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2.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 2021 Mar 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33750744

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the relationship between infection and the risk of risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following orthopaedic surgery. We assessed the 90-day risk of VTE following revision total knee replacement to measure the association between periprosthetic joint infection and the risk of postoperative VTE. METHODS: We used New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System data to identify all New York State residents undergoing revision total knee replacement from 1998 to 2014. ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification) codes were used to identify comorbidities and to classify the indication for revision total knee replacement as aseptic, infection, or fracture. The primary outcome was any diagnosis code for VTE recorded for the revision surgery and/or subsequent admissions within 90 days. A multivariable logistic regression model that included demographic characteristics and comorbidities was used to estimate the risk of VTE after revision for infection or fracture, with aseptic revision as the reference group. RESULTS: The present study included 25,441 patients who were managed with revision total knee replacement; the indication for revision was aseptic for 17,563 patients (69%), infection for 7,075 (28%), and fracture for 803 (3%). The mean age (and standard deviation) was 66 ± 12 years, 15,592 (61%) of the patients were female, 3,198 (13%) were Black, 1,192 (5%) were smokers, and 4,222 (17%) were obese. Seven hundred and nineteen patients (2.8%) had VTE within the 90 days after revision total knee replacement, including 387 (1.5%) during the admission for the revision procedure. The 90-day incidence of VTE was 2.1% after aseptic revision, 4.3% after revision for infection, and 5.9% after revision for fracture. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for VTE relative to aseptic revision was 2.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72 to 2.35) for septic revision total knee replacement and 2.62 (95% CI, 1.91 to 3.6) for fracture. A history of VTE was also a strong risk factor for VTE following revision total knee replacement (aOR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.48 to 2.71). CONCLUSIONS: We found that the odds of VTE after revision total knee replacement for infection were double those after aseptic revision total knee replacement. Although fracture accounts for a small percentage of revision total knee replacements, the risk of VTE was 2.6-fold higher after these procedures. The indication for revision total knee replacement should be considered when choosing postoperative VTE prophylaxis. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

3.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2021 Feb 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33559327

RESUMO

Prescribing clinicians and eye care specialists share responsibility for safely prescribing hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and screening for the potential risk of retinopathy. Two relevant national societies, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), have independently offered management guidelines (1, 2), but this is the first joint statement to emphasize points of agreement that should be recognized by practitioners in all specialties.

4.
Med Clin North Am ; 105(2): 273-284, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33589102

RESUMO

Patients with rheumatic disease, including those with systemic lupus erythematous, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthritis, use total hip and knee arthroplasties at high rates. They represent a particularly vulnerable population in the perioperative setting because of their diseases and the immunosuppressant therapies used to treat them. Careful planning among internists, medical specialists, and the surgical team must therefore occur preoperatively to minimize risks in the postoperative period, particularly infection. Management of immunosuppressant medications, such as conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and targeted therapies including biologics, is one avenue by which this infectious risk can be mitigated.


Assuntos
Artroplastia , Conduta do Tratamento Medicamentoso , Período Perioperatório/métodos , Doenças Reumáticas , Artroplastia/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia/métodos , Humanos , Doenças Reumáticas/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças Reumáticas/cirurgia , Risco Ajustado/métodos
5.
J Arthroplasty ; 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33234385

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We sought to examine bilateral total knee arthroplasty (BTKA) vs unilateral TKA (UTKA) utilization and in-hospital complications comparing African Americans (AAs) and Whites. METHODS: In this retrospective analysis of patients ≥50 years who underwent elective primary TKA, the (2007-2016) database of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (National Inpatient Sample) was used. We computed differences in temporal trends in utilization and major in-hospital complication rates of BTKA vs UTKA comparing AAs and Whites. We performed multivariable logistic regression models to assess racial differences in trends adjusting for individual-, hospital- and community-level variables. Discharge weights were used to enable nationwide estimates. We used multiple imputation procedures to impute values for 12% missing race information. RESULTS: An estimated 276,194 BTKA and 5,528,429 UTKA were performed in the US. The proportion of BTKA among all TKAs declined, and AAs were significantly less likely to undergo BTKA compared to Whites throughout the study period (trend P = .01). In-hospital complication rates for UTKA were higher in AAs compared to Whites throughout the study period (trend P < .0001). However, for BTKA, the in-hospital complication rates varied between Whites and AAs throughout the study period (trend P = .09). CONCLUSION: In this nationwide sample of patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty from 2007 to 2016, the utilization of BTKA was higher in Whites compared to AAs. On the other hand, while AAs have consistently higher in-hospital complication rates in UTKA over the time period, this pattern was not consistent for BTKA.

