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1.
Heart Rhythm ; 2019 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31255846

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) can occur after continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation as a single arrhythmic event or as electrical storm (ES) with multiple repetitive VA episodes. OBJECTIVE: We aimed at analyzing the incidence, predictors, and clinical impact of ES in LVAD recipients. METHODS: Patients analyzed were those included in the multicenter ASSIST-ICD observational study. ES was consensually defined as occurrence of ≥3 separate episodes of sustained VAs within a 24-hour interval. RESULTS: Of 652 patients with an LVAD, 61 (9.4%) presented ES during a median follow-up period of 9.1 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.5-22.1) months. The first ES occurred after 17 (IQR 4.0-56.2) days post LVAD implantation, most of them during the first month after the device implantation (62.9%). The incidence then tended to decrease during the initial years of follow-up and increased again after the third year post LVAD implantation. History of VAs before LVAD implantation and heart failure duration > 84 months were independent predictors of ES. The occurrence of ES was associated with an increased early mortality since 20 patients (32.8%) died within the first 2 weeks of ES. Twenty-two patients (36.1%) presented at least 1 recurrence of ES, occurring 43.0 (IQR 8.0-69.0) days after the initial ES. Patients experiencing ES had a significantly lower 1-year survival rate than did those free from ES (log-rank, P = .039). CONCLUSION: There is a significant incidence of ES in patients with an LVAD. The short-term mortality after ES is high, and one-third of patients will die within 15 days. Whether radiofrequency ablation of arrhythmias improves outcomes would require further studies.

2.
Heart Rhythm ; 2019 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31284050

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is limited information on ethnic differences between patients with Brugada syndrome (BrS) and arrhythmic events (AEs). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare clinical, electrocardiographic (ECG), electrophysiological, and genetic characteristics between white and Asian patients with BrS and AEs. METHODS: The Survey on Arrhythmic Events in Brugada Syndrome is a multicenter survey from Western and Asian countries, gathering 678 patients with BrS and first documented AE. After excluding patients with other (n = 14 [2.1%]) or unknown (n = 30 [4.4%]) ethnicity, 364 (53.7%) whites and 270 (39.8%) Asians comprised the study group. RESULTS: There was no difference in AE age onset (41.3 ± 16.1 years in whites vs 43.3 ± 12.3 years in Asians; P = .285). Higher proportions of whites were observed in pediatric and elderly populations. Asians were predominantly men (98.1% vs 85.7% in whites; P < .001) and frequently presented with aborted cardiac arrest (71.1% vs 56%; P < .001). Asians tended to display more spontaneous type 1 BrS-ECG (71.5% vs 64.3%; P = .068). A family history of sudden cardiac death was noted more in whites (29.1% vs 11.5%; P < .001), with a higher rate of SCN5A mutation carriers (40.1% vs 13.2% in Asians; P < .001), as well as more fever-related AEs (8.5% vs 2.9%; P = .011). No difference was observed between the 2 groups regarding history of syncope and ventricular arrhythmia inducibility. CONCLUSION: There are important differences between Asian and white patients with BrS. Asian patients present almost exclusively as male adults, more often with aborted cardiac arrest and spontaneous type 1 BrS-ECG. However, they have less family history of sudden cardiac death and markedly lower SCN5A mutation rates. The striking difference in SCN5A mutation rates should be tested in future studies.

3.
Eur Heart J ; 2019 May 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31114854

RESUMO

AIMS: The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac disorder predisposing to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite considerable efforts, its genetic basis and cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify a new susceptibility gene for BrS through familial investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole-exome sequencing performed in a three-generation pedigree with five affected members allowed the identification of one rare non-synonymous substitution (p.R211H) in RRAD, the gene encoding the RAD GTPase, carried by all affected members of the family. Three additional rare missense variants were found in 3/186 unrelated index cases. We detected higher levels of RRAD transcripts in subepicardium than in subendocardium in human heart, and in the right ventricle outflow tract compared to the other cardiac compartments in mice. The p.R211H variant was then subjected to electrophysiological and structural investigations in human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-CMs). Cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from two affected family members exhibited reduced action potential upstroke velocity, prolonged action potentials and increased incidence of early afterdepolarizations, with decreased Na+ peak current amplitude and increased Na+ persistent current amplitude, as well as abnormal distribution of actin and less focal adhesions, compared with intra-familial control iPSC-CMs Insertion of p.R211H-RRAD variant in control iPSCs by genome editing confirmed these results. In addition, iPSC-CMs from affected patients exhibited a decreased L-type Ca2+ current amplitude. CONCLUSION: This study identified a potential new BrS-susceptibility gene, RRAD. Cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells expressing RRAD variant recapitulated single-cell electrophysiological features of BrS, including altered Na+ current, as well as cytoskeleton disturbances.

