele at Y182H is significantly correlated with lower solar radiation intensity in East Asia and infer that MFSD12 was under selection in East Asians, probably after their split from Europeans.


Assuntos
Epistasia Genética , Cor de Olho/genética , Genoma Humano , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Pigmentação da Pele/genética , Alelos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Evolução Biológica , Grupos Étnicos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Expressão Gênica , Frequência do Gene , Genética Populacional , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Fatores de Troca do Nucleotídeo Guanina/genética , Humanos , América Latina , Masculino , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Receptor de Glutamato Metabotrópico 5/genética
6.
Am J Phys Anthropol ; 168(4): 651-664, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30629739

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Large shape variations take place during the growth process of children, including quantitative mass and size increase plus qualitative changes in their body shape. The aim of the present study is to apply Geometric Morphometric techniques in order to visualize and quantify such body shape differences in healthy children aged 6-59 months with optimal nutritional status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Anthropometrical measurements of weight, height, and middle-upper arm circumference were used to assess nutritional status on a sample of 258 Senegalese (n = 154) and Spanish (n = 104) children. A set of 36 anatomical and/or osteologically-based landmarks were identified on the body of the children along with 108 semi-landmarks used to capture curvature attributes on the frontal view of the body image. A specific method was developed to place and photograph children, as well as to locate landmarks, treat images and calculate semi-landmarks. Shape differences among children were analyzed in terms of age, sex, and population origin, taking into consideration allometry effects. RESULTS: Our results indicate significant differences in shape and size for all the three factors under study before removing size effect (p < .0001), and in shape after the size correction (p < .01). Only the ontogenetic effect persisted in the size of studied individuals after size-effects correction (p < .0001). Morphometric significant differences were described regarding age for PC1 and population origin in PC2 before removing size effect. Between-population morphometric differences were sorted along PC1 after size correction. DISCUSSION: Geometric Morphometric techniques are useful to study morphometric changes in the anterior whole-body view of children under 5 years old, allowing a precise description of shape changes observed when age and population origin are considered.


Assuntos
Antropometria/métodos , Tamanho Corporal/fisiologia , Desenvolvimento Infantil/fisiologia , Animais , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador , Lactente , Modelos Estatísticos , Senegal , Espanha , Imagem Corporal Total
7.
Int J Cardiol ; 279: 168-173, 2019 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30305239

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Serum uric acid (SUA) is a heritable trait associated with cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery disease (CAD). Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genes associated with SUA, mainly in European populations. However, to date there are few GWAS in Latino populations, and the role of SUA-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cardiovascular disease has not been studied in the Mexican population. METHODS: We performed genome-wide SUA association study in 2153 Mexican children and adults, evaluated whether genetic effects were modified by sex and obesity, and used a Mendelian randomization approach in an independent cohort to study the role of SUA modifying genetic variants in premature CAD. RESULTS: Only two loci were associated with SUA levels: SLC2A9 (ß = -0.47 mg/dl, P = 1.57 × 10-42 for lead SNP rs7678287) and ABCG2 (ß = 0.23 mg/dl, P = 2.42 × 10-10 for lead SNP rs2231142). No significant interaction between SLC2A9 rs7678287 and ABCG2 rs2231142 genotypes and obesity was observed. However, a significant ABCG2 rs2231142 genotype*sex interaction (P = 0.001) was observed in adults but not in children. Although SUA levels were associated with premature CAD, metabolic syndrome and decreased glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), only ABCG2 rs2231142 was associated with decreased eGFR in the premature CAD group. CONCLUSIONS: SUA elevation was independently associated with premature CAD, metabolic syndrome and decreased eGFR in the Mexican population. However, a Mendelian randomization approach using the lead SUA-associated SNPs (SLC2A9 and ABCG2) did not support a causal role of elevated SUA levels for premature CAD.


Assuntos
Doença da Artéria Coronariana/sangue , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Ácido Úrico/sangue , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Biomarcadores/sangue , Criança , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana/métodos , México/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
8.
Am J Phys Anthropol ; 168(3): 438-447, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30582632