6.
RMD Open ; 6(3)2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33011680

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: There is emerging evidence that COVID-19 disproportionately affects people from racial/ethnic minority and low socioeconomic status (SES) groups. Many physicians across the globe are changing practice patterns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to examine the practice changes among rheumatologists and what they perceive the impact to be on their most vulnerable patients. METHODS: We administered an online survey to a convenience sample of rheumatologists worldwide during the initial height of the pandemic (between 8 April and 4 May 2020) via social media and group emails. We surveyed rheumatologists about their opinions regarding patients from low SES and racial/ethnic minority groups in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Mainly, what their specific concerns were, including the challenges of medication access; and about specific social factors (health literacy, poverty, food insecurity, access to telehealth video) that may be complicating the management of rheumatologic conditions during this time. RESULTS: 548 rheumatologists responded from 64 countries and shared concerns of food insecurity, low health literacy, poverty and factors that preclude social distancing such as working and dense housing conditions among their patients. Although 82% of rheumatologists had switched to telehealth video, 17% of respondents estimated that about a quarter of their patients did not have access to telehealth video, especially those from below the poverty line. The majority of respondents believed these vulnerable patients, from racial/ethnic minorities and from low SES groups, would do worse, in terms of morbidity and mortality, during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: In this sample of rheumatologists from 64 countries, there is a clear shift in practice to telehealth video consultations and widespread concern for socially and economically vulnerable patients with rheumatic disease.


Assuntos
Doenças Autoimunes/etnologia , Betacoronavirus , Grupos de Populações Continentais , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Grupos Étnicos , Grupos Minoritários , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pobreza , Doenças Reumáticas/etnologia , Doenças Autoimunes/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Abastecimento de Alimentos/economia , Letramento em Saúde , Habitação , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Doenças Reumáticas/mortalidade , Reumatologistas , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina
8.
Semin Arthritis Rheum ; 50(5): 1049-1054, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32911282

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceptions and behaviors of rheumatologists in the United States (US) regarding the risk of COVID-19 for their autoimmune patients and the subsequent management of immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory medications. METHODS: We administered an online survey to a convenience sample of rheumatologists in the US from 4/8/20-5/4/20 via social media and group emails. Survey respondents provided demographic information such as, age, gender, state of practice, and practice type. We asked questions about COVID-19 risk in rheumatic patients, as well as their medication management during the pandemic. We conducted descriptive analysis and Multivariable regression models. RESULTS: 271 respondents completed the survey nationally. 48% of respondents either agreed or strongly agreed with the statement "Patients with rheumatic diseases are at a higher risk of COVID-19 irrespective of their immunosuppressive medications". 50% disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement "The pandemic has led you to reduce the use/dosage/frequency of biologics", while 56% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement "The pandemic has led you to reduce the use/dosage/frequency of steroids". A third of respondents indicated that at least 10% of their patients had self-discontinued or reduced at least one immunosuppressive medication to mitigate their risk of COVID-19. Responses to these questions as well as to questions regarding NSAID prescription patterns were significantly different in the Northeast region of US compared to other regions. CONCLUSION: In this national sample of rheumatologists, there are variations regarding perceptions of patients' risk of COVID-19, and how to manage medications such as NSAIDs, biologics and steroids during the pandemic. These variations are more pronounced in geographical areas where COVID-19 disease burden was high.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Conduta do Tratamento Medicamentoso/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Doenças Reumáticas , Reumatologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Risco Ajustado/métodos , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Betacoronavirus , Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Feminino , Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Área de Atuação Profissional/estatística & dados numéricos , Doenças Reumáticas/epidemiologia , Doenças Reumáticas/terapia , Medição de Risco , Percepção Social , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
9.
Semin Arthritis Rheum ; 50(5): 996-1005, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32911291