4.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 73(14): 1756-1765, 2019 Apr 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30975291

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Information on young patients with Brugada syndrome (BrS) and arrhythmic events (AEs) is limited. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe their characteristics and management as well as risk factors for AE recurrence. METHODS: A total of 57 patients (age ≤20 years), all with BrS and AEs, were divided into pediatric (age ≤12 years; n = 26) and adolescents (age 13 to 20 years; n = 31). RESULTS: Patients' median age at time of first AE was 14 years, with a majority of males (74%), Caucasians (70%), and probands (79%) who presented as aborted cardiac arrest (84%). A significant proportion of patients (28%) exhibited fever-related AE. Family history of sudden cardiac death (SCD), prior syncope, spontaneous type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram (ECG), inducible ventricular fibrillation at electrophysiological study, and SCN5A mutations were present in 26%, 49%, 65%, 28%, and 58% of patients, respectively. The pediatric group differed from the adolescents, with a greater proportion of females, Caucasians, fever-related AEs, and spontaneous type-1 ECG. During follow-up, 68% of pediatric and 64% of adolescents had recurrent AE, with median time of 9.9 and 27.0 months, respectively. Approximately one-third of recurrent AEs occurred on quinidine therapy, and among the pediatric group, 60% of recurrent AEs were fever-related. Risk factors for recurrent AE included sinus node dysfunction, atrial arrhythmias, intraventricular conduction delay, or large S-wave on ECG lead I in the pediatric group and the presence of SCN5A mutation among adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Young BrS patients with AE represent a very arrhythmogenic group. Current management after first arrhythmia episode is associated with high recurrence rate. Alternative therapies, besides defibrillator implantation, should be considered.

5.
Europace ; 2018 Dec 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30590530

RESUMO

Aims: Data on predictors of time-to-first appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients with Brugada Syndrome (BrS) and prophylactically implanted ICD's are scarce. Methods and results: SABRUS (Survey on Arrhythmic Events in BRUgada Syndrome) is an international survey on 678 BrS patients who experienced arrhythmic event (AE) including 252 patients in whom AE occurred after prophylactic ICD implantation. Analysis was performed on time-to-first appropriate ICD discharge regarding patients' characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression models were utilized to identify which parameters predicted time to arrhythmia ≤5 years. The median time-to-first appropriate ICD therapy was 24.8 ± 2.8 months. A shorter time was observed in patients from Asian ethnicity (P < 0.05), those with syncope (P = 0.001), and those with Class IIa indication for ICD (P = 0.001). A longer time was associated with a positive family history of sudden cardiac death (P < 0.05). Multivariate Cox regression revealed shorter time-to-ICD therapy in patients with syncope [odds ratio (OR) 1.65, P = 0.001]. In 193 patients (76.6%), therapy was delivered during the first 5 years. Factors associated with this time were syncope (OR 0.36, P = 0.001), spontaneous Type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram (ECG) (OR 0.5, P < 0.05), and Class IIa indication (OR 0.38, P < 0.01) as opposed to Class IIb (OR 2.41, P < 0.01). A near-significant trend for female gender was also noted (OR 0.13, P = 0.052). Two score models for prediction of <5 years to shock were built. Conclusion: First appropriate therapy in BrS patients with prophylactic ICD's occurred during the first 5 years in 76.6% of patients. Syncope and spontaneous Type 1 Brugada ECG correlated with a shorter time to ICD therapy.