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the variation in dental nonmetric traits and to evaluate the utility of this variation for inferring genetic ancestry proportions in a sample of admixed Latin Americans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We characterized a sample from Colombia (N = 477) for 34 dental traits and obtained estimates of individual Native American, European, and African ancestry using genome-wide SNP data. We tested for correlation between dental traits, genetic ancestry, age, and sex. We carried out a biodistance analysis between the Colombian sample and reference continental population samples using the mean measure of divergence statistic calculated from dental trait frequencies. We evaluated the inference of genetic ancestry from dental traits using a regression approach (with 10-fold cross-validation) as well as by testing the correlation between estimates of ancestry obtained from genetic and dental data. RESULTS: Latin Americans show intermediate dental trait frequencies when compared to Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. Significant correlations were observed for several dental traits, genetic ancestry, age, and sex. The biodistance analysis displayed a closer relationship of Colombians to Europeans than to Native Americans and Africans. Mean ancestry estimates obtained from the dental data are similar to the genetic estimates (Native American: 32% vs. 28%, European: 59% vs. 63%, and African: 9% vs. 9%, respectively). However, dental features provided low predictive power for genetic ancestry of individuals in both approaches tested (R2 < 5% for all genetic ancestries across methods). DISCUSSION: The frequency of dental traits in Latin Americans reflects their admixed Native American, European and African ancestry and can provide reasonable average estimates of genetic ancestry. However, the accuracy of individual genetic ancestry estimates is relatively low, probably influenced by the continental differentiation of dental traits, their genetic architecture, and the distribution of genetic ancestry in the individuals examined.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais , Hispano-Americanos/genética , Dente/anatomia & histologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Antropologia Física , Grupos de Populações Continentais/genética , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Genética Populacional , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Fotografia Dentária , Adulto Jovem
9.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 5388, 2018 12 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30568240

RESUMO

Historical records and genetic analyses indicate that Latin Americans trace their ancestry mainly to the intermixing (admixture) of Native Americans, Europeans and Sub-Saharan Africans. Using novel haplotype-based methods, here we infer sub-continental ancestry in over 6,500 Latin Americans and evaluate the impact of regional ancestry variation on physical appearance. We find that Native American ancestry components in Latin Americans correspond geographically to the present-day genetic structure of Native groups, and that sources of non-Native ancestry, and admixture timings, match documented migratory flows. We also detect South/East Mediterranean ancestry across Latin America, probably stemming mostly from the clandestine colonial migration of Christian converts of non-European origin (Conversos). Furthermore, we find that ancestry related to highland (Central Andean) versus lowland (Mapuche) Natives is associated with variation in facial features, particularly nose morphology, and detect significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups at loci previously associated with nose morphology in this sample.


Assuntos
Migração Humana , Índios Norte-Americanos/genética , Índios Sul-Americanos/genética , Haplótipos , Humanos , México , Nariz/anatomia & histologia , América do Sul
10.
PLoS Genet ; 14(9): e1007640, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30248107

RESUMO

Hair plays an important role in primates and is clearly subject to adaptive selection. While humans have lost most facial hair, eyebrows are a notable exception. Eyebrow thickness is heritable and widely believed to be subject to sexual selection. Nevertheless, few genomic studies have explored its genetic basis. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan for eyebrow thickness in 2961 Han Chinese. We identified two new loci of genome-wide significance, at 3q26.33 near SOX2 (rs1345417: P = 6.51×10(-10)) and at 5q13.2 near FOXD1 (rs12651896: P = 1.73×10(-8)). We further replicated our findings in the Uyghurs, a population from China characterized by East Asian-European admixture (N = 721), the CANDELA cohort from five Latin American countries (N = 2301), and the Rotterdam Study cohort of Dutch Europeans (N = 4411). A meta-analysis combining the full GWAS results from the three cohorts of full or partial Asian descent (Han Chinese, Uyghur and Latin Americans, N = 5983) highlighted a third signal of genome-wide significance at 2q12.3 (rs1866188: P = 5.81×10(-11)) near EDAR. We performed fine-mapping and prioritized four variants for further experimental verification. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing provided evidence that rs1345417 and rs12651896 affect the transcriptional activity of the nearby SOX2 and FOXD1 genes, which are both involved in hair development. Finally, suitable statistical analyses revealed that none of the associated variants showed clear signals of selection in any of the populations tested. Contrary to popular speculation, we found no evidence that eyebrow thickness is subject to strong selective pressure.


Assuntos
Sobrancelhas/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Loci Gênicos/genética , Fenótipo , Sistemas CRISPR-Cas/genética , Cromossomos Humanos/genética , Fatores de Transcrição Forkhead/genética , Edição de Genes , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Transcrição SOXB1/genética , Seleção Genética
11.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 164: 69-74, 2018 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30098507

RESUMO

Halophytic plants play a fundamental role in salt marshes, influencing their structure, dynamics, and cycling of nutrients and minerals. These plants have the ability to retain metals in the soil, or absorb and retain them in underground structures, or transport them to their aerial structures. Here we aim to study shape variation in the leaves of Cressa truxillensis inhabiting the salt marsh of San Antonio Oeste, according to their proximity to a source of metals in the soil. A gradient of bioavailability of metal was observed in the soil, decreasing from the site closest to the source to the most distant point, where Zn was the most abundant metal followed by Pb and Cu. We used landmark-based geometric morphometric tools to study leaf shape variation. We observed more oval leaf growth on the farthest point of the pollutant's source, and lanceolate shape close to it. No significant among-site size differences were found. Collectively, these results suggest that the stress conditions associated with the soil metals' concentration generate changes in the leaf shape of Cressa truxilensis. Considering that this species has not been extensively analyzed, this study establishes a baseline and supports the use of the leaf as an early biomarker of stress by contamination in plants associated with marshes.