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Glucocorticoids (GCs) remain widely used. However, the impact of GCs from the perspective of the patient, rather than of the clinician, remains relatively unexplored. Additionally, no general patient reported outcome measure has been developed to assess the effects of GCs across rheumatological conditions. The aim of this literature review was to identify the adverse effects of systemic GC use that are of importance to patients. METHODS: OVID EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO and CINAHL was searched relating to three concepts: GCs, the patient perspective and adverse effects. A meta-synthesis of the qualitative data was performed separately by two independent researchers before qualitative metasummary was utilized to quantitatively aggregate the findings (combining quantitative and qualitative results), including the derivation of frequency and intensity effect sizes to identify those outcomes most prominently featured across all reviewed articles. RESULTS: The initial search retrieved 1,356 articles, of which 25 (18 quantitative, 7 qualitative) were deemed suitable for quality assessment and data extraction. Four major themes emerged amongst the 71 discrete outcomes: physical symptoms (44), psychological symptoms (18), effect on participation (6) and contextual factors (3). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a broad range of inflammatory diseases and demographic features describe key cross-cutting themes in relation to GCs and their impact on health-related quality of life. This work will inform the development of a core domain set for clinical trials involving GCs and a patient reported outcome to measure impact of GCs from the patient's perspective.

10.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2020 Sep 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32892514

RESUMO

We are very grateful for the interest in our manuscript describing synovial histology features that associate with patient reports of morning stiffness in rheumatoid arthritis(RA)1 . Pamuk et al. note that neutrophil gene and protein expression, as well as cell counts, fluctuate in the blood in a 24-hour circadian cycle and the circadian variation in neutrophil function may contribute to morning stiffness.

11.
Joint Bone Spine ; : 105053, 2020 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32681975

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) decide whether to add oral disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus injectable biologic DMARDs when methotrexate response is inadequate. METHODS: Using nominal group technique (NGT), RA patients answered the question "What sort of things are important to you when you make a decision between adding pills versus injectable medications to treat rheumatoid arthritis when methotrexate fails to control RA disease activity?" Patients nominated, discussed, and voted for the responses. RESULTS: Forty-seven RA patients participated: Birmingham (n=6 NG; 21 patients) and New York City (n=4 NG; 26 patients). They were predominantly female (85%), 70% white, with a mean age of 64.5 years and 58% had>10-year RA duration. Present/past DMARDs included methotrexate only in 6%, other traditional DMARDs in 15%, glucocorticoids in combination with traditional DMARDs in 11%, and biologics and/or Jak-kinase inhibitors in 68% of participants. Voted domains in order were: (1) efficacy/effectiveness and the onset/mode of action (78/282 votes); (2) side effects/fear of side effects (84/282 votes); (3) cost including out of pocket, co-payments and patient responsibility (54/282 votes); (4) convenience/frequency of use (27/282 votes); (5) doctor's opinion (20/282 votes); (6) other drugs/comorbidity/other patient's experience/effects on other people (3/282 votes); (7) fear of needles (8/282 votes); and (8) newness of the medication (8/282 votes). CONCLUSIONS: We identified the patient perspective regarding the choice between adding oral versus injectable DMARD once methotrexate failed to control RA disease activity. This knowledge can help in shared decision-making for DMARD choice in RA treatment.

13.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2020 Jul 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32729675

RESUMO

We are grateful for the interest in our manuscript describing synovial histology features that associate with patient reports of morning stiffness in rheumatoid arthritis1 . Jain et al raise an important point; not all joints in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis are affected equally at any given time, making it challenging to associate studies of synovium from only one joint with assessments of global patient symptoms. We had discovered that morning stiffness duration was associated with the presence of fibrin and neutrophils in synovium, however, neither of the questions used in this analysis focus on any particular joint and it is likely that joints other than the arthroplasty joint influenced patient responses.

14.
RMD Open ; 6(2)2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32719151

RESUMO

Total hip and total knee arthroplasty) remain important interventions to treat symptomatic knee and hip damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, with little change in utilisation rates despite the increasingly widespread use of potent conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) and targeted DMARDs including Janus kinase inhibitors and biologics. The majority of patients are receiving these immunosuppressing medications and glucocorticoids at the time they present for arthroplasty. There is minimal randomised controlled trial data addressing the use of DMARDs in the perioperative period, yet patients and their physicians face these decisions daily. This paper reviews what is known regarding perioperative management of targeted and csDMARDs and glucocorticoids.