6.
Heart Rhythm ; 15(10): 1475-1476, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30278882
7.
Heart Rhythm ; 2018 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30193851

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies in Brugada syndrome (BrS) have mainly consisted of men. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and arrhythmic risk factors in BrS women. METHODS: Consecutive BrS patients were enrolled from 1993 and followed prospectively. RESULTS: Among 1613 patients, 494 were women (mean age 47 ± 16 years). Women were more frequently asymptomatic than men (423 [86%] vs 867 [77%], respectively; P = .001) and less frequently had a spontaneous ECG pattern (107 [22%] vs 398 [36%], respectively; P <.001). During median [25th, 75th percentile] follow-up of 57 [23, 118] vs 62 [22, 113] months (P = .65), arrhythmic events occurred in 12 women (2%) vs 79 men (7%) (P = .0005). Mean age at the first event was 48.6 ± 17.8 years for women vs 43 ± 14.2 years for men (P <.001). Gender was significantly related to cardiac events (hazard ratio [HR] 2.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-5.4; P = .0005). In multivariate analysis, event predictors in women were index patient status (HR 10.15; 95% CI 1.7-61.4; P = .01), previous sudden cardiac death (HR 69.4; 95% CI 15-312.5; P <.0001), syncope (HR 6.8; 95% CI 1.4-34.5; P = .02), fragmented QRS (HR 20.2; 95% CI 1.8-228.9; P = .02), and QRS duration >120 ms (HR 4.7; 95% CI 1.2-19.5; P = .03). CONCLUSION: Women represent a lower-risk group than men among individuals with BrS. In asymptomatic women, fragmented QRS and QRS >120 ms seem to be the only event predictors.

8.
JACC Clin Electrophysiol ; 4(9): 1166-1175, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30236390

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the incidence, clinical impact, and predictors of late ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) recipients aiming to clarify implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) indications. BACKGROUND: The arrhythmic risk and need for ICD in patients implanted with an LVAD are not very well known. METHODS: This observational study was conducted in 19 centers between 2006 and 2016. Late VAs were defined as sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation occurring >30 days post-LVAD implantation, without acute reversible cause and requiring appropriate ICD therapy, external electrical shock, or medical therapy. RESULTS: Among 659 LVAD recipients, 494 (median 58.9 years of age; mean left ventricular ejection fraction 20.7 ± 7.4%; 73.1% HeartMate II, 18.6% HeartWare, 8.3% Jarvik 2000) were discharged alive from hospital and included in the final analysis. Late VAs occurred in 133 (26.9%) patients. Multivariable analysis identified 6 independent predictors of late VAs: VAs before LVAD implantation, atrial fibrillation before LVAD implantation, idiopathic etiology of the cardiomyopathy, heart failure duration >12 months, early VAs (<30 days post-LVAD), and no angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors during follow-up. The "VT-LVAD score" was created, identifying 4 risk groups: low (score 0 to 1), intermediate (score 2 to 4), high (score 5 to 6), and very high (score 7 to 10). The rates of VAs at 1 year were 0.0%, 8.0%, 31.0% and 55.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Late VAs are common after LVAD implantation. The VT-LVAD score may help to identify patients at risk of late VAs and guide ICD indications in previously nonimplanted patients. (Determination of Risk Factors of Ventricular Arrhythmias [VAs] after implantation of continuous flow left ventricular assist device with continuous flow left ventricular assist device [CF-LVAD] [ASSIST-ICD]; NCT02873169).