Assuntos
Convolvulaceae/efeitos dos fármacos , Poluição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Metais Pesados/toxicidade , Folhas de Planta/efeitos dos fármacos , Plantas Tolerantes a Sal/efeitos dos fármacos , Poluentes do Solo/toxicidade , Biomarcadores , Convolvulaceae/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos , Folhas de Planta/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Plantas Tolerantes a Sal/crescimento & desenvolvimento
12.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 7867, 2018 05 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29777172

RESUMO

Establishing the genetic basis that underlies craniofacial variability in natural populations is one of the main topics of evolutionary and developmental studies. One of the genes associated with mammal craniofacial variability is RUNX2, and in the present study we investigated the association between craniofacial length and width and RUNX2 across New World bats (Phyllostomidae) and primates (Catarrhini and Platyrrhini). Our results showed contrasting patterns of association between the glutamate/alanine ratios (Q/A ratio) and palate shape in these highly diverse groups. In phyllostomid bats, we found an association between shorter/broader faces and increase of the Q/A ratio. In New World monkeys (NWM) there was a positive correlation of increasing Q/A ratios to more elongated faces. Our findings reinforced the role of the Q/A ratio as a flexible genetic mechanism that would rapidly change the time of skull ossification throughout development. However, we propose a scenario in which the influence of this genetic adjustment system is indirect. The Q/A ratio would not lead to a specific phenotype, but throughout the history of a lineage, would act along with evolutionary constraints, as well as other genes, as a facilitator for adaptive morphological changes.


Assuntos
Quirópteros/genética , Subunidade alfa 1 de Fator de Ligação ao Core/genética , Palato/fisiologia , Platirrinos/genética , Alanina/análise , Animais , Teorema de Bayes , Evolução Biológica , Quirópteros/classificação , Subunidade alfa 1 de Fator de Ligação ao Core/química , Subunidade alfa 1 de Fator de Ligação ao Core/metabolismo , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Ácido Glutâmico/análise , Palato/anatomia & histologia , Filogenia , Platirrinos/classificação , Crânio/anatomia & histologia , Crânio/fisiologia
13.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 963, 2018 01 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29343858

RESUMO

Facial asymmetries are usually measured and interpreted as proxies to developmental noise. However, analyses focused on its developmental and genetic architecture are scarce. To advance on this topic, studies based on a comprehensive and simultaneous analysis of modularity, morphological integration and facial asymmetries including both phenotypic and genomic information are needed. Here we explore several modularity hypotheses on a sample of Latin American mestizos, in order to test if modularity and integration patterns differ across several genomic ancestry backgrounds. To do so, 4104 individuals were analyzed using 3D photogrammetry reconstructions and a set of 34 facial landmarks placed on each individual. We found a pattern of modularity and integration that is conserved across sub-samples differing in their genomic ancestry background. Specifically, a signal of modularity based on functional demands and organization of the face is regularly observed across the whole sample. Our results shed more light on previous evidence obtained from Genome Wide Association Studies performed on the same samples, indicating the action of different genomic regions contributing to the expression of the nose and mouth facial phenotypes. Our results also indicate that large samples including phenotypic and genomic metadata enable a better understanding of the developmental and genetic architecture of craniofacial phenotypes.


Assuntos
Face/anatomia & histologia , Face/fisiologia , Desenvolvimento Maxilofacial/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , América Latina , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
14.
Hum Mol Genet ; 27(3): 559-575, 2018 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29220522