15.
J Clin Rheumatol ; 26(6): 224-228, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32694358

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: With hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and chloroquine (CQ) emerging as potential therapies for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), shortages have been reported. We aimed to understand how rheumatologists, one of the most common prescribers of HCQ/CQ, prescribed these medications to manage COVID-19 and to understand if their patients are affected by shortages. METHODS: Between April 8 and April 27, 2020, an online survey was distributed to a convenience sample of rheumatologists who practice medicine in a diverse range of settings globally, resulting in 506 responses. Adjusted Poisson regression models were calculated. RESULTS: Only 6% of respondents prescribed HCQ/CQ for COVID-19 prophylaxis, and only 12% for outpatient treatment of COVID-19. Compared to the United States, the likelihood of prescribing HCQ/CQ for prophylaxis was higher in India (adjusted risk ratio [aRR], 6.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7-16.8; p < 0.001). Further, compared to the United States and those with 1 to 5 years of experience, rheumatologists in Europe (aRR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.3; p < 0.001) and those with 10+ years of experience (11-20 years: aRR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.3; p = 0.015; 21+ years: aRR = 3.3; 95% CI, 1.4-7.4; p = 0.004) had a higher likelihood of prescribing HCQ/CQ for outpatient treatment. Of note, 71% of all rheumatologists reported that their patients were directly affected by HCQ/CQ shortages. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that only a small percentage of rheumatologists are prescribing HCQ/CQ for prophylaxis or outpatient treatment of COVID-19. Medication shortages experienced by large numbers of autoimmune disease patients are concerning and should play a role in decisions, especially given poor efficacy data for HCQ/CQ in COVID-19.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Hidroxicloroquina/uso terapêutico , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Reumatologia , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
BMC Rheumatol ; 4: 26, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32514493

RESUMO

Background: Patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA), defined as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The frequency of screening and treatment of hyperlipidemia, a modifiable CVD risk factor, is low in these patients. The reasons for low screening and treatment rates in this population are poorly understood. Our objective was to elicit the barriers and facilitators for screening and treatment of hyperlipidemia from the perspective of patients with IA. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study using focus groups of patients with IA, guided by Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. We recruited patients with IA aged 40 years and older from a single academic center. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: We conducted three focus groups with 17 participants whose mean age was 56 (range 45-81) years; 15 were women. Four themes emerged as barriers: 1) need for more information about arthritis, prognosis, and IA medications prior to discussing additional topics like CVD risk; 2) lack of knowledge about how IA increases CVD risk; 3) lifestyle changes to reduce overall CVD risk rather than medications; and 4) the need to improve doctor-patient communication about IA, medications, and CVD risk. One theme emerged as a facilitator: 5) potential for peer coaches (patients with IA who are trained about concepts of CVD risk and IA) to help overcome barriers to screening and treatment of hyperlipidemia to lower CVD risk. Conclusion: Patients with IA identified educational needs about IA, increased CVD risk in IA and the need for improved doctor-patient communication about screening for hyperlipidemia and its treatment. Patients were receptive to working with peer coaches to facilitate achievement of these goals.

17.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(9): 2367-2374, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32423756

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) receive transfusions more often than patients with osteoarthritis following lower extremity total joint arthroplasty (TJA), but mitigating factors are not described. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is widely used to reduce blood loss in patients undergoing TJA, but its effect on transfusion rates in patients with RA has not been studied. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed data from a prospectively collected cohort of patients with RA undergoing TJA. Disease activity measured by Clinical Disease Activity Index, patient-reported outcome measures, and serologies was obtained. Baseline characteristics were summarized and compared. Transfusion requirements and TXA usage were obtained from chart review. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with transfusion in RA patients undergoing TJA. RESULTS: The cohort included 252 patients, mostly women with longstanding RA and end-stage arthritis requiring TJA. In multivariate analysis, 1 g/dL decrease in baseline hemoglobin (odds ratio [OR] = 0.394, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.232, 0.669], P = .001), 1-minute increase in surgical duration (OR = 1.022, 95% CI [1.008, 1.037], P = .003), and 1-point increase in Clinical Disease Activity Index (OR = 1.079, 95% CI [1.001, 1.162]) were associated with increased risk of transfusion. TXA use was not associated with decreased risk of postoperative transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative health optimization should include assessment and treatment of anemia in RA patients before TJA, as preoperative hemoglobin level is the main risk factor for postoperative transfusion. Increased disease activity and increased surgical time were independent risk factors for postoperative transfusion but are less modifiable. While TXA did not decrease transfusion risk in this population, a prospective trial is needed to confirm this. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