9.
JACC Clin Electrophysiol ; 4(3): 397-408, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30089568

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify using implantable loop recorder (ILR) monitoring the mechanisms leading to sudden death (SD) in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). BACKGROUND: SD accounts for 11% to 25% of death in HD patients. METHODS: Continuous rhythm monitoring was performed using the remote monitoring capability of the ILR device in patients undergoing HD at 8 centers. Clinical, biological, and technical HD parameters were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: Seventy-one patients (mean age 65 ± 9 years, 73% men) were included. Left ventricular ejection fraction was <50% in 16%. Twelve patients (17%) had histories of atrial fibrillation or flutter at inclusion. During a mean follow-up period of 21.3 ± 6.9 months, 16 patients died (14% patient-years), 7 (44%) of cardiovascular causes. Four SDs occurred, with progressive bradycardia followed by asystole. The incidence of patients presenting with significant conduction disorder and with ventricular arrhythmia was 14% and 9% patient-years, respectively. In multivariate survival frailty analyses, a higher risk for conduction disorder was associated with plasma potassium >5.0 mmol/l, bicarbonate <22 mmol/l, hemoglobin >11.5 g/dl, pre-HD systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg, the longer interdialytic period, history of coronary artery disease, previous other arrhythmias, and diabetes mellitus. A higher risk for ventricular arrhythmia was associated with potassium <4.0 mmol/l, no antiarrhythmic drugs, and previous other arrhythmias. With ILR monitoring, de novo atrial fibrillation or flutter was diagnosed in 14 patients (20%). CONCLUSIONS: ILR may be considered in HD patients prone to significant conduction disorders, ventricular arrhythmia, or atrial fibrillation or flutter to allow early identification and initiation of adequate treatment. Therapeutic strategies reducing serum potassium variability could decrease the rate of SD in these patients. (Implantable Loop Recorder in Hemodialysis Patients [RYTHMODIAL]; NCT01252823).

10.
Eur Heart J ; 39(31): 2879-2887, 2018 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30059973

RESUMO

Aims: To clarify the clinical characteristics and outcomes of children with SCN5A-mediated disease and to improve their risk stratification. Methods and results: A multicentre, international, retrospective cohort study was conducted in 25 tertiary hospitals in 13 countries between 1990 and 2015. All patients ≤16 years of age diagnosed with a genetically confirmed SCN5A mutation were included in the analysis. There was no restriction made based on their clinical diagnosis. A total of 442 children {55.7% boys, 40.3% probands, median age: 8.0 [interquartile range (IQR) 9.5] years} from 350 families were included; 67.9% were asymptomatic at diagnosis. Four main phenotypes were identified: isolated progressive cardiac conduction disorders (25.6%), overlap phenotype (15.6%), isolated long QT syndrome type 3 (10.6%), and isolated Brugada syndrome type 1 (1.8%); 44.3% had a negative electrocardiogram phenotype. During a median follow-up of 5.9 (IQR 5.9) years, 272 cardiac events (CEs) occurred in 139 (31.5%) patients. Patients whose mutation localized in the C-terminus had a lower risk. Compound genotype, both gain- and loss-of-function SCN5A mutation, age ≤1 year at diagnosis in probands and age ≤1 year at diagnosis in non-probands were independent predictors of CE. Conclusion: In this large paediatric cohort of SCN5A mutation-positive subjects, cardiac conduction disorders were the most prevalent phenotype; CEs occurred in about one-third of genotype-positive children, and several independent risk factors were identified, including age ≤1 year at diagnosis, compound mutation, and mutation with both gain- and loss-of-function.

11.
Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther ; 16(7): 489-500, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29912584

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent arrhythmia worldwide. While mostly seen in elderly, it can also affect young adults (≤ 45 years of age), older adolescent, and children. Areas covered: The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current management of AF in young patients. Specific issues arise over diagnostic workup as well as antiarrhythmic and anticoagulation therapies. The future management and diagnostic strategies are also discussed. Expert commentary: Management of AF in the young adult is largely extrapolated from adult studies and guidelines. In this population, AF could reveal a genetic pathology (e.g. Brugada, Long QT or Short QT syndromes) or be the initial presentation of a cardiomyopathy. Therefore, thorough workup in the young population to eliminate potential malignant pathology.


Assuntos
Antiarrítmicos/uso terapêutico , Fibrilação Atrial/tratamento farmacológico , Terapia Trombolítica/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Humanos , Adulto Jovem
12.
Heart Rhythm ; 15(10): 1457-1465, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29908370