RESUMO

Shape variation of human head hair shows striking variation within and between human populations, while its genetic basis is far from being understood. We performed a series of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and replication studies in a total of 28 964 subjects from 9 cohorts from multiple geographic origins. A meta-analysis of three European GWASs identified 8 novel loci (1p36.23 ERRFI1/SLC45A1, 1p36.22 PEX14, 1p36.13 PADI3, 2p13.3 TGFA, 11p14.1 LGR4, 12q13.13 HOXC13, 17q21.2 KRTAP, and 20q13.33 PTK6), and confirmed 4 previously known ones (1q21.3 TCHH/TCHHL1/LCE3E, 2q35 WNT10A, 4q21.21 FRAS1, and 10p14 LINC00708/GATA3), all showing genome-wide significant association with hair shape (P < 5e-8). All except one (1p36.22 PEX14) were replicated with nominal significance in at least one of the 6 additional cohorts of European, Native American and East Asian origins. Three additional previously known genes (EDAR, OFCC1, and PRSS53) were confirmed at the nominal significance level. A multivariable regression model revealed that 14 SNPs from different genes significantly and independently contribute to hair shape variation, reaching a cross-validated AUC value of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.62-0.70) and an AUC value of 0.64 in an independent validation cohort, providing an improved accuracy compared with a previous model. Prediction outcomes of 2504 individuals from a multiethnic sample were largely consistent with general knowledge on the global distribution of hair shape variation. Our study thus delivers target genes and DNA variants for future functional studies to further evaluate the molecular basis of hair shape in humans.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Cabelo/metabolismo , Cabelo/fisiologia , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
15.
Am J Hum Genet ; 101(6): 913-924, 2017 Dec 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29198719

RESUMO

The genetic basis of earlobe attachment has been a matter of debate since the early 20th century, such that geneticists argue both for and against polygenic inheritance. Recent genetic studies have identified a few loci associated with the trait, but large-scale analyses are still lacking. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study of lobe attachment in a multiethnic sample of 74,660 individuals from four cohorts (three with the trait scored by an expert rater and one with the trait self-reported). Meta-analysis of the three expert-rater-scored cohorts revealed six associated loci harboring numerous candidate genes, including EDAR, SP5, MRPS22, ADGRG6 (GPR126), KIAA1217, and PAX9. The large self-reported 23andMe cohort recapitulated each of these six loci. Moreover, meta-analysis across all four cohorts revealed a total of 49 significant (p < 5 × 10-8) loci. Annotation and enrichment analyses of these 49 loci showed strong evidence of genes involved in ear development and syndromes with auricular phenotypes. RNA sequencing data from both human fetal ear and mouse second branchial arch tissue confirmed that genes located among associated loci showed evidence of expression. These results provide strong evidence for the polygenic nature of earlobe attachment and offer insights into the biological basis of normal and abnormal ear development.


Assuntos
Orelha/anatomia & histologia , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Animais , Região Branquial/anatomia & histologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Receptor Edar/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Camundongos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas Mitocondriais/genética , Fator de Transcrição PAX9/genética , Proteínas/genética , Receptores Acoplados a Proteínas-G/genética , Proteínas Ribossômicas/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Adulto Jovem
16.
Am J Phys Anthropol ; 164(2): 321-330, 2017 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28635123

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Traditional interpretation of Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection is that life history traits (LHT), which are closely related with fitness, show lower heritabilities, whereas morphological traits (MT) are less related with fitness and they are expected to show higher heritabilities. In humans, although few studies have examined the heritability of LHT and MT, none of them have analyzed the same sample for comparative purposes. Here we assessed, for the first time, the heritability, additive genetic variance (VA ), residual variance (VR ) and coefficient of genetic additive variation (CVA ) values of LHT and MT in a singular collection of identified skulls with associated demographic records from Hallstatt (Austria). MATERIALS AND METHODS: LHT, such as lifespan, number of offspring, age at birth of first and last child, reproductive span, and lifetime reproductive success, were estimated from 18,134 individuals from the Hallstatt Catholic parish records, which represent seven generations and correspond to a time span of 400 years. MT were assessed through 17 craniofacial indices and 7 angles obtained from 355 adult crania from the same population. Heritability, VA , VR , and CVA values of LHT and MT were calculated using restricted maximum likelihood methods. RESULTS: LHT heritabilities ranged from 2.3 to 34% for the whole sample, with men showing higher heritabilities (4-45%) than women (0-23.7%). Overall, MT presented higher heritability values than most of LHT, ranging from 0 to 40.5% in craniofacial indices, and from 13.8 to 32.4% in craniofacial angles. LHT showed considerable additive genetic variance values, similar to MT, but also high environmental variance values, and most of them presenting a higher evolutionary potential than MT. DISCUSSION: Our results demonstrate that, with the exception of lifespan, LHT show lower heritability values, than MT. The lower heritability of LHT is explained by a higher influence of environmental and cultural factors.