18.
BMC Rheumatol ; 4: 14, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32159074

RESUMO

Background: Despite high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, screening and treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suboptimal. We asked primary care physicians (PCPs) and rheumatologists to identify barriers to screening and treatment for hyperlipidemia among patients with RA. Methods: We recruited rheumatologists and PCPs nationally to participate in separate moderated structured group teleconference discussions using the nominal group technique. Participants in each group generated lists of barriers to screening and treatment for hyperlipidemia in patients with RA, then each selected the three most important barriers from this list. The resulting barriers were organized into physician-, patient- and system-level barriers, informed by the socioecological framework. Results: Twenty-seven rheumatologists participated in a total of 3 groups (group size ranged from 7 to 11) and twenty PCPs participated in a total of 3 groups (group size ranged from 4 to 9). Rheumatologists prioritized physician level barriers (e.g. 'ownership' of hyperlipidemia screening and treatment), whereas PCPs prioritized patient-level barriers (e.g. complexity of RA and its treatments). Conclusion: Rheumatologists were conflicted about whether treatment of CVD risk among patients with RA should fall within the role of the rheumatologist or the PCP. All participating PCPs agreed that CVD risk reduction was within their role. Factors that influenced PCPs' decisions for screening and treatment for CVD risk in patients with RA were mainly related to their concern about how treatment for CVD risk could influence RA symptomatology (myalgia from statins) or how inflammation from RA and RA medications influences lipid profiles.

19.
Joint Bone Spine ; 87(4): 307-313, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32147565

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess why patients choose TNF- versus non-TNF biologics for treating active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after methotrexate-failure. METHODS: Participants responded to the question "What sort of things help a patient decide the treatment choice between the two types of injectable biologics, TNF biologic versus non-TNF biologic, for treating active rheumatoid arthritis when methotrexate fails to control RA disease activity?" They nominated responses, discussed and then voted. RESULTS: Forty-four patients participated in 10 nominal groups (Birmingham; n=6; New York City: n=4), who were predominantly female (86%), 68% white, with a mean age of 65 (standard deviation [SD], 12) years. Present/past DMARDs included methotrexate in 91%, glucocorticoids in 11%, and biologics and/or Jak-inhibitors in 68% of participants. Pain and fatigue were mild-moderate with means of 3.9 (SD, 2.5) and 4.3 (SD, 2.5), respectively, on 0-10 scale; mean morning joint stiffness was 1.3hours (SD, 2.1). The number of groups that nominated each response and total votes were as follows: (1) Side effects/fear of side effects: 10/10; 31% votes (82/264); (2) Efficacy/ability to reduce joint damage: 9/10; 30% votes (80/264); (3) Doctor's opinion, 6/10; 12% votes (32/264); (4) Cost, 7/10; 9% votes (25/264); (5) Other drugs/comorbidity, 4/10; 12% votes (31/264); (6) Experience of others/information-seeking/own research, 2/10; 2% votes (5/264); (7) Newness, 1/10; 2% votes (6/264); and (8) Convenience/frequency of use, 1/10; 1% votes (3/264). CONCLUSIONS: We identified the patient perspective of choice between TNF versus non-TNF biologic for treating active RA. This knowledge can help in informative shared decision-making in clinical care.

20.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(7): 1792-1799.e4, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32173615

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient satisfaction after total hip (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a core outcome selected by the Outcomes Measurement in Rheumatology. Up to 20% of THA/TKA patients are dissatisfied. Improving patient satisfaction is hindered by the lack of a validated measurement tool that can accurately measure change. METHODS: The psychometric properties of a proposed satisfaction instrument, consisting of 4 questions rated on a Likert scale, scored 1-100, were tested for validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change using data collected between 2007 and 2011 in an arthroplasty registry. RESULTS: We demonstrated construct validity by confirming our hypothesis; satisfaction correlated with similar constructs. Satisfaction correlated moderately with pain relief (TKA ρ = 0.61, THA ρ = 0.47) and function (TKA ρ = 0.65, THA ρ = 0.51) at 2 years; there was no correlation with baseline/preoperative pain/function values, as expected. Overall Cronbach's alpha >0.88 confirmed internal consistency. Test-retest reliability with weighted kappa ranged 0.60-0.75 for TKA and 0.36-0.56 for THA. Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score/Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores quality of life improvement (>30 points) corresponds to a mean satisfaction score of 93.2 (standard deviation, 11.5) after THA and 90.4 (standard deviation, 13.8) after TKA, and increasing relief of pain and functional improvement increased the strength of their association with satisfaction. The satisfaction measure has no copyright and is available free of cost and represents minimal responder burden. CONCLUSION: Patient satisfaction with THA/TKA can be measured with a validated 4-item questionnaire. This satisfaction measure can be included in a total joint arthroplasty core measurement set for total joint arthroplasty trials.

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