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is limited information on gender differences in patients with Brugada syndrome (BrS) who experienced arrhythmic events (AEs). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare clinical, electrocardiographic (ECG), electrophysiological, and genetic characteristics between males and females in patients with BrS with their first AE. METHODS: The multicenter Survey on Arrhythmic Events in BRUgada Syndrome collected data on the first AE in 678 patients with BrS including 619 males (91.3%) and 59 females (8.7%) aged 0.27-84 years (mean age 42.5 ± 14.1 years) at the time of AE occurrence. RESULTS: After excluding pediatric patients, it was found that females were older than males (49.5 ± 14.4 years vs 43 ± 12.7 years, respectively; P = .001). Higher proportions of females were observed in the pediatric and elderly populations. In Asians, the male to female ratio for AEs was ≈9-fold higher than that in White. Spontaneous type 1 BrS ECG was associated with an earlier onset of AEs in pediatric females. A similar prevalence (≈65%) of spontaneous type 1 BrS ECG was present in males and females above the age of 60 years. Females less frequently showed spontaneous type 1 BrS ECG (41% vs 69%; P < .001) or arrhythmia inducibility at electrophysiology study (36% vs 66%; P < .001). An SCN5A mutation was more frequently found in females (48% vs 28% in males; P = .007). CONCLUSION: This study confirms that female patients with BrS are much rarer, display less type 1 Brugada ECG, and exhibit lower inducibility rates than do males. It shows for the first time that female patients with BrS with AE have higher SCN5A mutation rates as well as the relationship between gender vs age at the onset of AEs and ethnicity.

14.
Europace ; 20(12): 2014-2020, 2018 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29688407

RESUMO

Aims: QT prolongation during mental stress test (MST) has been associated with familial idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. In long QT syndrome (LQTS), up to 30% of mutation carriers have normal QT duration. Our aim was to assess the QT response during MST, and its accuracy in the diagnosis of concealed LQTS. Methods and results: All patients who are carrier of a KCNQ1 or KCNH2 mutations without QT prolongation were enrolled. A control group was constituted of patients with negative exercise and epinephrine tests. Electrocardiogram were recorded at rest and at the maximum heart rate during MST and reviewed by two physicians. Among the 70 patients enrolled (median age 41±2.1 years, 46% male), 36 were mutation carrier for LQTS (20 KCNQ1 and 16 KCNH2), and 34 were controls. KCNQ1 and KCNH2 mutation carriers presented a longer QT interval at baseline [405(389; 416) and 421 (394; 434) ms, respectively] compared with the controls [361(338; 375)ms; P < 0.0001]. QT duration during MST varied by 9 (4; 18) ms in KCNQ1, 3 (-6; 16) ms in KCNH2, and by -22 (-29; -17) ms in controls (P < 0.0001). These QT variations were independent of heart rate (P < 0.3751). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified a cut-off value of QT variation superior to -11 ms as best predictor of LQTS. It provided 97% sensitivity and 97% specificity of QT prolongation in the diagnosis of LQTS. Conclusion: We identified a paradoxical response of the QT interval during MST in LQTS. Easy to assess, MST may be efficient to unmask concealed LQTS in patients at risk of this pathology.

15.
Heart Rhythm ; 15(9): 1394-1401, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29649615

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The literature on fever-related arrhythmic events (AEs) in Brugada syndrome (BrS) is currently limited to few case reports and small series. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of fever-related AE in a large cohort of patients with BrS. METHODS: The Survey on Arrhythmic Events in Brugada Syndrome is a multicenter study on 678 patients with BrS with first AE documented at the time of aborted cardiac arrest (n = 426) or after prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation (n = 252). RESULTS: In 35 of 588 patients (6%) with available information, the AE occurred during a febrile illness. Most of the 35 patients were male (80%), Caucasian (83%), and proband (70%). The mean age at the time of AE was 29 ± 24 years (range 0.3-76 years). Most patients (80%) presented with aborted cardiac arrest and 6 (17%) with arrhythmic storm. Family history of sudden death, history of syncope, and spontaneous type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram were noted in 17%, 40%, and 71% of patients, respectively. Ventricular fibrillation was induced at electrophysiology study in 9 of 19 patients (47%). An SCN5A mutation was found in 14 of 28 patients (50%). The highest proportion of fever-related AE was observed in the pediatric population (age <16 years), with a disproportionally higher event rate in the very young (age 0-5 years) (65%). Males were involved in all age groups and females only in the pediatric and elderly groups. Fever-related AE affected 17 Caucasians aged <24 years, but no Asians aged <24 years. CONCLUSION: The risk of fever-related AE in BrS markedly varies according to age group, sex, and ethnicity. Taking these factors into account could help the clinical management of patients with BrS with fever.