Assuntos
Aptidão Genética , Traços de História de Vida , Crânio/anatomia & histologia , Antropologia Física , Áustria , Ossos Faciais/anatomia & histologia , Feminino , Variação Genética , Humanos , Masculino , Seleção Genética
17.
PLoS Genet ; 13(5): e1006756, 2017 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28542165

RESUMO

Latin Americans are highly heterogeneous regarding the type of Native American ancestry. Consideration of specific associations with common diseases may lead to substantial advances in unraveling of disease etiology and disease prevention. Here we investigate possible associations between the type of Native American ancestry and leading causes of death. After an aggregate-data study based on genome-wide genotype data from 1805 admixed Chileans and 639,789 deaths, we validate an identified association with gallbladder cancer relying on individual data from 64 gallbladder cancer patients, with and without a family history, and 170 healthy controls. Native American proportions were markedly underestimated when the two main types of Native American ancestry in Chile, originated from the Mapuche and Aymara indigenous peoples, were combined together. Consideration of the type of Native American ancestry was crucial to identify disease associations. Native American ancestry showed no association with gallbladder cancer mortality (P = 0.26). By contrast, each 1% increase in the Mapuche proportion represented a 3.7% increased mortality risk by gallbladder cancer (95%CI 3.1-4.3%, P = 6×10-27). Individual-data results and extensive sensitivity analyses confirmed the association between Mapuche ancestry and gallbladder cancer. Increasing Mapuche proportions were also associated with an increased mortality due to asthma and, interestingly, with a decreased mortality by diabetes. The mortality due to skin, bladder, larynx, bronchus and lung cancers increased with increasing Aymara proportions. Described methods should be considered in future studies on human population genetics and human health. Complementary individual-based studies are needed to apportion the genetic and non-genetic components of associations identified relying on aggregate-data.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Índios Norte-Americanos/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Chile , Feminino , Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/mortalidade , Genética Populacional , Genoma Humano , Genótipo , Humanos , América Latina/epidemiologia , Masculino , Fatores de Risco
19.
PLoS One ; 12(1): e0169287, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28060876

RESUMO

The expression of facial asymmetries has been recurrently related with poverty and/or disadvantaged socioeconomic status. Departing from the developmental instability theory, previous approaches attempted to test the statistical relationship between the stress experienced by individuals grown in poor conditions and an increase in facial and corporal asymmetry. Here we aim to further evaluate such hypothesis on a large sample of admixed Latin Americans individuals by exploring if low socioeconomic status individuals tend to exhibit greater facial fluctuating asymmetry values. To do so, we implement Procrustes analysis of variance and Hierarchical Linear Modelling (HLM) to estimate potential associations between facial fluctuating asymmetry values and socioeconomic status. We report significant relationships between facial fluctuating asymmetry values and age, sex, and genetic ancestry, while socioeconomic status failed to exhibit any strong statistical relationship with facial asymmetry. These results are persistent after the effect of heterozygosity (a proxy for genetic ancestry) is controlled in the model. Our results indicate that, at least on the studied sample, there is no relationship between socioeconomic stress (as intended as low socioeconomic status) and facial asymmetries.


Assuntos
Assimetria Facial/epidemiologia , Assimetria Facial/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Heterozigoto , Hispano-Americanos/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Classe Social , Adulto Jovem
20.
Toxicol Res ; 32(4): 289-300, 2016 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27818731

RESUMO

Non-genotoxic carcinogens are substances that induce tumorigenesis by non-mutagenic mechanisms and long term rodent bioassays are required to identify them. Recent studies have shown that transcription profiling can be applied to develop early identifiers for long term phenotypes. In this study, we used rat liver expression profiles from the NTP (National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, USA) DrugMatrix Database to construct a gene classifier that can distinguish between non-genotoxic carcinogens and other chemicals. The model was based on short term exposure assays (3 days) and the training was limited to oxidative stressors, peroxisome proliferators and hormone modulators. Validation of the predictor was performed on independent toxicogenomic data (TG-GATEs, Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System, Osaka, Japan). To build our model we performed Random Forests together with a recursive elimination algorithm (VarSelRF). Gene set enrichment analysis was employed for functional interpretation. A total of 770 microarrays comprising 96 different compounds were analyzed and a predictor of 54 genes was built. Prediction accuracy was 0.85 in the training set, 0.87 in the test set and increased with increasing concentration in the validation set: 0.6 at low dose, 0.7 at medium doses and 0.81 at high doses. Pathway analysis revealed gene prominence of cellular respiration, energy production and lipoprotein metabolism. The biggest target of toxicogenomics is accurately predict the toxicity of unknown drugs. In this analysis, we presented a classifier that can predict non-genotoxic carcinogenicity by using short term exposure assays. In this approach, dose level is critical when evaluating chemicals at early time points.

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