16.
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol ; 11(2): e005409, 2018 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29437760

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Safety and feasibility data on transvenous lead extraction (TLE) in the challenging population of adults with congenital heart disease (A-CHD) are limited. Herein, we report the results of TLE in A-CHD during a 20-year period. METHODS AND RESULTS: All consecutive TLE procedures in A-CHD were included in a monocentric prospective registry from 1996. A total of 121 leads were extracted in 49 A-CHD (median age, 38 years; 51% men) during 71 TLE procedures. Twenty-four (49%) patients had transposition of the great arteries. Main indications for extraction were infection in 34 (48%) and lead failure in 22 (31%). A laser sheath was required for 56 (46%) leads and a femoral approach for 10 (8%). Complete TLE was achieved for 111 leads (92%). In multivariable analysis, lead duration (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.04; P<0.01) and number of previous cardiac surgeries (odds ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-4.67; P<0.01) were predictive of TLE failure. No perioperative death or pericardial effusion was observed. Subpulmonary atrioventricular valve regurgitation increased in 8 patients (5 with transposition of the great arteries) and was independently associated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator lead (odds ratio, 9.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-71.64; P=0.03) and valvular vegetation (odds ratio, 7.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-40.51; P=0.02). After a median of 54 (19-134) months of follow-up after the first TLE, 3 deaths occurred independently from lead management. CONCLUSIONS: Despite complex anatomic issues, TLE can be achieved successfully in most A-CHD using advanced extraction techniques. Subpulmonary atrioventricular valve regurgitation is a prevalent complication, particularly in patients with transposition of the great arteries.

17.
Heart Rhythm ; 15(5): 716-724, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29325976

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Detailed information on the profile of patients with Brugada syndrome (BrS) presenting their first arrhythmic event (AE) after prophylactic implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is limited. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (1) to compare clinical, electrocardiographic, electrophysiologic, and genetic profiles of patients who exhibited their first documented AE as aborted cardiac arrest (group A) with profiles of those in whom the AE was documented after prophylactic ICD implantation (group B) and (2) to characterize group B patients' profile using the class II indications for ICD implantation established by HRS/EHRA/APHRS expert consensus statement in 2013. METHODS: A survey of 23 centers from 10 Western and 4 Asian countries enabled data collection of 678 patients with BrS who exhibited their AE (group A, n = 426; group B, n = 252). RESULTS: The first AE occurred in group B patients 6.7 years later than in group A (mean age 46.1 ± 13.3 years vs 39.4 ± 15.1 years; P < .001). Group B patients had a higher incidence of family history of sudden cardiac death and SCN5A mutations. Of the 252 group B patients, 189 (75%) complied with the HRS/EHRA/APHRS indications whereas the remaining 63 (25%) did not. CONCLUSION: Patients with BrS with the first AE documented after prophylactic ICD implantation exhibited their AE at a later age with a higher incidence of positive family history of sudden cardiac death and SCN5A mutations as compared with those presenting with aborted cardiac arrest. Only 75% of patients who exhibited an AE after receiving a prophylactic ICD complied with the 2013 class II indications, suggesting that efforts are still required for improving risk stratification.

18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29254945

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data on the age at first arrhythmic event (AE) in Brugada syndrome are from limited patient cohorts. The aim of this study is 2-fold: (1) to define the age at first AE in a large cohort of patients with Brugada syndrome, and (2) to assess the influence of the mode of AE documentation, sex, and ethnicity on the age at first AE. METHODS AND RESULTS: A survey of 23 centers from 10 Western and 4 Asian countries gathered data from 678 patients with Brugada syndrome (91.3% men) with first AE documented at time of aborted cardiac arrest (group A, n=426) or after prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation (group B, n=252). The vast majority (94.2%) of the patients were 16 to 70 years old at the time of AE, whereas pediatric (<16 years) and elderly patients (>70 years) comprised 4.3% and 1.5%, respectively. Peak AE rate occurred between 38 and 48 years (mean, 41.9±14.8; range, 0.27-84 years). Group A patients were younger than in Group B by a mean of 6.7 years (46.1±13.2 versus 39.4±15.0 years; P<0.001). In adult patients (≥16 years), women experienced AE 6.5 years later than men (P=0.003). Whites and Asians exhibited their AE at the same median age (43 years). CONCLUSIONS: SABRUS (Survey on Arrhythmic Events in Brugada Syndrome) presents the first analysis on the age distribution of AE in Brugada syndrome, suggesting 2 age cutoffs (16 and 70 years) that might be important for decision-making. It also allows gaining insights on the influence of mode of arrhythmia documentation, patient sex, and ethnic origin on the age at AE.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Brugada/fisiopatologia , Síndrome de Brugada/terapia , Desfibriladores Implantáveis , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28912206

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: After sudden cardiac death with negative autopsy, clinical screening of relatives identifies a high proportion of inherited arrhythmia syndrome. However, the efficacy of this screening in families not selected by autopsy has never been assessed. We aim to investigate the value of clinical screening in relatives of all subjects who died suddenly before 45 years of age. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred and three consecutive families who experienced unexplained sudden cardiac death before 45 years of age were included from May 2009 to December 2014 in a prospective multicenter registry. Clinical screening was provided to all relatives and performed in 64 families (230 relatives, 80 unexplained sudden cardiac death). Diagnosis was established in 16 families (25%), including Brugada syndrome (7), long QT syndromes (5), dilated cardiomyopathy (2), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (2). The diagnostic yield was mainly dependent on the number of screened relatives (3.8±3.4 screened relatives in diagnosed families versus 2.0±1.5; P<0.005) rising to 47% with at least 3 relatives. It additionally increased from 3 of 32 (9%) to 9 of 22 (41%) when both parents were screened (P=0.01). Diagnostic performance was also dependent on the exhaustiveness of screening (70% of complete screening in the diagnosed families versus 25%; P<0.0001) with 17 Brugada syndromes and 15 long QT syndromes diagnosed based on pharmacological tests. CONCLUSIONS: Even without autopsy, familial screening after sudden death in young patients is effective. Broad screening of relatives and systematic tests, including pharmacological challenges, greatly increases the likelihood of diagnosis in families.


Assuntos
Morte Súbita Cardíaca , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Cardiopatias/genética , Adulto , Autopsia , Eletrocardiografia , Saúde da Família , Feminino , Genótipo , Cardiopatias/mortalidade , Humanos , Masculino , Linhagem , Estudos Prospectivos , Sistema de Registros
20.
Int J Cardiol ; 245: 178-180, 2017 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28784436

RESUMO

AIMS: Intravenous drug challenge is frequently performed to unmask Brugada syndrome (BrS). However, its true sensitivity has never been assessed. We used the obligate BrS transmitters in families affected by BrS to evaluate the true accuracy of drug challenge. METHODS: All consecutive patients from 2000 to 2014 who underwent drug challenge during familial screening for BrS were included in the study. Obligate BrS transmitters were defined as the presence of a descendant and non-descendant first-degree relative affected by BrS. Two physicians blinded to the clinical and genetic status reviewed the data. RESULTS: Among 705 drug challenges performed in 149 families, 50 were performed in obligate transmitters from 42 different families. SCN5A mutations were identified in 20 families. Two obligate transmitters were not carrier of the familial mutation. Based on obligate transmitters, sensitivity was 100% for Ajmaline vs 77% for Flecainide (P=0.002). Based on the presence of the familial SCN5A mutation in all family relatives, sensitivity and specificity of sodium channel blocker challenge were respectively 78% (95/122) and 46% (68/148). During a median follow-up of 91 (26-136) months, 2 ventricular fibrillations occurred in obligate transmitters. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that Ajmaline challenge presents an excellent sensitivity that may rule out the diagnosis of BrS when negative. Conversely, a negative Flecainide challenge may not prevent from Brs inheritance and risk of SCD. This may lead to suggest systematic use of Ajmaline during drug challenge.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Brugada/diagnóstico , Síndrome de Brugada/genética , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.5/genética , Bloqueadores dos Canais de Sódio/administração & dosagem , Administração Intravenosa , Adulto , Ajmalina/administração & dosagem , Síndrome de Brugada/induzido quimicamente , Eletrocardiografia/efeitos dos fármacos , Eletrocardiografia/métodos , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Método Simples-Cego
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